6 Dangers Of A Low-Fat Diet Your Doctor Won’t Tell You

Click here to view the original post.
6 Dangers Of A Low-Fat Diet Your Doctor Won’t Tell You

Image source: Max Pixel

 

In the first half of the 20th century, America saw a sudden increase in heart disease. The medical community was baffled and the public wanted answers, and the “diet-heart hypothesis” or the “lipid hypothesis” was born. This subsequently changed how we view all-natural fat, including meat and dairy products.

Here are six things to consider before you begin to follow the government recommended policy of eating a low-fat diet:

1. It’s just a theory!

The theory of eating a low-fat diet to prevent heart disease was thought up by Ancel Keys, a man who had no training in nutritional science, epidemiology or cardiology.[1] It is important to remember, though, that it is just a theory—never proven by hard fact. But he did not follow his own low-fat diet recommendations. History shows us that despite great opposition, his theory became national policy without any evidence or research to support it.

2. Biased-based research

All the research to support the idea of a diet low in saturated fat, low in cholesterol and high in polyunsaturated fat was funded by large food corporations (Pillsbury, Quaker Oats, Swift & Co., Frito-Lay, General Mills, Heinz, etc.)[2] — companies that were wanting to patent their own new “food products.” They also wanted to be able to label their products with the recommendations of the American Heart Association. As George Mann, someone who dedicated his life and research to oppose Keys, put it, “for a generation, research on heart-disease has been more political than scientific.”[3]

3. Consuming vegetable oil increases your risk of cancer

6 Dangers Of A Low-Fat Diet Your Doctor Won’t Tell You

Image source: Flickr / Creative Commons

Research has proven that eating a diet high in vegetable oil INCREASES your risk of cancer.[4] In studies, cancer rates have been consistently higher in the low-saturated-fat groups than the high-saturated-fat groups.

‘Miracle Oil Maker’ Lets You Make Fresh Nut Oils Within Minutes!

And in 1968, vegetable oil was shown to double the rate of cancerous tumor growth in rats.[5]

4. The healthiest people in the world eat a lot of saturated fat

The Japanese and the Swiss, ranked one and in the world for health, vitality and longevity, have two of the fattiest diets in the world. The Japanese are often praised for their health, but the idea that they eat a low-fat diet is simply a myth. Although they do not consume much dairy fat, the amount of other animal fat they consume is significant.[6]

5. Saturated fat protects you from harmful viruses and bacteria

Saturated fats, such as lard, tallow, butter, coconut oil and cocoa butter, have proven antimicrobial qualities.[7] They help protect cells from harmful viruses and bacteria. Saturated fat also is one of the main building blocks of cells. When saturated fat is replaced with vegetable oil, cells become more prone to disease and cancer.[8]

6. Breast milk is extremely high in both cholesterol and saturated fat

Breast milk contains one of the highest sources of cholesterol on the planet. More than 50 percent of the calories found in breast milk are saturated fat. Commercial formula does not replicate the nutrients found in a mother’s milk. They are made low in fat and cholesterol, by recommendation of the American Heart Association. Sadly, a study published in Pediatrics has linked children who are failing to thrive with their consumption of a low-fat diet.[9]

Policy is often put into place for convenience and money, not your well-being. It’s always important to educate yourself, especially when it comes to your health. Don’t take someone’s word for it. In an age where information is so abundant, seek out the truth!

*This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or cure any particular health condition. Please first consult with a qualified health professional.

Do you agree or disagree? Share your thoughts in the section below:

[1] NINA TEICHOLZ, Big Fat Surprise, 2014,  pg. 49

[2] TEICHOLZ, Big Fat Surprise, 2014,  pg 91

[3] TEICHOLZ, Big Fat Surprise, 2014,  pg. 71

[4] TEICHOLZ, Big Fat Surprise, 2014,  pg 94

[5] TEICHOLZ, Big Fat Surprise, 2014,  pg. 94

[6] https://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/know-your-fats/the-skinny-on-fats/

7 FALLON, SALLY, AND MARY G ENIG, PHD, “Diet and Heart Disease—Not What You Think,” Consumers’ Research, July 1996, 15-19

8 https://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/know-your-fats/the-skinny-on-fats/

[9] SMITH, M M, AND F LIFSHITZ, Pediatrics, Mar 1994

WWII Pilots Said It Boosted Vision. And Native Americans Insisted It Cured Heart Problems.

Click here to view the original post.
WWII Pilots Said It Boosted Vision. And Native Americans Insisted It Cured Heart Problems.

Image source: Pixabay.com

 

It’s related to and often confused for blueberries, and has a time-honored role in both folk and herbal medicine.

It is the bilberry, a delicious blue fruit that can be distinguished from blueberries by looking at the flesh. The flesh of the bilberry is dark and juicy, while the flesh of the blueberry is white or pale green.

The pigment throughout the berry is what makes the medicinal qualities in the bilberry more potent than that of the blueberry. These plants are difficult to cultivate and are most often hunted and wild-harvested in the forests of Europe, northern Asia and North America.

Learn How To Make Powerful Herbal Medicines, Right in Your Kitchen!

Scientifically known as Vaccinium myrtillus, the bilberry is also commonly called a “huckleberry” or a “whortleberry.” Its most popular name, “bilberry,” comes from the Danish word bollebar, which means “dark berry.”[1] The wild plants are so common in Europe that much of the world’s supply is gathered in the mountains from Scandinavia to the Balkans. It is harvested in midsummer and found in woodlands and meadows. The berry is common in European cuisine — made into syrups, jams and desserts.

History of its Use

WWII Pilots Said It Boosted Vision. And Native Americans Insisted It Cured Heart Problems.Native Americans traditionally ate the fruit of the “big huckleberry,” and used its roots as a treatment for heart ailments and arthritis. In Europe, the bilberry has been used medically for nearly 1,000 years to prevent scurvy due to its high vitamin C content. [2] However, it was German physician H. Bock who first described bilberry’s medical properties, in 1539.[3] The berry continued to gain popularity and by the 17th century a mixture of honey and bilberries, called “rob,” was being prescribed in England to treat diarrhea.

During World War II, pilots for the British Royal Air Force found — rather accidentally — that eating bilberry jam before a night mission improved their night vision. The practice became standard for both British and American pilots flying at night for the rest of the war.[4] According to Nutritional Herbology, taking bilberry to improve night vision “…is so effective that a single dose is said to improve one’s night vision within hours.”[5]

Medicinal Properties & Uses

Since the night vision claims by the RAF pilots, extensive research in Europe has discovered that the fruit is high in bitter compounds, called flavonoids. These flavonoids or anthocyanosides are contained in the pigment of the bilberry’s skin and flesh and are responsible for the berry’s high antioxidant properties. It’s these flavonoids that are believed to help promote healthy brain and eye function. They also protect against heart disease, free radicals and inflammation.[6] The bitter compounds inhibit collagen destruction and are a standard ingredient in anti-aging remedies.

Beet Powder: The Ancient Secret To Renewed Energy And Stamina

Bilberry is known to affect the structural and circulatory systems.[7] Its tannins and flavonoids are responsible for its anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic and antispasmodic properties. Consuming the berry also helps decrease capillary permeability. This makes the berry a common choice among the sufferers of varicose veins, poor circulation, macular degeneration and glaucoma. It works so well and has so many uses that bilberry is among the most popular non-prescription “drugs” in Europe.

The berry is sweet and tastes similar to a blueberry and is high in zinc, Vitamins C and A, phosphorus, manganese and iron.

The fruit is usually consumed encapsulated or added, as a powder, to smoothies. The dried berries can be made into a tea and administered as a treatment for diarrhea.

Have you ever eaten bilberry? Share your thoughts in the section below:

[1] Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs (pg. 16)

[2] 21st Century Herbal by Michael J. Balick (pg. 296)

[3] Guide to Medicinal herbs by Johnson, Foster, Low Dog & Kiefer (pg. 103)

[4] http://www.encyclopedia.com/sports-and-everyday-life/food-and-drink/food-and-cooking/bilberry

[5] Nutritional Herbology by Mark Pedersen (pg. 46)

[6] Guide to Medicinal herbs by Johnson, Foster, Low Dog & Kiefer (pg. 105)

[7] Nutritional Herbology by Mark Pedersen (pg. 46)

The Heal-Everything Herb That Doubles As Bandages … And Toilet Paper

Click here to view the original post.
The Heal-Everything Herb That Also Doubles As Toilet Paper

Image source: Wikimedia

It was brought to the Americas by European settlers and is now considered to be naturalized to North America. The settlers, in fact, had good reason to carry it with them: It has a long list of medicinal qualities.

It is mullein, which grows all over the forests of North America and is also known by several other names: flannel leaf, bunny ears, beggar’s blanket, Quaker rouge, hag’s taper, donkey ears and tinder plant.

Traditional folk medicine praised mullein as a remedy for asthma, bronchitis and tuberculosis. The plant is also said to be a natural painkiller and a cure for earaches and headaches. It also can act as an expectorant and decongestant. As a result, for centuries the plant’s leaves and its flowers have been made into teas and tinctures, and ingested. They even smoked it (which isn’t ideal for health).

Need All-Natural Pain Relief With No Nasty Side Effect?

Mullein is known to affect the respiratory and lymphatic systems. A study performed at Clemson University in 2002 found that the plant also has strong antibacterial properties.[1] Its high mucilage content is likely responsible for its medicinal properties. Astringent tannins and saponins, which help protect the plant when it is injured in nature, give the plant its soothing effect on the respiratory system. It also contains high levels of iron, magnesium, potassium and vitamin C.[2]

The Heal-Everything Herb That Also Doubles As Toilet Paper

Image source: Wikimedia

Even though mullein has been used for centuries, the Western medical community disputes the actual effectiveness of this plant, claiming “a lack of therapeutic validation.”[3] However, the herb has been evaluated and approved by the German (and government-funded) Commission E, which was established to evaluate and approve of substances that were traditionally used in folk medicine — such as mullein.

Mullein is a biennial plant, meaning that it takes two years for it to reach maturity. It is preferable to harvest the flowers and leaves in the plant’s second year of growth.[4] Both the honey-scented flowers of the plant and its soft, fuzzy leaves are used to treat ailments. The flowers are usually extracted in oil and also used to make tea, while, the dried leaves are typically reserved for making steam tents, poultice application and smoking. [5]

Across the centuries, people have used mullein as toilet paper, bandages, torches and to pad in the soles of their shoes. It should be a staple herb in every herbal medicine cabinet.

Mullein is a relatively safe herb to consume, its primary side-effect being it can cause contact dermatitis or irritate the throat when consumed, due to the fine velvety hairs that cover its leaves. It also has been known to interact with antidiabetic drugs and prescription diuretics in a negative way.[6] The seeds of some species of mullein contain high amounts of coumarin and rotenone, which can be toxic if consumed in large quantities. The seeds of the mullein plant should never be consumed under any circumstance.[7]

Have you ever foraged for or eaten mullein? Do you use it for health? Share your tips in the section below:

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12241986

[2] Nutritional Herbology by Mark Pedersen (pg. 124)

[3] Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs (pg. 270)

[4] Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West by Michael Moore (pg. 112)

[5] Rodale’s 21st Century Herbal by Michael J. Balick (pg. 300)

[6] http://www.encyclopedia.com/plants-and-animals/plants/plants/mullein

[7] Edible and Medicinal Plants of the West by Gregory L. Tilford (pg. 102)

hydrogen peroxide report

No, Garlic Is Not Healthiest When It’s Raw. (Ferment It! Here’s How.)

Click here to view the original post.
You’re Consuming Garlic All Wrong. (Ferment It! Here’s How.)

Image source: Pixabay.com

If you’re trying to take advantage of all garlic has to offer, you have to eat it raw.

Garlic contains a property called alliin, which turns into something called allicin once it’s been crushed and exposed to air. Allicin is responsible for all of garlic’s amazing features and its distinctive smell. However, allicin has a very short life span. It is most potent 10 minutes after a clove has been crushed and almost completely gone after 30 minutes. Even though it makes food taste wonderful, cooking destroys nearly all of the health benefits in a clove of garlic.

But even in its raw state, our bodies cannot digest and process all of garlic’s nutrients. However, lacto-fermented garlic far surpasses the nutritional value of fresh garlic. In other words, if we want to experience all of the health benefits in a clove of garlic, we can maximize it through consuming fermented garlic.

The antioxidant activity of fermented garlic is much higher than that of fresh. The fermentation process also produces high levels of hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide, something our bodies produce naturally, eliminates harmful bacteria, viruses and fungi. As a result, fermented garlic is one of nature’s most powerful antibiotics. Plus, because of the fermentation, it also contains good probiotics. Fermented garlic really is a superfood!

Fast, All-Natural Pain Relief With No Nasty Side Effects!

So how do you make fermented garlic? Let’s take a look:

1. Peel enough cloves of garlic to fill a one-quart jar about three-quarters of the way full. This typically takes 9 to 12 heads of garlic.

2. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of sea salt.

3. Fill the jar with filtered water, leaving one inch of space at the top of the jar.

4. Cover with an air-tight lid. Let it sit on a countertop at approximately 75 degrees Fahrenheit, out of direct sunlight, for at least 10 days. For best results, let it culture for up to 6 weeks. Don’t open the jar until you’re ready for it to be done. When you open the jar it should smell fresh and garlicky!

As the garlic ferments it will bubble and expand, filling the extra space at the top of the jar. After a day or two, sometimes it is necessary to “burp” the jar. Don’t remove the lid; just loosen it a little, let some of the pressure out and tighten it again. This usually only needs to be done once.

Most people enjoy eating the cloves of garlic whole, as the taste of fermented garlic is salty and milder than fresh garlic. Alternatively, you can substitute fermented garlic in recipes that call for fresh, such as hummus, salsa, guacamole and homemade salad dressings.

If you really are struggling with the idea of eating a clove of garlic, you can crush a clove of garlic shove it into an empty gelatin capsule and swallow it quickly before the capsule starts to dissolve.

If some of your cloves turn purple, blue or green, don’t fret, it’s natural. The sulfur compounds in the garlic can react with the copper that is found in most drinking water. These cloves of garlic are still safe to consume.

Do not consume if you notice mold growing or if it has an aroma other than the wonderful smell of garlic.

A jar of fermented garlic should last for up to one year once it’s placed in the refrigerator and if it does not become contaminated. Always use a clean utensil when removing garlic from the brine.

*This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or cure any particular health condition. Please consult with a qualified health professional first about this method.

Have you ever made fermented garlic? Share any tips or questions in the section below:

Harness The Power Of Nature’s Most Remarkable Healer: Vinegar