Federal appeals court says weapons “like M-16 rifles” not protected by Second Amendment

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Image result for wiki ar15

Now this is disturbing news.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit decision upheld Maryland’s ban on assault rifles, which was passed in 2013 in response to the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre in Connecticut. It cited a 2008 Supreme Court case, Heller v. District of Columbia, which said that weapons “most useful in military service” are not covered by the Constitution.

Federal appeals court says assault rifles are ‘weapons of war’ not protected by Second Amendment

This shows a concerning level of ignorance regarding the basic principle of the Second Amendment were clearly the “security of a free State” involves warfare against tyrants or foreign invaders, meaning yes, using precisely weapons of war. If anything it’s sporting firearms that have a limited or nil combat application therefore aren’t strictly “necessary to the security of a free State”.

This serves as a reminder that gun rights should never be taken for granted and that there’s people always operating to take them away from us. The minute you relax, the minute they take a bite. Relax too much and one day you have nothing left.

Take care folks,

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Happy people: A Year in Taiga

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I’m pretty sure I posted this before, maybe last year, but in case you missed it it’s worth posting again.

Happy People: A Year in Taiga goes along the journey of one year with the professional trappers and hunters living along the Taiga river in Russia. These are hardy, no-nonsense old world people. They make a living in one of the harshest parts of the world, one that is at that beautiful and full of natural resources. The skill and resourcefulness they show is admirable.

It’s the second time I watch this documentary. Its four parts, one for each season (as in actual seasons of the year) each lasting one hour. Again, worth every minute of it.

One of the things that stuck with me this time though is that even though I bet they are happy people and some of them probably chose such a life, I sure wouldn’t trade places with them any time soon. In spite of the beautiful natural surroundings you can also see the Spartan way of life, in many ways limited. At the end of the day the trapping, fishing and hunting is done for good old money mostly, and they make rather little of it at that. Clearly being frugal is one of their main survival skills and if applied to any other line of work, likely one that pays better, it’s also understandable that a person would thrive as well.

Again, the skill and resourcefulness is amazing. How they cut down trees to make everything from skies to canoes, driving, navigating, repairing, fishing, hunting, trapping. While these people may be jack of all trades, they sure have mastered several of them as well.

Let me know what you think in the comments below.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Oroville Dam: Have you bugged out already?

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You may want to if you haven’t done so already. It can be nothing, or it can get biblical over there folks.

According to Los Angeles Times, more than 100,000 people were ordered to flee to higher ground Sunday afternoon after the emergency spillway at Oroville Dam developed a hole, prompting fears it could collapse. With rain expected later this week, things can get really bad really fast.

Now this isn’t a storm or winter blizzard we’re talking about. If the dam collapses and you’re down range its bye bye. With such high-stakes I at least wouldn’t be risking it and would get the hell out of there until the crisis is resolved. After all this is precisely the kind of thing we prepare for. Taking such risks makes no sense if it can be at all avoided.

Oh, remember what I always say about bugging out and bugging in not being a matter of choice? well… this.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Brazil SHTF: Police Strike allows for “Purge” type Chaos

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Police go on strike in Brazil, cities being wiped out in “Purge” fashion

Police in Brazil have gone on strike, leaving the country unarmed and left in a “Purge” like chaos. In 30 cities across Brazil, militarized police are refusing to do their jobs. According to an anonymous source in the city of Espirato Santo, Brazil, the chaos can be comparable to the 2014 thriller “Purge”, with people running rampant with guns and machetes, stealing from malls, and even dead bodies lying in the streets. As buses are set ablaze on night streets, and people crawl for shelter covered in blood, Brazil is slowly becoming overtaken by it’s people.

“A pm is on strike and the thugs are randomly shooting at anyone who passes the street in Espírito Santo, my God what is happening” says one Brazilian resident.

“I won’t even leave my house today,” one Brazilian resident in Espirito Santo told Political Outsource. “things are absolutely crazy, there are people running around with guns in pretty populated areas, dozens of people stealing sh-t from malls, even dead bodies on the streets!”

In another interview with Political Outsource, one resident in Espirito Santo said in a phone interview; “It’a f–king mess what’s going on here. The worst part is the regular citizen can’t have a gun to defend himself!”

This same thing happened in Argentina a couple years ago and left many dead behind. Now its happening in Brazil with similar consequences.

Lesson Learned I: When cops go on strike all hell breaks loose and you better be well armed in a defendable position. Yes, like in the movie.

Lesson Learned II: The day cops go on strike is not the time to go buy guns and ammo, let alone the time to train and learn their proper use.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Salomon: High performance footwear

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The Philosophy

Every hiker knows that his boots are the most important part of his gear. Lose your backpack, lose your pants, its all good, but without shoes… your mobility is greatly handicapped and without mobility you have very few options.

Given how important it is to have adequate footwear during an emergency, your daily wear shoes should reflect that. If something happens and today whatever you chose to wear is all you will have to walk several miles, get by for days or even weeks, walk across broken terrain, help people or extract yourself or others across rubble and debris, keep yourself dry when raining. Therefore we are looking for practical, capable footwear.

Salomon Quest and X-Ultra

I’ve been using Salomon footwear for about a year now and have not been disappointed.

Even the low-top hikers X-Ultra have kept my feet dry and provided more than enough foot support and traction.

The Salomon Quest boots are a in a league of their own. Tough, impossibly comfortable once broken in and durable.

The grey ones are the typical hiking boots that made the Quest boots famous. Since these ended up in the feet of military personal nearly as much as in the feet of hikers, they came up with the Quest Forces model. The colours are more militaristic and use leather loops instead of metal eyelets but other than that its mostly the same great boot.

I think they all work very well for all-round footwear. They are comfortable enough for normal, everyday use yet provide serious hiking capability if it’s ever needed. It doesn’t hurt that they look great. The Quest boots are clearly more suited for moderate to cold climates (especially with Goretex models) and the low top do well in very warm climates. These do have goretex as well, which granted, makes it warmer, but then again its great to step on a few inches of water and not have a single drop go in (have done so numerous times already)

Give Salomon a try. You won’t be disappointed.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Stocks During the Economic Collapse of Argentina?

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Dear Ferfal,

I think I’ve read every blog post you’ve ever written. Long time fan. Thank you so much for sharing your experience and wisdom with everyone.

The Dow Jones just hit 20,000! I have a question about what the stock market is like when TSHTF. Like most Americans, I “own” stocks through my retirement plan. If inflation goes really high, is a stock like a gold ring that doesn’t have value until you sell it (and therefore increases with inflation), or will stocks kind of stay the same price, and therefore lose tremendous value? What happened in Argentina?

And I want to say that you have actually changed my life. I live in a very safe place, the kind of place where people still can leave their front door unlocked. Which I sometimes do when I go next door (on the other side of the porch), but I’ve made it a habit to always lock the door behind me when I come inside. If I come home and someone is inside, I can run away. But nobody’s coming in when I’m home unless I let them in (not too many ways out except the front door). Anyway, I think it’s a good habit, and I think I’m better prepared for what’s coming thanks to you.

Best Wishes,

-Adam

Hello Adam,

Thanks for being a long time reader. I’m glad to know I helped make your life a bit safer! These are all little things we do, habits and strategies that start building up as our mindset changes.

I see survivalism, at least the practical version of it that I call modern survivalism, as a lifestyle in which practical decisions are made keeping in mind the best possible outcome in a worst case scenario. Sounds paranoid but it’s not. If doing one thing instead of another improves my odds and quality of life (better, safer, more peace of mind) then it is the one that provides the most strategic advantages from a tactical point of view. From the items in your EDC, the clothes you wear, the car you drive and the place where you live.

Regarding the stock market in Argentina during the crisis, here yet again we see that common assumptions and what actually ends up happening during an economic collapse have little in common.

Of course, the stock market has collapsed in the past and such a possibility is something to keep in mind, but we must remember than these situations are pretty complex, both in causes and effect. It is crucial to fully understand the former to correctly predict the latter.

Here is where we must ask ourselves, what caused the collapse in the first place? In the case of Argentina it was a bank run followed by a devaluation. The knowledge of an impending devaluation and rumours of accounts being frozen obviously triggered such bank run. If the same had happened for example with stocks, rumours of a bubble, followed by sharp sales and loss of value the story would have been different. The chart below reflects the Merval, the most important index of the Buenos Aires Stock Exchange.

We clearly see a big drop as expected at the time of the economic collapse in December 2001, but then as time goes by it starts going up, even as the Peso goes down, why? Well, the price is now in Pesos no longer pegged to the dollar, but even more important is that stocks represented something physical to own, a part of a company (even a struggling one!). Even if people suffered it often occurred that companies did well eventually. The common saying in Argentina years after the crisis about “its great that the economy is doing much better. Too bad we don’t get to see any of it” reflects just that. With a 25% inflation per year anything that held its value was better than the Peso. Real estate, US Dollars and yes also stocks.

I would say that looking at it from a historical perspective, good time-proven stocks tend to do well on the long run. High risk ones are more of a question mark. It sure isn’t a chunk of gold or silver in your hand, but the chances of it being worth only the paper they are printed on and the company going belly up isnt as high if you invest wisely. As always, don’t keep all your eggs in one basket and so on.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

How the super-rich are preparing

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An armed guard stands at the entrance of the Survival Condo Project, a former missile silo north of Wichita, Kansas, that has been converted into luxury apartments for people worried about the crackup of civilization.

Interesting article.

Doomsday Prep for the Super-Rich

These guys have:

*Money, both cash and funds in accounts across the world.

*Well set up Bug out locations, both local and abroad.

*Means to get there. Most of these guys have their own plane, boats, can pay for private jets, tickets, etc.

*Intel and connections. By the time you read about SHTF they’ll already be in some safe location.

All we can do is try to get as close to such a setup as possible. One of the toughest parts for most people being having the money do move around like that, and maybe even harder to get, connections with true insiders that warn you ahead of time.

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

 

Best carry knife for Germany ?

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Hi Ferfal, You seem to like folding knives. I live in Germany where it is illegal to carry a folding knive. It is only allowed to carry non-foldable knives with a blade that is less than 12 cm long. I’m looking for an all-purpose knive that I can legally carry. What knive(s) do recommend for Germany?

Regards, Karl

….

Hello Karl, thanks for your message and sorry for the long wait.

Yes, I can recommend you a knife and will do so in a minute but before we go there I’d like to talk a bit about having the right mindset. This goes for my friends here in Europe and the ones in US that have to deal with restrictions just as bad or worse depending on where they are living.

Those of us that are law abiding citizens always look to understand the local laws and regulations and stay on their right side. The problem I see is that many times, like-minded honest citizens try to go an extra step away from that line, just to play it safe. This is how I often come across people that truly believe guns are illegal when they are not, or knives or other defensive tools. I had a friend in Argentina that was surprised to know that guns were legal to own in the country. She was in her early twenties, we were in college and she wasn’t a dumb person. It’s just human nature to assume that anything potentially dangerous gives you power, and these days people are brainwashed to believe that power should not be in the hands of common people.

The same happens with guns, ammunition, and knives. Recently I had to explain a gun store owner that buckshot is perfectly legal. He was under the impression that it was banned so he hadn’t been ordering it for years “just in case”.

Now, the thing that sets me apart from most other people is that I know for a fact what happens when SHTF. I know that if someone attacks you on the street or breaks into your house to hurt you and your family, they (its usually more than one) won’t care what you thought or wrongfully assumed. It will just be too damn late and what happens is cold harsh reality. An undeniable fact that can’t be changed and isn’t open to debate. (Yes, people there are no “alternative facts”). If you get killed in your home, or your loved ones hurt. If you’re left on a wheelchair for the rest of your life or your daughter is raped that cannot be changed. It simply is what it is and you can’t go back in time to change it.

So… you may read here and there to just play it safe and go with a Swiss army knife, or maybe a non-locking Opinel. True, it will handle 90% of the cutting tasks you may come across on your day to day routine and even help in some emergencies. But my advice is to plan for the worst and keep that worst case scenario in mind. Don’t take five steps away from the legal limits. Know them and within that limit we law abiding people always respect, carry the best most capable tool you can.

In your case, it seems that you can’t carry a folder that locks and can be opened single handed. You may be able to do so with a lawful use (say you go fishing, hunting or hiking) but it seems that you can carry a fixed blade as long as its under 12 cm (4 3/4inch). That’s actually pretty good and opens up a few interesting options.

SOG Seal Pup

SOG SEAL Pup Fixed Blade M37N-CP $30.74

A great option. I believe the blade is exactly within your limit. This would be one of my first choices. If the blade happens to be a couple mm too long, I wouldn’t hesitate to cut the tip down a bit and regrind it. If you’ve done this before you can do it yourself, or find someone more experienced if not. Just be careful not to overheat the thin tip and dip it in water constantly when working on it with a grinder.

ESEE 3P

ESEE -3 Plain Edge $98.99

This is another solid choice. Definitely within your legal limit yet a super capable little knife. The sheath is pretty much ideal since you can carry it as a neck knife or on your belt. It doesn’t look aggressive or tactical, at least not much, so it may work better if ever stopped by cops and such.

Cudeman MT-5 Survival fixed blade knife

Survival fixed blade knife Cudeman MT-5 120-X $79.99

This is a actually a great brand, makes excellent knives in quality BÖHLER N-695 stainless steel, similar to 44C . If you’re in an area that is damp or wet often, this is a great way to go at exactly 11 cm.

If you ever need that knife, and you happen to need it in a life or death situation where a Vicotrinox or other pen knife simply wouldn’t have been enough, you’ll be glad you went with the most capable tool you could lawfully carry.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

6 Reasons why you should own a kerosene heater

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For most people that live in locations where winter temperatures mandate heating to remain comfortable or even survive, staying warm is crucial. This means having a main source of heating and at least two backup plans. Remember that three is two, two is one and one is none. People may use electricity, natural gas, heating oil and wood, just to name some. It still surprises me though that a lot of people don’t include what is probably the most rugged system, ideal for disasters which is kerosene heaters.

Sengoku CTN-110 KeroHeat 10,000-BTU Portable Radiant Kerosene Heater

Why should you get one?

1)They are cheap. Some on Amazon go for under 100 bucks and if you keep an eye out you can often find them on flea markets or garage sales for a lot less. Keep in mind that you may need a new wick for it though. Other than the kind of fuel used, the wick is the second most important part of a kerosene heater.

2)Most reliable way to heat a home. There just isn’t a most straightforward and reliable way to provide heat. Electricity will be down during serious storms, propane bottles can leak, found empty when needed the most. A generator is a far more complex machine, and it is nowhere nearly as efficient in terms of heat per fuel used. With a kerosene heater you can literally buy one, keep it along with a few gallons of fuel stored in a garage and years later you know you can have it running in a matter of minutes. Kerosene heaters are extremely simple machines. There really isn’t much that can break of otherwise go wrong.

Dura Heat Convection Kerosene Heater, 23,000 BTU, Indoor- DH2304

Dura Heat Convection Kerosene Heater, 23,000 BTU, Indoor $139

3)Its safe. Like with all open flame heaters, you have to make sure you have ventilation of course. A cracked window, just a couple inches will do for smaller rooms. For larger family rooms even less than that will do. You should still have a CO detector to be on the safe side but these modern heaters burn very clean and are extremely safe. Kerosene is one of the safest fuels you can store.

4)Its compact. If you have little room around to spare and nowhere to stockpile cords of woods then this is the way to go.

5)It can be used in any type of building. Kerosene heaters are used all over Japan in both houses and apartments. No complicated or expensive installation is requires.

6)It can be used for cooking and lighting besides heating. The models with flat tops can usually warm up, even boil water placed on top of them on a pot. The model shown below also has a glass body and can double as a lantern.

Dyna-Glo WK11C8 Indoor Kerosene Convection Heater, 10500 BTU $97.72

FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Bank Payments and Having Children when SHTF

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Image result for greece financial crisis

Hi ferfal my name is Aris from Greece I am 31 years married no children yet. I had send you before an e mail many years before but didnt get an answer its ok I had your book for guidance hope you are ok.

I know you are very busy so I’ll make it quick.

I have a question need your advice .

What did you do in Argentina with banks? my father has a  house loan and till now we pay it  many people here dont paid the banks because they waiting bankrupsy and to come drachma alredy the banks here make some cut to the loans if someone  has 10000 euro loan and can afford to pay the say pay us 5000 euro cash and we are ok.

Many clever guys took advance of this so me and my father feel like suckers that we struggle  to be ok with our payments.

questions

1 shall i stop paying the bank and keep the money in offshore or as we say in the matress waiting?2 keep paying ?

Thanks.

Also a personal  question my wife and I want to make a child start a family but situation here is very bad economical shall I wait for better days or to start having children, how was in Argetina the birth  rate after the economic collapse?

I try to buy the new book of you but don’t have money right now waiting the summer for work. I love my country and I don’t want to leave.

Thanks for all the advices from the first book sorry for my english!!!

-Aris

Hello Aris,

I’m sorry I didn’t reply to your previous email. Some days it piles up and if the following day I also get a bunch its sometimes hard to keep up. Sometimes they end up filtered as spam for whatever reason.

Regarding your first question. What you certainly DON’T want to do is to lose your house to the bank. You need an advisor to go over your contract and make sure that whatever it is that you do, you do not endanger that.  Having said that, yes, many times you pay every month and then comes this guy that hasn’t paid a cent all year and gets a bigger discount than you. Banks are all about making money, not being fair, let alone being your friend. If they can charge you 2x they will, and if they believe they can only get 1x out of another person then they will go for that. In Argentina its common practice to pile up property municipal fees and wait for some payment scheme that offers a bigger discount to debtors. In that case yes, the person that paid in time feels like a sucker. After making sure you are not endangering possession (don’t know how this works in Greece) maybe you can save up that money in an offshore account. If you have to make the payment you still have the money, if eventually a better deal can be made and save money then you can try that too.

As for your question regarding children my advice is to go for it. I had my first boy right after the  big collapse of 2001. It wasn’t easy, as you say money was tight, but it was worth every second and I’m glad we had him back then rather than wait. As I explained in my previous post, you have to live today, not plan to live 5 years from now and this is especially true with having kids. Have them young, enjoy them. In Argentina birth rates went up soon after the crisis. This is pretty common, for people to invest more in family when times are tough.

FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Are you truly living or are you merely surviving?

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This is a question I used to ask myself a lot when living (or should I say surviving) in Argentina.

I knew the answer well enough. I was surviving in Argentina and I did not like it. That’s why we left after all. Since then I can say we’ve been living life. It’s been a great life with my fantastic wife and kids. We live every day to the fullest and look forward to the next one. In many ways we’ve been making up for lost time. Every day I try to do right, do what I like and live it as the precious moment that it is. For all the talk about the snowflake generation, I do treat each day, each moment as one. As something that is unique, special, will last just a moment and I’ll never get back. Let me tell you, it’s a great way to live your life. If you do it you’ll look back and regret nothing.

What does it mean to “merely survive”? It means to just be alive but not do much living other than that. In our case the clear limiting factor was crime. Every time you left your home you felt exposed and you did because you actually were. You would walk around always looking around, you looking for threats. Even in crowded places you needed to be careful with pick pockets or snatchers grabbing your backpack, briefcase or in the case of women their purses. I’ve seen men get mugged, at gun point, at the train station in the middle of rush hour. The platform packed full of people and the robber sticking a gun to the guy’s face. It could truly happen anywhere at any time and it happened a lot, all around you. After we left Argentina, the thing that amazed us the most was that, security. The ability to go out for a long walk, pretty much anywhere we want and not fear getting attacked. Sleeping at night knowing that even is some noise wakes you up, chances are its not four or five guys trying to break in. Crime limited you in other ways too. It dictates where you can live. Gated communities and apartments in safe buildings are fine, a more isolated house in the outskirts of town is not. When buying a new car, try not buying one that is too expensive or looks too good or you’ll get carjacked over it. A guy that I knew bought himself a fancy car and had it armoured so as to be able to enjoy it. A week later he was carjacked when getting in, robbed at gunpoint.

What can you do about this? The choice is either do something about it (try to avoid being a victim) or go into denial. I’d say 90% of people chose denial.

The other factor was of course economic. No matter how much money you made 25% inflation meant you couldn’t save up money at all. You had to spend it right away. With that kind of economic instability you can’t plan for anything beyond a couple weeks, let alone a few years.

Here is where I suppose a lot of people may feel represented. Not because of inflation but because of money being tight and living month to month with nothing left in between. That isn’t much of an enjoyable life either. Worrying about an unexpected expense, an accident or illness ruining you financially. Never taking vacations, always living on a strict budget.  In my case I felt as if my life was on hold, as if someone had pressed the “pause” button in my life. What kept us going was the hope that soon enough we’d get to live for real. Be free to go out for a walk without worrying about getting mugged. Get to travel without the fear of our home getting picked clean while we were away. Get to dress anyway we wanted without worrying about having something on us that was of certain brands or worth a bit too much and it being too much of a temptation for a would-be robber. I mean, my wife and I, we ended up replacing our gold wedding bands for silver ones. It was common practice to avoid getting mugged. I still remember the day after we left that we got to wear them again.

When certain “preppers” talk about looking forward to SHTF, because they’ll do great while all the liberals die off, they have no idea what they’re talking about. Surviving sucks folks. It’s the living part that’s fun. Merely surviving sucks but it’s much better than being dead, most of all because it means there’s still chance you may end up living again one day.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Survival Diet: Sugar causes heart attacks (yes, it does)

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Image result for sugar heart attack

It is obvious enough, isn’t it? Staying healthy is essential for survival and nothing else is as strongly linked to health as our choice of fuel, whatever constitutes our diet.

With the right diet, your body works better, it repairs itself better and even your mind works better. One of the big problems with processed foods (among others, including pesticides, GMO, etc) is the addition of sugar. With moderation, sugar as found in fruit is cool, as found in Froot loops its not.

It doesn’t take a brain surgeon to understand why our brain craves sugar and how food companies figured out how to exploit that to maximize profit at the expense of our health. You can literally pick up horse manure, if you add enough sugar and some artificial flavouring you can wrap it up and sell it. Someone will buy it. And like it.

I firmly believe that if it wasn’t for the billions food companies pump into the medical establishment, we would know a lot more about the disastrous effects it has on our bodies.

If you think I’m nuts try this: One week without food with added sugar. Fruits yes, but no sodas, no junk food or even a teaspoon of the stuff in your coffee. Just one week and you’ll see for yourself how you can concentrate more and basically think better.

Take the time to read the article linked below.

Eggs Don’t Cause Heart Attacks — Sugar Does

Take care folks,

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Russian and Argentine Collapse: Similarities, differences and lessons learned

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Image result for USSR collapse food

Folks there’s this fantastic thread over at ar15 survival forum where member Gyprat posts about his experience the Soviet Union during its socioeconomic collapse. I encourage you to follow the link and read the entire thread.Gyprat’s insigths into societal collapse

Here are some thoughts and notes I took about parallelisms, similarities and some differences too with what I saw in Argentina.

1)” One day I remember well was in August of 1991, when communists attempted a government takeover coup. I was in Moscow that day. Everyone was scared and confused. Nothing was on the news. Oil pump quit in my little Lada’s engine and I was not far from one of the busiest intersections, where tanks were taking positions to fire at something. I was lucky to have tools and skills to pull the oil pan off and to make a temporary repair to the oil pump shaft to get us back home.”

The Lada comment and car problems right in the middle of chaos, protests and social unrest. This means no one to call to tow your car, no help, no insurance or breakdown cover, you have to fix it yourself. In my case it wasn’t a Lada but a Renault 9. A reliable, but mostly simple carburetor engine vehicle that was easy to work on and parts easily available. Dear God I’m no mechanic by any stretch of the imagination but I knew that car well and could fix little problems with my Leatherman, some wire and duct tape. At times that made the difference between having a vehicle when SHTF all around you or not. Today, the lesson for me is keeping my Honda well equipped and well serviced in an official Honda shop.

2) The rumours, lies and misinformation. Understanding that the government lies, that companies lie (yes, for profit! Unbelievable!) , that the media owned by such companies lies as well. Lies and social engineering, how people’s opinion is “shaped” and they don’t even realize it. Maybe this is one of the most important, key aspects taking place today. Alas, 99.9% of people, even those that consider themselves “conservatives” don’t even realize they’ve been manipulated in such a way.

3)” Monetary system? Everything was cash based.”

Yup, indeed it was. Cash is king. Even when devaluating it’s still king. You have to be careful and watch before things go Venezuela or Weimar republic on you (meaning cash becoming practically worthless)  but cash gets things done.

4)” Some people had savings accounts in the only available, government owned bank. Once the inflation hit, savings accounts were frozen by the government. People had to stand in long lines to get a limited amount of money out. I can’t remember all the details but the inflation hit very hard.”

Oh I sure can relate to that.

One of the most powerful tools that I’ve mentioned here before (even if some of the “experts” here have mocked me for it) having an off shore bank account and second nationality. When everyone in my country was struggling to get 300 pesos out of an ATM, I could go to a local branch of my off shore bank, use their ATM and get 1000 USD out of it, cash. Then go to an “arbolito”, street currency dealer, and turn that into 4000 pesos. Only Gyprat here understands what that means. To have your money safely abroad, and access it, while everyone else a)Lost 66% of their savings b) will keep losing more to inflation c) cant even access what’s left of it.

5)” I could barter almost anything for alcohol.”

Alcohol is always a valuable barter item, especially in times of war, but I believe its also very much cultural as well. A bottle of vodka sure has more of an appeal in a place like Russia than in South America. I my experience it was always cash the nice thing to have and most often used in bribes. Gyprat mentions cash bribes as well, I think it’s the “safest” route for something that has universal appeal. Maybe in USA a box of ammo has somewhat of a similar appeal, especially in more pro gun areas. In general though, if I had to advice anyone I’d say go with cash if you have to buy your way through trouble.

Regarding bribes, it sure is illegal and you shouldn’t do it, but then again sometimes you do NOT have an option. I know because I’ve been in such situations before. Sometimes it culturally accepted, (even if it wasn’t not long ago) and sometimes it’s so accepted that it’s expected of you, and not doing what’s expected of you when dealing with corrupt people with power gets you in very serious, life threatening trouble. Consider yourself lucky if you’ve never been in that position, but know that some of us have.

6)” Medical services were free.”

Free in Argentina too, although not nearly as good as having private cover like I had. One of my grandparents died before his time because of poor public cover. I will admit though that poor public cover is better than no cover, and that with the new government in Argentina the free public healthcare is doing much better once again. Turns out that when politicians aren’t stealing 90% of the people’s money, it’s much easier and cheaper to get shit done! If I was poor and suffered health problems, I’d rather be in Argentina today than in USA. Healthcare will be a main topic to work on for American survivalists in the future. You just have to check GD forum here to read up on some horror stories. Make it a priority to have as good health cover as you can afford, and as always options, options, options. The more the better.

7)” Water was another story. We live near the highest spot in the whole city. Water pressure was always low and we only had water from 6-9 AM and back at 5 through 8PM. That’s it. Water quality was terrible too.”

Yup, little water and of poor quality. By code, homes in Argentina have at least a 1000l tank. That means the tank gets filled up during the times of the day that you actually have water, and you use the 1000l during the day. With a bit of careful use you can get through a couple days or more, but the problem is that people forget about the automated system and only realize theres something going on when they run out of the reserve tank which is no longer being refilled.

Poor water quality means a good water filter is essential.

“Natural gas, on the other hand, was always there and was almost free.”

Yes, natural gas is generally pretty reliable if you have a city connection. Its also much cheaper than buying bottles, another advantage of being closer to a town that actually has NG. Ironically enough, people that live further away, in many cases poor people that live in less consolidated areas, they have to pay a lot more for gas used for heating.

8) I was just telling my oldest son about the time my grandparents lost everything. They had been successful business owners, both of them. My grandfather had a large carpentry shop, half a block workshop, my grandmother had a successful bakery, also pretty big. They made very good money. Because of the increase in crime and a couple armed robberies my grandmother sold the bakery. They still had my grandfather’s business. My aunt convinced my grandfather that he was already a successful businessman, to just sell his company and live off interest and investments. So he did that. Sold it, put the money in the bank and bought a couple small rental flats. Then came the hyperinflation in the later 80’s. My father, an accountant and executive in a large bank, told them to take the money out of the bank ASAP. They didn’t listen, my aunt told them it would be all right. It wasn’t and they lost everything. The retirement collected each month was pitiful and really the rentals were the only thing keeping them afloat.

I remember it was the first time I heard my father shout so much. My grandparents were crying in the kitchen, asking him “what do we do now!?” My dad was so pissed, he shouted back “Nothing! now you’re fucked! Why didn’t you listen to me!?”.  Sometimes people self-destruct like that. You know what’s better for them, you try to make them understand but they just don’t listen. Of course it’s much worse when its people you care for.

9)” This meant that everything was tied to a real market price, tied to the real currency exchange rate. Prices skyrocketed. People were walking around in shock and disbelief after they saw new prices on food and everything else. It was like 10, 100 or 1000 times more than a month earlier. Yes, food was readily available but people could not afford much because they were still getting paid very little..”

Amen to that. This is what folks sometimes don’t understand. Cash is king, yet you have to be careful with hyperinflation. If a banana costs 1000 USD, does that mean the USD is worthless? Well, not if you need that banana and you have those 1000 bucks. “So I should stock up on bananas/tools/stuff! Sell it after the collapse!” Well… no. There’s lots of “stuff” floating around, the price will rarely be as good as you hope. Only certain items at a certain time keep up the price. In my case it was foreign currency, what Gyprat calls “real market price”. In the case of Argentina I know gold and silver stayed in that “real market price” too and that’s where I see Americans finding a safety net in such an economic disaster takes place there. Even if bananas cost 1000USD each, I don’t see 1oz gold coins selling for 2000 USD, the price will most likely than not go up just like the price of bananas did.

10)” Food was number one priority back then. Like I said previously, people were not really starving but they were not eating as good as what’s considered normal here in the US. I often laugh when I hear on the news about people who “starve” here in the US. How is this possible when food is so cheap and available everywhere? Perhaps they call it starving when they can’t afford to eat out everyday? Obviously they have no clue about basic things like cooking. Yes, it’s nice to have pork chops or a steak every day but it costs a lot too. Why not make soup? It’s relatively cheap and will feed a family for several days. A 50 lbs. bag of rice can be purchased at Costco for around $15 and will last for a long time. You can make a lot of mouth watering dishes from potatoes only. How can you go hungry in this country???”

Regarding food and eating habits it was as bad or even worse in Argentina in terms of eating habits. Argentines eat meat, and meat in Argentina means beef. An “asado” often mistaken with a BBQ, is not about grilling a few burgers or hotdogs. Its about getting all sorts of cuts from a cow, preparing the organs and eating it all. Any Argentine male worth his salt knows how to prepare a fire and cook everything inside an animal on it, most know how to ID each cut of meat and organ. We had to adapt and understand that in spite of our cultural tradition food didn’t mean a pound of beef in each plate. You had to stretch it, lots of rice, pasta, make soups, cook lentils. That same pound of meat that used to sit in a single plate now went into a big pot along with rice, vegetables etc and fed the entire family.  Sure this means learning to cook for those that don’t know how to do it already.

11) “My grandparents shared a lot stories about the WW2 with me. I sure learned a lot of valuable lessons from them. My grandmother told me stories about people trading everything they had, including gold and silver for a piece of dry bread so their children would not die of starvation, or at least live another week. This was true survival. Food was very important. Alcohol and tobacco were very valuable items as well.”

My wife’s grandparents went through WWII in Italy. Her grandmother had a big chain of gold and would go to town to sell a few link to buy whatever they needed. By the time they left Italy and moved to Argentina that neck chain had lost so many links it was now short enough to be a bracelet. My wife still has that bracelet. While I see how in some desperate situation you may end up trading precious metals at a great loss, in general I would say that with enough time and know how you can put precious metals to very good use, especially in countries where there’s already a culture and understanding of what precious metals are, how to ID them and their overall value.

12) “The supply line was always overloaded in summer months. Forget about running a hair dryer or any high wattage appliances. It was enough for lights and maybe for a TV. We were the only ones who could watch TV because my dad installed a CVT to keep the voltage close to 220V. Our neighbors were lucky if they got 160 Volts in the evening and it often sagged down to below 140 Volts and could spike to above 260V, early in the morning. It was enough for lights but not enough for a TV or any other appliance. The electrical company was owned by the government and could care less, like every other organization back then.”

This I can completely relate to and experiences the exact same thing. In my case, in Buenos Aires, we rarely had spikes, and it seemed that year round, other than in winter when AC weren’t used as much, you had 150V-160V instead of 220V. This isnt enough to run a microwave and the AC barely works or doesn’t work at all. I fixed it by installing a voltage elevator. That thing cost me a good bit of money but was worth every cent. Loved that thing. When I left I gave it away to my brother in law. He didn’t seem to care though, and in spite of being a pretty good electrician he just left it there in the house. By the time he could be bothered with picking it up someone else took it. Some people just cant be helped.

13)” One thing that was always available was bread.”

Probably strongly linked to the Soviet communist system. Its good that they managed to keep bread supplied but I certainly wouldn’t expect it in other countries. Even in current Venezuela its clear that they can’t keep people fed. Having flour and bakeries all over the country ready to supply the population on demand even when little else is working in terms of infrastructure is a serious achievement. Indeed, a person can live on bread and water, but I wouldn’t count on it in most countries if there’s a socioeconomic collapse.

14) “Having a vehicle for transportation is essential for living in this country. I did not need a car when I lived in Russia because everything was close and there was good and affordable public transportation in most Russian cities and even outside of city limits. American cities are spread out and it’s nearly impossible to get places without a vehicle.”

This is another American-specific issue to prepare for. In Europe you can move around most countries without a car. Even with a car public transportation is very good and at times even more convenient. Why drive somewhere, park and such, if an air conditioned train gets you there faster without you having to drive? It is true that in certain small towns public transportation isnt as good but in America you are always expected to drive places rather than catch a train or bus. You need a car and you need one that works well, and is affordable to fuel and maintain. Heck, its so important you probably need two so as to have at least one backup.

“I would probably trade my new 4runner for a 4×4 Dodge 2500 truck with a Cummins diesel or another vehicle that runs on diesel fuel”

I just refilled my diesel Honda CRV. What was it? 30 bucks? I came back from Sierra Nevada just a few days ago. Round trip about five hours driving time and I still had fuel to drive around town and then some, about 44 mpg is I remember right. Diesel is just fantastic. Its not only cheaper, it just gives you a lot more range on these little engines, all while giving twice as much torque compared to gasoline.

15)” The city we lived in (Tula) was about 100 miles south of Moscow. Moscow, being the capital, always got much, much better food availability and selection than any other city in the country. Most government officials lived in Moscow and obviously they made sure that their city was supplied better than anywhere else. They also wanted to show off to some foreigners who visited the capital”

So much for large cities being the first place to burn down, refugees pouring out of them into the countryside!

It is indeed typical for collapsed countries to keep their capitals and other major cities strong. Its a practical decision (x money servicing a larger number of people) a strategic one (capitals are usual government headquarters) and psychological (the capital, the “head” of the country and what it stands for).

16)” Crime was getting worse by the day. Armed robberies became a new norm. People no longer trusted wooden entry doors with regular locks. My friend’s company built new, hardened metal doors, locks and hinges that guaranteed to turn your apartment into a fortress. The doors were bullet resistant and guaranteed to stop a 7.62mm AKM round fired at a close range.”

Exact same thing in Argentina. Most houses have armoured doors. Not having one is practically asking criminals to rob you. Not kidding here, if you don’t have one and you get robbed people will go “what do you expect? Did you see that stupid flimsy door he had?”

17) “Moving to another country would be an ultimate test of your flexibility and ability to adjust to new conditions and culture.”

And I would add, it’s the ultimate solution to a large scale SHTF that affect a country or region.

It’s the one thing Gyprat and I have in common. We left the mess behind and found greener pastures. The grass isn’t always greener on the other side but it is if your side is collapsed Russia or Argentina. After years of researching disasters and survivalism I can say with confidence that when it gets THAT bad, you better move somewhere else. That’s the ultimate solution. Study, have skills, get an education, for God’s sake learn a second language and If you can get a second citizenship, don’t let such an opportunity go to waste if you happen to have it.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Serious Survival: How much food should you stockpile?

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It seems that for every blogger or forum member there’s a survival expert as well. That’s great because there’s such wealth of information and you can learn from different experiences and accounts.
Then again the downside… every blogger and member thinks he’s an expert.
You see, for realistic survival and preparedness it’s crucial to differentiate the “I think” and “I believe” from the “this is how it went down” “this is why”.
We all know that food is essential for survival. No food and you won’t last long. Same goes for water (and I see it overlooked more often). Keep in mind that while a day without food may suck a bit, but a day without water will be tough indeed. In certain warm climates it can be downright dangerous.
We all get how important food and water is, but then there’s the classic survival question: How much food should you have stored for emergencies?
Doomers say you need years worth of food. Decades even. After all you die if you don’t eat. Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) are famous for their year worth of food approach, although many have far less than that.
Officially speaking, what would a real expert recommend? Ready.gov says to have 3 days worth of shelf stable food and bottled water. That may seem as very little but in general most emergencies are either resolved within that time frame or help becomes available. Still, tell this to anyone that spent a week or more snowed in during a storm and he’ll find it lacking.
So how much? A Week? A Month? A year?
The first piece of advice is one you’ve probably heard before and that it is to store what you eat. If your kids don’t even know what rice looks like then having buckets full of the stuff isnt that much of a good idea. Either store something else or actually start eating rice.
There’s two very important reasons for this.
First, if you don’t rotate your food supply it just becomes one of those “just in case” things, and you’ll find yourself throwing food away every few years. This makes keeping large quantities of food stored a great waste of money. Second, if you store what you eat there wont be any difference between emergencies and “normal” times, at least food wise.
In our home we love rice and lentils and prepare rice and lentils stews often. Its tasty, very healthy, stores well for years and its pretty affordable too. Some canned tomato and vegetables and you have all you need for a great nutritional meal.
Another important point is understanding how much calories you actually need. The standard reply here is 2000 calories. Sure, if trekking the north pole you’ll need 5000 instead but even if some manual labour may be needed during disasters there’s people that stay healthy AND active with a lower caloric diet. 2000 will do well enough.
OK … SO HOW MUCH DO I NEED?
The 3 day recommendation by ready.gov is based on a rather optimistic government recommendation. If they have said instead to have 7 days immediately people would be wondering “Wait, so you’ll let me hang there for an entire week?!” People don’t react well to uncertainty and avoiding panic is a government’s #1 priority. Two weeks worth of groceries is just common sense. It doesn’t put a significant dent in your wallet if done correctly, and yes, it is true that it will cover 99% of the disasters and emergencies you’re likely to face in your lifetime.
I already imagine people thinking “but I want to be ready for SHTF, a worst case scenario, the real end of the world stuff!”.
OK, lets do that. Lets say it’s a worst case, total SHTF scenario. But lets keep it real and look how does it actually play out in the real world rather than fantasize about it.

Related image
Lets say you have 2 years, no, 10 years worth of food. Lets say you have that plus means of producing more, a fully working farm.
Now lets suppose you have your ten year supply of food, plus a farm, plus a pile of guns and ammo… and you’re sitting in Eastern Ukraine when the Russian troops roll in. Or Aleppo when they are levelling every structure around you with barrel bombs. Or in South Africa when white farmers were exterminated and kicked out of their homes. Or in Fukushima when the tsunami destroyed everything and the radiation scorched the land. Do you see a trend here? More food, or a bigger farm would have done you no good. In all of these sometimes like more cash or gold to take along with you when you bug out or even better money in an offshore account would have been far more useful.
“But… I want the end of the world to be more convenient…”
Ok, what about Venezuela? You have out of control inflation, out of control crime and poverty with people starving. Even farmers starve there(posted about just this a few weeks ago), just like Irish farmers starved during the genocide known as the Great Famine or Ukranian farmers died during Holodomor, reduced to cannibalism. Yes, sometimes its natural disasters, but in others its lack of means of production, and an authoritarian government ensure that people starve in spite of having land and the knowledge to work it.
In my experience after the collapse of Argentina’s economy I would say it was somewhat similar to Venezuela during the times of Chavez. By this I mean horrible inflation, but not reaching the levels of food poverty seen today in Venezuela. Food was available, just two or three times more expensive than before. Just imagine how you would deal with such a scenario if you woke up to it tomorrow. Indeed, we all wished we had more food stocked up, and we rushed to buy more right away desperately trying to beat the nonstop inflation. I sure kept several months worth of food stockpiled. But still, at the end of the day if you had money you ate.
I stayed for over a decade after the collapse of 2001. In retrospective I probably should have left sooner. Personal circumstances, heck, life I guess, made us delay our departure. Still, we always had the resources to leave ASAP if needed. This is more than what most people in Venezuela can say.

Image result for irish great famine
In such a complex situation would a 10 year supply of food, or a farm, made much of a difference? Not really. The food would have been nice, but the money to buy it was just as good besides having a conservative stockpile. A farm? Maybe more of an anchor to the country at a time when leaving was the clear path. A farm in a place like Venezuela, where you cant sell it, or if you do you don’t get anything for it, really does you no good.
So, start with a couple weeks worth of stockpiled food. Work towards a month. Then 6 when you can afford it and have the room for it. 6 to 12 months is the maximum I would recommend, with 6 months being the most realistic objective for most people. Six months of food gives you plenty of time for things such as unemployment, family problems. 12 months helps greatly when dealing with inflated prices, food shortages, and overall instability in the country where you maybe spent several months maybe saving money and looking for a job abroad, for a way out of the country entirely.
The lesson being, If you need more than 12 months worth of food, then more food will do you no good because what you really need is to get the hell out of there!
Take care folks,
FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Reply: Best Concealed Carry Glock for California?

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Image result for chopped g19 to take g26 mags

Chuck Haggard said…

A very real issue with the Glocks is that the ten round “Clinton” magazines are not reliable, especially with JHP ammo.

For a ten round limit I’d go with a G30 or a G26, both are designed around the ten round mags and are very reliable.
An option some explore is doing a grip chop on a G19 to take G26 magazines, that gives greater velocity and sight radius while allowing the shooter to use a reliable magazine, enhances concealment, and allows one to use the 15 or 17 round mags if they travel to a state where those are legal.

OK, I like the idea and I think it makes sense, for the reasons you just mention:

1)More reliable mags.

2)Better sight radius. I at least like having a bit more distance between sights, I find it helpful although some people argue that a shorter one is quicker to align, which in theory is correct.

3)More barrel length, more velocity and better terminal ballistics.

Having said all this if you have larger hands you may still be better off with the Glock 19 or 17 in their original size. I have used those 10 round mags (gift from an American friend) and I at least never had a problem with them so they can work for you after extensive testing with the ammo you intend to carry.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

 

Bought a couple of these… maybe you should too.

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If you don’t have a good set of electronic earmuffs, get these:

Howard Leight by Honeywell Impact Sport Sound Amplification Electronic Earmuff $38.72

Best Sellers in Amazon. For under 40 bucks, I just don’t think you can beat them. Not many products get over 10.000 reviews, a 4.5 star average. I was about to get some fancy Peltors but after seeing these and such overwhelming positive feedback I went for these instead.

earmuffs

I got a couple, one for myself and another for my oldest son that is now shooting with me. Hearing is just too important, and it makes no sense for any avid shooter not to have a quality set of earmuffs.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

 

Relocating to Australia?

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Image result for melbourne

Message:

Hi Fernando I live in the UK currently things are going downhill. I’m

aware though that it’s not limited to just here it’s more of a global

thing. I’ve been offered the chance to go and live and work in

Australia. Do you think this would be a beneficial location to

relocate to or will it be much the same as here in UK?. Currently

re-reading your “Bugging out and Relocating” book. I notice you say

Melbourne is a pretty good place to live. It’s definitely one area we

are looking at. Any advice on this is greatly appreciated. Thanks,

Ashleigh

..

Hello Ashleigh,

Please accept my apologies for not replying sooner. It gets pretty busy this time of the year. 🙂

I wouldn’t doubt it for a second and yes, I would go to Australia if I was living in UK. Having said that here are the reasons I would go for it and some of the other considerations you should keep in mind.

Since you read my book “Bugging Out and Relocating” you probably understand some of these already. Australia simply has a lot going for it. The weather, the quality of life and standards of living in general are among the best in the world, especially in Melbourne, Perth and if you can afford it, Sydney(very expensive!). You’re talking about some of the best ranking cities to live in, in the entire planet.

The one thing every source I have mentions is cost of living. It can be an issue if you don’t make enough money, especially in Sydney, the most expensive city in Australia. Maybe the second most common problem people face when relocating to Australia is actually getting the visa to move there. If you have the opportunity and the money is good you really should give it a try if you feel strongly about it.  What happens sometimes is that people move to a “better” place but then just miss good old home and eventually move back. People that move to Australia though tend not to regret it. Another thing I’ve learned over the years and verified it on others time and again: Going “up”, as in a better place, it’s easier than going down. I’d say Australia is definitely an improvement in general quality of life, especially if you already have a job in line.

As for the situation in UK, I just don’t see it getting better any time soon. True, everywhere is complicated these days but some are worse than others. Right now UK is going through some serious changes given Brexit. Some believe it will be better on the long run, some are less optimistic, but what all serious analysts agree on is that the next few years will be hard indeed. I can very much assure you this: It will be very hard for at least the next 5 -10 years, at least it will be for most people. You are already seeing where this is going with the NHS cutting budget and services and with inflation. If there’s one thing I know, that’s inflation and there’s simply no way around your currency dropping 20% or more. Everyone gets that much poorer.  Then you also have to accept that many companies are preparing for more complicated times ahead, reduction of staff, drop in sales. Out of the common market sales will simply drop and many companies will have to move operations within the EU where they intend to still do business.

I say go for it. Worst case scenario you don’t like living there and just have one more significant experience that makes your life richer although chances are you’ll love it and stay there permanently.

Good luck!

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Cheap and Great Results: Red Lithium Grease for Guns

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glocklithium

Next time you’re in Walmart, remember This:  High Temp Lithium grease. Its costs just a few bucks for a lifetime supply of the stuff. In Amazon you can get a pound of it for just under eight bucks.

High temp Red lithium grease is intended for vehicles and other high temperature, metal on metal friction.

What’s wrong with gun oil? Nothing really. It just doesn’t last nearly as long. After over a decade of using it I can say that grease just stays around more, doesn’t dry away nearly as fast. You simply see it where you last placed it in the gun after weeks of use, while oil just seems to go away after a couple trips to the range. Not very scientific but that’s my impression.

One final tip though: don’t overdo it. As cheap as it may be a very small amount of it goes a VERY long way. Just a pinch on the rails and other contact areas, heck use a tooth pick for good measure. If you overdo it you end up with a greasy mess which may even attract unwanted dirt in dry, sandy climates.
Other than that, it’s what I’ve been using mostly for keeping my guns lubbed and I’m happy enough with it to recommend it to you folks.

Have a great weekend!

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

3 Items to pick up Next time you’re in IKEA

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ikeabat

1)Batteries. Their primaries are cheap and pretty good quality but the best deal is their rechargables. These are made in Japan and great quality. I read somewhere that these are the same as Eneloops. Not sure if its true or not but “made in Japan” does point in that direction and again, the quality is there. I’m using these to replace the AA and AAA in my kits given that all alkalines seem to leak eventually. This is much safer and works well with the second item in the list.

2)AA and AAA USB charger. Its cheap, compact and works. I bought one of these for the car. If It goes well I’ll get one or two more. Can’t remember the price but it was just a few bucks. You don’t find cheap and well-made chargers that often, especially this small.

3)USB LED light. Missing in the picture here but it’s a small black LED light that connects to a USB port. I found it close to the batteries and charger. Very minimalistic like IKEA usually does it and cheap too. It could be a bit longer but its small so as to be out of the way. Maybe not as much of a bargain as the first two but I’m giving it a try to see how it does.

Take care folks!

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Gunfight Video: 10 Lessons Learned

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1)Carry a gun,  a FIGHTING gun, not a microsubcompactnano pocket carry special in 25 ACP with a capacity of 2+1.

2)Train. A lot.

3)Awareness. Enough of it and you may even avoid the fight entirely.

4)Apendix carry isnt that great. Its more obvious when drawing and that can get you killed. Stick to strong side, 4 oclock.

5)When shooting, shoot to kill and shoot a LOT.

6)If you’re not shooting, get out of the way (like his wife did)

7)Even at just a foot away, you can still miss.

8)Down doesn’t mean dead. Make sure he’s no longer a threat, kick his gun away.

9)Look for his friends, there may be more.

10)Brazilian cops do NOT mess around.

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Flash Flood: What happens if you get caught

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floodcar

I found this car just a couple streets from mine, right after the storm and flood I talked about in the previous post.

The difference between making it home all right or drawning is in these details, in having the right vehicle for what you are dealing with, in that extra inch of water that causes your vehicle to float, lose contact with the pavement and turns your car in the worst boat in the world. Ultimately, its about knowing when to turn around and not risk your life.

And again, the best 4×4 in the planet wont do you any good in the garage if you drive a Prius to save gas as your daily driver. Chances are your daily driver is what you’ll have to face these situations when SHTF.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Story Time: BOV/Daily Driver saves the Day

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crv1

After over a week of continuous heavy pouring rain today it finally stopped. I’ve seen tropical climate rain before but nothing like this, non-stop pouring followed by “what the hell the sky is falling”, followed by more pouring rain.

In spite of this, this past Saturday morning I still had to drive to town to pick up a delivery. After checking the news and making sure there was no flood alert I thought “hey, the worst that can happen is getting wet a bit”.

Not so much. The slope on the side of the road had collapsed, dirt and rock had been washed over the road, and by the time I made it back I was dealing with more flooding, a fallen tree and the road going home up hill was turning into a downfall river.

The humble Honda CR-V saved the day though. AWD, snow+mud tires and the extra torque of the diesel engine meant I could climb up the road that was now becoming a river slowing down in the opposite direction. As it turned left, it was surreal to see the well-known road home now flooded, with a fallen tree across the street, the trunk almost fully under water. It seemed like a completely different place.

I don’t know how close I got to getting washed downhill. The current was pretty strong. A bigger truck would have done even better no doubt, but then again a bigger truck would have probably been left in the garage because I wasn’t expecting any of this.

The lesson is pretty clear: SHTF happens without notice and more likely than not your daily driver is what you’ll have to work with. Its better to drive around the small or mid size SUV all day than to have a Humvee in the garage while driving a Prius all day because its good on gas.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

The Best Amazon Black Friday Deals for Survivalists

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This is the time of the year I really envy you guys (most of these deals are US only). Some of the deals are outstanding, more than 50% discount in some cases. If there’s anything you’re needing to buy its worth checking. Keep in mind that most have a limited duration.

Kershaw 1990 Brawler Speedsafe Folding Knife $17.49

Just a steal. Period. I have one, love it and recommend it. Under 20 bucks and notice the fantastic rating with +1000 reviews. Stocking stuffer, for BOB and kits or as your EDC.

Smith’s PP1 Pocket Pal Multifunction Sharpener $8.89

Columbia Men’s Steens Mountain Front-Zip Fleece Jacket $19.95-$69.95

 

The pump shotgun: 7 Reasons why it’s the classic survivalist Workhorse Gun

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Mossberg 500 ATP 7-shot with rifle sights

From killing zombies to defending your home, you cant go wrong with the dependable pump shotgun, especially with the two most popular ones, the Mossberg 500 and Remington 870.

Jack of all trades master of none describes the pump shotgun perfectly.

1)In most hands, quick follow up shots aren’t as fast as in a semi auto rifle (or shotgun) then again the pump action can be surprisingly fast in the hands of an experienced operator and each trigger pull puts nine 9mm projectiles on target faster than any other firearm.

2)It requires manual operation between shots. Then again, the pump action ejects any cartidge no matter the condition and will reliably slam a fresh shell in place as dependably as no other gun.

3)Capacity isn’t as high as in a 20 or 30 rounds rifle magazines, then again the tube can be constantly fed, topping up the magazine which is something you can’t do with a detachable mag rifle.

4)It lacks the range of the rifle, but with rifle sights or red dot and slugs you can break the 40-50 yard limit set by buckshot, and do so accurately.

5)It may not seem very tacticool, but few other firearms are as durable, as reliable or as easy to repair and replace parts.

6)Shotguns can operate with a variety or cartridges, from birdshot to buck or slugs, even non lethal. No other firearm provides such flexibility.

7)They are cheap too, meaning you can arm more people. For the price of one medium grade carbine or rifle you can buy shotguns to arm three or four adults, maybe more with second hand market shotguns.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

EDC: Pocket Piece to Remember JFK

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jfk

My favourite pocket piece, it’s been with me for a few months now, including today in the anniversary of Kennedy’s death. In many ways it symbolises the death of real money too, since 1964 was the last year in which 90% silver was used in American currency, minted just a few months after his death.

For many one of the last great American presidents, RIP JFK.

FerFAL

Long Term Food Storage: Alternative to Coffee & Tea

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mate

It’s easy enough to stock up on tea and coffee but if you are looking into something different, maybe something even better, as your daily booster beverage consider yerba mate.

I drink both coffee and tea, but mate is with me every morning and throughout the day.
Unlike tea or coffee, I’m used to drinking mate without added sugar. It’s also more gentle as a stimulant than coffee (even if it does contain caffeine ) Its probably the healthiest beverage too. Yerba mate contain 24 vitamins and minerals, 15 amino acids, abundant antioxidants.

Its cheap too. Around here it costs about 2.50 for half a kilo.

I drink it the traditional way but you can also make mate tea if you prefer.

Look around, you’ll probably find it in your grocery store in the imported/Latin food section.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Black Friday Preparedness Deal Alert I

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Trump Supporter Survival Guide 101

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Image result for trump protest face trump supporter

The election is over but the implications are still very much alive. You just have to watch the news for a few minutes to see protests, violence, people randomly attacked and so on.

Folks, this isnt a political website. As I’ve always said vote anyway you think you should (and that’s exactly what millions did) but if one thing is clear is that the lack of tolerance has reach record levels and on one hand you have people that can’t seem to process that they’ve lost, just like some can’t grasp the concept of finally getting what they wanted and be content with it. This website is about practical, objective advice. If you can’t stop yourself from wearing your Trump or Anti Trump, or Hillary for Prison t-shirt then that’s fine too, but know that from a practical perspective, it’s not exactly advisable at the moment.

Having said all this, here’s my advice.

  • Avoid logos, stickers, etc.

The election is over so there’s not much of a political battle to fight at the moment. These days, you risk getting into trouble for nothing really to be gained.

People have been beaten, insulted or otherwise aggravated because of wearing Trump shirts. I know of people that had their car vandalized, tyres slashed, all four, because of Trump stickers. Recently a car was set on fire over a Trump sticker.

Mustang vandalized, set on fire in Santa Maria

Given that the elections are already over and in the spirit of going as unnoticed as possible, I at least would avoid it. For those of you very political at least hold until next elections.

  • Avoid politics at your workplace.

People have gotten themselves in trouble at work for expressing their political views, even fired. Now, it sucks not to be able to express your views, but then again with freedom comes responsibility and that includes knowing whats in your best interest or not.  If anything, try being as discrete as possible when discussing politics. Even if your boss and immediate colleges mostly think alike, you never know who’s overhearing and who takes note of your views with a negative connotation making life harder at your workplace.

  • Avoid protests and rallies.

At the end of the day, what matter is your vote and that has already been cast. If people want to protest/express their discontent that’s all fine and dandy, until the protest stops begin peaceful that is, which is not ok (but more on that later). Confronting them though makes no sense, does you no good other than scratching some childish itch some people have.

  • Learn how to deal with roadblocks.

Everyone has the right to peaceful protest but there’s nothing peaceful about stopping traffic and keeping people hostage in their vehicle. Remember the basics. Avoid protests when possible. Do NOT engage. Do NOT lower your window to talk politics with the violent thug attacking you, keep moving away from the potentially dangerous ambush.

  • Don’t let politics destroy your family.

I’ve addressed this topic before and I’ve seen the same thing happen in my own country. The division, the rift between opposite opinions. The fatal mistake of believing that a political adversary is an enemy. Trump himself has talked about “unity” and “heal the division” in his victory speech. But if there’s one thing both Trump and Hillary hardcore supporters agree on, ironically enough, is that they want none of that. I know for a fact such a thing is a big mistake, especially when politics end up affecting your relationships with family and friends. An extra dose of maturity and empathy can work miracles.

  • Stay informed.

Matt Bracken was interviewed recently. I have a ton of respect for Matt and his opinions. There’s talks about possible false flag ops (entirely possible in the near future) and there’s strong evidence about many protesters being paid to participate, herded into buses like we see so often in South America. I understand how some people may not like Trump and chose to express such opinions. I also understand having thousands of paid violent “protesters” making a mess. This kind of organized resistance to the democratic process is pretty risky and its important to stay informed, fully understanding the interest and political inclinations of each player and media outlet.

  • Keep Preparing.

With a Republican president and majority on both houses gun owners can sure relax. Chances of any kind of gun ban are slim to say the least and fingers crossed, maybe some new opportunities may arise for those living in more restrictive cities and states regarding concealed carry and what kind of firearms can be owned.

Still, firearms ownership is just a small part of the equation. Today more than ever its important to be ready to face challenges. Socially speaking expect protests and random or organized acts of violence and rioting to become more common, not the other way around. The supplies kept in your vehicle are key, especially your first aid kit.  Shameless self-promoting here, if you haven’t done so already do get my book, “The Modern Survival Manual”, and put into practice as much as you can right away. Everything from awareness, grey man philosophy, self-defense and economic preps its all very much relevant and applicable. This website is packed full of information as well, read through the older articles.

With a new president there’s always a “honeymoon” period of about 3-6 months. After that things settle and the political and economic future becomes more clear. Some measures taken by Trump may be less popular than others. Mistakes will be made in the learning process, especially in his first presidency. Economic measures that may have benefits in the long run may be less popular at first, even have the opposite effect, just like positive short term ones may not work that great down the road. And then there’s the fact that almost half the country isn’t happy with the way things went, and will try to sabotage Trump every chance they get.

Good luck people!

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Toblerone: Before and After Brexit

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This is priceless.

Its amazing that UK went Venezuela in their attempt to control inflation.

The government clearly pressured for Toblerone to be sold at the same price in spite of 30% inflation. They demanded that they didn’t make the packaging any smaller and kept the same price.

So how’s the Toblerone now sold in UK?

This is the result.

Toblerone 2020?

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

EDC Keychain: 5 Must Have Essential Items

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Yesterday during an interview with Jim Paris I was asked about survival gear. It’s a massive topic and it can be overwhelming for the uninitiated.  It’s safe to recommend stocking up food and at least two weeks worth of bottled water. The same goes for essential emergency supplies, but people want specifics and these lists can be massive, overwhelming.

For those new to modern survival I recommend starting with the core items behind such philosophy: The items you are most likely to use during an emergency, meaning the ones you will have on your person. This is what we call EDC, everyday carry items. Now here too it can get a bit intense but I do have a tip for you.

Just start with your keychain.

Everyone carries one. It’s an item you will have with you no matter what and a few carefully selected items can keep the total volume and weight down while making sure critical tools are always available. I’ve had this setup for years and ended up with it after years of trial and error. I guarantee you will be using all of these more often than you’d think.

These are the items I recommend you have in your keychain.

1)Flashlight.

SureFire Titan Plus Ultra-Compact Variable-Output LED Keychain Light $87.75

ThruNite Ti NW Lumen Cree XP-L V4 LED Key Chain Flashlight in Titanium alloy, Neutral White $25.95

Few other items are as indispensable during emergencies. Today LED lights are surprisingly bright. Surprisingly durable as well and can run for long periods of time.

I currently keep a Thrunite Ti in my keychain, but if you want to spend a bit more and buy premium quality look for the Surefire Titan.

2)Knife/Multitool.

Victorinox Swiss Army MiniChamp II Pocket Knife,Red

Victorinox Mini Champ Swiss Army Knife $29.95

Leatherman - Squirt PS4 Multi-Tool, Black

Leatherman – Squirt PS4 Multi-Tool, Black $29.24

Pretty basic right? You gotta have a knife. Better yet have a knife and a bunch of small tools. After years of use I recommend either a Leatherman Squirt PS4 or a Victorinox Minichamp, the Minichamp being my personal favourite although the PS4 is objectively as good, maybe better for certain applications.

3)USB Flash drive.

SanDisk Cruzer Fit $9.78

Keep one with your important work files, copies of documents and other important papers and family photos and videos. The Sandisk is a good way to go given that their encryption software is pretty good and allows for the creation of password protected vaults, meaning you can safely use the Flash drive for everyday use too.

4)Lighter

Jolmo Lander Titanium Watertight Fluid Lighter Ti Peanut Petrol Lighter $15

Fire being a quintessential survival tool I believe you should have a lighter or at the very least fire starting tools. A ferrocerium rod is suitable for repeated outdoors use, but a lighter provides a quicker flame when needed. This is the one I have, a titanium peanut lighter. Pretty great and totaly worth it.

5)Mini Prybar

Miscellaneous M4276 2" Pico Widgy Pry Bar Titanium

2″ Pico Widgy Pry Bar Titanium $20.57

Boker Plus 09BO310 Access Prying Tool $24.99

Its small, light and compact. A small prybar can spare the relatively fragile blade in your keychain tool. For years I had the Vox bar from Boker. Currently I’m using a tiny Pico bar. Either one will serve you well.

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Burglars Explain how they Broke into Homes

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Image result for burglar

Home security is a top concern. It is today and it sure is after a socioeconomic breakdown. Maybe one of the weakest point I see on nearly all American preppers is home security. Having guns means you have means of self-defense, it doesn’t mean that your house is more of a hard target.
This article from 12News is well worth the time it takes to read it and has some good first-hand information about how burglars operate.

Here are the top five lessons:

1)Burglars will look for jewellery, electronics, cash, credit cards and guns. One burglar said that NRA stickers means there’s guns to be stolen.

Not mentioned in the article but I know this to be true, many criminals also look for drugs, legal or otherwise, either for personal consumption or for selling.

2)All burglars CHECK IF YOU ARE HOME. They knock on your door and if someone answers they ask for directions, pretend to be lost or to be looking for someone else. Some even pretend to be doing surveys.

3)They prefer breaking in early morning or afternoon when people are working and kids are in school. Most of them access through UNLOCKED windows and doors. Some kicking down the door if locked.

4)The ideal house to break in? They looked for homes with big fences and overgrown trees or bushes. “Homes AWAY FROM OTHER HOMES, blind spots, older window frames, cheap wooden doors,” wrote a burglar. “Large trees, bushes or shrubs around the home, or very reserved and conservative neighbours,” wrote another inmate.

“Nice home with nice car = A person with money,” another said.

Simplisafe2 Wireless Home Security System 8-piece Plus Package

Simplisafe2 Wireless Home Security System 8-piece Plus Package

5)How to make your home a hard target? Keeps doors and windows locked. Large dogs are one of your best deterrents. Smaller ones don’t seem to do the trick nearly as well. Install an alarm, most intruders said they would leave immediately if a security alarm went off.

Most burglars consider a car parked on the driveway to be a sure-fire sign of someone being home. TV or radio noise also made them think twice about breaking in.

“Put bars on your windows and doors, get an alarm, keep an extra car in the driveway, keep lights, TVs and radios on when you leave your home,” read one questionnaire.

“Home alarm, know your neighbour so they can report suspicious people around the neighbourhood,” said a burglar.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

 

Thoughts regarding the Presidential Election

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Politics and Religion.

The golden rule of blogging says you’re never supposed to talk about those two if you want your readers/viewers  to like you.

Well, I’m not the kind of person that worries about being liked. I’m the kind that worries about the well-being of my readers and sometimes that includes tough topics, topics in which we may not agree on or be forced to look at uncomfortable truths. Still, this is an important … no, an ESSENTIAL part of modern survivalism and the mindset that goes along with it. The ability to understand the agenda of politicians, the different media outlets, some more obvious than others, the ability to understand were your bests interest lies.

I was asked about my opinion regarding the US elections. Keep in mind these videos are just that, my opinion. Also keep in mind the following: that if you think I’m stupid/misinform/Hillary killed my dog or Trump spit on my Lucky Charms this morning, you’re wrong.  It’s not personal. Its political analysis, some of which you probably haven’t considered before.
I’m not trying to change anyone’s vote here. If anything, it would be nice to see less verbal violence, more communication and tolerance among yourselves. These elections are ripping the American society apart like no other election in recent history. Friends, even families are fighting or even not talking to one another because of different political ideology. Its destructive, poisonous behaviour that I’ve seen how it leads to decades of social conflict and division.

With that being said, here’s what I think. Of course, YMMV, and you know what? That’s just fine brother.

FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Home Invasion: 13 year old vs Armed Gang

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Un chico de 13 años mató a uno de los 6 delincuentes que ingresaron a robar en la casa de un familiar, en la localidad bonaerrense de Francisco Alvarez. (TELAM)

Home invasion in Moreno, Buneos Aires leaves one dead.

The typical Argentine nightmare: Mom arrives home and a gang of criminals force their way in. At least 5 men, wearing body armor labelled “Police” and armed with SMG, shotguns and .45 pistols. They start beating the mom and her son, 11 year old Nicolas. The other son, 13 year old Lucas, is inside the house in one of the bedrooms. He sees that that they start beating his mom and little brother, asking where the money is. Lucas gets dad’s 9mm, with a round in the chamber, takes aim from the hallway and opens fire. Lucas shot one of the criminals twice in the armpit, killing him instantly. The rest of the gang escapes. One of them opens fire with a .45, the ricochet of one of the rounds wounding the younger child in the head but only cuts the scalp, doesn’t go through.
Now, the nightmare of this family just beings. Lucas doesn’t fully understand what he did, he’s receiving psychological support. The entire family is scared, worried about payback from the gang. It’s the 3rd time the family suffers a home invasion. They now have to sell the house and move to another town, maybe out of the province.
FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Michael Moore: Best Pro Trump Speech ever (not kidding)

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It’s just four minutes, just listen to it and comment below.

Please sit down if you are a Trump supporter before listening because I know several that have fainted after listening to it.
FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Brexit: leading banks set to pull out of UK early next year

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City of London banks

The UK is the leading exporter of financial services across the world and the financial capital of the EU. The UK’s financial services trade surplus of $97 billion in 2015 and it employs 2.2 million people.

Of course most of this is true thanks to the so-called “passporting rights” for members of the single market which allows UK-based banks to offer financial services to companies and individuals across the EU unimpeded. This will no longer be the case when UK leaves the EU. Britain’s biggest banks are preparing to relocate out of the UK in the first few months of 2017 amid growing fears over the impending Brexit negotiations, while smaller banks are making plans to get out before Christmas.

http://www.bbc.com/news/business-37743700

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/oct/22/leading-banks-set-to-pull-out-of-brexit-uk 

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

 

12 Important Tips to Survive Brexit

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Image result for poverty britain

I’m getting lots of emails and messages from readers in UK really worried about the ongoing situation. My experience in Argentina is actually pretty relevant, especially regarding inflation, devaluation and banking. My blog is packed full of information, use the tabs and search window. If you haven’t read them already, my books (The Modern Survival Manual, Bugging Out) will provide very valuable information. I’ll try covering more Brexit advice in future posts and videos in my youtube channel.
As for now, you need to understand the following:

1)More Poverty, more unemployment. Preparedness is mostly about getting ready for what is likely. Snowstorms happen every winter in certain areas, so you prepare for those. But sometimes preparedness is also about what’s possible, even if unlikely. If you would have told me just a year ago that the British Pound would perform worse than the Argentine Peso I would have told you to stop smoking crack, explain how bad that stuff is for your health. Today the Pound is the worst performing currency in the entire planet. This isn’t some anecdotic piece of news. This is staggering. Inflation will occur, people’s purchasing power will drop, imports will become more expensive, there will be less money, worse infrastructure, less investments, therefore less jobs. Basically a significant share of UK middle class will become poor and those that are already low middleclass/poor, well, you’re looking at a VERY tough situation ahead of you.

2) Inflation. With the worst depreciation in 31 years the consequences are just unavoidable. Prices will go up. They will go up A LOT. You don’t just lose 21% and just pretend nothing happened. I’ve seen it first hand and know very well what you will be seeing in the years to come. Chances are you wont hear much of a buzz in the news, and only certain media will report it. But you’ll notice it soon enough. Mark my words one day you’ll be leaving Sainsbury’s, Tesco or Asda, you’ll look at your trolly (Cart for Americans) and ask your husband or wife “dear, how many pounds did we just spend? 150?”. You’ll think “hey, that doesn’t look like 150 quid worth of grocery…”. Understand this, the media will try to hide it and marketing will try to do the same. Unless you check the net content they’ll trick you with their “new and improved” packaging. Fuel will be another issue, already going up in price.

Everything is linked and UK simply isnt much of an industrial country. If its not imported then it’s using imported parts or materials in its production. After years of being part of the EU, this was simple, cheap and straight forward for companies but not anymore.

3)Even worse medical care. The NHS was very bad already but believe me when I say it will get even worse. People already died of illnesses that other developed countries detected and treated in due time. It’s a disgrace to read time and again about people being sent home with a golf ball lump under their skin and be told its nothing by their GP. With NHS women hardly get an Pap Smear and even for women with a family history of breast cancer they just get check after 50… every three years. Shameful.

4)More Xenophobia and hate crime. One of the ugly sides of the Leave campaign was to subtly (and sometimes not so subtly) appeal to the racism and xenophobia some people have in UK, with hate crimes going up 57 to 147%. It’s amazing given that London is such a multicultural city but we’ve witnessed truly pathetic scenes such as Brit teen telling a Latino looking man to go back home (turns out the man was an American army veteran, living in Britain for more years than the teen has been alive). In many cases its just people harassing other just because of an accent or skin color. There’s this elder German women that lived in UK for over 20 years, all of a sudden being told by her neighbours to go back to her country.

The survival lesson is: If you’re not white, if you’re and expat living there or just happen to have an accent, you will be less welcomed in UK today that you would have been just a few months ago and it will get worse. Official stats are showing just this, and its really no surprise because it is in fact a government policy implemented years ago to make the country less appealing for immigrants. If this happens to be your case, I’d say it’s a big factor to take into consideration. Think if you’re willing to put up with it, if you’re willing to have your family, maybe your children suffer it as well.

5)Media censorship. Its already quite noticeable, the BBC of course but most British mainstream media are heavily controlled and report little actual news. You need to understand this, understand that there’s a political guideline which they follow, the way they report news and even which news even gets reported. The Guardian and Independent seem to be more likely to report the negative news which other official or non official but government aligned agencies are likely to avoid.

When it comes to news, you just need to understand who is reporting it, who owns the given media corporation and what their interests are.

What to do:

1.buy yourself a gun. NOW

Firearms are already heavily restricted in UK and this will only get worse after Brexit. The UK has been asking for tougher gun laws and nearly all other EU countries have more permissible ones, allowing handguns and semi auto rifles in most cases.

The reasons for owning a firearm are numerous, and indeed you just don’t know what may happen one day. What I do know, without a shadow of a doubt, is that if the day ever comes and you do need a gun, you won’t have time to wait for several weeks. You will need it right then and there. With the chances of tighter regulations plus the likeliness of post Brexit social unrest, I can only recommend getting yourself a shotgun, a quality semi automatic one would be my preferred choice. Get your Firearm Certificate or shotgun licence, join a club and practice. Ideally you would join a club and get involved in shotgun practical shooting, which is the closest you can get to defensive shooting skills in UK. Listen, as of today its simple and straightforward enough. Tomorrow it may not be. This would be my number one priority if living in UK right now.

2.Open a bank account offshore while you still can.

Now this is something I was told about in Deutsche Bank here in Spain, just today. UK is now considered a “high risk” country for money laundering, along with several third world countries. You can imagine how ridiculous this seemed and I said so to the clerk. The bank lady agreed, but she said that since they are leaving the EU they understand there’s a much higher chance that, as of right now, some people from UK would try to open accounts abroad for money laundering. In any case, as of today you should be able to find a bank in an EU country other than UK to open an account. Do it while you can. This is a key asset to have.

3.Buy Euros. NOW.

The Pound keeps dropping like a rock and this WILL NOT IMPROVE. You are losing money, and right now you can do something about it, you still have the option to go to any bank and get as many Euros as you can. From now on until article 50 is triggered it’s a no brainer. Some will hold until the last minute refusing to accept article 50 will be effectively triggered. It will, and when it does you’ll see the pound drop even further. If you have most of your money in Euros, it will be a lot less painful. If you opened your account abroad as recommended, you can easily send some of your savings there in Euros, move your money back and forth as needed.

4.Stock up food and medical supplies

I cannot emphasize this enough and it involves preparedness on several levels. First and obvious enough, food will get more expensive. They will try to hide it as much as they can but it’s unavoidable. If there’s shortages, problems with supply (Britain is an island after all) having a supply of food stocked is essential. If you lose your job, a stash of food will give you some peace of mind. You’re going to eat anyway. Remember to store what you eat. Try sticking to shelf stable food and canned produce. Rice, beans, dry pasta, properly stored they will last for years. Canned sausages are pretty common. Canned beans are a waste of money in my opinion but some people like it. Try them out now, see what you like and stock up.

5.Thousands in UK are already applying for Irish citizenship

This would allow them to stay in the EU, travel, work and study in EU in spite of the UK leaving. Having seen this first hand, if this is an option you want to do this ASAP. Soon enough waiting periods will increase considerably and as always you just never know if new restrictions are implemented eventually. Being an island with a bunch of countries right in front of you means you have options, but only if you have the right to work, study and reside there. I believe many folks just took that for granted and don’t fully understand how much their options will be reduced once that right is lost. Again, If I was in UK and had the option to apply for Irish or other EU country citizenship, I would do it immediately.

6.Keep a cash stash, including Euros and precious metals.

These are complicated times. You are looking at a period of instability and uncertainty in which problems with the banking system and cash availability are a possibility. As the pound keeps devaluating so does your savings. In my case I have some GBP in my cash stash, just in case. I felt the sting of seeing it lose value to the Euro. I can only imagine how much worse it would have hurt if all of my savings where in such currency.

My standard recommendation is to have at least a month worth of expenses in cash, just in case. In the case of UK, I would go for at least two months, and you probably want at least half of that saved in Euros. There’s little doubt that the pound will keep dropping.

Silver is another asset to consider. UK has Britannia silver and gold bullion. I’d look into setting aside some as insurance for a worst case scenario. Junk silver is also an option with pre 1920 British coins being sterling silver (92.5% silver) and pre 1947 coins being 50% silver.

Check with your insurance company to see how much it covers worth of cash, bullion and antiques & collectibles (junk silver) In many cases the amount of cash covered is pretty low but it can be increased if you have other forms of wealth which is yet another reason for having them.

7.Try staying healthy and get private medical cover.

The NHS being what it is its important to avoid it as much as you can. Stay slim, fit and healthy. If you do this you’re already avoiding a fair share of medical complications. If you don’t have private medical, I would recommend getting at least their basic plan. UK is moving towards private medical care and if you happen to need it I at least believe its money well spent. The NHS will not cure, they will just distract you until you die.

Staying healthy also means your medical premiums will be much lower, saving you money.

These are complicated times. Some of the problems ahead are obvious and unavoidable, the impact of others may be reduced with good policies but still common sense preparation is highly recommended.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

UK no longer a great place to live

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Message:

Hi Fernando, I have been reading your blog and books for quite some time now. They have been a great source of information and have helped me to take a different view on many important issues. Thanks for your insight into your experiences. This is what has prompted me to contact you today. From reading both your books I have started to see some worrying trends here in Scotland (UK) where I currently live.

Despite what the media say we are seeing a sharp rise in the price of essentials like food, fuel, clothing and petrol. There are a lot of people out of work and there are hardly any jobs, those who do have jobs are having things like sick leave changed to being unpaid from paid, and there are much less staff to do more work and for longer hours with no extra pay. The media (mainstream) are being censored more now than ever. We are one of the most watched countries in the world yet we are told we are still at imminent danger of a terrorist attack. Our children are being taught terror drills in school. We are now at a point where if you speak your mind too much your sanity is questioned and you are placed in a mental health facility for treatment. This is especially true if you happen to be questioning government, police, courts etc. Our wages continue to stay at the rate they have been for years and yet everything we rely on continues to rise. Banks have made it near impossible to get a mortgage for the average person, and there seems to be more and more security to take out your cash. The other thing I’ve noticed is shortages of items like baby milk. The media claim this is because people are buying bulk to send to China, we are now limited to buying only 2 cans at a time.

Having read your books there seems to be some similarities here. The news this morning claims it’s set to get worse as fuel is to go up another 5p per litre by the end of this month and food and clothing are to increase in price again. Also things we used to get on the NHS at our GPS etc are now no longer available for example I called for an appointment for a general health check after having a baby 6 weeks ago, they told me that service no longer exists due to cutbacks. My friend was recently declined by GP to check blood pressure (he has heart issues) they told him they no longer offer that service its too costly to keep checking everyone. Do you think the people in Scotland and the rest of the UK could be facing financial collapse?. What advice would you give me at this time?. What are the best things I cando at this moment to help myself and my family? (I have 5 young children). Any advice is greatly appreciated.

Kind Regards

Ashley

.

Hello Ashley,

Thanks for your email. I’m sorry to hear about the ongoing situation in UK. I do know it’s pretty complicated and in all honesty its about to get worse. There’s just no other way. If there’s one thing I know it’s the calamities high inflation brings with it. If your currency drops 10%, 20% or more… there’s just no way around it, the standard of living for most of the population will drop accordingly. More middle class will become poor and those that were already struggling will fare significantly worse.

I was just working on an article regarding advice for post Brexit UK. My books (“The Modern Survival Manual” and “Bugging Out and Relocating”) have information which will come in handy no doubt, keeping in mind the different context there are still similarities as you have noticed. You are already seeing some similarities like the cuts of spending and therefore worse healthcare, inflation, “new and improved” items and products getting smaller while going up in price and the media covering it all up.

For now let me just say this. Yes, I think UK will go through some very complicated times to say the least, as you are already noticing. I’ll try finishing the article and posting it tomorrow, with some advice for you and other readers living there.

Kind regards,

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

5 Apocalyptic Realities In A Country That’s Out Of Food

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Hi Fernando,

The link below relates to an article regarding the current food crisis in Venezuela.

http://www.cracked.com/personal-experiences-2379-my-mango-tree-could-kill-me-life-when-food-runs-out.html

It is a very interesting read.

Have a good day.

-Kevin

.

Thanks, very interesting read.

Some thoughts I’d like to point out:

1)Even a simple fruit tree can be a key asset with food supplies running so low.

2)You can get attacked over a fruit tree.

3) When points one and two are about to become a reality, it means you should have left the God forsaken place a LONG time ago.

4) People are starving while a loaf of bread costs 0.50USD. The problem is that due to hyperinflation, a single dollar is a fortune and few can afford those prices. This is how the rich in Venezuela feast in country clubs while the rest, poor and former middle class, starve.

5) Properly arm yourself NOW. You don’t want to be the guy defending his mango tree (let alone his life) with a crossbow pistol.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Best Concealed Carry Glock for California?

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In the golden state of California, I’m only allowed 10 rd capacity magazines. Would you still go with a 9mm or 40sw? If the latter, which model: full size, compact or sub compact?

A-

Its no secret that I greatly favour Glocks. There’re lots of guns out there but none of the is like the Glock. I’m also not the only guy that thinks this way. Most firearms experts that I consider worth listening to will repeat the same thing.

Now, which Glock should we go for.

My standard response is get a Glock 17 or if you want something a bit smaller a Glock 19 both in 9mm of course.

Listen, you just need a 9mm. It ubiquitous, it just works, bot accurate and with moderate recoil. With quality JHP ammo it will get the job done for defense. Cheap 9mm means you can easily afford the few hundred rounds needed to learn basic gun handling. More importantly, you can afford the thousands of rounds need to acquire proper gun fighting skills.

Having said this, personally what would I carry in such a situation?

A Glock 32. 357 SIG. It’s the same size as the Glock 19, meaning compact but not ridiculously compact that it impairs proper gun operation. If I’m limited to 10 rounds, then yes, I certainly want the most bang per rounds. One of the rules of gunfighting is to carry the most powerful caliber you can realistically shoot fast and accurately. At least in my case, I can shoot 357SIG as if I shot hot military 9mm. Without such restriction I would go for my Glock 31, 15+1 rounds of 357SIG in a gun similar to the Glock 17. That’s hard to beat in my opinion. Some folks will prefer 45 ACP, even 10mm and both are great choices. For me though, Id go with 10 rounds of 357SIG in a Glock 32 if that was the limitation presented with.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Hurricane Matthew: Ready to Bug Out?

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Hurricane Matthew: Evacuations begin as deadly storm nears

If it’s necessary to do so, don’t wait until the last minute. Mandatory evacuations are already being ordered for residents of Merritt Island and other barrier islands. Residents were ordered to leave starting 3 p.m. Wednesday.

Lines at gas stations are already long, but they will be worse tomorrow. Hopefully you already have gas stored.

If you need to get any last minute preps, better do it now. Ready.gov has some good tips to follow.

Stay safe folks!

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

5 Tips: How to (not) run over BLM protesters

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Image result for blm protest run over

As America keeps changing into whatever it has been becoming during these last few years, incidents like the ones seen recently are likely to become more common. People rarely find themselves in this kind of volatile, extraordinary circumstances and often don’t know how to react. I’ve been in them more than I care to remember so what I say comes directly from years of experience, at times coming across riots, protests and especially roadblocks on daily basis, some of them more violent than others.

This is the advice I have for you.

  • Lives DO matter.

Do NOT run over people. I’m not saying this as a disclaimer alone, I really do mean it. I fully understand how sensitive people are these days, the politics, the racial tension. Still, every single life is precious in its own way and no car, no paint job is worth a human life. I’m tired of reading about folks in the forums joking about running over BLM or whatever other activist of any kind, no matter how much you may disagree with them or not. I doubt many of them have run over people before. I can tell you one thing though: Hitting an innocent person with your car is one of the most horrible feelings you can experience. The only time I felt worse was when my then three year old son nearly died in a hospital bed. It’s that bad. People say taking any life will cause endless nightmares. I don’t know about that because it is different when some scumbag is actively trying to kill you, its you or him in which case I have no regrets. I do know that believing you just killed a person that you know wasn’t trying to kill you back messes you up. Unless you are a monster, no good person wants to carry that weight.

  • Stay informed and avoid whenever possible.

In my case it became somewhat of a daily morning ritual. I would turn on the TV during breakfast so as to know what roads or parts of town to avoid before I hit the road. At times it was just easier to use public transportation, but its not always an option and its not always safer. If I was taking my car I would turn on the radio to listen to the news in case new roadblocks were popping up while driving. In some countries you have Apps that inform you about them too.

If you know there’s trouble, avoid it at all cost. Not only are you risking getting stuck for hours, you risk getting attacked and mugged as well. It just isnt worth it so take an alternative route. I didn’t use one back then, especially because I knew most of the city like the palm of my hand but get comfortable with your GPS.

If you happen to see a roadblock forming right in front of you, act fast. Sometimes you can drive around them quickly before they close in, sometimes you can make a quick U turn and get the hell out of there. In those moments, a second too late makes all the difference between making it home in 5 minutes or getting stuck there for hours, or worse. An agile vehicle is great for such situations. I learned to appreciate SUVs for their better than sedan ground clearance and off road capability. I don’t need to cross the nearest national park off road with it. But if I can go off the road to avoid the roadblock for a bit or go over a sidewalk or boulevard to do so, then yes I can appreciate that. This is why my daily driver is a Honda CR-V.

  • Remain calm and stay in the vehicle.

It is easy to get scared, its easy to get angry. In both cases you’ll just make it worse. If you are scared you may panic, floor the pedal and run over a bunch of people. If you get angry you may get out of the car to confront the people blocking your way. This is a very typical reaction and one you certainly would regret. You start thinking about your rights being just as important as theirs. You think about the wasted time, about wanting to get home after a long day, about why can’t you move around like the free person that you are. You get out of the car and you are surrounded and outnumbered. It only takes one or two cowards to strike you from behind, crowd dynamics say you’re likely to get stomped on once you fall, maybe beaten to death. If you are carrying you may start shooting. Either way we go back full circle: Just don’t get out of the vehicle.

  • Move slowly.

Don’t floor it, don’t speed up, just keep moving slowly. Its easy to get nervous with all the screaming, with hands and maybe sticks hitting your car. Stay cool, keep moving slowly. This one time I had people start pushing and rocking the car as I made it through the crowd. It felt like being in a boat. Sometimes there so many people you can’t even see the road, see if your about to hit the curb. You have to focus on getting out of there, know where you’re going and keep moving slowly, at walking speed.

  • Do NOT stop. Whatever you do, when surrounded by protesters and otherwise angry people, do not stop. Especially if they block your view as in the photo above, keep moving.  If you stop you just encourage them to pile up in front of your car. They may climb on top of it. Its easier for them to break your windows, open doors and even pull you out. The responsible citizen will keep driving at a very slow speed doing his best to slowly push people but no one can ask of you to stay in a place where your life may be at risk. Even if you accidentally hit or run over someone keep driving. If you get out to check on the protester you hit there’s a good chance you’ll get attacked and in such number your life is clearly at risk. Just keep driving slowly, get yourself to a safe area to ensure your safety and then contact the authorities to let them know what just happened.

Riots and roadblocks can be dangerous and they certainly are stressful. Hopefully you’ll never have to deal with one but if you do these five tips will help you get through it.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

What’s Wrong with 1911 for Survival?

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I love how consistent you have been over the years advising your readers to rely on the Glock. I agree with your assessment concerning reliability/durability, availability, weight, etc. All things considered the Glock is simply the right answer. I’ve got a 1911 and have used that design ever since I was 12 years old, but it just shows a lack of understanding for someone to recommend the 1911 to someone who is new to firearms and needs something simple and reliable. Just knowing what “the extractor tension test” means is enough proof that the 1911 is for the dedicated hobbyist and not for the beginners first pistol. I feel bad for people who are new to firearms, need one, and are fed tons of well meaning but convoluted information about what is “best” from so called “experts” who have confused their personal hobby with someone else’s practical needs. Indeed you are correct: the answer is simple for the beginner; the answer is Glock 19.

-Charles

My first serious gun was a Norinco 1911. At the time internet was still pretty new and there simply wasn’t the massive amount of information that is available today. Back in those days if you wanted to learn about something you bought these things called “magazines” (for you kids, its like a website or blog, but printed in paper every month or so) Guns & Ammo Magazine said the Norinco 1911 was great for a “street custom” and that’s exactly what I did. I took a perfectly functional 1911 that never had a hiccup and spent almost a thousand dollars worth of dual tone finish, hammer, sights, trigger, springs, guide rod, walnut grips, fancy torx screws, brand name magazines, etc. After enough messing around I managed to end up with a gun that jammed more often. Cutting a couple loops from the new recoil spring helped greatly. Going back to the original guide rod solved the problem completely. At the end of the day the only thing that made a real difference was the nicer sights I installed. The rest was mostly cosmetic. Here it is in all its glory:

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In my case as well, for years this was the only handgun I used. I learned to love the 1911. Learned to shoot it, clean it, repair it.

But a Glock it is not, Most of the parts required careful hand fitting. Every spare part in the Glock just drops into place. Even then the 1911 is less reliable and more sensitive than the Glock. It’s heavier, holds less rounds and in those 500-1000 round weekend classes you’ll get cut and scrapped by every single sharp edge of the gun. You shoot slower with the single stack 1911, need to reload more often and unless you have a big magwell its harder to reload too compared to that huge gap where you slap Glock magazines in.

You mention Glock 19s for beginners and that is true, every single person I taught how to shoot for the first time they all shot better with Glocks. But that doesn’t mean its not a gun for elite shooters too. In fact Navy SEALs recently adopted that same Glock 19 as their sidearm. Most world class professional shooters from the tactical community that I know of also use one kind of Glock or another, mostly 19 and 17.

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Gun nuts, we love all kind of guns. Shoot as many as you can, collect tons of them, but when it comes to your sidearm, make sure it’s a Glock.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Thermos cooking Rice and Lentils

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Thermos cooking has been around since they were first introduced but if you aren’t familiar with the concept and if you haven’t tried it out then keep on reading and check the video below.

Thermos cooking is one of those great survival tips. Its simple, it can be done with common objects like a thermos found in most households, its probably the most fuel efficient way of cooking and it addresses a key survival problem: Preparing food when the grid is down. We learned about making a simple can stove with the Supercat stove video. Still, boiling water and cooking food are two different things. Cooking requires more time and (more important) more fuel. Well, you don’t need to worry about that with thermos cooking.

Simply preheat the thermos with a bit of boiling water, remove it, introduce the food (think rice, pasta, lentils) and fill it up with four parts of water for each part of food. Tighten the cap, shake a bit and that’s it. Let it sit for some time. For rice and lentils it can be 8 to 10 hours. For pasta 15-20 minutes will probably do. You’ll need to experiment to see how much water you exactly need for each food and how long it takes to hydrate and cook properly. A good Thermos makes a difference. The ones I used were rated for 12 hours and after 12 hours the water inside was still too hot to touch.

Here’s the video experimenting with rice and lentil Thermos cooking.

Here’s one of the best selling Thermos in Amazon in case you need to grab one for your kit.

Thermos Stainless King 24 Ounce Food Jar $24.99

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

List of Prices during the Aztec Empire

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I was discussing in a forum recently about the value of precious metals during precolonial times.

As you probably know, Aztecs used cocoa beans as currency. By today’s definition of currency, it wasn’t so much an actual currency as it was a valued consumable good. Still, it is true that it was used to trade for goods and services. The list of prices in cocoa beans makes it clear that even then, gold was still pretty valuable and expensive within its economy, with half a kilo of gold only being beaten by selling ones own children.

A 1545 list of commodity prices in Tlaxcala gives an idea of the purchasing value of cacao:

1 good turkey hen=100 cacao beans

1 turkey egg=3 cacao beans

1 fully ripe avocado=1 cacao bean

large strip of pine bark for kindling = 5 cacao beans

1 large tomato=1 cacao bean

pumpkin = 4 beans

5 long narrow green chiles = 1 cacao bean

small rabbit = 30 cacao beans

0.62kg gold statue = 250 beans

ones own child sells for about 600 cacao beans.

“ordinary” person’s yearly standard of living=4800 cacao beans

Quachtli (large white cotton cloaks)=60-240 cacao beans depending on quality/size.

Quachtli (cotton cloaks) where used as currency as well, used to pay for more expensive items along with copper axe-blades, or quills full of gold dust while cocoa beans were ‘the every day small change’.

1 x dugout canoe = 1 x quachtli

100 sheets of paper = 1 x quachtli

1 x gold lip plug = 25 x quachtli

1 x warrior’s costume and shield = about 64 x quachtli

1 x feather cloak = 100 x quachtli

1 x string of jade beads = 600 x quachtli

Cocoa beans where even counterfeited, like todays currency, making fake cocoa beans with wax, dirt and other beans.

Sources:

http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread574535/pg1

http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/maya/chocolate/beanz-meanz-money

There’s just no way around it. If anyone wants to own gold and silver, you either pay dearly for it or go find it, mine it and smelt it. All of this requires considerable labour, thus the status of scarce and precious.

2016 American Silver Eagle (1 oz) Five Coins Brilliant Uncirculated

2016 American Silver Eagle (1 oz) Five Coins Brilliant Uncirculated
If you’re just getting started gold and silver should be the least of your concerns. The basic gear and supplies mentioned here often. A Glock, a good rifle, emergency supplies and a respectable stockpile of food and water should be your main concern. In terms of wealth a stash of cash comes before precious metals too. But once that’s covered, if you want insurance against inflation or you just want a proven form a wealth storage, PM is worth considering.

Take care folks,

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

S&W M&P Reliability: Stick to Glocks

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Why do nearly all new pistols look like Glocks? Because they want to be one!

There’s a reason why 60% of law enforcement and I’d say 9 out of 10 true firearm experts chose Glock. It may not be perfect but it sure gets close and the simple truth is that no other firearm can claim the reliability, durability ease of use and downright ubiquity of the Glock pistol.

Tons of articles can be written about firearms but just trust me:

Carry and learn the Glock pistol. If you don’t know which one then pick the Glock19 9mm.

Other than that play, experiment and collect all other firearms in the planet if that makes you happy, but for dead serious business stick to what works best.

That is all folks.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Valuable Alternative Currency in Argentina

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Image result for argentina colapso 2001 pesoss trueque

Hello Ferfal, read your first book.  Fantastic!  Mucho Gracias.  Hope you and family are well and good.

Am reading some stuff by another author, Bonner.  He writes, talking about the economic crisis in your country in 2001,

“Argentines found themselves using radically different new forms of money. And the interesting part is that they weren’t rare gems or coins.  I’ll tell you what their number one currency became, and it wasn’t cash.

For example, this one small item you can buy at Walmart, or almost any department store, that during a crisis becomes an incredibly valuable currency for everyday goods. You may even have some in your home already.”

What do you think of this?  Hype or true?  Asking you, what WAS your number 1 and 2 currency right after the big crisis in 2001?

What do you think he’s talking about, the small item you can buy at Walmart?

Interesting stuff.  He thinks the same Crash is coming to Amerika and you won’t be able to get cash from the bank, etc.

I read your blogs all the time now.  You can publish this if you like.

Thanks and be well, be safe.

-Roy

Hello,

Thanks for your email. I’m glad you enjoyed my book The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse”. In it I explain how things went down and what worked (and didn’t) when the economy collapsed in my country.

For those that haven’t read it, and answering your questions:

1)During and after the December 2001 Economic Collapse the currency was and still is the Argentine Peso. The only problem is that it devaluated greatly all of a sudden. Before the collapse, it was artificially pegged to the US dollar at a 1:1 rate. One peso, one dollar. Of course this was impossible to sustain and very hard on the national industry. After the collapse it quickly devaluated, first to 1.4, then 2 and finally 3 pesos for 1 USD in just a matter of days. This means that in a few days the national currency lost 2/3 of its value. Today, the exchange rate is about 1:15. Whats important to understand for the average Joe, is that during those first few days suffering a devaluation of nearly 70% it means that everything becomes 70% more expensive. Keep in mind that the national industry had been all but destroyed and replaced with imports, imports that had to be paid in USD… Try closing your eyes for a second and imagine what life would be like if everything was 3x more expensive, if you had to live with 1/3 of your current wage. How would you cope? Just imagining it for a few minutes will give you a headache. Actually going through it is a living nightmare.

2)In spite of the devaluation de Argentine Peso remained the official currency and by all means the one used the most. I’m not familiar with the author you mention but I just have to disagree with this part “Argentines found themselves using radically different new forms of money.” As I said, the Argentine Peso remained the official and most used currency. The only other currency used pretty often was the USD, which was of course highly regarded because it kept its value as the Peso lost it. If you had stashed say 10.000 USD before the devaluation, you still had 10.000 USD, which was now worth 30.000 Argentine Pesos, but if you had those same 10K in pesos you just lost a lot of money. As devaluation went on day after day, the USD became of course more highly regarded and sought after.

3)The only other form of “money” I can think of was the coupons used in barter clubs which I describe in my book. These were nothing more than cheaply printed notes to be used in the different barter clubs. They never came close to replacing the Peso as currency and were always only good within its own barter club, therefore of limited acceptance. You have to understand that unemployment was spiralling out of control. People had nothing, not even devaluated pesos. For someone that had nothing and was looking to trade a skill, service or good, the barter coupon offers some degree of hope, a way of procuring other needed goods or services. In spite of this, the peso was much preferred over coupons.

4) The Argentine Peso, the USD as a safe haven and as a last resort for unemployed, desperate people, coupons used in barter clubs. These where the only currencies used. Gold and silver did keep their value of course, but it was never used as an alternative currency even if having you savings out of the bank in precious metals would have been a life saver at the time. In all honesty having it in USD cash would have been the best choice, given that when selling PM you usually lose much more money given premiums, etc.

But let me makes this absolutely clear: There was no object, nothing you can buy in any Walmart that was ever used in Argentina as “currency” during that time. Not matches, lighters, canned food, none of the common barter fantasy stuff. If you had the crystal ball or the time machine what you did was go back in time, get your money out of the bank in USD cash. That was the ideal thing to do. If USA ever finds itself in such a situation, then naturally the USD would NOT be a safe haven therefore in that case you would travel in your time machine, get all your money out of the bank and buy precious metals before the USD collapses.

5) “What do you think he’s talking about, the small item you can buy at Walmart?” I honestly don’t know. All I know is that no small item was used in place of the Peso or USD. Those two where the only forms of currency widely accepted, with the USD being the most prized one given the constant devaluation of the peso. No small item sold in Walmart was ever used as currency and most definitely not “incredibly valuable currency for everyday goods”. It does sound like one of those marketing gimmicks where you are given some cool guy tip that blows your mind if you buy whatever product is being sold or if you sign up for something, sometimes just to get your email. Again, no common use product was even close to being an alternative currency in any way in Argentina during that time and years after that.

My only advice in this regard is that if you want to prepare for an Argentine-like event in USA is to first have at least a months worth of expenses in cash, USD, and then have whatever you want to protect from devaluation in precious metals which simply wont be touched by the devaluation of the Federal Reserve notes.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Real-World Bugging Out and Bug Out Locations

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I’d like to address some misconceptions regarding a topic that, while very often talked about but rarely needed to be put to practice, it involves an extreme kind of worst case scenario where we basically lose our home, permanently or for a given period of time. This can be very challenging, and unfortunately it happens more often than we’d think so its important to get real bugging out right.

First, you need to understand what bugging out means, separate fantasy from reality. People that have bugged out for real they do it because there’s no other option left. The default reaction to disasters isn’t to run to the hills, or your house in the woods, or your house in Poland. The default reaction is to stay put. That’s what most official broadcasts recommend in times of crisis and it is in fact the most sound advice unless evacuation orders are specifically enforced. This means that you bug out when staying is no longer an option, not because you don’t like the current president or because Mc Donalds just ran out of chicken nuggets. Your house is burning down, got destroyed by a quake and you barely made it out alive, a wildfire will be destroying your house in a matter of minutes, or a flood. Forces have invaded or you just killed a bunch of would-be home invaders and now the family of those you killed is after you. All of these actually happen and they are the kind of situation that forces you out of your house.

Second, you just can’t already live in a bug out location. This is key, and a common fail of understanding the concept of what bug out location means. Ask all those survivalists living in their Bug Out Locations in Oregon what did they do when the wildfires destroyed their BOL. Did they have to bug out of their bug out locations then? Point is, if youre already living in it, it becomes you place of residence and you need to figure out another BOL.

Bugging out and having a bug out location is not about buying property (doesnt have to be) and its not about having fancy 4×4 vehicles. In fact for bugging out reliability and fuel efficiency are by far more important than off road capability, even if some off road capability can be an asset sometimes and even essential in certain extreme terrains. For 99.9999% of the population though, you just need a car that runs and hopefully balances well load capacity with how many miles it covers per gallon.

As for bug out locations. If you have several properties chances are you are renting them, therefore not immediately available. Its nice to have a holyday home or cabin in the woods to go during weekends to change the scenery, and it can be a valuable asset in specific scenarios, but this doesn’t mean buying a second house is the only way to go. In fact its not even the most practical one. Having friends or family that can take you in during a time of need, making plans with like-minded people and setting mutual support agreements isnt nearly as expensive.

FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Fantastic Video: Everything you need to know about the Glock Pistol

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Youtube is packed full of “experts” that truly know very little about the topic they address. Even the few good shooters you see, they are rarely more than that. In this case we’re talking about a real firearms expert, a true scholar if you will.

This is without a doubt the best, most informative video about Glocks that I’ve ever seen and I hope it convinces you that it is by far the most adequate handgun for survival purposes bar none.

The video is a bit long but for those of us that value good information it’s worth a thousand two minute videos that don’t say much. Make sure to check his other videos too. I liked the one about the Beretta M9 as well.

Take care folks.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

What news sources can you trust?

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Hi Fernando, love your book and blog. What sources of news do you trust and follow for international and US news?  Same question for economic information. Thanks  -Rick

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Hi Rick. Thanks, glad you liked my book.

I try to read several news outlets so as to gather information as objectively as possible. Every news source has its own agenda, some more noticeable and more extremist than others. This chart gives you an idea of what to expect.

Pew political charts

http://www.businessinsider.com/here-are-the-most-and-least-trusted-news-outlets-in-america-2014-10

Usually I start with a news widget in my cell phone that shows me headlines from various outlets including CNN, AP, CBS, Slate, Fox and Yahoo News just to mention some.

In general I balance CNN, BBC, Fox, but also check RT and Al Jazeera along with local media sources from wherever it is that I am. I can’t say I trust much any of them. It’s the collection of them which I try to look through to learn the truth of whats going on out there.

You have to know what to expect from each one, know their bias. That way its easier to distil the actual news.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Small rural USA town faces “total collapse”

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A display window at the Siege Museum in Petersburg. The museum, which had been popular with Civil War buffs, is closed and in need of expensive repairs. But work has been put on hold because of the city’s severe budget woes. The municipality south of Richmond is teetering on insolvency.

Message:
I saw this article pop up today and thought you’d might be interested.
A small town in the USA state of Virginia had the main job creator
move out 30 years ago, so the government basically ran on the economic
equivalent of pixie dust and prayers. Now, it’s defaulted on all its
loans, and the government will literally cease to exist within a
month. The only hope, a very slim hope, is that the new city manager’s
drastic plan will buy enough time.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/city-on-the-brink-petersburg-can%e2%80%99t-pay-its-bills-and-time-is-running-out/ar-AAiwmaD?li=BBnbfcL&ocid=mailsignout

And this isn’t unique-Maywood, California, an aging suburb of Los
Angeles originally built to house workers for a massive auto factory
that closed down in the 1970s, had its government cease to exist a
couple years ago, leaving Mexican gangs as the de facto government.
And there are others

Before Collaspe

.

Thanks for the link BC. Spending more than you can afford is never a good idea.

I talked about this many times before. It is pretty typical as the social degradation continues to see small towns like these take a hit. Lots of ghost towns around, some pretty large.

Its more important than ever for communities to work together if they expect to survive.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

 

The Men who Crashed the World

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Folks, you probably saw this video before but if not its highly recommended.

Pay particular attention to minute 12 of the video, explaining the competition between NY and London. This actually explains well, years before it actually went down, why Brexit took place: So that the “city” can escape the EU regulators.

Also, on minute 27:20. I find it interesting how events played out in relation to Europe-USA: It wasn’t that Europe went down because USA did, Europe was actually the canary in the mine. I believe that to be true today as well.

Make time to watch this other clip too. Its very informative, explains the scam that is the current economic system. Its fun too. Maybe something teenagers would watch while learning very important information regarding how the world works.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Impeachment in Brazil: Latin America is running out of Populists.

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And it cant happen fast enough. I’m honestly sick of the lot.

Dilma Rousseff was officially removed from office today. In the early 60s, Rousseff participated in the militant activities of the Comando de Libertação Nacional—COLINA (National Liberation Command) and advocated Marxist politics. She claims to have had a change of heart, going from Marxism to pragmatic capitalism. By this she means she’s the kind of Marxist that will play ball with the elite if that means that the redistribution mostly goes towards her own bank account.

First Cristina Kirchner, now Dilma and that clown in Venezuela Maduro will follow shortly.

Things are shaping up nicely in Latin America after a few dreadful decades.

Beware of Populism

Populism is a political sickness, a disease. I hails from both left and right, often in extreme sides of the political spectrum since there is where it festers best given that it needs fanaticism and lack of rational and critical thinking to survive. The Populist leader is always charismatic in his own way. Populists tend to shout. A lot. Moderation and dialogue is not their thing. Dialogue upsets them. They get their audiences engaged and their political agenda will be all about blaming those on the other side of the political spectrum and assure you that the only way to fight such a powerful enemy (Populists cant think in terms of political adversaries) is to concentrate as much power as possible on his own person. He’s the messiah, he’s the only possible saviour. A Populist will spend very little time talking about the people working with him and presenting them as individuals with their own ideas and potential. The Populist rather thinks in terms of people that work FOR him, not WITH him, as in him being equal among others working for the people they are supposed to represent. The people he represents, public resources and funds, it all belongs to him in his mind. The Populist doesn’t even consider the possibility of working with political adversaries for the good of the people. That’s simply unthinkable for him. The Populist is essentially a corrupt individual, capable of everything in order to care for what matters the most in his vision of the world: Himself.

FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Freedom in the 50 States

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Ferfal,

Enjoy and thanks for your great weekly advice.
-Bill
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Thanks!

That’s pretty interesting information. It’s also well presented and easy to navigate.

I did a good amount of research for my second book “Bugging Out & Relocating” and the same best ranking States keep coming up.

New Hampshire is usually top 5 in key categories and its logical to see it do well here as well.

I think anyone considering relocating within USA should take a good long look at this map and data. The factors used to score freedom directly affect quality of life.
FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Coup d’état in Argentina likely?: Yes.

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Hello Fernando:
I have read your work for quite some time. You have given me a lot of ideas over the past couple years on my attempt to go “Galt” and I thank you.
You are the only person at the moment that I could think of to answer a really bizarre question, is Argentina in the midst of a coup?
Background:
My wife’s family is from Argentina. She has an aunt visiting from B.A. who phoned home to check on the dog and a neighbour told her that there was a possible coup taking place…..
I have not seen or heard anything anywhere, but then again propaganda being what it is today….what would one expect?
I understand this email is coming from out of nowhere, and completely understand if you wish to ignore it. But if you are able to confirm or deny you will keep my wife’s aunt from life support ( and me supporting her for the rest of my life). Please – no need to publish any of this in your blog. —- unless you think it fits a discussion/narrative on propaganda.
Cheers.
Edward
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Hello Edward,
Thanks for your email. Actually, yes, your question is pretty accurate.
Coups aren’t that rare in Argentina. A coup d’état literally mean “blow of state”. In December 2001, it is well known that while the social agitation was very real and people were indeed angry, Peronist leaders were the ones that gave the situation that extra push. President Fernando de la Rúa sure lacked the political skills to keep the country under control but the various Peronist governors and leaders across Buenos Aires were the ones that allowed the looting to get out of control forcing the president to resign.
It’s actually the same populist and nationalist politicians which are attempting the same thing now, most of them aligned with the previous Kirchner government. I cannot emphasize enough how important it is to never EVER give up reason, logic and sensible debate to extremist nationalist and populist ideas no matter how good they may seem to some. You cannot expect anything good to come out of someone you already know is corrupt and lacks any kind of moral compass.
Right now we have Mauricio Macri for president. In spite of his flaws, he’s by far the best president we’ve had since the return of democracy after the last military junta.
Your aunt’s neighbour is right. They are trying to get rid of him. They will try to either kill him or overthrow him. The thing is, killing him would leave his sidekick vice president Gabriela Michetti in charge, and she would continue his work. Now if they manage to overthrow him along with his entire political party and everyone associated to it, then the corrupt Peronists can take control of the country again. The main objective here is pretty simple. It’s a matter of survival. Former president Cristina Kirchner is against the ropes. Every day a new offshore account is found, another of her dogs is caught with gym bags full of cash, even her daughter was caught with 9 millions USD in cash in a safe deposit box. We’re talking billions of dollars here that she stole through different channels. Every day she’s closer to going to jail. There’s even accusations of treason given her dealings with Iran. If she doesn’t manage to overthrow Macri she will go to jail along with her two children and accomplices. This is no secret though and most main media groups in the country are already connecting the dots and showing how indeed there is a deliberate plan to create instability among the population and question the legitimacy of the government. I doubt they will be successful, mostly because the cat is out of the bag and the population knows this. They know what they are trying to do. Still, the may manage to do it if the government doesn’t stop the operation against them in time. December is usually the hottest month in Argentina, both weather and political wise. Most episodes of political violence occur during the summer holyday of November and December.
Who knows. All I know is that I cant wait to see the Kirchners and their accomplices rotting in jail.
FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

British Pound beats Argentine Peso for Worst currency of 2016

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maxresdefault

Never in a millions years would I have thought I would end up writing that headline one day but there it is.

The British pound has beaten Argentina’s peso to a title nobody wants: the world’s worst performing currency.

Yes, The British Pound is the worst performing currency for 2016, doing worse so far this year than any other major currency. That means it’s even worse than Argentina’s peso, which so far this year is down 11.7% against the dollar. Since voting to leave the European Union the pound has plunged 14% against the U.S. dollar. It’s down about 12% since the start of the year, and is trading at its lowest level since 1985.

If this doesn’t make your spider sense tingle I don’t know what will. People in developed countries just do not understand what it means for a currency to devaluate 5% ,  let alone 10 or 15%. I don’t blame them. It just isnt that common in 1st world countries. I on the other hand know exactly what it means.

There’s no free ride folks. This has devastating consequences. Its not a matter of if, the devaluation already happened and people will pay for it. They will pay it at the grocery store, older people will pay it with their pensions. For each point of devaluation, a proportional number of middle class people fall into poverty.

For those that are about to learn a lot of this the hard way, get my book  “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” so as to minimize the blow as much as possible and get ready for what’s coming.

FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Zero Tolerance ZT0561: The Beauty and the Beast

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zt0561

ZT Zero Tolerance 0561 Hinderer Collaboration Dark Earth Scale Folder

The Zero Tolerance 0560/0561 is a knife that combines great materials, American craftsmanship and an outstanding esthetical design (fancy words for pretty).

And pretty it sure is. Maybe the prettiest folder ever made. In my opinion even more so than Rick Hinderers Xm-18 which inspired it. People will say they like the Elmax steel (more on that later) or that they appreciate Rick Hinderer’s design, based on his experiences in both rescue and firefighting. As someone with decades of experience with knives, using them, buying them and yes, even making them and reading books specifically about knives I can tell you this: Looks is what catches the attention of 99.9% of buyers when they first see a knife, and this is particularly true about the ZT0560. Very few folders have such eye-pleasing lines, proportions, colours and texture.

Is it all about looks though? Of course not.

The design is sound. The 3D machined titanium scale is very solid and comfortable, providing a good frame lock. By the way, if its not locking solid and disengages when lightly smacking the spine of the blade then send it back for replacement because its not supposed to do that. They need to tighten the locking bar or maybe address the contact surface of the bar. The Lock Bar Stabilizer prevents the accidental over travel of the lock bar during closing of the knife. The steel insert in the lock bar prevents both the sticking of the lock bar due to titanium-steel contact. It also means it wont wear down nearly as much after years of hard use. If it gets used that much, which is unlikely, its just a matter of replacing the insert. Steel is premium Bohler-Uddeholm ELMAX steel with extremely high wear and corrosion resistance. This super steel is stainless but acts like carbon steel allowing relatively easy sharpening in spite of its outstanding edge retention ability, which sometimes comes at the cost of much more work needed for sharpening. The blade geometry is a wide, drop point shape. Thick, but pretty classic. The bevel angle is pretty steep, which makes sense for a work knife although a more narrow bevel should be put in it to take full advantage of the high quality steel. This will come at a cost though, super steel or not, a more narrow angle means less steel behind the edge. Mess with this only if you know very well what you are doing and intent to use the knife for cutting and carving in softer materials. Otherwise, leave it as it is. There nothing wrong with it.

The blade has thumb studs but its clearly intended to be used as a flipper. My knife came with an unusually strong detent. After flipping it about a thousand times its just now starting to let go enough and feeling comfortable to deploy. So yes, a break in period makes it better. The squeaking sound is also gone now. After that, the knife opens smoothly thanks to the KVT ball-bearing opening system. I’m still using the first interphalangeal joint in my index finger rather than the pad for stronger deployment of the flipper.

zt05612

The ZT0561/0560 has a four position deep pocket carry clip. Scales are machined titanium on one side and G10 on the other.

The design, while pretty, is not perfect. For example the thumb studs are all but useless for opening the knife. ZT says they aren’t intended to be used, rather worth as a blade stop when the knife is opened, the studs resting on the scales. If you still do use it, the studs easily catch the flesh of your finger pad. This also happens with the jimping on the flipper and the web of your hand between the index and thumb(why put jimping there at all?) Clearly, flipping is the intended method of use. The G10 scales have some sharp edges. These can be easily fixed with some sand paper, same thing for the (again) jimping that is a tad too aggressive in the handle. Although its easy enough to fix, you shouldn’t have to do any of this on a +USD200 knife.

Finally, maybe the thing that bothers me the most but doesn’t seem to be bothering others: The KVT ball-bearing opening system. Yes, its supposed to be super smooth but with the strong locking bar that slows it anyway I just don’t see the point vs traditional washers. You don’t really gain anything over correctly worn in phosphor bronze washers, while being less abuse resistant. Don’t get me wrong, it will work for cutting your entire life if you look after it. But washers are stronger if you even need to pry with your ZT. Can you pry with your ZT0560 if you need it? Yes you can, you can pry the hell out of it. If it wasn’t the case I wouldn’t have bought the knife and I wouldn’t be writing this. Its just that with the ball-bearing system you are more likely to deform the titanium contact surface. Washers are simply tougher and I always prefer tougher.

But I read that this knife sucked…

I always do a lot of research before buying anything, especially when I’m spending this kind of money on a knife.

As good as the ZT0560/0561 may be, its not perfect. Many users have reported problems with the steel being too soft, rolling or chipping. After researching some more it seems the problem was with the heat treatment of the earlier version around 2012 or so. In some cases, sharpening the knife fixed the problem (soft metal on the outside, but ok on the inside) in others the heat treatment itself was the problem and the knife needed to be sent back for replacing the blade. Even in the early models, this was very rare and most people were extremely happy with the performance of Elmax steel. These last few years such a problem is unheard of as far as I know.

If you want something similar, a bit smaller, a lot cheaper and without the KVT system, check out the ZT0566.

Zero Tolerance 0566BW Hinderer Folder BlackWash Knife with SpeedSafe $159.47

You have a knife that have the same great built quality, ELMAX steel, but a 3.25 inch blade rather than 3.75 with Speed Safe assisted opening system.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Someone please tell Mr. Trump…

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That thanks to the United States Constitution, ALL Americans are “2nd Amendment people”.
And if by “2nd Amendment people” he meant law-abiding gun owners, tell him that none of us is a deranged criminal willing to murder political adversaries.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Survival 101: Put together a basic food stockpile

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food101

Dry Organic Whole  Wheat Pasta, 99.9% Ethanol and a Super Cat Stove.

Food is critical for survival. That’s no secret. Air, water, food and shelter, those are the rules. Although air related preps do exist (respirators) and are critical (try not breathing for a few minutes see how that works out for you) its pretty much all around you all the time. Shelter is key as well. Exposure kills, but we have evolved a good bit and its not as hard to find adequate clothing and shelter although both are vast survival topics. Something similar goes on with water. Yes, water is essential and water purification itself is tremendously important. I’ve been without running water and its no fun. Far worse than not having power.

Now food. Food’s the thing. You need air every few seconds, you need water every few hours, and food too you need every day. But the thing about food is that even today it’s a) not as plentiful, not when compared to water let alone air b) Its far more expensive.

Lack of food is the thing that has killed millions throughout history. It still does. Its easy today to lose perspective of how important it is but in places like Venezuela where most barely have a couple servings of food in storage, they know the truth.

I never went through anything quite that bad but got a bit of a taste of it myself in Argentina, especially right after the economic collapse. All of a sudden all prices doubled, then tripled, then quadrupled. Suddenly it became damn hard to buy anything. Its ok if you have a hard time buying a new phone of stupid crap like that but having a hard time buying enough food to keep you going is serious business. What are you going to do? Ask friends and family? (Who happen to be going through the same thing themselves)? Beg? Eat out of the trash? Oh wait, you’ll grow your own right. That’s nice, and by all means do, but let me tell you one thing: When things are SO bad that a country can’t get its act together to keep rice and oil stocked, then finding seeds/fertilizer/supplies/tools and the long etc needed for gardening is almost impossible. If anything having a garden helps, but it not a solution to the food problem. There’s a reason why when famines occur millions die. Very few people are truly self-reliant food wise, and even those that are they need a good amount of supplies and infrastructure to keep their operation running long term. Now if you’re one of those fully self-sufficient persons in all aspects of survival including food production then more power to you. If you’re just another mere mortal wondering how to tackle this issue in a simple manner keep reading.

food1012

Lentils, Canned Olive oil and whole Grain Rice

Crunching numbers…

I’m no cook. I’m no Mr. Pantry either. Some people love the food and cooking side of prepping but that aint me. Like any Argentine worth his salt I can cook any dead animal with charcoal or firewood and I make a mean pizza, but other than that and a handful of basic recipes that it. This is more about having calories to keep you alive. So with that in mind here’s the idea: Stores are closing, there wont be any power, what do you stock up today to keep you alive? Oh, to make things interesting, its just one food item you can pick. The rest you will have to pick yourself, grow, trade for /work for or buy later down the road. Now some folks with go for bulk red winter wheat and that’s fine, but I’ll go with this: dry pasta. Its basically the same thing as flour, only that already processed into a form that is easy to cook. Its cheap, lasts for years, cooks in 5 minutes and keeps you alive. A pack of pasta can cost about .50 cents. Around here you can get somewhat nicer organic whole grain pasta made in Italy for 1.50. This may not be the cheapest, but its affordable and good quality. Each pack has 500gr of pasta, enough for four servings. For 60 servings, enough for two months, that’s 15 pack of pasta or 7.5 kilos, which costs 22.5 Euros (roughly the same in dollars in USA). Caloric wise 100gr of pasta gives you 350 calories, which means 875 calories worth of pasta per day which isnt even close to the 2000 calories you need per day. You either need to have either four servings rather than just two per day, or (more likely ) complement your diet with something else. Rice and lentils would be my suggestion (they will need more fuel for cooking though), and plenty olive oil over whatever fresh vegetables you manage to procure. Realistically speaking though two servings of pasta per day makes sense to crunch the numbers for a basic staple that will be supplemented with other food, but a pack of 500gr a day per person is doable and this gives you either food to eat four meal of a day, or more clever, eat two and trade the other two for something else so as to vary your diet. A pack of 500gr a day per person costs 45 bucks a month, still very doable, and where using the more expensive type of pasta that costs twice as much compared to the cheaper store brand. In most American Walmart you have Great value spaghetti going for $2.07 for 908gr. (2lbs). Buying 17 packs per person should be enough for a month (eating or trading) which is just 35.19USD a month. I get it, you wont eat pasta all day for the rest of your life, but at this rate a year supply of pasta is $422.28, 1800 calories a day. In case youre wondering, you can live on that. Thin, but alive. Throw in some fruit, vegetables or multivitamins to cover vitamin C requirements and avoid scurvy and you’ll be better than you imagine. With pasta as your main staple and little else to round up a more balanced nutritional diet a dollar a day per person is possible when buying bulk.

So pasta rocks. It keeps you alive, its dirt cheap, lasts for years (decades if stored away from bugs and humidity in a sealed container) and it cooks fast. Now if the world is ending, or a bit less tragic if you go Venezuela, how are you going to cook it if you don’t have electricity? A Super Cat stove and alcohol is a viable solution. Lets crunch those numbers then. You need 50ml of alcohol to get a pot of water boiling for 5-6 minutes. If you do this twice a day that’s 100ml per day, or 3 litres per month. Around here a bottle of 250 ml of 99.9% ethanol costs 0.7 cents, so its 2.8 Euros per liter. 8.4 Euros of fuel per month, 100.8 Euros a year.

This is of course and oversimplification of a topic that is pretty complex but having food in your belly makes all the difference in the world. With a dollar a day per person and 110 USD worth of fuel for cooking having 6 to 12 months worth of food really isnt as hard as some people believe it to be.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

79 year old living in a cave and doing great: Three reasons Why

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In reply to:  Argentina:  man lives in cave for 40 years

Granted he is living a rough life, but he is free. Looks like he is in remarkable shape for a guy almost 80. I am impressed with this man. He needs to write his own SHTF book.

-Martin

Hi Martin. Thanks for the comment.

I did notice that as well. Let me say this just in case anyone has any kind of doubt regarding where I stand: NO, I don’t say move to a cave. I have no doubt it’s a miserable life. In Mr. Pedro Luca’s own words, he wishes he would have done things different in his life (check the previous post) I also doubt this man is getting much in regards to proper medical care, but more on that later.

Having said this, I’d also like to point out three factors that probably explain why this man is looking better than most 79 year olds we know, that haven’t been living in a cave in the middle of nowhere.

1)Food & Exercise. This man is obviously on a very lean diet. The kind of staples he eats, combined with his chicken and whatever it is he hunts makes for a diet better than what 99% of Americans eat. A key aspect here is quantity. This man hasn’t got much wealth and has to ration his food carefully. I’ve written before about the advantages of a low caloric diet which considerably slows down ageing and extend life by 20-30%. If you’re reading this for the first time it may surprise you, but what will blow up your mind is googling the topic and finding out this has been proven to be true beyond doubt. Eating 20% less calories than the recommended amount for your size extends your life by pretty much the same percentage. This man clearly walks a lot as well. The article mentions him going on three hour treks to reach the nearest settlement. I’m sure he walks a lot checking his traps and hunting as well. This along with tending his fire, carrying water, caring for his animals and carrying supplies back to his cave keeps the 79 year old in good shape. Check the link below and see the video, he moves surprisingly well for a man about to turn 80.

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2016/07/31/argentine-man-has-lived-in-cave-for-40-years.html

2)No excessive medication and treatments. I’ve also written before about the problem with the corrupt medical practice around the world. I wont deny the marvels or modern medicine but I have little doubt that half of the surgery, treatments and drugs sold are pure nonsense and only done so as to make money out of the victi.. I mean patients. This has been my experience with both doctors and dentists and numerous reports and studies support such tendencies.  I bet a thousand bucks that 90% of the drugs sold around the world can be completely avoided by eating more frugal amounts of food like this man does and walking more. Lets keep it real as well. This man may drop dead today from something that if checked once a year by a doctor could have been prevented. Moderation and common sense folks.

3)This man may feel very lonely at times. Living in isolation means depression is a real risk, and even in such location it can (ironically) develop stress. Then again he does go to the nearby town somewhat often and according to the article and video he seems to be liked and respected by locals. He even gets visited by tourists, all of which he seems to enjoy so he probably has enough social interaction to keep him mentally healthy as well. I bet he’s not nearly as stressed as many people are with their nine to five routines, talking with a dozen people they cant stand each day just because they share an office.

Living a stress free lifestyle is as important as eating right. A few days ago I was reading about the countries with the best life expectancy.

According to the World Health Organization, Spain ranks #4 (Behind Japan, Switzerland and Singapore, in that order). A lot of that is attributed to the Mediterranean diet and good healthcare, but living here I assume the easy going lifestyle also has a lot to do with it. The “work to live rather than live to work” mentality takes a bit of getting used to but eventually you see that it’s the healthier attitude.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Argentina: man lives in cave for 40 years

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Pedro Luca holdig his shotgun in front of his cave.

79 year old Pedro Luca has been living in a cave in San Pedro de Colalao, a desolated part of the province of Tucuman located in the northwest of Argentina.

Now if you think living like this is fun, think again. Mr. Luca’s life is pretty solitary and to be honest quite miserable. He wakes up at 3AM to begin his day by starting a fire. He keeps elven roosters and two goats, hunts and traps or goes to the nearest settlement 3 hours away down the mountain to buy some supplies (candles, yeast, corn) and collect his pension of 160 USD. He collects water from a creek. Of course he has no running water or power. He has leathery, weathered skin and few teeth left. I know that part of the country well enough. It gets very cold at night. Winters over there must be terrible and the wind sandblasts your skin. And then there’s of course the pumas which wont think twice about having you for lunch if not kept at bay with fire or gunshots.

Quoting Mr. Luca: “I never asked myself why I chose to live here,” he says. “There was another cave nearby but I liked this one better. Sometimes, I think that I would have liked to travel the world, see Europe. But there’s a lot of sea in the middle of it all and you have to have the time to cross that sea.”

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2016/07/31/argentine-man-has-lived-in-cave-for-40-years.html

Lesson of the day folks: Remember this next time you think about grabbing your INCH bag (Im never coming home bag) and running to the hills to live off the land.

FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

 

Surviving Your Dentist and Bitcoin

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Hello
1 I am a retired lawyer – for 30 years I defended dentists in malpractice suits. I can tell you with some authority…you are exactly correct!!
Many years ago I started going to see other dentists every time one told me I had a cavity. I’d go to another dentist, never mention I’d already been to see one, & the 2nd one would never mention a cavity.
I also learned to never say I was having tooth pain (they are taught to ask). Just say “no problems” & see if they can find it.
Obviously, there are exceptions, but…
2 As for why we have such an inefficient medical system, Milton Friedman accurately described it back in the 1970’s. The problem is too much money. Government programs pump billions in to medical schools & they have to spend it. This is why we have studies on pregnant pigs, studies on insects, conflicting studies on the most minute aspect of everything. They have to spend that money. Way too much supply for the demand. So medical folks create more demand!
3 I’m enjoying your book on the Argentina Collapse. Very good! Thanks for writing it.
Do you have an opinion on Bitcoin in preparation for an economic collapse? I don’t see it on your site..
Thanks!
Jack

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Thanks Jack for sharing your experience. I’m glad you’re enjoying my book too.
I agree about this being a money problem (seems its always the issue). They just have to milk money out of the sheep any way they can.
About bitcoin. I may have talked about it before but I’m no expert. Some of the most evil people in the planet seem to hate bitcoin so that makes me like it already. It may be a huge thing in the future, and today it does have a place for sure. It’s hard to understand what digital money actually is. I know it took me enough time, but once you understand why it’s “mined” and why that is important you understand it a bit better. I think its another tool in the tool box. I think of it as a digital version of gold, with some advantages over it and obviously some disadvantages, the greatest one clearly being the lack of time proven acceptance over thousands of years like precious metals. In a diversified portfolio I think it does have a place and I understand why people are excited about it although I try to be cautious.
Regards,
FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Surviving … your doctor

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I talked before about avoiding “Unnecessary Surgery and Treatments”.

Well, recently I followed my own advice so I hope telling you about this inspires you too to take control of your own health and not accept everything your doctor says without question.

Last week I went to the dentist. This one would be new to me since I moved to Spain. In spite of the free (I know, nothing is really free but you know what I mean) medical care I have private. The plan that I have is pretty good from a well-known company in Spain. So I go to their hospital in the nicest part of town and after a bit of looking around and a fancy 3D scan of some kind I get told that I need two teeth pulled plus implants and work done on 6 other teeth. I already knew I had one in pretty bad shape that probably needed removed and have an implant but I was sure the other one could be saved and the other stuff, most of it honestly sounded like BS.

An important part of developing modern survival skills is learning to “read” people. Not just listen to what they are saying, but learn to tell read their voice tone, body language, gestures and of course using your own common sense. This is how you avoid scams and con artists, how you get good business deals and how you learn to get an upper hand on all kinds of social interactions. This dentist guy, he just didn’t seem honest. His hurry to quickly get started with the pulling of teeth was pretty disturbing as well. After politely but firmly telling him that no, I was not getting my teeth pulled then and there I made an appointment for next week. This gave me time to get a second opinion. Thank God I got that second opinion.

Turns out I only need one implant as I suspected. There’s no need to pull the other one. This second dentist didn’t mention any of those six other teeth that needed to be fixed, just one that has a small, visible dark spot, a cavity on top. It’s not just that I was going to get charged almost two thousand Euros worth of BS dentist work, I was also going to have this guy pull a teeth unnecessarily and probably mess up five others.

The U.S. Health-Care system wastes $750 Billion annually on unnecessary health-care costs. You should expect your doctor to act accordingly and, pretty likely, either suggest or assure you that you need surgery, treatment or medication you don’t actually need. Accept this is very likely to occur.

People: You know yourself better than your doctor or dentist. Always get a second opinion if you have the slightest of doubts. If you feel worried/confused/not sure of what to do, just do what I did. Say you can’t do it right now and get an appointment for some other time. This gives you time to think things over, get another opinion and cancel if needed.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Terror Attack in France: At least 73 dead

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The terrorist weapon used? A truck, simply crushing and accelerating into the crowd that celebrated Bastille Day. There are reports of gunfire being exchanged between the truck occupants and police. It seems that guns and explosives were also found in the truck. This is ongoing news. http://edition.cnn.com/2016/07/14/europe/nice-france-truck/index.html

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Hard-Use Folder Indeed: Zero Tolerance 0550

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Zero Tolerance ZT0550 Hinderer Design Folding Knife

The knife is the quintessential survival tool. For the modern survivalist that doesn’t specifically carry a fixed blade as part of his daily required equipment the folder is the kind of knife he’s more likely to carry.
Now pocket knives and folders come in all kinds. Any good knife is a useful tool. Some are particularly well made and designed, making them a pleasure to use and handy in a number of situations.

And then there’s the hard-use folding knife. Yes, it folds. Yes, it fits into your pocket and yes it will open all the mail you get, cut strings and even help you prepare a sandwich. But it will also cut through dry wall. It will chop and stab through a 2×4 and pry open a door if needed or cut through metal to get you out of a car wreck. Yes, it will not break or otherwise fail if ever used in the art of putting two-legged predators down.
Many handy, outstanding folders and pocket knives simply aren’t made for that sort of situation. But the Zero Tolerance 0550 is.
The titanium frame lock holds the blade in place, the thumb stud rests against the frame for additional support. The steel is outstanding S35VN, meaning it will hold an edge considerably longer, take more abuse without chipping, rolling or breaking.
At 3.5” the blade isn’t too big but it is big enough. “built like a tank” is read often when researching the ZT0550 although it really is a comfortable, medium size knife.
Check out this torture test video of the ZT0550.
FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

PRK or LASIK eye surgery for Survivalists

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I just begin reading your book surviving economic collapse. On page 33 you mention LASIK and referred to the US Navy and Air Force.

I have personal knowledge knowing Air Force surgeons and having been an opthamologist that the procedure recommended is not LASIK but thermal keratoplasty.

The difference is that thermal keratoplasty  uses the laser to modify the corneal shape without slicing through the cornea like LASIK.
The sliced flap can be dislodged rendering the vision in the eye completely blurred.

Thermal keratoplasty is more uncomfortable than LASIK but has equally good results and less risk.

That being said you’re better off with LASIK than glasses for your purposes.

Thanks for all your insights.

Robert McBratney
retired Ophthalmologist

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Thanks for your email Robert. You are right. Keratoplasty is the recommended procedure when possible for patients that are likely to suffer trauma, such as military personnel and of course survivalists as well. At the time I wrote that it wasn’t as common as it is today and LASIK had become a procedure accepted by the Air Force for their pilots.

LASIK involves the cutting of a small flap while keratoplasty shapes the eye surface itself, without the cutting of a flap. The flap may be completely cut off during surgery by accident or become detached by trauma. Keeping things in perspective, its very unlikely to suffer accidental flap detachment during surgery and even in thousands of cases of very strong trauma flap loss is a very rare incident.
Having said that, indeed, if I was doing it today I’d go for Keratoplasty. Its cheaper, safer, and there’s no flap to mess up in the first place.
FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Food prices could jump 400 percent in global shortage

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Food prices could jump 400 percent in global shortage

http://personalliberty.com/food-prices-could-jump-400-percent-in-global-shortage/

Food prices are very likely to go up steadily in the future. Failed crops, climate change (man-made or otherwise) and disasters are likely to send food prices up almost 400% in the not so distant future.

There really is no reason not to stock up. When it comes to food, you want to stock it deep,

One day you may be happy you put a lot of it aside.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Who Benefited from Brexit and how was it Orchestrated

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I have family in London and friends in other parts of UK and yes, since Brexit they are worried and they feel they have become second class citizens. In many ways they have. It is true that discrimination towards immigrants has been happening for a long time though. In fact, the American Army veteran that was recently discriminated, it’s the second time something like this has happened to him.

Here’s the clip in case you havent seen it.

There was also the story of a German woman that had been living in UK for 40 years. Her neighbours are now telling her to go home. She probably thought she WAS home already.

These aren’t isolated incidents. Five minutes of google search with minimum intellectual honesty will prove that to anyone.

Keep in mind that the Brexit campaign started from the moment they joined the EU. What people don’t know is why this happened and who REALLY orchestrated it. This was mostly a plan by the City elite, a lobby called “City for Britain,” hedge fund owners and Rupert Murdock who owns the main media groups in UK and many around the world. The list? Fox news, Fox Broadcasting Company, Twentieth Century Fox, News UK (The Sun, The Times), The New York Post, just to mention a few. If you watch Fox news, chances are you’re been fed a strong anti EU bias. That wasn’t accidental. The City elite also includes other media corporations the ones owned by Richard Clive Desmond.

Basically people, this was all about the wealthy elite of London regaining control and making sure the EU didn’t meddle with their business. Its as simple as that.

Here’s a quote from Rupert Murdoch that explains why they (Murdoch and the “City” elite) wanted to quit the EU.

I once asked Rupert Murdoch why he was so opposed to the European Union. ‘That’s easy,’ he replied. ‘When I go into Downing Street they do what I say; when I go to Brussels they take no notice.’

http://indy100.independent.co.uk/article/this-terrifying-rupert-murdoch-quote-is-possibly-the-best-reason-to-stay-in-the-eu-yet–WyMaFTE890x

So as to achieve their objective, The “City” and the British government started a long campaign to fuel the nationalist, anti EU sentiment. Basically the BBC and Rupert Murdoch and other media moguls like Richard Clive Desmond started a negative campaign against the rest of Europe (most British forget that they ARE European themselves) Immigrants taking up their jobs, immigrants killing/raping /stealing from white Brits, The British government would drive around vans “inviting” immigrants to “go home”.

It was a non-stop campaign for years before the official Brexit campaign even started and it was pretty successful. Of course that when someone that was NOT an immigrant committed a crime (which is most often the case) it didn’t get the same media attention. And of course they never mentioned that it was within the EU that the UK saw its greatest growth ever in standards of living for its people. Objectively speaking, the EU has a)some corruption, like everywhere else and in my opinion far less than the City elite b)regulations. Many of them are nonsense, most of the DO in fact make sense and go a long way into improving peoples quality of life, ensuring workers and customers rights. The problem is that some of these regulations also go against the interest of people that want maximum profit and zero accountability.

How can you tell that the government was in favor of leaving the EU? Simple:

1)Just read the BBC headlines. For years they have been either subtly or not so subtly anti EU.

2) Notice how the referendum was pushed ahead of schedule to match the worst moment in terms of the immigration crisis. These things are supposed to take years, instead it was speed up to a matter of months. Why the rush all of a sudden?

3)Notice how it was matched perfectly with the European Football Tournament. Laugh all you want but these are EXACTLY the strategies analysts use. Football (soccer for you Americans) is huge in UK. In fact it was perfectly timed. If I had been the one in charge of the Brexit side I would have matched it right in the begging of the tournament, when everyone is waving the flag, feeling nationalistic. Yet I would have made sure it was right in the begging of it and not in the middle or end of the tournament when England was most likely to lose. That’s exactly what happened.

4)It was also done at the time university students are out on holidays. Most where registered to vote in the wrong place. Students are known to be by a very wide margin pro EU.

5)Age 16 and 17 were not allowed to have a say in spite of these having to live with the consequences of the referendum far more than say their 80 year old grandparents that were far more likely to vote to leave the EU. Why were 16 to 17 year olds allowed to Vote in the Scotland independence referendum yet not allowed to vote in the EU referendum? I’ll tell you why. Because +70% of them vote to stay and believe in integration. They were likely to vote to stay in the UK union just during the Scottish referendum just like they would have voted to stay in the EU if they had the chance to vote. Get rid of those votes and you just got rid of a few million votes that would have voted against your interests.

6)Officially the public funding for both Stay and Leave was 50/50. Unofficially though, the government favoured Brexit. Cameron sure did in spite of claiming otherwise just based on his actions which clearly undermined the Stay campaign. Not only did the government clearly favour and anti EU agenda, even the monarchy made their anti EU position clear as well, maybe feeling its own position eventually threatened by a young, more democratic and not as favourable towards status quo rule.

7)They even allowed the Brexit campaign to choose the referendum question. Yes or No being is perceived as more negative and NO is less likely to be chosen. Stay or Leave was considered less drastic and more favourable for the Brexit side.

8)British people living out of the country for more than 15 years did not have the right to vote. A million British expats in Spain alone explains why this was important. How does this work? You lose your rights as a citizen because you lived elsewhere for a period of time? At the same time, EU citizens of other countries that have been legally living, working and contributing in UK had no say, no matter how long they had been living there.

Some points may seem less obvious than others, some may look a bit more like coincidences. There are no coincidences here, just a carefully executed plan.

The campaign was successful and now UK left the EU. I am grateful for that to be honest because it means there’s no longer an enemy plotting against the EU from within and I especially like the idea of detaching ourselves form the populist and nationalistic sentiment that fueled in Britain to win the referendum. It will be hard though for the people in UK, both locals and immigrants.

And there is also the concern that the “City” will try to destroy the EU, which has ensured peace and prosperity for its nations in spite of its many imperfections.

I know all too well what nationalism and populism does to a country. After all, Cristina and Nestor Kirchner’s motto was, and they repeated it ad nauseam, “national and popular”. Patriotism shouldn’t be confused with nationalism. It’s most definitely not the same thing, and believe me when I say the people are the ones to suffer the most under a populist and nationalistic government.

I just got banned from ar15.com forums for not agreeing with the majority there regarding Brexit and expressing such an opinion. It happened in the GD forum of all places. I suppose it goes to show how when presented with facts that don’t correspond with the lies they’ve been fed, some people just snap.

We are entering complicated political waters everywhere around the world. The rise of nationalism, populism and in general the polarisation of ideology both left and right provide fertile ground for intolerance. That’s pretty dangerous because intolerance (even verbal, even political) always leads to violence. It’s one thing to debate and it’s another to insult or censor those we don’t agree with. Verbal violence in politics is pretty dangerous. We shouldn’t cheer when we find a politician who says outload things we once didn’t dare say ourselves, especially when we didn’t dare say them out of shame. Maybe instead of cheering a bit of self-criticism is in order. We should be able to talk and we should be able to express different ideas and debate them without getting angry at one another.

Again folks, careful with political intolerance. No matter what extreme of the spectrum it comes from, it tends to be equally dangerous.

Intolerance leads to divisions in society and a society that is divided and fighting among themselves is much easier to control… and exploit.

Kind regards my friends.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Glock (almost) Perfection?

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Fernando–

The Glocks are very nice guns and have lots of performance features to commend them.

The only thing I disagree with is the lack of a positive mechanical safety.

I know that devotees of the non-safety pistols get defensive when anyone takes exception to this design feature.

But–anyone trained to a level of competent pistol shooter can train to take the safety into account when they do need to deliberately fire the weapon.

And–when they don’t need to have the weapon fire, or heaven forbid not have it fire when somebody who should not have their hands on the gun (but somehow got hold of it)–then that is when the manual safety earns its plaudits!

We see too many cases with the non-safety pistols where gun owners (including experts) somehow shoot themselves or others, kids get hold of a gun and shoot themselves or others–where a mechanical safety properly employed would have likely saved people from harm.

I realize that everyone who has not had such an incident happen in their own lives will poo-poo and object to suggestions along these lines, but consider how many tragedies might have been prevented happening to others like themselves who did have things go bad for themselves or their loved ones.

Best wishes,
Larry

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Hi Larry,

I cant say I agree with you on this one and I believe I have a good foundations for the point I’ll try to make.

No, I don’t think the Glock needs a safety.

1)Revolvers don’t have safeties, and no one ever thought of bothering putting one in them other than some oddity here and there. Nearly all firearms experts agree revolvers don’t need safeties. Revolvers do have longer and stiffer trigger pulls in double action, but that doesn’t change the fact that they are perfectly ok without a manual safety and the double action only trigger pull in a standard Glock is stiff enough to avoid the kind of accidental discharges that sometimes happen with hair triggers and single action only firearms like the venerable 1911.

2)Talking about the 1911, that was my first handgun. I spent years training with it, so much that when I went to the dark side and got my Glock, I spent years disengaging a safety that wasn’t there anymore whenever I drew the gun. No problem there since its just a reflex thumb flick on the side of the Glock.

3)In terms of legal problems and accidental/negligent discharges due to lack of manual safety, notice that most police departments seem to be ok with Glocks anyway, in spite of the complicated legal situation they often find themselves in.

4)The British army recently adopted the Glock 17, no problem with the lack of safety there. SEAL did so too, as have other special forces around the world. The truth is that as long as the shooter does its part and carries the gun in a holster Glocks are perfectly safe. The accidental/negligent discharges can still happen with guns with safeties, all they have to do is disengage it and pull the trigger. They key part of the problem being pulling the trigger when you don’t really intend to do so. I think there a good reason why firearms instructors, shooting experts and specialists overwhelming favour Glock both for themselves and for arming others.

5) I will concede that in a fight, at night, and after losing control of your weapon, an attack may grab your weapon and fail to disengage a safety while trying to shoot you. Then again I believe that the advantage of having a Glock, the best handgun for combat and defence. Greatly out weights the chances of what has to be admitted as a rare, unlikely scenario compared to much more probable ones. As for kids, I believe that if a child has a loaded gun that’s already a disaster. I believe also that most kids will easily figure out a safety. They are simple enough to figure out for a kid that ever played videogames or even owned a toy gun. If a child has hold of a loaded gun and is playing around with it trying to figure out how to operate it you have messed up bad as a parent already and chances are that with any loaded firearm you’re looking at a tragedy about to happen. If anything, keep your gun in a quick access safe or use a trigger lock. They are cheap enough and much better insurance than praying a child doesn’t figure out the use of the safety which he most likely will.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.