How Your Sleep Patterns Can Spark Alzheimer’s

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How Your Sleep Patterns Can Spark Alzheimer’s

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Staying up late or even all night can be fun — sometimes. You’re at a party that goes long and nobody wants to leave. Or you have a new baby in your house. Or you’re binge-watching Netflix. Or you just can’t stop working on a craft project.

Occasional all-nighters are a fact of life, but sleep deprivation can be harmful, especially during emergencies. Frequent all-nighters (or insomnia) can bring serious, long-term health consequences, even for teenagers.

The body “recharges its batteries” during sleep. Long-term sleep deprivation can promote and accelerate cognitive conditions like Alzheimer’s. If you’re getting less than six hours of sleep per night, your brain cannot detoxify the buildup of harmful proteins (called amyloid-beta) so your liver can flush them out. Over time, the buildup of these proteins can cause deterioration of the brain’s mental faculties, bringing on Alzheimer’s, and increasing the risk for dementia.

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Sleep deprivation also can cause a number of physical and psychological problems. In the short term, you may be cranky, snapping at people and having abnormally highly emotional reactions. This can cause problems with family members as well as coworkers. You’ll look tired. Your judgment and self-control will suffer. Long-term sleep deprivation can bring on anxiety and depression.

The reaction time of a sleep-deprived person can be equal to a drunk person, without alcohol. The risk of a car accident or other devastating event increases. It’s not just you that becomes groggy; your cells will, too. You also might gain weight.

You may have an occasional deadline-sensitive project. Working when you start getting tired means you’ll be less productive.

If you’re having trouble sleeping, it’s time get your body back in order so that it can sleep at least 8 hours again.

Try some of these tips:

  • Have a regular bedtime and wake-up time. This will keep your circadian rhythm working like it should.
  • Get regular exposure to natural sunlight during the day. If you work in an office, factory or other enclosed place, then take a walk outside at lunchtime or during a break.
  • Keep your bedroom completely dark, or as close to dark as you can. Even light from a digital alarm clock can activate your pineal gland and make it think it’s daylight, thus disrupting sleep. Turn the clock’s face away from you and turn off any other lights.
  • Practice regular rituals, like reading, that tell your body that it’s sleep time.
  • Limit/eliminate the use of electronic devices an hour before bed. If you must use your smartphone or tablet, then use the setting that gives you a “night mode.” This will change the screen from the disrupting “blue light” to a warmer light. Additional apps are also available that go beyond the built-in functions.
  • Take a warm bath/shower an hour or two before bed. This drops your core body temperature when you finish, signaling the body to start going to sleep.
  • If you get up during the night, don’t turn on a light or check the clock. Using a low-wattage yellow, orange or red bulb in night lights prevents the disruption melatonin production (like white or blue light will).

With a few changes to your nightly routine, you’ll be sleeping like a baby again. Your body – and your brain – will thank you.

What are your tricks for getting a good night’s sleep? Share your suggestions in the section below:

9 Off-Grid, All-Natural Solutions To Depression

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9 All-Natural Solutions To Depression

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Depression can strike anyone, anywhere, for any reason, and without explanation. Sometimes it goes away on its own, such as in a case of “the blues” around the holidays. Situational depression is caused by a sudden, unexpected life event — a job loss or the death of a spouse – and usually resolves when you move forward.

But long-term depression with no obvious direct cause and that doesn’t resolve may need help. Allopathic doctors quickly prescribe antidepressants without a second thought after a five-minute visit, but those come with side-effects, some of them major. Antidepressants don’t address underlying causes of depression.

One estimate puts the rate of depressed people over 18 in the U.S. at about 6.7 percent.

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Natural solutions are readily available.

1. Sleep. Are you sleeping? If not, fatigue can exacerbate depression. Getting quality sleep will restore your physical self and help support your mental self. Try valerian root, melatonin, magnesium or l-tryptophan to improve your sleep.

2. Exercise. Do you exercise? Why not? Take a short walk in the sunshine, do some push-ups, lift weights (it can be light weights), or dust off that expensive exercise machine you bought in January. Regular exercise helps jump-start your serotonin and other brain chemicals, and works better than prescriptions. Remember: You’re not training for the Boston Marathon. Just get moving, however you can!

3. Reduce or eliminate sugar. Cleaning up your diet can go a long way to feeling better. Eliminating grains and sugar (particularly fructose), or at least keeping it under 25 grams a day, will help reduce hypoglycemia. This also will reduce secretion of glutamate high enough to cause agitation, depression and other symptoms that increase the risk of suicide.

4. Omega-3 fats. These fats are needed for good brain function. Fish oil capsules are ideal, since your brain is made up of 60 percent fat!

9 All-Natural Solutions To Depression

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5. Magnesium. This mineral controls a number of processes in the body. Deficiency can cause symptoms like depression and hypertension. Stress, depression and other high-energy events can cause your magnesium levels to burn down faster and keep you awake, groggy and depressed. Twice-daily supplementation can help raise your levels to improve sleep and decrease depression.

6. 5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan). This amino acid is known to convert to serotonin, a neurotransmitter, and a “feel-good” brain chemical. Start with a small amount, 50 mg, and go up as needed.

7. Vitamin D. Most people are deficient in the “sunshine” vitamin, but it’s easy to reverse. A blood test at your doctor’s office will tell you how much you need to be taking to raise and sustain a proper level.

8. Vitamin B-12. Found only in animal-based food sources, a deficiency of B-12 can cause a host of ills, including depression, Alzheimer’s, dementia and sleep problems. Supplementation helps, particularly if you prefer a plant-based diet.

9. Eliminate yeast overgrowth. Excess mycotoxins secreted by long-term Candida albicans overgrowth can block serotonin as well as other hormones, leading to depression and other health issues. Sugar also feeds yeast overgrowth. A blood test in your doctor’s office can determine if you have Candida. Eliminating sugar and yeast overgrowth can help with depression.

There’s no reason to stay depressed when natural treatments can get you back on your way. If you’re feeling the blues, don’t just “live with it” or “manage” your depression. Get rid of it naturally and get back to your happy life.

What all-natural solutions do you use? Share your tips in the section below:

*This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or cure any particular health condition. Please consult with a qualified health professional first about this method.

Sources:

How To Fight Major Depression During The Holidays, HotzeHWC.com, December 28, 2015

Tips To Avoid Depression, Mercola.com, May 3, 2011

Supplements Proven Beneficial For Depression, Mercola.com,

Warning: Potentially Life Threatening Deficiency Affects 25% Of Adults, Mercola.com, May 19, 2008

Magnesium for Post-Election Blues, CarolynDean.com, November 10, 2016

A Letter From A 19-Year-Old Suffering From Candida, CarolynDean.com, July 7, 2009

The Biggest Cause of Anxiety and Depression Is Traumatic Life Events, Mercola.com, December 19, 2015

Sugar Leads To Addiction, CarolynDean.com, December 16, 2014

How To Grow A Lemon Tree … From A Store-Bought Lemon

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How To Grow A Lemon Tree ... From A Store-Bought Lemon

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Do you wish you could grow your own lemons, but don’t know where to start? If you’ve been to garden centers and considered buying a few trees, you may have been shocked by the price of just one. But you can start growing your own lemons — or any citrus you like — for next to nothing.

The price to get started: whatever lemons cost at your local grocery. Just don’t toss out the seeds! You’ll also need a zippered freezer bag and some paper towels. Once the sprouts appear, you’ll also need some good potting soil, a pot (or pots) for planting, and a breathable plastic cover (or regular plastic wrap with tiny holes punched in it.)

Ready to get started?

Purchase some nice-looking lemons on your next shopping trip. Organic is best, if you can get them, because non-organic lemon seeds may not germinate. After slicing your lemon open, carefully remove the whole seeds with the tip of a small knife and drop them into a cup of water. The seeds must not dry out, or they won’t sprout. Set the cup aside. (You also can leave them in the water until you’re ready to start sprouting them.) Remove all the pulp by wiping them clean with a paper towel.

Fold up and moisten a paper towel or two and place them in a freezer bag; set them aside. You’ll use this as a sprouting medium.

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On another folded paper towel, lay one seed out, and with the same knife point, carefully poke through and remove the outer husk of the seed. This allows the seed to germinate. Once you remove the husk, place it into the freezer bag on the damp paper towel. Remove the husks from all the seeds and add them to the bag, flatten it and zip it closed.

Place the bag in a window or other sunny spot for a few weeks until little green sprouts appear. Those are your seedlings, and you’re on your way!

How To Grow A Lemon Tree ... From A Store-Bought Lemon

Image source: Pixabay.com

Once you’re ready to start planting your tiny trees, prepare your pot and soil. You’ll need a good potting soil suitable for fruits and vegetables, and a pot that’s six inches wide and six inches deep. There should be holes in the bottom to allow drainage—stagnant water can cause mold growth and other problems. Plant your little seedlings about a half-inch below the soil’s surface, and lightly spray the soil with water so that it’s damp. Cover with the plastic film (make sure there are tiny holes) and secure around the edges with a rubber band. Leave it in a sunny window, or under a grow light until the tiny leaves break through the top of the soil.

Your lemon tree will need at least eight hours of sunlight a day (or from a grow light) and some watering. Your soil should be moderately moist, but not soaking wet. About a month after leaves start appearing, add more nutrients to the soil with a good fertilizer.

When the plant gets bigger, you’ll need to move it to a larger container. These trees grow best in a container that’s wider than it is tall. Once your lemon tree is big enough, plant it in an outside garden area, if you have the space (and climate). If you don’t, a suitable indoor container with adequate sunlight will allow you to grow your lemon tree and pick fruit indoors.

Keep an eye out for things like browning leaves, pests underneath the leaves, and other potential problems when you water it. Your local extension service can give you advice on growing in your specific area.

Although younger trees are known to produce some fruit, you can reasonably expect to start picking your own lemons within three to six years.

With a little time, money and patience, you can have your own lemon tree — or orchard — and may never have to buy lemons again.

Have you ever grown lemon trees? What advice would you add? Share your tips in the section below:

Sources:

How to Grow a Lemon Tree from Seed, Growing Wild Ceeds, 3/10/2012

Grow Lemon Tree Seeds Easily At Home, Unknown Remedy, 10/28/2016

Grow a Lemon Tree Seed, StepToHealth.com

 

All-Natural Secrets To A Better Night’s Sleep

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All-Natural Secrets To A Better Night’s Sleep

Sleep problems affect 70 million Americans every day—one out of five of us. Are you one of them?

You may have tried things like warm milk or chamomile tea with honey before bed, only to lie awake wondering when it was going to kick in. Or maybe you’ve mentioned insomnia to your doctor, and he handed you a prescription for something you’ve seen on TV. Most of these sleep medications are only intended for short-term use (two weeks or less), and some are actually addictive.

Sleep is one of the best things for your overall health. Long-term poor or insufficient sleep can affect:

  • Weight
  • Chronic pain
  • Depression
  • Mental acuity
  • Impaired cognition
  • Driving
  • Emotional balance (crankiness, bad judgment, etc.)
  • Hormone production/fertility
  • Immunity
  • Premature aging
  • Behavioral difficulties in children

Computers, smartphones, tablets and even your Wi-Fi can disrupt your sleep with an EMF (electromagnetic field), especially if they’re charging next to your bed. Turn these off at night, or move them at least three feet away from the sleeping area—including children’s rooms. Use a regular alarm clock, also three feet away, with a gentle but effective alarm to wake you up in the morning.

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Making your room completely dark (or as close as you can get) will help normalize your circadian rhythm and start the production of melatonin. A slightly cooler temperature—around 69 Fahrenheit—is optimal. Even a small bit of light—from outside, from a phone, or from anywhere else can disrupt your sleep and stop the normal flow of melatonin.

Regular exercise also helps, but not at night–unless it’s a relaxing yoga or other type of stretching. Avoiding big meals and caffeine too late at night allows your system to relax and sleep. But if you’re still having trouble sleeping, or you’re waking up at night, natural sleep aids are non-addictive and readily available.

  • Melatonin. This hormone controls your sleep and is produced by the pineal gland. Pill dosages range from 3mg to 10mg, so you’d have to try some and find out how it affects you. Too much can lead to headaches, nausea and other side effects, so start with a small dose and raise it as needed. Take it one hour before bedtime, unless it’s a “quick release” pill. Melatonin is best for short-term use.
  • Valerian root. One of the most common natural sleep aids available. The plant is native to Europe and parts of Asia, and is consumed either as a tea or in capsules. Valerian root promotes deep sleep and calmness, and increases GABA levels.
  • GABA, or gamma-aminobutyric acid. This amino acid works in the central nervous system to tamp down the brain’s nerve activity. Low levels of GABA interfere with deep sleep, causing you to wake up frequently. GABA is sometimes combined with 5-HTP to promote sleep.
  • L-Tryptophan. Yes, this essential amino acid in turkey also helps with sleep on its own. Available as a supplement, 500 mg nightly helps maintain serotonin and 5-HTP levels and promotes sleep.
  • L-Theanine. This green tea extract is an amino acid that’s also available in pill form. It promotes calmness both day and night, resulting in a deeper sleep. Recommended dose is 50 to 200 mg.
  • Magnesium. A deficiency of this multipurpose mineral can cause insomnia. Taking 200 to 400 mg of magnesium citrate before bed removes calcium from the muscles and relaxes cramped muscles. You also can soak in Epsom salts or rub magnesium oil on your skin to absorb it quickly.
  • Lavender. A small pouch of dried lavender placed under your pillow, or in a sleep mask, can help you relax and fall asleep. Lavender spray on bedding also works.

Try only one of these supplements at a time, and when you have time to sleep (i.e., weekends, a day off). You don’t want to be late for work because something knocked you out! Once you determine if it works, you’ll know if you can take it regularly.

Sources:

Magnesium makes me sleep, Dr. Carolyn Dean, 12/26/2012

Nightcaps, sleeping drugs and magnesium, Dr. Carolyn Dean, 2/18/2010

Sleeping with the enemy, Dr. Carolyn Dean, 08/16/2010

8 Natural Remedies That May Help You Sleep, Mercola.com, 01/06/2009

What Happens in Your Body When You’re Sleep Deprived?, Mercola.com, March 03, 2016

How Much Melatonin Should You Really Be Taking? Sleep.org (The National Sleep Foundation)

Why I chose Magnesium over Melatonin, Sylvie McCracken, HollywoodHomestead.com, December 2013.

7 Natural Sleep Aids that Really Work, DrAxe.com

Harness The Power Of Nature’s Most Remarkable Healer: Vinegar

The Peruvian ‘Miracle’ Vegetable You Can Grow In Your Own Backyard

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The Peruvian ‘Miracle’ Vegetable You Can Grow In Your Own Backyard

If you’ve never heard of the magical Peruvian plant called maca, you’re not alone. A little-known plant from the Brassicacea family, maca is primarily known for increasing libido and fertility, but offers so much more.

Sometimes called the “Peruvian ginseng,” maca’s root is a superfood offering a myriad of health benefits beyond the known aphrodisiac effects.

Maca (Lepidium meyenii) is a staple in diets of people in the mountains of Peru. A root vegetable similar to turnips, this bulb vegetable is ground into a powder. There are yellow, red and black varieties of maca. Most maca is sold as a combination of the red, black and yellow type, but single-color varieties are also available.

Maca grows best in a very high altitude that’s unfriendly to other types of agriculture. This plant also can be grown in a home garden with plenty of water and enough space to grow on its own. After drying the roots, you can harvest the seeds and plant it yourself, ensuring your own supply. Maca can survive dry conditions, flooding, bad soil and very cold temperatures.

Why should you grow maca? Some of maca’s documented benefits include:

  1. Improved menstrual issues, including pain, cycle regulation and flow.
  2. Decreased hot flashes and other symptoms in menopausal women.
  3. A boost in iodine for proper thyroid function.
  4. Corrected hormone balance for both men and women.
  5. Reduced depression and anxiety.
  6. Controlling stress.
  7. Improved immunity.
  8. Improved sleep.
  9. Better skin health.
  10. Helping hair grow.
  11. A boost in iron for red blood cells.
  12. Increased energy, stamina, focus and mental clarity without caffeine.
  13. More lean muscle.
  14. Antioxidants, including glutathione and superoxide dismutase (SOD).

Maca has been cultivated for more than 3,000 years in the Andes. It’s rich in most of the amino acids, free fatty acids, carbohydrates, plant protein, fiber, sugars, minerals and other important nutrients that improve health and well-being beyond the standard multivitamin.

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It’s important to note that maca is a food, not a supplement. Maca is available in bulk as a powder, or in capsules. Taste can vary by brand and variety; some will have a mild taste, but others may have a “dirt” taste. Maca is best taken in capsules, although some fans like the taste. Devotees of this root plant don’t care what it tastes like once they’ve experienced the incredible benefits. Mixing maca into smoothies, coffee, tea, chai or other drinks makes it easier to take and kills the “dirt” taste, if there is one.

Gelatinized maca is available for those with sensitive stomachs or digestive issues. The harvested maca root is heated above 160 degrees Fahrenheit, dissolving the starch molecules and making digestion easier. The downside is that maca’s enzymes and glucosinolates are dissolved, but its remaining nutrients become concentrated. The result is called a “4:1 product,” meaning that it takes 4 kilograms of raw maca to create 1 kilogram of powdered gelatinized maca. While raw maca is considered best, gelatinized maca is a better choice for some who may experience side effects from the raw form.

Start with a low dose to find out how your body reacts to maca, and increase slowly to get your body used to taking it.

Maca just may be the health boost you’ve been wanting.

Have you ever tried maca or grown it? Share your tips in the section below:

Sources:

What is Maca? TheMacaTeam.com

Maca Nutrition Facts, TheMacaTeam.com

http://www.offthegridnews.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=75198&action=edit#

Maca Is Good for More Than Your Mojo, Mercola.com, 03/13/2017

Maca May Help Improve Your Reproductive Health, Mercola.com

Top 5 Maca Root Benefits & Nutrition, DrAxe.com

Maca Root Buttocks, TheMacaTeam.com

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7 Things Your Doctor’s Not Telling You About Coconut Oil

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7 Things Your Doctor’s Not Telling You About Coconut Oil

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Do you notice more coconut oil in your grocery, discount or health food store? Coconut oil is everywhere, and in everything, from food to beauty products, as more people discover its benefits.

Health-conscious people have known about coconut oil for many years. As its popularity increases, so has its availability. Common in the Philippines, where it’s grown and produced, this simple oil is nothing short of miraculous because of the many things it can do. After harvesting, the white coconut “meat” is removed, dried and pressed to remove the oil.

Coconut oil contains medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA), which has long been thought to clog arteries, although newer studies are showing just the opposite. MCFA digests differently than long-chain fatty acids, starting in the digestive system. They’re sent directly to the liver, where they are turned into ketone bodies (water-soluble molecules) used for energy in your kidneys, brain and muscles. But you likely won’t hear this from your doctor.

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If you’ve never tried coconut oil, (and you’re not allergic) here are seven reasons why you should:

Coconut oil. . .

1. Is better for cooking. Hydrogen molecules are added to soy or other “vegetable” oils to extend shelf life. This type of oil can turn trans-fat when you cook with it. Coconut oil has a naturally long shelf life without preservatives, withstands higher cooking temperatures and can be used in place of butter or olive oil. It’s liquid above 76 degrees Fahrenheit, and solidifies at lower temperatures.

2. Has natural anti-fungal properties. If you suffer with heartburn, acid reflux, bloating or other digestive issues, you may have an overgrowth of Candida albicans, or yeast overgrowth in your gut. Coconut oil’s lauric acid fights back. Taken daily, the oil’s acids help reduce and eliminate “bad” bacteria in the gut and allow healing.

3. Helps with weight loss and energy. Coconut oil’s MCFA helps the body metabolize fat, which is used for energy. These acids also keep your blood sugar stabilized and prevent cravings for salty or sweet junk food. Fat also provides better satiety longer, which keeps you from eating what you shouldn’t.

7 Things Your Doctor’s Not Telling You About Coconut Oil

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4. Can help with hair repair and re-growth. The small molecules of the medium-chain fatty acid are able to penetrate the hair shaft better than other oils.

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Coconut oil prevents frizzing much better than silicone- or alcohol-based products, which can dry your hair. A very small amount hand-rubbed onto towel-dried hair before drying and styling works well to stop frizz and give a healthy shine.

5. Has been shown to improve cognitive functioning in Alzheimer’s patients. Ketones supply the brain with energy, and coconut oils create an alternate source. There are numerous stories of diagnosed Alzheimer’s patients who started taking coconut oil daily and saw improvements.

6. Is a natural moisturizer. Your skin is your biggest organ and will absorb anything you put on it—including chemicals in your toiletries. Coconut oil is easily absorbed into your skin with no toxic chemicals. Use a small amount on your hands, feet, or any place you need a little extra moisture.

7. Can help improve dental care. Oil-pulling,” or simply swishing coconut oil around in your mouth, coats your teeth and helps remove plaque, stains and odor. It’s primarily an Ayurvedic medicine practice, but is gaining attention (and fans) here in the US. Oil-pulling also helps with bleeding gums and heart health by helping to remove oral bacteria that can migrate into the heart.

Do you need any more reasons to try coconut oil?

*This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or cure any particular health condition. Please consult with a qualified health professional first about this method.

Are you a fan of coconut oil? Share your uses for it in the section below:

Sources:

https://draxe.com/coconut-oil-benefits/

https://draxe.com/oil-pulling-coconut-oil/

http://coconutoil.com/coconut-oil-reverses-alzheimers-in-45-year-old-woman/

http://www.well-beingsecrets.com/health-benefits-of-coconut-oil/

http://www.well-beingsecrets.com/how-to-use-coconut-oil-for-hair/

http://www.well-beingsecrets.com/coconut-oil-for-weight-loss/

http://coconutoil.com/study-coconut-oil-improves-memory-and-brain-function/

http://articles.mercola.com/health-benefits-coconut-oil.aspx

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/10/22/coconut-oil-and-saturated-fats-can-make-you-healthy.aspx

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/09/26/coconut-oil-benefits.aspx

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/08/22/mct-oil-health-benefits.aspx

http://articles.mercola.com/coconut-oil-for-hair.aspx

The Natural Blood Pressure ‘Medicine’ Your Doctor Hasn’t Told You About

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The Natural Blood Pressure ‘Medicine’ Your Doctor Hasn't Told You About

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If you’ve been told that you have “high blood pressure,” aka, “hypertension,” you’re not alone. The CDC says that more than 75 million people in the U.S. alone have it. There are many reasons why you may have it, and most allopathic doctors will automatically write a prescription to lower your blood pressure. But do you really want a prescription, with side effects? Or worse, another one?

Blood pressure is the force exerted on the blood vessels when the heart pumps blood throughout your system. Pressure goes up and down all day, depending on your activity. But when it stays up, it’s “high.” The CDC considers pressure that’s 120/80 to be “pre-hypertension.” The first number, “systolic,” is over 120 bpm, and the second number, or “diastolic,” is over 80 bpm.

Hypertension has no obvious symptoms, so monitoring blood pressure is important. It’s called the “silent killer,” because there is no warning. Hypertension can cause chest pain and decrease blood flow to the heart, causing heart attacks and heart failure. Strokes and chronic kidney disease are also a risk. You may not know about it until it’s too late.

So, What Can You Do?

Lifestyle changes, like quitting smoking, reducing caffeine intake, eating better and exercising are a good start, but might not be enough. In that scenario, you’ll likely be told that a prescription is your only solution.

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Patients spend an average of $733 yearly on blood pressure medications to lower blood pressure, totaling over $42 billion. Magnesium, a mineral, is readily available at drug stores, health food stores and even some big box stores (Walmart, Target.) Magnesium is also in nuts, seeds, greens and whole grains. If you don’t eat enough of these foods, supplementation is easy.

Why Magnesium?

Heart attack patients receive a high dose of magnesium in the ER, because the heart can’t function well without it. Hypertension is one of many symptoms of magnesium deficiency, along with cardiac arrhythmia, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and sudden cardiac death. Proper levels of magnesium relax the smooth muscle tissue in your blood vessels, allowing freer blood flow and keeping your blood pressure normal.

Stress, bad diets and other factors can burn up your magnesium levels faster than normal. If your magnesium level is depleted and you’re not supplementing, hypertension may be your first indicator that you’re deficient. Other symptoms will follow.

Low magnesium is critical in the elderly. If you’re a woman taking calcium without magnesium, calcium can build up in the heart, brain and other places, causing blockages. Magnesium metabolizes calcium. If you’re under an unusual amount of stress, you’re burning up your magnesium reserves even faster.

Magnesium is relatively inexpensive and is available in organic form. At Vitacost.com, a 240-count bottle of 400 mg tablets costs about $14. A liquid version called ReMag is more expensive, but doesn’t have the laxative effect that pills might. You can also soak in it — get some “Epsom salts.” A foot bath or tub soak with Epsom salts is an easy way to increase magnesium.

Sound expensive? Think of it this way: how much would blood pressure meds cost, even with your co-pay? How much would a heart attack or stroke cost, if you survive it?

Avoid taking all of your magnesium at one time, such as first thing in the morning, since it can cause diarrhea. Split-dosing your magnesium into morning and evening doses is safer to avoid the potential laxative effect.

If you’re looking for a better way to control your blood pressure, consider magnesium. It’s is an underrated mineral, but it’s also one of the most important to improve and keep your overall health. For high blood pressure patients, it can mean the difference between surviving a heart attack and not even having one.

*This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or cure any particular health condition. Please consult with a qualified health professional first about this method.

Have you ever taken magnesium for blood pressure? Share your thoughts in the section below:

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Sources:

Magnesium, Arrythmias & Hypertension, CarolynDean.com, April 11, 2013

Magnesium for Broken Heart Syndrome, CarolynDean.com, January 8, 2016

The Magnesium Miracle, CarolynDean.com, undated

Magnesium—An Essential Mineral for Heart Health, Mercola.com, July 25, 2016

Magnesium Benefits Your Blood Pressure, Mercola.com, June 11, 2009

Treatment and Drugs for High Blood Pressure, Mayo Clinic website (undated)

The Cost of High Blood Pressure, The Piper Report, May 13, 2013