An Active Shooter Open Fires on a Crowd. What Do You Do?

Click here to view the original post.

[Editor’s Note: A rising epidemic is growing in this country that no one seems to know how to quell. According to a recent study, there are more mass shootings in the United States than in any other country in the world. Equally as sobering is the fact that Americans tend to suffer from mental disorders more than any other country. Could this be coincidental?

While there is no universal definition of a “mass shooting,” one can surmise this country has a big problem and the numbers speak for themselves. Thus far, 2018 has seen close to 100 mass shootings occur across the country. The numbers are sobering to say the least and show that something is very wrong and has sprawled nationwide debates on every subject from gun control to protection.

The fact is, we have always had a false sense of security in this country and many of us are unprepared on how to handle a situation of an active shooter opening fire. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security believes in a “whole community” approach to preparedness and have created workshops to help others prepare. Civilian-based companies are also seeing the need for essential training in this matter and active shooter response training companies for schools, healthcare systems, houses of worship and businesses are trying to help others get prepared.

With mass shootings increasing, we should all have a plan in advance if faced with this type of devastating emergency. While the situation and location matter, acting deputy undersecretary, Bob Kolasky for the Department of Homeland Security is teaching a simple guideline for surviving a mass shooting: Run, hide and fight. His advice is based of studying actual cases and, while horrific in terms of imaging, the fact remains that it is up to you to prepare yourself for surviving the situation.

With that in mind, how does one survive a mass shooter? Writer, Jeremiah Johnson, who happens to be a retired Green Beret shares valuable advice on how to prepare, train and mitigate a mass shooting attack.]

Mass shootings are increasing in frequency and severity. While many are holding out hope that they will stop or that the government will handle the situation, our personal security and peace of mind continue to be under attack. This begs the question on what can each citizen of this country do to survive.

Firstly, if you’re in a state that permits you to carry, open or concealed weapons, then you have an opportunity to prevent something: that will be on you, on your state’s laws, and where you fit in between with whatever you have in your head and what your environment and social life/structure has placed in it.

While I was in the military, we learned drills to respond to a near-ambush, and a far-ambush (the latter also termed a “sniper”).  The actions are a little bit different, but we can find some tailoring to employ them for your use.  Let’s do a “near-maniac” and a “far-maniac” for our categories.

Near-Maniac

This could be loosely defined as a jerk who is starting to fire in your immediate vicinity…say within 30 feet (an approximation).  Much of this immediate action will be contingent on your situation: how many maniacs, what type of weapon(s) he or they are firing, and how the attack is being carried out.  For that “how,” I mean is it just a random spraying or is it a precise, calculated effort to place bullets into a target.  Is the maniac just shooting at anything, or is he more deliberate and calculating?  Let’s cover the basics.

  1. Get yourself and your loved ones out of the line of fire and behind cover and concealment if possible. For a refresher: cover actually protects you to some degree from the bullet; concealment does not necessarily protect from bullets, but it affords you a degree of being rendered unseen to the maniac.
  2. Figure out his intended path or estimate it. Maniacs in general tend to be very focused, and when the predatory instinct is at a fevered pitch, the cone of focus of their field of vision is more intensified with adrenaline…they tend to go after what comes into that cone, or what they place the cone on.  Gauge from the sounds of activity and the direction in which they’re running, and the sounds of the yelling.
  3. If possible, move away from his direction of travel. Maintain as much cover as possible, and run low, almost crouching, so as not to silhouette yourself or to give him a target with your movement.  Remember: as discussed in past articles, movement is the first focus that we have that attracts our hunter-gatherer eyes.
  4. Safeguard your relatives or family members: have them continue on to safety or lead them…if they leave without you, make sure it is to provide that they are not followed…to act as a blocking element to ensure the maniac does not pursue them.
  5. * The military reaction to a near ambush is to charge the ambusher…CQB, or “Close-Quarters Battle.”  I would advise not engaging unless you have the training as either former military, law enforcement, or martial skills that you’ve placed into practice in the past.

Far-Maniac

A “pseudo-sniper,” usually these guys don’t have the training to effectively place a bullet in anything more than a mob targeted at random.  Nevertheless, it may be something you encounter in an open area, such as a football field or an athletic stadium of some kind, or in a public venue such as a fairground.  In that case, take these steps:

  1. Identify the direction and distance of the Far-Maniac.
  2. If in the open where there’s no cover and concealment? Run, but not with the crowd.  The maniac will see the “area target” of the crowd and want to shoot at it…a better chance of hitting someone…than an individual target moving rapidly and haphazardly.
  3. Move in a zig-zag pattern, changing your direction every 3-5 steps, but not in a defined pattern…don’t change in the same manner to “telegraph” yourself.
  4. Immediately find cover and concealment.
  5. Know whether the maniac is on the move, or if he’s in a fixed position, dumbly awaiting the drone
  6. Be able to continue movement if you are covered throughout the traveling
  7. * If you are armed: find a good location and hunker down, making sure that avenues of approach are covered, and that you are not able to be seen and sighted in unless he (the Maniac) exposes himself to your position

Whether a contrived false-flag operation or a genuine independent maniac, these mass shootings have been occurring more and more frequently.  Your best bet with things is to play the scenario in your mind and know what actions you will take when out and about with your family before the event occurs.  With practice and training, and if you live in a state where firearms are not an anathema to vampires of Marxism, you may be able to do some good and prevent a bad situation…at the very least, keep it from escalating and touching you and your family.  Fight that good fight to win!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

7 Brute Ways To Protect Yourself From Barbarian Hoards in a Collapse

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, we did a segment on some positive actions and strategies of the Roman Army to incorporate into your SHTF battle plans.  But what about the barbarians?  Yes, the Roman war machine was the penultimate fighting unit down to the individual level.  It was after the Republic (and then Empire) decayed through overextension, greed, corruption, and moral turpitude that the Legions lost their effectiveness.  By the early 5th century C.E., the Legions were a shadow of their past.

This brings us to the barbarians.  The term was an all-encompassing one that meant “foreigners,” more than anything else…specifically to non-Romans.   Those who were not Roman citizens, is the most accurate rendition.  By the middle of the 4th century, the Legions depended heavily on conscripts from Gaul (now France), the Germanic tribes, and many nations such as Greece and Spain.  With service, Roman citizenship was obtained, along with grants of land.  This became a two-edged sword, however: the discharged auxiliaries of the foreign nations returned to their homelands.

The Barbarians and Their Effective Fighting Skills

They brought back to their tribes and clans the knowledge of the fighting ways of the Legions, incorporating many of their tactics into their own ways of fighting.  To a point.  These barbarian tribes had many effective ways of fighting peculiar to themselves that proved of great merit…lessons we can incorporate into what we do today.

Let’s list some of these ancient tribesmen and some of the tactics that enabled them to succeed, and we’ll draw a correlation as to how we may emulate some of these tactics.

  1. The Saxons: They are the ancestors of the Germans today. Indeed, Saxony is a famous geographical area in Germany between the Elbe and Rhine rivers.   The most common weapons of these people were spears: a lighter one for throwing a long distance, and a heavier one for close-in combat.  In Saxon poetry the spear was referred to as the aesc (which is derived from the make of the shaft, fashioned from ash wood.  The aesc-berend was the “spear-bearer,” the term given to a Saxon fighting man.  Saxon warriors (contrary to Hollywood portrayal) did not all have chain mail: they had thick embossed leather armor, as well as hides.  They did have helmets of iron and plates of horn with nose-guards.  Their infantry traveled lightly, and swords were not as widespread as commonly portrayed.  The Saxons gathered about warrior chiefs and kings, giving him their loyalty and in return they received a share of what was taken in conquest in the form of arms, monies, and livestock.
  2. The Vikings: the term coming from the word vikingr, an ancient Norse word that means “sea rover” and the Scandinavian nations such as Norway, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, and Denmark were the points of origin of these warriors. They relied on their raids on narrow, sturdily built, and swift long ships.  These Northmen interacted with the Romans by trading and occasionally by mutual visitation.  It was not until after the Empire had fallen that the Northmen assumed the “Viking” mantle and began their raids throughout Europe that lasted for several centuries.  A warrior culture, they had the Jomsvikings…the elite of their warrior tribes who trained incessantly for the raiding seasons and lived for battle.  These Jomsvikings were supported by the communities they lived near within compounds.  They were without wives for the period they served in this manner and concentrated their focus upon hand-to-hand combat in preparation for raids.
  3. The Britons: The peoples of the British Isles were conquered and occupied for several centuries by the Romans, but eventually Roman rule disintegrated as the Legions departed in 406 C.E., leaving all their forts, edifices, and infrastructure intact. The Britons were masters of the chariot and proficient with spear and lasso.  Often their chariots would act as a “shock unit” and ride into closely packed formations of infantry to disorganize the ranks and then create gaps through which their own infantry could penetrate.
  4. The Huns: the ancestors of the modern-day inhabitants of Hungary and the steppes and plains of western and central Asia, the Huns were the consummate horsemen of their day. They rode, ate, slept, and lived (among other things) on the back of a horse.  They were excellent archers and spearmen, and their ferocity was so great as to cause entire nations of Germanic tribes in the area of what is now known as the Black Sea to come stampeding onto Roman territory to escape the Huns.  These Huns had a habit of killing just about everyone who did not submit to them, and many of those who did.  They could ride great distances and appear seemingly out of nowhere to battle with vigor and endurance.  It took the combined efforts of the Romans and the Visigoths to stop them from conquering all of Europe.

7 Brute Ways To Protect Yourself From Barbarian Hoards in a Collapse

So, what can we learn from all of this?  Let’s go over it, then.

  1. It is better to be lightly armed and completely proficient in the use of weapons than be encumbered by a bunch of gear that may just slow you down [Saxons].
  2. A lightning raid executed perfectly will shock, demoralize, and defeat an opponent who is unprepared for it [Vikings].
  3. Train without ceasing, and train to the peak of your proficiency [Vikings].
  4. Vehicles have a distinct advantage over infantry if employed properly [Britons].
  5. Find a good leader whose aims exemplify those of the group…a leader with ability, humility, and humanity…who is not afraid to lead by example [Saxons, Vikings].
  6. Speed and timing in an engagement are very difficult to counter by your enemy if you have mastered them and mastered their employment in an unpredictable manner [Huns].
  7. Violence of action in an engagement often carries the day: 100% commitment with vigor. [Vikings, Huns]

Although appearing outwardly disorganized, these people had structure to their societies, and their cultures have contributed much to the mindset and makeup of the world today.  They supplanted the Roman Empire with their vigor and tenacity.  We can learn much by studying them: their seriousness, their stern demeanor and taciturn ways.  Chances are these are some qualities that have been passed on to you, their descendants that you might never have been aware of unless you studied them.  They have much to teach us, if we pay attention to what they did and some of the positive aspects of their lives.  So, raise those drinking horns high, and take a step back in time to study their history…your own family’s history, in many cases…and translate it into a tool for today…as it is also the history of all of us.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Why Every Prepper Needs Non-GMO Seeds in Their Long-Term Supplies

Click here to view the original post.

Oftentimes in the interests of economics and financial necessity, people will abandon quality in the interests of price. Nothing could be more telling than the current battle being waged with GMO foods and crops. The GMO crops are more than simply unhealthy: they have also been the doorway for companies such as Monsanto, Cargill, and others to patent their seeds. The FDA became involved during the Obama years, and raids and prosecutions occurred by charges that the patents on GMO seeds were violated by farmers whose crops showed traces of those patented genes.

This is difficult to avoid, as it is almost impossible to prevent bees and/or wind from spreading pollen from GMO crops to non-GMO farms. There is a definitive work that you can read to find out the dangers from a health perspective and from a corporate perspective (regarding “Frankenstein GMO’s and factory farming). It is entitled Seeds of Deception: Exposing Industry and Government Lies About the Safety of the Genetically Engineered Foods, by Jeffrey M. Smith.

The book was written in 2003 and contains a wealth of knowledge about GMO (Genetically Modified Organisms) crops and farming…giving the history behind the corporate movement and explaining how cross-pollinating occurs (as outlined above), giving the corporations “leverage” with which to take down small family farms.

Fortunately, there are champions to rely upon that will give us a “rallying flag” to regroup and wage this battle, uphill though it may seem. My good friend, Miss Tess Pennington, is one of those champions: a family woman of faith, honesty, and solid American values based on hard work and true pioneer spirit. She has shown us the way: there are numerous articles available at Ready Nutrition for your perusal on seed-saving and seed preservation that will be your “compass rose” to keep the harmful GMO crops from crossing your table.  Ready Nutrition’s archives are full of the vital information you need: all of that information is right under your fingertips, waiting for you to read it.

Miss Tess recently began her own Heirloom Seed company! All you’ll have to do is send her an e-mail or post a comment, and she’ll be happy to give her advice that can help you to find the best way. Now is the time to become proactive with establishing your own greenhouse. A self-enclosed greenhouse will not only ensure protection of your produce from the elements but enable you to further shield and protect them from the cross-pollination previously discussed.

In our next installment in this 2-Part series, we will go into further detail about the dangers of GMO foods…how they affect our health and what effects they render on the human body. The fight against GMO crops and Agribusiness is an uphill battle, but you can win that battle right inside your own home. Being informed and aware is the first step, and the second is to take action on that information…by buying heirloom seeds, practicing seed-saving techniques, and boycotting unhealthy products by embracing a healthy lifestyle within your home and family. That’s what Ready Nutrition is all about, and Miss Tess and I both encourage you in these efforts. JJ out!

Read More About the Toxicity of GMO Seeds:

Ready Gardens

Non-Organic Crops Are About to Become Much More Toxic

Flashback: Study Finds Herbicide Glyphosate Wrecks Healthy Gut Bacteria

Food Safety Experts Slam USDA over Dicamba GM Crops

5 Reasons Why There is Security in Seeds

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Wealth Preservation: Understanding Silver and Gold Content for Collapse Investing

Click here to view the original post.

Investing in precious metals is a great way to diversify and preserve your wealth. You can even find it on eBay! While this article is by no means an exhaustive treatise on gold and silver buying, it is more of a “primer” to give you some basic information you need to get started (if you plan on going into this area) or to provide knowledge to arm you in your dealings with people.  Some of this may be useful for you in purchases of precious metals, but the scope of this is mainly to cover things that you may find when out hunting in the flea markets, thrift stores, yard sales, or other areas of the “secondary shops.”

First, we’ll cover gold measured in terms of purity that is expressed in karats, symbolized by the letter “K” and “kt” with jewelers.

24 Karat                                 100%, or pure gold

22 Karat                                 91.7% gold

18 Karat                                 75.0% gold

14 Karat                                 58.3% gold

10 Karat                                 41.7% gold

Now let’s cover silver, a metal marked with a purity mark.  Here are the marks and their percentage of silver contents that correspond:

999                                          99.9% silver

958                                          95.8% silver

925                                          92.5% silver (known as Sterling silver)     

800                                          80.0% silver

We are referring mostly to jewelry or decorative pieces and keepsakes here (such as silverware, candlestick holders, or other things that may bear a stamp to show their precious metal content).  Coins are a little bit more involved and beyond the scope of this article, as there are too many to list here.

One of the problems that people run into with jewelry and their great-grandmother’s candlestick holders is that most businesses that buy them will usually pay according to their melt value.  This is especially true with silver.  Most of these dealers will estimate the silver content of your item by weight, and then will pay you roughly 15-25% under value to cover their handling and melting charges.

Learn how to test your junk gold and silver

For coins there can be a numismatic value attached to the coin…that is, its worth as a collector piece…that is greater than the melt value.  There is also the little problem that although the coins are no longer in circulation, well…they are.  All coins and currency are (technically) the property of the U.S. government…and to melt them down without proper authorization would be considered destruction of government property.

Jewelry doesn’t have that problem.  The real problem is that you will receive a fraction of what it is worth when you take it to a dealer who will hand you nice, crisp, approved, Federal Reserve Notes in exchange for your silver or gold.  Here’s how to figure out the “melt value” in silver:

Take your weight in silver (usually in grams) and convert to troy ounces, multiplying this weight by the percentage of silver in the silver content of your item.  Then you will have the amount of silver in troy ounces.  Then it’s a simple matter to look up the spot price of the silver (what silver is trading for that day on the commodities exchanges).  Divide the weight of your silver by the spot price to find out the worth in dollars.  Then multiply this figure by the percentage that the dealer will pay you minus his handling and melting fees.

Now, many people do this routinely as a business.  Others hold onto their finds.  Your actions will be determined by your purpose: to turn a “quick” Federal Reserve note out of some metals, or to garner a supply little by little as a hedge against either a currency collapse, or as a barter material in a future time.  Either way, this piece will get you started on researching an area you may choose to enter or specialize within.  Good luck and remember to lay your groundwork before you act.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Ways To Avoid Approaching Attackers

Click here to view the original post.

 

I know this has been covered before by everyone, but I’m compelled to state it again: what is in his hands? Hands empty? And he’s about to attack you? Go through him, do damage, and leave. As an unwanted side effect of deep training in self-defense, too many people wait for the attack…”

Comment by Miro, a Ready Nutrition Reader

Excellent comment by Miro, substantiating a point I made in a letter to Readers about how important the comments sections can be.  Read them and learn about others’ points of view, as well as picking up some tips and good information you can use.  Good job, Miro.  I suggest everyone go to the article Immediate Actions You Must Take If You’re About to be Attacked,” and read the rest of what Miro wrote.  We’re going to get into those actions in Part 2.

It is especially important because it characterizes vital points about threat assessment, the critical component in your actions.  What you must do is often characterized by what threat you face.  In this light, observe the actions of the individual or people approaching you.  What are they carrying?  Do they have any weapons, and is it obvious that they are going to be a threat?  Facial expressions, gestures, speed of movement, and stance (approaching you, trying to cut you off, etc.) all need to be considered to determine threat level.

Staying Safe and Escaping a Dangerous Situation is Your Main Priority

In the article previously mentioned, the three factors are Equalize, Distance, and Escape.

  1. Equalize – this means to use whatever you have on hand to make the situation more manageable for you. An assailant comes at you with a knife, and you have an umbrella…you can use the umbrella to interdict between the knife and yourself (if it’s opened) or as a striking tool if it’s closed.  A pocketbook can be used as a “Morningstar/mace” against an attacker with a club or knife.  A jacket carried in-hand can be slung upon the attacker’s face or weapon.  Here are seven improvised objects that can be used for self-defense.  These actions take you to the next step:
  2. Distance – this means to place as much distance as possible between you and the attacker. This can also include getting into a car or vehicle and locking the door behind you.  Your objective with this step is to separate yourself from your attacker and his weapon.  “Distance is your best friend,” as they used to say in the Army.  It is your best friend.  By using that “friend,” you can progress to step number 3.
  3. Escape – Yes, get out of that uncontrolled situation. What you do afterward is your business, but the first rule is to survive and succeed.  Suppose there’s a dozen of these guys, right out of the movie “The Warriors?”  What then?  There’s no use getting into semantics.  Just GOOD (Get Out Of Dodge) while the getting is good!  Escape, call the police and deal with them if you must ON YOUR TERMS, not on theirs.

5 Ways to Avoid an Approaching Attacker

Emphasis should be placed on “escape” here, because you’re dealing with 2 scenarios: 1. The everyday/now, and 2. A SHTF/disaster-stoked scenario.  In the scope of this article, we will deal with the first scenario…and this is where threat assessment is more critical.

The reason: the law.  Laws more often protect the criminal more than the victim.  If you are going to engage one of the morons who is attacking you and you must do it alone, use some of these tools to your advantage, and keep some points in mind:

  1. In this CCTV/omnipresent camera age, try to maneuver into an area where there is some sort of security camera. This can dispel doubt and give credence to your case of self-defense and provide evidence that you were defending yourself
  2. Make it loud and summon others. You’d be surprised how loud a small air horn (they make them not much larger than a tube/vial of pepper spray these days) can be.  Attract attention!  Most of these hoodlums do not want to be seen.
  3. If you must engage, fight to win. Be as effective as possible and use “Fabian Tactics,” in other words, “hit and run.”  Inflict the maximum amount of damage with the minimum amount of effort and get out of there.  We have covered the vital areas to strike for, as well as improvised weapons in previous articles.  It would behoove you to refresh on these.
  4. “Any Old Port in a Storm” – be smart: duck into a business or make a break for an area where there are plenty of people. The probability is high that the pursuer(s) will break contact and discontinue the chase.
  5. When it’s done, it’s not done – Yeah, that sounds contradictory, but you cannot let it go and think if you’ve escaped them that it’s all over. Best thing to do: file that police report and get them involved.  You pay for the “system,” so make it work for you.

Take note of the attacker(s) after you have concluded that an attack is occurring.  How are you being approached?  “Blocking” is the key word here…placing something in between you and them.  A line of cars, a narrow alleyway where they cannot come at you except in a single file, a busy street full of traffic.  Put something between you and them.  Part of avoiding them from channeling you into an area they can deal with you is your preparations.

Start Actively Practicing Situational Awareness

What this means is simple: don’t park in an area that has “blind spots,” or areas where a goon can hide.  Don’t enable said goon by being complacent in your activities.  Part of prevention is observation: you need to see who is lurking around, potentially following you, watching you, and planning something.  When several people are in an area where you park, and they look at you and begin talking to themselves and continue to look at you…the odds are not in your favor with this.

Avoidance is not being a coward.  Avoidance is gaming the situation correctly and assessing it for what it is.  Even if you beat the daylights out of them if they attack, what is to be gained from it?  Better yet, what can you lose?  When they say they were the victim and then bring criminal and civil charges against you.  All for something you could have avoided.

Sun Tzu: The apex of a general’s skill is when he wins a battle without fighting fight.

Sage advice.  Avoid at all costs, and break contact to continue the mission.  The mission is to survive and to keep yourself, your family, and your home intact.  Assessing the threat at the level that it is and meeting that threat head on only when there is no alternative will give you better odds at staying out of problems from being hurt, being sued, or having the law on top of you.  In Part 2, we will cover what to do when there is no way to avoid the attackers, and go a little more “in-depth” than the basic article mentioned previously.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Amazing Health Benefits of Ginkgo Biloba

Click here to view the original post.

We’re going to cover Ginkgo biloba, a very well-rounded herb with an ancient and time-tested past.  Ginkgo (as it’s commonly known as) has been used for thousands of years in China.  It has been known in the West for only a short time.  When Nixon opened relations with China back in the 1970’s, Ginkgo was “discovered” by Westerners for the first time.  Even this happened on a fluke, or more accurately, an appendicitis.

James Reston, the vice-president of the New York Times visited Beijing in 1971, where he came down with acute appendicitis and required surgery to survive.  The Chinese surgeons used acupuncture and herbs to help him recover.  It was this event that brought traditional Chinese medicine to the forefront of America’s focus.  Ginkgo has its roots (no pun intended) in Chinese herbal medicine, where it is a cornerstone of Chinese traditional healing methods.  Ginkgo has come to be recognized for its qualities in the West, as well.

Ginkgo itself is one of the oldest known plant species that survives, and it was around in most parts of the earth in the age of the dinosaurs.  It is literally a “living fossil,” meaning that the fossil record clearly shows ginkgo existed back then, as it does now.  After the Ice Age, the plant only survived in Asia.  It is actually a tree and is cultivated by the Chinese, who have been using it for almost 5,000 years to help restore memory and mental status, and to help with respiratory problems.

How Ginko Biloba Can Enhance Your Health

In Europe, it is prescribed to combat the symptoms of Alzheimer’s and Dementia.  It improves circulation to every portion of the body, including the brain.  Ginkgo also helps to maintain the elasticity and suppleness of the veins and arteries of the circulatory system.  The herb also reduces clotting, an important quality for people who have a higher than usual tendency toward clotting. Ginkgo also prevents the interaction of free radicals with neurotransmitters.

What this means is that your brain works through a series of “firings” of electrical impulses, transmitted along a complex “circuitry system” of your neural pathways.  These pathways have neurotransmitters (such as Acetylcholine, for one) that “connect” these pathways and enable the transmission of the electrical impulses (and thus thoughts) to and through the brain.  Free radicals are the result of excess oxidation at the cellular level and are responsible for the aging process.  A free radical is a reactive molecule or atom that is “missing” an electron and leaves it unbalanced.  It takes that electron back…from another atom or molecule.  The free radical kills healthy cells with this scavenging process.

Ginkgo is an antioxidant.  It has extra electrons, and when it comes into contact with the free radical, it gives one of these electrons to the free radical and neutralizes it.  This concept is important in relation to brain function, where impairment by free radicals and excess oxidization leads to Alzheimer’s disease.  Ginkgo also helps the eyes, ears, and respiratory system in a similar fashion, and especially the latter, where the circulatory system runs hand-in-hand with the breathing.  Want some more?  Ginkgo also protects against UV (Ultraviolet) light exposure.

Want even more? 

Soviet scientists found that Ginkgo biloba fights free radicals and cellular degeneration caused by radiation exposure…results from patients at Chernobyl.

How’s that for a super-happy-prepper herb?  Especially in light of the fact that North Korea is threatening the United States with a nuclear attack.    Ginkgo has been found to counteract the cumulative effects of radiation.

Ginkgo Biloba Extract:

To make a tincture, place 150g of dried ginkgo leaves or 400g of fresh ginkgo leaves in a jar and cover with 500ml of vodka. Cover and store in a dark place for 4 weeks, shaking the jar daily. After 4 weeks, strain the mixture, pressing all liquid from the ginkgo. Stored in a glass bottle, this will keep for up to a year.

For those who wish to avoid consuming alcohol, ginkgo tea is very simple to make. Simply add 1 cup of boiling water to 1 teaspoon of dried ginkgo or 1 tablespoon of fresh ginkgo. Allow to stand for several minutes, then sweeten as desired. The disadvantage to taking ginkgo in tea form is that the required dosage is much higher – 2-3 cups per day, rather than the 1-3 teaspoons of tincture. Alternatively, ginkgo capsules are available from health stores. Source

Ginkgo takes 50 lbs. of leaves to make 1 lb. of extract, a standard Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) that contains between 22 -27% ginkgo flavone glycosides (flavonoids), and 5-7% terpene lactones.  Flavone glycosides are antioxidants that actually protect cellular membranes from deterioration.  Recommended dosages are 120 to 240 mg per day.  There can be some side effects in patients with circulatory disorders, therefore everyone should consult with your family doctor prior to using Ginkgo.  You can make it a part of your daily supplements as well as your long-term survival supplies.  It is an incredible supplement that just may help you to fight that good fight longer and better.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Lessons from the Roman Army for Post-SHTF Combat Operations

Click here to view the original post.

Alright, we have done a couple of articles on “Knowing Yourself,” and “Knowing Your Enemy.”  Now that everyone knows one another, let’s take it to another level.  As a single individual, as a family member, or operating in a group, after it hits the fan, you will have to fight eventually.  You will not be able to avoid it and hunker down until the cavalry comes, because it will be in your neighborhood and the cavalry isn’t coming to your rescue.

We’ve discussed Fabian Tactics in previous articles.  These were based on the exploits of Quintus Fabius Maximus in the First Punic War between Carthage and Rome. “Hit and Run” tactics exemplify their description: strike a numerically superior larger force at a time and place of your choosing, and then break contact.  Fade back into the forest, hide, and avoid further combat until the next engagement of your choice.

Lessons from the Roman Army for Post-SHTF Combat Operations

Let’s “fix” ‘em: set the enemy up and zap ‘em!  Let’s do a few things that the Romans were famous for…using these techniques here and now.

  1. Choose the Ground: Yes, you choose the place you will engage them.  Along with this, you pick the time of day, the formation of the attack, the objective, and the criteria for withdrawal.  You choose it.  As an individual, you would be sniping.  As a group (depending on your numbers and composition), you can engage in operations limited by your size.  Choosing the ground means also to actively recon the enemy and not allow him to choose it and catch you unawares.
  2. Prep the Ground: The Roman Army were masters of this task. They scouted the area and with thorough intel, they knew where their enemies were, actions these people planned on taking, and avenues of approach.  They cut timber and created obstacles of logs interlaced with natural “barbed wire” in the form of thorns and thistles…along with spikes and stakes, to limit enemy cavalry.  Long before William Wallace of “Braveheart” was ever a thought, the Roman legions spread out hay soaked with pitch and oil in areas where enemy foot soldiers would move, and applied flaming arrows when the time was right.  They always took the high ground when possible, and used the natural terrain features (cliffs, rivers, etc.) to form boundaries to help them channel the enemy.
  3. Always Fight with the Sun at your Back: The Romans positioned themselves and attacked to place the sun in the eyes of their enemies. I know, I know: the enemy has “Ray-Bans,” right?  No, it worked for the Viet Cong as well.  When they’re looking into the sun, they’re at a severe disadvantage.  Use the sun.  Use the terrain.  Live with the land and live.
  4. “SPECVLATORES”- the Speculatores…the deep-cover operatives…the Special Forces and Reconnaissance warriors of the Roman Empire. You need operatives in your “unit” with the ability to do “deep penetration” of an enemy’s defenses…whether in their midst unsuspectingly or observing them from a nearby locale…operating on their own ground unbeknownst to them.  You need one or two people who can get the job done…and provide you with the deep-cover intel you’ll need to make decisions.
  5. Alliances – “The enemy of my enemy is my friend.” Not always so, but you can use such rifts to your advantage…with other groups who your enemy is at odds with.  Here is where diplomacy, teamwork, and political acumen/savvy comes into play.  These “non-combat” skills are just as important to “fixing” your enemy as any of the actual missions you will undertake to defeat him.  Be skilled at making alliances, and do not make them just for the sake of socializing.  It is an art that we will cover more in-depth in future pieces.
  6. Feed Them Disinformation: Yes, the Romans were very adept at sending messages or planting information that was false. This regarded their strengths, their movements, supplies, and reinforcements.  Sun Tzu was not the only one with a knowledge of how to monopolize disinformation, and he wasn’t the first to employ it.
  7. Lure Them and “Stake” ‘Em – the Roman Army would plant different things out in front of an approaching enemy force in order to delay and distract them…making them ripe for an attack or ambush. You can do the same, and make it fall “in line” with the enemy you’ll be facing.  Quick question: How many of you have Russian or Chinese canned delicacies, such as Borscht or caviar for the former, or imported Chinese canned foods and fineries for the latter?  Because you may be able to use it to lure such if they ever come to this country…and set a trap on or in it, or place shooters in an overwatch position overlooking it.  Because you may need prisoners, and what better way to lure them in than with a carton of their own cigarettes, their own liquor that they would think to be safe?      Be advised: SAVE YOUR RECEIPTS FROM THE STORE YOU BOUGHT IT!  This is because in the times to come if anyone ever suspects you of collaborating with them…you can show the receipts that you bought it all long before the conflict began, and give them an explanation of why you bought it all.  This may keep you from being shot by your own countrymen.
  8. The Violence of Action in a Controlled Manner – the Romans did not win their mastery over all of Europe and most of the Middle East by conducting drill and ceremony. They were trained, skilled killers and understood that the thing that made the Empire possible was the discipline and aggression of the individual legionnaire.
  9. A Perfect Chain of Command – Modern militaries all have a chain of command and an order of succession for someone to fill the “vacancy” at all levels when a commander “buys the farm,” so to speak. You need to enable each member of your team to be able to step into the shoes and position of the leader and take charge to continue with the mission.
  10. Discipline: this encompasses all areas. A “guerrilla fighter,” whether fighting off marauders from a neighboring town post SHTF, or a tyrannical, oppressive government, or a foreign invader…the guerrilla needs to be disciplined.  Physical toughness, adherence to standard operating procedures (SOP’s), a cool head and iron nerves, and endurance…the ability to keep this up for years…to go the distance.  These are the things that the Romans kept focused upon and central to their legions for many centuries.

In conclusion, small unit tactics are more than just a matter of either superior arms or numerical advantages.  They are based on common sense and knowing how to plan out your objectives, as well as a plan of attack.  You will have to be the “David” going against the Goliath, and although not shirking from battle, picking the time and place of your engagement, and the conditions and standards you will set to achieve those objectives.  It is no guarantee of success, but you are guaranteed to perform better with the proper planning, training, and clarity of purpose prior to a battle.  It can mean the difference between success and failure, life or death.  In this vein, I highly encourage you to study more about the Roman Army and the warfare in ancient times.  Take the time to clean the tarnished pitcher and you may just find a silver piece made by Revere.  The knowledge is there: seek after it and make your future rather than just allowing it to happen to you.  That’s what it’s all about.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Survival Uses for Pine Tree Resin You Haven’t Thought Of

Click here to view the original post.

There are many uses for the resin that can be collected from pine trees.  Just what is the resin and how does the pine tree use it?  Well, it’s a substance that helps protect the tree from funguses and disease, as it is antimicrobial in nature.  Resin (commonly referred to as “sap”) also enables the tree to hold in water and protect it in times of drought.  It is used by the tree as a sort of natural “self-patching” kit to help it close a wound within it, such as a deep gouge in the bark.

People have been using resin for a long time.  It can be used to make wood stain and varnish.  Yeah, I know, that’s really exciting.  So, let’s cut to the chase and list what it can do.

  1. First Aid: The sap is antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory.  A hardened piece can be softened with heat and applied to a wound to help stop bleeding.  If you chew it (softer pieces), it can treat sore throats and help with a cold.
  2. For fire and light: the resin burns, and can be used to make torches, fire starters, and makeshift candles. Read more on how to acquire a supply of fat wood for lighting fires in a snap.
  3. Glue: for patching holes and tears…also in skin, akin to super-glue on a cut (double use as first-aid there). You can mount heads on blowgun-darts, spears, and arrows with it.

There’s plenty to go around.  You can gather it in the woods both hardened and soft.  Be sure and use a container, preferably glass and not plastic to carry your resin.  People harvest it by cutting v-shaped notches into the bark in rows parallel to one another.  The resin then collects in the lowest one…a bucket or vessel is needed to catch it.  Don’t go out and destroy or hurt live trees unless it’s a genuine survival situation.  If it kills you to think about it, know that those who harvest it do so for 20 years or more with no overall ill effects on the tree.

Fossilized resin is known as amber and has been fashioned into jewelry.  Many times, the amber trapped animals in it when it was still soft resin, such as bees, ants, and spiders…and they ended up being perfectly preserved…of great historical and scientific value.  Pine tar, pitch, rosin, and turpentine can be made from pine tree resin, and although they are beyond the scope of this article, they are worth mentioning for your further research.

I’ve written articles on pine pollen and pine needle tea in the past.  As you can see, the pine trees have many uses besides just building cabins and as fuel for fires that don’t immediately jump out at you.  Learn to find and gather the resin and try to practice using it in the ways we covered here.  This is good for your ongoing survival training and further sustaining yourself when the going gets tough and the only resources you have are what information you carry in your head and the skills to make it happen.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

Top 13 Uses for Pine Trees in Woodcraft and Self-Reliance

Did you know pine trees can be used as food, medicine and survival equipment?

16 Uses of Sticky Pine Sap for Wilderness Survival and Self-Reliance

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Your Best Self: How To Find Time To Transform With Workout, Meditation, and Study

Click here to view the original post.

Well, the Winter is almost over.  Hopefully, you have continued through the Winter months with your physical training and exercise, along with continuous development through study and preparation.  It is truly an ongoing effort, requiring the allocation of time and the discipline to employ that time (i.e., use it wisely).  If you have not been maintaining a “ready posture” through the Winter, well, now is the time to get back into the groove.  Break down this “restart” with a method I call “WMS,” that translates into Workout, Meditate, and Study.  Let’s jump into it!

Transform Into Your Better Self

Workout: your physical training is imperative to your survival and optimal performance when the “lights go out all over the world,” and also in day to day business at hand.  I have written other articles on the importance of a training calendar to keep track of your time and budget it wisely.  I also stressed that your workouts should not last longer than an hour.  Your workout is for you, tailored by you, whether you’re into aerobics training or strength training.  The exercise is important for the health benefits, and also (when you’ve expended the energy), your body becomes more relaxed.  As we’ve covered exercise in plenty of articles, now let’s jump to the next step.

Meditate: After you’ve taken your supplements and your high-protein shake (no more than 20-30 minutes post workout!), limber up and prepare to meditate.  That’s right!  Meditation will relax your body and mind.  Meditation and working out also has a synergistic effect on the mind. It is proven to develop junctions in the synaptic nerve endings and reinforce connections between nerve centers of your brain.  Deep breathing exercises, while sitting in a comfortable position and listening to instrumental music, as you focus on relaxation and clearing your mind: this is what it’s all about.  You want to use music or tones (such as sounds of nature, as the ocean waves, or the songs of birds) without any words.  The words throw off your concentration upon relaxation…the words stimulate the mind to think of images or situations.  That’s not what you want.  You want to develop Alpha brain waves, and “de-stress” after your workout.  Wind down from the physical and bring your body back to a good state.  The time can be of your choosing…15 minutes to 30 minutes is fine for just starting out.  Now, step 3!

Study: Yes, study!  You pick the subject.  Have a nice cup of tea or coffee with your studies and give it about 15 to 30 minutes of effort.  After a good workout and a thorough meditation, along with a good cup of coffee (it is proven to help with concentration and mental alertness), you can feel refreshed.  It is also a good time to get the creative juices flowing in the brain…and improve yourself before starting out your day with work or whatever is in it.  Learning new things (such as a language) is very good to stimulate development (physically) of the human brain.

The key to the whole endeavor is to be disciplined.  This means you must make a plan and then follow through with that plan in action.  All of these three steps should run you under 2 hours.  It’s hard: juggling the treadmill for the week, the kids, and all of the “trappings” our constantly busy society offers.  Guess what?  You have to make time for yourself.  Do those three things, and you will find that the other things will become easier, and not harder.  Perseverance, persistence, and determination are needed to establish this as a new routine.  Make it a permanent one!  Don’t stop after a few days.  You’re investing in something for the long haul.  You will emerge from your three-part training program ready for a good breakfast, a refreshing shower, and then you can face the world both healthier and clearer.  The key is to face it on your terms and win each day, for yourself and your family.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Your Best Self: How To Find Time To Transform With Workout, Meditation, and Study

Well, the Winter is almost over.  Hopefully, you have continued through the Winter months with your physical training and exercise, along with continuous development through study and preparation.  It is truly an ongoing effort, requiring the allocation of time and the discipline to employ that time (i.e., use it wisely).  If you have not been maintaining a “ready posture” through the Winter, well, now is the time to get back into the groove.  Break down this “restart” with a method I call “WMS,” that translates into Workout, Meditate, and Study.  Let’s jump into it!

Transform Into Your Better Self

Workout: your physical training is imperative to your survival and optimal performance when the “lights go out all over the world,” and also in day to day business at hand.  I have written other articles on the importance of a training calendar to keep track of your time and budget it wisely.  I also stressed that your workouts should not last longer than an hour.  Your workout is for you, tailored by you, whether you’re into aerobics training or strength training.  The exercise is important for the health benefits, and also (when you’ve expended the energy), your body becomes more relaxed.  As we’ve covered exercise in plenty of articles, now let’s jump to the next step.

Meditate: After you’ve taken your supplements and your high-protein shake (no more than 20-30 minutes post workout!), limber up and prepare to meditate.  That’s right!  Meditation will relax your body and mind.  Meditation and working out also has a synergistic effect on the mind. It is proven to develop junctions in the synaptic nerve endings and reinforce connections between nerve centers of your brain.  Deep breathing exercises, while sitting in a comfortable position and listening to instrumental music, as you focus on relaxation and clearing your mind: this is what it’s all about.  You want to use music or tones (such as sounds of nature, as the ocean waves, or the songs of birds) without any words.  The words throw off your concentration upon relaxation…the words stimulate the mind to think of images or situations.  That’s not what you want.  You want to develop Alpha brain waves, and “de-stress” after your workout.  Wind down from the physical and bring your body back to a good state.  The time can be of your choosing…15 minutes to 30 minutes is fine for just starting out.  Now, step 3!

Study: Yes, study!  You pick the subject.  Have a nice cup of tea or coffee with your studies and give it about 15 to 30 minutes of effort.  After a good workout and a thorough meditation, along with a good cup of coffee (it is proven to help with concentration and mental alertness), you can feel refreshed.  It is also a good time to get the creative juices flowing in the brain…and improve yourself before starting out your day with work or whatever is in it.  Learning new things (such as a language) is very good to stimulate development (physically) of the human brain.

The key to the whole endeavor is to be disciplined.  This means you must make a plan and then follow through with that plan in action.  All of these three steps should run you under 2 hours.  It’s hard: juggling the treadmill for the week, the kids, and all of the “trappings” our constantly busy society offers.  Guess what?  You have to make time for yourself.  Do those three things, and you will find that the other things will become easier, and not harder.  Perseverance, persistence, and determination are needed to establish this as a new routine.  Make it a permanent one!  Don’t stop after a few days.  You’re investing in something for the long haul.  You will emerge from your three-part training program ready for a good breakfast, a refreshing shower, and then you can face the world both healthier and clearer.  The key is to face it on your terms and win each day, for yourself and your family.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Ashwagandha: This Ancient Herb Has Been Used in Natural Medicine For Over 2,500 Years!

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, we’re covering a unique herb that has been around for quite a while as a holistic support and herbal supplement.  The herb is Ashwagandha, also known as Indian Ginseng, or Withania somnifera scientifically.  It has been in use in Ayurvedic medicine for more than 2,500 years.  It is not a commonly-known herb, but the benefits are incredible and worth covering in this report to you.

For those who are not familiar with it, Ayurvedic medicine is the medicine that is traditionally used in the nation of India and has been in practice for more than 5,000 years.  The interesting thing is that we’re exploring the herb for its qualities known to traditional Western medicine, as well as in the context of American Sports Nutrition.

How Ashwagandha Can Improve Health

Ashwagandha can be taken in pill, tincture, or capsule form.  It is an anti-inflammatory that bolsters the immune system, relieves the pain and swelling of inflammation, and it reduces anxiety.  Yes, it is a stress-relieving herb that works on mild to moderate depression, as well as enabling physical recovery from strenuous work or exercise.

The herb is an adaptogen, a term used to describe an herbal substance that has a homeostatic effect on an organism.  What this means is that it works to bring your body into balance if there is an overage or a shortage that results in a person’s condition.  For example, if a person is hyperglycemic (too much blood sugar), an adaptogen will lower that blood sugar and bring the person closer to normal values.  If the individual is hypoglycemic (low blood sugar), the adaptogen will work in the opposite direction and raise the blood sugar closer to normal.

Most scientists do not know why an adaptogen works the way it does.  To Herbalists and other Naturopaths, the reason is not as important as the fact that the results can be documented and monitored, as well as the amounts a person needs to take in order to achieve those results.  The principle of Herbalism is that the whole herb (in whatever form it is consumed) is more effective than any of its individual constituent parts taken alone.  Examples of other adaptogens include ginseng (the most well-known and widely used).

Ashwagandha also works on male infertility, and at dosages of around 2,000 mg per day will help with low testosterone and low libido.  In much the same manner as ginseng, Ashwagandha enhances the human body’s ability to deal with stress.  It also improves reaction time, mental clarity, and performance as it relates to physical exercise and work.  Although there is no general consensus on the exact dosages across the board, following the packaging instructions from the manufacturer will ensure you take what is needed.  Usually, a dosage of approximately 500 mg either 1 to 2 times per day with a meal will suffice.

The good thing about such adaptogens is that they can be used to supplement a workout routine and help to reduce recovery time for a person.  When taken routinely, Ashwagandha is very productive for athletes, people working physically-demanding professions, and for stress…basically everybody!  Check it out in one of your grocery stores or in your health food concerns after clearing it with “Dr. Happy,” your friendly family physician.  It is not expensive, and it delivers a lot of benefits without any side effects or precautions.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

SHTF Combat Operations and Fabian Tactics

Click here to view the original post.

In one of my previous articles, I referenced several resources for you to use, and I will repeat them here.  The Field Manual for the Infantry Rifle Platoon and Squad, FM 7-8 is the manual I used when I was in the service.  (The “modern” version is FM 3-21).  Another reference is SH 21-76, the Army Ranger HandbookThese three little books war a “gold mine” of information that you will need to organize yourselves (family, extended family-friends, and allies) into a cohesive force.  Notice how I did not say “effective,” and that adjective can only be obtained by practice and repetition.  It costs to become an effective fighting force.

The cost is paid through study, time, effort, and the allocation of resources; the cost is paid through practice and repetition.

That being mentioned, why am I writing about this?  Why write about such “military matters” as combat operations?

Because after the SHTF, the Army isn’t going to be sent in to do the “dirty work” for you while you dehydrate organic tomatoes: you’re going to have to do it yourself.

“Citizen-soldier” is a unique concept that perhaps is brought to the forefront of the imagination with the citizen-soldiers of the Revolutionary War…but its roots are much older than our transposed, Northern European form of society, culture, and government.  It has its roots in much older nations, such as the ancient city-states of Greece, and the Republic (then Empire) of Rome.

Citizens were not “encouraged” to serve: they were expected to be soldiers.

Fast-forward to now.  You can do the same: for your family, for your neighborhood, and for your community.  After it hits the fan, you may have to fight any number of enemies: marauding gangs, outlaws, foreign troops, and perhaps even those of your own government gone bad.

7 Tactical Topics You Must Master Before it Hits the Fan

You have a lot of studying to do that is beyond the scope of this article to cover, but we’re going to list some topics for you, and I will cover some of them later.  These topics are not merely subjects.  They are tasks, to learn how to do and execute as an individual and as a group.  Let’s list some:

  1. Traveling formations: File, Wedge, Diamond.
  2. React to near ambush.
  3. React to far ambush (sniper fire)
  4. Setting up an ambush (L, V, and so on)
  5. Fixing and Flanking (with an “A” team/squad as base and the “B” team as flanking element) This calls for a “lift and shift” of fires on an enemy.
  6. Strategic withdrawal/Orderly retreat
  7. Setting up a cigar-shaped perimeter at night, with security

My best advice for you to train your group: LINK UP WITH A VETERAN – AN EXPERIENCED ONE. A veteran will be your best bet for being able to bring all these tasks to bear and train to standards.

A War of Attritions

You also need to follow a doctrine, and that is one of Fabian Tactics.  What are they?  Well, Fabian Tactics are also referred to as “hit and run” tactics, and are usually thought of as “guerilla,” or unconventional warfare tactics.  They can be employed as such, and usually are; however, they are also used by conventional forces when arrayed against a much larger force.

The effects of these “hit and run” tactics are not to achieve an out-and-out victory, but to delay, to harass, and to dissuade a superior force from entering into an area and conducting regular combat operations that eventually lead to taking the ground and pacifying the resistance.

The term originated with the former Consul of Rome, Quintus Fabius Maximus, who utilized such “hit and run” tactics with the Roman legions when they fought the great Carthaginian General, Hannibal.  The measure was used successfully, in which the Romans wearied the men and forces of Hannibal and dragged out the conflict for so long that the battle in Italy was unsustainable.  It forced the Carthaginian withdrawal, and then later the Romans defeated them in North Africa.

Learn from experience.  Learn from those who did it before.  Read and study about the Viet Cong…how a third-world nation held out against the United States Military.  Do you want a good read?  Invest in The Tunnels of Cu-Chi,” for an in-depth view of how the North Vietnamese Army and the Viet Cong were so successful.  Watch films on resistance…by the fighters in the Warsaw ghetto during World War II.  Do you want to know how to do it from the ground up?  Pick up the book and the film, both entitled Defiance,” about the Bielski brothers in Belorussia during WWII…how they formed and trained an effective resistance force.

Start studying these things.  One by James Michener (and not a novel, but a documentary) is entitled The Bridge at Andau,” where you can read about teenage girls that had the guts to blow up Soviet tanks during the Hungarian resistance.  Study, task organize, and train.  Above all, find yourself a vet and learn from them.

And treat the vet as a hero: as the vet should have been treated by the nation.  It may just be that the vet will end up being a hero again…in your service when the “S” hits the fan. 

 

Fight that good fight, fight it well, and fight it smart.  Fight it to win.  JJ out!

 

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

FEMA: “Each Family Needs To Have a Central Rally Point”

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, this is going to take some planning on your part, as each person and family’s geographic location and other demographics (number of family members, etc.) are going to determine courses of action.

One of the problems that may be faced is that nobody will be home when the SHTF, and there may be a considerable distance for everyone to travel to reach home when that happens.

One way to lower your risks in traveling is to plan out and create rally points and hide sites.

FEMA also emphasizes the importance of having a family rally point.

“During many emergencies family members may be easily separated, and the confusion or chaos during any disaster often makes it more difficult for families members to find each other. Each family needs to have a central rally point that is reasonably secure and relatively easy for each family member to reach, adjusted for individual means of transportation. Such a rally point starts with a safe location near a family’s home or apartment … a location outside the residence where everyone agrees to meet in the event of fire or other threats. Think about other types of emergencies you might expect, and select the rally point providing the greatest safety during any one expected emergency. Families who have agreed, in advance, to help each other in time of major emergencies, also need to select secure rally points. I’m sure you may have heard all of this advise before, but too many of us forget survival essentials.”

When Comms are Down, Each Family Should Have a Rally Point

A rally point is nothing more than a predetermined location that you and all your family members agree to meet up or link up.  We will also address hasty rally points that can be used when you’re all together.  Hypothetically, let’s say that the Anderson family consists of Working Dad, Working Mom, 15-year-old Johnny and 19-year-old Susie.  Johnny is in high school, and Susie is a student with a part-time job in a drugstore right next to the school.  Here are the distances for all of them from home:

Dad – 10 miles       Mom – 8 miles       Johnny – 10 miles       Susie – 7 miles

Everyone is our hypothetical family is working and studying on the West Side of town, and home is to the East of town, for convenience’s sake.  Let us also say that the SHTF event is an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) attack.  The optimal location would be for the rally point to be established nearest to Susie, as she is the closest to home.  The others could make their way to this rally point…. let’s say it is a large oak tree in the park…where they would link up with one another and then attempt to reach home together.

Family’s Who Have a Hide Site Can Regroup More Efficiently

In addition to this, just in case things become too “hairy” you should establish a hide site.  A hide site is nothing more than a place to rest and regroup (possibly with some supplies that are hidden or cached) before continuing your movement home.

With everyone firmly rooted in the mentality of English property law, this may require you to establish a hide site that may be located on someone else’s property, such as a business or an abandoned/dilapidated structure.  You make the call and be the judge: when the SHTF, you can write a check to the property owner if you feel the need for sleeping in the abandoned barn with only three walls and half a roof.

The point being, if you’re going to use such things to facilitate your travel home, this means you will have to plan on them beforehand and perhaps conduct a rehearsal.  The more you practice, the better you will be.  You can then formulate a plan that will remove the uncertainties out of what all of you do.  What uncertainties can you avoid?  How about these, for starters:

“Oh, my word, where’s Johnny?” or “What about Susie?  My cell phone’s down…I can’t reach her!”

Mr. and Mrs. Anderson and family can take all the guesswork out of worrying for one another by having a premade plan that has been practiced.  A good deal of security and sense of confidence will come just from having a basic plan that each family member knows, and each family member knows that all of the other family members have the plan memorized and are going to carry out their parts.

You can aid each other in these plans with Motorola’s in the vehicles, shielded by a Faraday cage.  Turn on your agreed-upon preplanned family frequency when it’s safe to do so…and make communication when you’re able.  Now, back to a hasty rally point.  When you’re traveling toward the house?  A hasty rally point is a point that is identified by the group leader of your family as a fallback location while in the middle of movement/ traveling.

The hand-and-arm signal for “Rally” in the United States Army is to extend your right hand straight up, palm flattened, and make a circular motion above your head, fingers extended and joined.  Make sure all of your family members see it.  Then point to the exact location you have in mind: a small hollow at the base of a hill, a large boulder next to a creek, or whatever is decided upon.  Make sure each family member sees both the sign for “Rally” and you pointing to exactly where it is.

If trouble arises and everyone has to run, you will meet up at this rally point and then determine if you will proceed as you were going, or what alternate route you’ll take.  Planning is everything in this, and rehearsals will make it as perfect as it can be.  Help one another and take time to consider the best locations you can use, and give yourself a better chance.  Anything that will tip the scale in your favor even a few percentage points is worth your consideration.  Fight that good fight, every day.  JJ out!

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Get Back in Shape After Winter {Plus Workout}

Click here to view the original post.

Over the course of all of my time writing for ReadyNutrition, I have continuously emphasized the need for physical fitness training, coupled with a good diet and proper rest.  This is paramount to survival if it hits the fan or you’re faced with an emergency (life or death) situation.  One of the problems I see with people is that they must “emerge” from the Winter…a time when the body’s natural rhythm is in accord with rest and lower activity.  They must also emerge from the holidays…the “barrage” of festive occasions from Thanksgiving all the way through to Easter. This high-calorie diet can create a heavy feeling and cause you to not workout as much as you should.

From a time standpoint of not working out and making bad diet choices, that’s a long time. Potentially, if one does nothing but eat and go back and forth during this time, you’re looking at six months or more of not exercising.  I’m not going into the “why’s” or parameters of that missed time.  We’re just going to tell you how to emerge from it and get back on track if you haven’t been training and maintaining over the winter months.

Let’s Cut to the Chase

Firstly, your muscles will have atrophied and shrunk somewhat over that period of time, and usually, people build up considerable weight in the form of fat.  When you first start out, it’s going to be twofold: at the dinner table, and with slow stretching and light calisthenics.

At the dinner table, you need to limit your intake to what you need.  Avoid the condiments and sauces and the other stuff with high-fructose corn syrup.  You’ll need to get yourself on a regular dietary routine for about a solid week.  All of this is going to be dependent on how much weight you’ve gained, and any other habits you may have picked up in between.  In that first week, you also need to do stretching exercises and light calisthenics.  If you lifted weights and let it slide?  You don’t want to just go out and start lifting immediately.  You need to acclimate your system to a healthy diet and your muscles to being subjected to physical exercise again.

Again, it will vary according to the individual.

Getting Back Into the Game

Remember, folks, you need to gently get your body back into shape. Train don’t strain. Workout a little more each day until you feel capable of taking it to the next level.

Basic Workout Program for the First Week

Day 1: Light stretching in the form of side-straddle-hop (jumping jacks), some push-ups, dips (for triceps, with a bar-grips or with the edge of a chair), and some chin-ups.  You can use bands (elastic or rubber) for stretching exercises as well.

Day 2: A brisk walk will be good for you and then some stretching afterward.  When do you stretch?  Try and rub your muscles with your hands, as well: this “massage” stimulates blood flow and distributes it throughout the muscle, as well as stretching the muscle itself.  Distance for your walk will vary, but it’s not to be a “walkathon.”  You and your body are beginning to become “familiar” with one another.

Day 3: Work your lower body and abs with crunches, wall-squats, more jumping-jacks, and leg lifts…train don’t strain!…and train to your ability level.  The idea is to get back into it, slowly and steadily.  Stairmaster-type exercises and step-aerobics can work well for you.

Day 4: Another walk at the same pace and distance as the one on Day 2…just enough to get the blood moving and stretch out.  Don’t forget to stretch and do the massage as outlined above.

Day 5: Repeat what you did on Day 1 with those same exercises.

Day 6: Repeat Day 3’s lower body and abdominal exercises and then a short walk about half the distance to your other two walking days (Days 2 and 4) to stretch out and finish off.

Day 7: A rest-day from training.

There is your first week of “getting back into the game,” so to speak.  Here are points to follow that are important:

  1. Put the fork down: Yes, put it down!  Do not snack in-between meals, and either eat three normal-sized meals or 4-5 smaller meals with equal time in between.  Concentration is on high protein meals with low fat and medium carbohydrates.  Stick with your pasta, potatoes, and rice.  It’s the sauces and condiments that really pile on the fat, as well as the method of cooking.  Try to broil meats and bake potatoes.
  2. Copious amounts of water: Yes, the key to getting back into shape metabolically is to flush the poisons out and stay away from sugary beverages. Sodas are no good.  Juice is good, but in moderation, unless it’s vegetable juice and without any sugar.
  3. Avoid harmful substances: Alcohol is detrimental to training and packing on muscle. Alcohol also is converted along the way and stored as fat after it gives your liver a thorough (and detrimental) fight.  Smoking (tobacco or anything else) is out.  You wouldn’t inhale a car’s exhaust fumes, so don’t put anything else that’s poisonous and burns you into your lungs.  Drugs (unless prescribed as medication) are a complete no-go to be avoided at all costs.
  4. Soreness and fatigue: You’ll need to capitalize on rest for the first several weeks to a month. Lactic acid will build up in your muscles, and the muscles will become sore and tired.  This usually puts a wall up to people getting back into exercising.  You can overcome it with proper rest (critical), proper nutrition (critical), and with hot showers, baths, and massages (palliative/supportive measures accompanying your normal hygiene).
  5. Interference: The normative, daily activities and rigors of existence…the telephone call from coworkers or bosses; the screeching parakeet, yelling children, and barking dog; the conversation between you and your spouse that “has to happen” just as you’re doing pushups; the surprise visit from “Uncle Nick” who has two 16” pizzas and a six-pack of beer. All of these “impediments” need to be overcome to succeed and require discipline on your part and a certain amount of diplomacy as well.

You can overcome what you’ve put on over the winter months.  It didn’t happen overnight.  It will require patience and discipline.  You have to take care of yourself.  A mountain of supplies and equipment will not help you if you are out of shape.  Now’s your chance to turn things around if they went “south” for the winter.  As Ben Franklin put it, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” but if you have to take that pound to cure it?  Then by all means: enter the fray and fight that good fight to win!  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Common Sports Items You Can Use to Protect Yourself in an Emergency

Click here to view the original post.

OK, I’m going to start this off with almost a “disclaimer,” of sorts.  Please do not think that I do not buy gear of top quality; however, I’m skeptical about much of the equipment out there on the market.  Just because something has a brand name attached to it doesn’t mean that it is quality.  Much of the stuff that is “garbage” and is passed off as being “quality” is manufactured on the cheap in China and other countries that are not trying to produce something that will last a long time.

That being mentioned, the article is specifically for people who don’t have $80 to “dump” into Oakley Tactical shooting gloves, or Tactical Military knee pads at $70 to $80 per pair.  And more.  While there are some great places to find quality tactical gear, this article can give you some ideas on how to build up a supply of reserves (or daily, whichever you prefer, with your “good” gear in reserve) for when times are tough.

You can find some good deals for used sporting equipment by simply doing a search on the internet. Ebay, Amazon are some big names that have used sporting equipment, but there are other websites that specialize in used sports gear. So, check it out in your free time. That said, let’s jump into it!

5 Types of Sports Equipment That Can Be Modified Into Protective Gear

Gloves: One of the things the Oakley’s have that attracts a lot of people are those hardened plastic “knuckles” on the outside.  That’s fine.  I personally feel that if you have the glove that covers the knuckle, you don’t need an “artificial” one: if you’re going to strike a blow, you’re not going to hit the individual on top of his helmet.  You’re going to pick a “soft” spot such as his jaw, his temple, his throat, etc.  There are some substitutes.  Weightlifting gloves, and motorcycle-riding gloves.  The tips of the fingers are removed, yet they’re padded on the palms.  Pick up the ones made of thick leather and maybe a Velcro strap to close around the wrist.  This will protect your palms, give your knuckles a shield, and still enable you to use your fingertips where gloves may (and often do) interfere.

Related Article: These Simple Training Techniques Will Prepare You For Emergency Hand-to-Hand Combat

Football and Rugby Shorts: These are great, made of nylon (Spandex-type) or polyester, stitched to take some punishment with padding on the hips and on the thighs usually sewn into the material.  When you’re lying in the prone, this is a great help.  Enables you to cushion those areas.  Helps to minimize bumps and bruises, as well.  Drawback: they don’t have “slots” to allow you to urinate easily.  Either make your own and emplace “button snaps” on them, or you’ll have to pull down on the waistband if you’re a guy.  If you’re a gal, well, it’s not a major concern.

Knee and Elbow Pads: As mentioned before, there is no need to go out and spend all that money on those pads.  There are plenty of rollerblading and skateboarding knee and elbow pads for half those prices that are just as durable, if not more so.  You should shop around to find the best deal and the best quality pieces.  Try to stick to earth tones or black in terms of color.  Used sporting goods all over the place will be able to get you a complete set of both for about $20 in total, and they work.

Wrist Guards: Now, on this one I’m partial…I like the ones that give you support and are made out of leather.  You may have to have these custom-ordered.  Reason for them?  Leather will protect the wrists from being slashed, either by a sharp edge or by a knife.  These, too, can be made for you at a leather-works shop.  Buckled ones are best.  If you’re not going to go with leather, then you can pick these up inexpensively for under $10 at Wal-Mart in the sporting goods section.

Shin Guards: The ones made for soccer players are the best.  Excellent to strap on the outside of your pants over your calves and tuck into your boots.  Protects you going through clear-cut, swamps, and other places that the shins are likely to take a beating.  Not hard to find and not expensive at all.

Not mentioned is the everyday baseball bat. I covered this in a different article on how this can be used in a self-defense manner and add any attention to yourself for having it in the vehicle.

We have covered a few things to give you some ideas.  Many of these pieces that are normally used in sporting events are designed specifically to take a beating, which is what you need for equipment in the first place.  It stands to reason that if you can save a few dollars and still get what you needed in the equipment?  More power to you.  Adapt and be versatile, and you’ll come to find the best deals often don’t just involve an outlay of cash but some scrutiny to see whether something more affordable will foot the bill.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

9 Mindful Ways to Start Breaking Up With Plastic – For Good!

Click here to view the original post.

 

One of the big problems with our prepackaged, modern, consumer spending-based economies is that everything is mass-produced in plastic with little or no regard for the future problems it creates. To date, 14 billion pounds of garbage are dumped into the ocean every year – most of it being plastic.

Image result for the jungle upton sinclairThe book “The Jungle,” by Upton Sinclair basically was the blueprint that propelled the FDA into action against big industry and how detrimental it can be to the individual.  Time, however, is the factor that erodes both conscience and consciousness, in that order.

Each generation faces new challenges from a system designed to follow profit-potential rather than the welfare of the people confined within it.  No exceptions are to be found in the food and beverage industries: most of their products are either unhealthy or outright poisonous due to dyes, preservatives or additives.  No less the containers and packaging they are in.

Recently several articles surfaced that categorized these problems.  Rather than “rehash” the information, in a nutshell, I will summarize it.  BPA’s (Bisphenol A’s) are chemicals used in plastic bottles, containers, and on the interior liners that are found in many food cans.  This chemical has been in use for more than fifty years and is found to be linked to male infertility, low sperm counts, and prostate cancer, as well as, breast cancer in women.

How This Will Affect Your Body

BPA lodges in the body’s fat cells and disrupts endocrine function…this is your body’s hormonal system.  Here are two articles you can read to reference these problems:

Study Reveals Science Behind Soy Boys,” by Kit Daniels of Prison Planet, 2/5/18.

Bisphenol A (BPA) is Found in Plastic Containers, Water Bottles, and in Till Receipts,” by Victoria Allen, the Daily Mail, 2/4/18.

You will see in the articles that the BPA contaminants are far from being limited to just the food and beverage industry.  The problem with the articles is they don’t suggest any kind of solution: they just mention things such as “you should check to find out if a product has BPA’s on the label,” and “don’t handle any cash receipts from the stores!”

Moreover, it was exposed recently that plastic microplastic contaminants were found in 90% of bottled drinking water.

recently released study tested 259 water bottles from 11 brands sold across nine countries, including the United States, and found that 93% of those tested contained microplastic contamination. The research, which was conducted by researchers at the State University of New York at Fredonia and non-profit journalism organization Orb Media, found an average of 10.4 plastic particles per liter of water, which is twice the amount of contamination found in tap water, according to another Orb Media investigation

Source

9 Mindful Ways to Phase Plastics Out of Your Life

Well, we’re going to offer some solutions.  Of course, they won’t be perfect, but you can cut down on your exposure to such things and give yourself a better edge.  Let’s do it:

  1. Use containers for your drinking water that are not made of plastic, like this one. This will be extremely difficult for long-term storage.  I have written extensively about the importance of storing a water supply.  I’m not reversing my stance: life over limb instead of being “Mr. Particular” and agonizing over some things that cannot be changed.  If you can afford giant, stainless-steel or porcelain water storage vessels…go for it.  If you have only the plastic, then run with the ball as best you can.  But tote your water on a daily basis and store water for your daily drinking needs in either glass bottles or stainless-steel bottles.  You can also use wide-mouth 1-quart Mason jars.  The biggest challenge you’ll face is the freezing temperatures of the winter.  Fill your vessels up to about ¾ of the way to allow for some expansion if the vessel freezes.  The steel bottles you can heat over a flame.  The glass bottles, warm them up gradually.
  2. Use corning ware or smooth-baked porcelain in place of plastic food storage containers or cling-on wrap. These food wraps are made from beeswax and are washable and reusable.
  3. Use reusable storage bags instead of plastic food bags for storage. This is a great way to get away from plastics and teach mindfulness to the youngsters. We also found these reusable bread storage bags that could be used when buying bread at the bakery.
  4. Heat up your food in the oven and not in the microwave…this will enable you to use that corning ware you store your food in.
  5. For food freezing or long-term storage: use wax paper and butcher’s block paper…steer clear of aluminum foil…or any container of aluminum, for that matter.
  6. Check out all of your cookware beforehand for the presence of any BPA’s or chemical contaminants…Teflon-coated pans or pots are a No-Go, for example. Cast Iron and Stainless Steel…you can’t go wrong with them.
  7. Utensils and plates: go with metal and porcelain/corning respectively…avoid the plastic coatings and chemicals that are attached to them.
  8. Use your Internet resources and Consumer reporting firms (regarding products) to find out what chemicals are used in your foods, the packaging, and all of the products you purchase…before you purchase them.
  9. Wilderness and outdoor equipment: I use two WWII-era steel one-quart canteens with cork liners…I mentioned I prefer the canteens to the Camelbaks. One of the reasons is the steel canteens can be heated up.  I also use the issue canteen cup (made of steel) for my Morning, Joe, when I’m out in the woods.

Start Healing the Body from Heavy Metals

I recently wrote several articles about chelation therapy, and the herbs used to remove heavy metals from your system.  I highly recommend going back and reading them.  When you pick up your groceries, if you can shop at the coops or the Hutterite or Mennonite farms for your meats and produce, by all means: eliminate the chemicals in this manner.

If you are forced to continue to buy from the grocery stores, I recommend researching how you can clean up or remove chemicals from your food, as the depth is beyond the scope of this basic article.  This piece will get you started with ideas and help you in the first step: to become aware.  The next steps are up to you.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Escape Unseen and Cover Your Tracks in Winter

Click here to view the original post.

Let’s say the you-know-what hit the fan and you did everything right. You made short and long-term emergency plans, had multiple escape routes and somehow were still tracked down and captured. In a post-SHTF world, all bets are off. The world you would find yourself in is unpredictable at best. So what would you do if you were taken captive? Your only option would be to find a way to escape.

Related article: If You See These 14 Signs It’s Time to Bug Out

Timing is Crucial

So, when is the best time to run from pursuers?  Wintertime can often be unrelenting but could offer you an opportunity in this situation. If you know how to read the signs Mother Nature gives when a storm is about to hit, then you could time your escape perfectly. A snowstorm could be the best time to escape. The middle of a snowstorm will give you good cover and erase any tracks you make at the same time – especially with a good head start. That said, it is important for you to know beforehand and train how to navigate in the snow.

The pain is that the snow levels can be at a depth where you will need snowshoes. This video can show you how to use a knife to make snowshoes out of evergreens and cordage. (Your paracord bracelet would come in handy for this!) Now, with the head start, your snowshoes will leave tracks that will be almost indistinguishable in a few hours.

How To Cover Your Tracks

You can help it along.  Take a fallen branch…2 feet in length or more and drag this behind you over top of your tracks…smooths them out.  By the time the pursuers reach the area you’ve traversed, the falling snow will have done the trick.

Bear in mind this doesn’t beat the dogs, who track by both sight and scent.  We’ve discussed beating them in other articles.  This is for the two-legged “dogs” who pursue you.  Also, part of keeping your trail to a minimum is to look where you step.  With snow, to step on an embankment that may collapse on one side is a no-go.

Rule: Do your best to maintain the overall visual “continuity” of the terrain you’re traveling over.

This applies to any season, and it means to keep everything as natural looking as can be.  You can be aided in a snowstorm flight by high winds that will also help to blow the snow (especially if it’s a “dry” snowfall) across your trail.  If there’s a fallen log, don’t step on it or go over it…go around it if possible.  You want everything to appear au naturale to the pursuers…nothing out of place.  Take special care not break off any branches or step on any fallen timber and cause a fresh break.  Foliage that has snow on it?  If a man-sized patch of green shows through where small evergreen saplings are growing…they’ll know that a human passed through there.

Confuse the Trackers By Doubling Back

Doubling back is a good way to throw them off…if you do it right. You can reverse the snowshoes when you head back, as well…but you must make sure that you brushed over top of your first set of tracks before you double back.  A good tracker will also see more weight is distributed overtop of the toe area.  Lead it to the edge of a cliff and throw them off your trail if you can do it.  Want a good one?  Bring an extra jacket and an empty backpack with you.  Wrap boughs in it and throw it off the cliff, after filling the backpack with snow.

Your “dummy” will be partially covered with snow when they find it and they’ll waste time getting down below to check it out.  Time is what you want to buy yourself.  As many times as you can break off the main trail, throw a “division” and then double back, the better.  It is going to depend on how much time you have, and in how good a physical shape you’re in.

Covering Your Tracks in the Mud

During the warmer months, with the Spring Thaw, the first thing you’re going to have to deal with is the mud…and mud means a problem.  Mud means footprints, and mud that clings to your boots and is dragged with you…an exceptional problem when trying to cover your tracks. Due to the differing terrains, you will encounter this issue – especially in a rocky field with scrub grass.  Suddenly, tracks from “The Golem” are seen making a trail in the grass for about 50 meters.  Bad juju.

When transitioning from a muddy area to a terrain with little or no mud, you must have a way of taking care of this so that you don’t leave the tracks.  The answer: Teva’s.  Yes, the hardened-sole flip-flops that can take a rugged gravel creek bottom with sharp stones.  Pack these Teva’s and a sturdy plastic bag for when you’re changing the terrain.  Take off the muddy boots and throw them in the bag. Switch to the Teva’s for the entire time you cross the new terrain.  Switch back again when you come to more mud and slop to cross.

I’m a firm believer in using the creeks if the bottom is firm, as prints will be left in a muddy bottom.  For this, you’ll want to pick up some neoprene booties as well as some Rocky Gore-Tex socks.  Then you can protect your feet from the temperature of the creek.  Knowing the terrain beforehand is critical.  You can follow outcroppings of rock and submerged rock flats for a long way in a creek if the depth is below the knee without making any trail.  Bust up your travel of a trail and use both sides of the creek intermittently when you must emerge from it when possible.

One of the things you can do is to make yourself a pair of “boots” for the spring months…out of tough nylon or plastic bags.  Tie off four (4) pieces of broken branches to your boots, forming a “tic-tac-toe” arrangement of lines…making sure the ends don’t protrude too far from your boot edges.  Then pile some leaves and brush in your bags.  Step on this “mass” and then tie up the edges of the bag around your feet.  This will help you to keep from making tracks by removing your sole from the equation and giving you more surface area to distribute your weight.

You’ll have to repair or change it off every so often, so have an extra supply of bags you can switch off to.  The field expedient method is to do it with shirts or pieces of cloth taken from an article of clothing or from a sheet of material.  Just remember to tie up the corners, with the “biomass” of leaves and scrub beneath your feet.  Next installment, we’ll cover the dry summer and desert conditions, as well as some specialty information.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How Medicinal Mushrooms Can Improve Your Health

Click here to view the original post.

For those of you who may be wondering, I can state this article is completely objective.  As far as mushrooms are concerned in the diet?  I hate ‘em.  I hate the very sight of them regarding cooking and as an accouterment to meals.  That being said, I still actively gather them when possible and have plenty of supplements with them.  I value them from a natural medicine perspective and admit to their having nutritional value, although I hate the taste of them.

What’s so great about mushrooms?

Mushrooms contain fiber, protein, and carbohydrates, as well as vitamins and minerals, especially B-vitamins and the mineral selenium.  They are extremely low in fat.  Three ounces of mushrooms (White Mushrooms, readily available in grocery stores) contain about 3 grams of protein.  Unlike other foods that lose the nutrients in the cooking process, mushrooms actually release their nutrients when they are cooked.  They are also good for supplying Vitamin D and have been shown to increase HDL (High-Density Lipoproteins, aka the “good” cholesterol), as well as lower Triglycerides in the bloodstream, thereby making them helpful for the heart and circulatory system.

Health Boosting Medicinal Mushrooms You Need for Natural Medical Supplies

Shiitake Mushroom

Shiitake Mushroom

There are many beneficial chemicals contained in many mushroom species, such as antioxidants, that fight free radicals, and oxidation (processes of aging and cellular deterioration).  They also contain polysaccharides and phenols, and these help to reduce inflammation and stress.  Lentinan and beta-glucans are chemicals that help with chemotherapy and side-effects associated with it, such as nausea and vomiting.  Beta-glucans themselves are cancer-fighters and are found in such types as Shiitake, a popular mushroom found in grocery stores.  Shiitake mushroom extracts have been found to help combat bacteria and viruses, and the extract, as well as the dried mushroom, can improve the immune system by strengthening it. We found this tincture recipe from Moutain Rose Herbs to guide you through making your own.

Make a Mushroom Double Extraction

Ingredients

  • 80 proof or higher alcohol (I use vodka)
  • organic (and consciously harvested) dried mushrooms such as reishimaitakechaga, or shiitake
  • water (I like to use water I collect from springs)

Instructions

  1. Fill a jar halfway with dried mushrooms.
  2. Fill jar with alcohol, making sure that it completely covers the mushrooms, but leave about a ½ inch space at the top of the jar.
  3. Let it sit for a month. Shake daily.
  4. After a month, strain mushroom-infused alcohol into another jar and set aside.
  5. Next, make a water extract by bringing a half gallon of water to a simmer in a stock pot. Add the mushrooms from the alcohol extract to the simmering water.
  6. Simmer the mushrooms for about 2 hours, until the water has reduced to approximately 8-16 ounces. Make sure to keep an eye on the water level, as you don’t want it to completely evaporate. You may need to add water to the stock pot throughout the process.
  7. Let it cool.
  8. Strain and compost the mushrooms, reserving the mushroom-infused water.
  9. Combine the water extract with the alcohol extract.
    The final product is your mushroom double extract! The alcohol percentage should be somewhere between 25-35%, making it shelf stable.

Source

maitake mushroom

Maitake Mushroom

Other species such as Maitake are also extremely effective in combatting viruses and bacteria.  The King Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus eryngii) is a species of the Pleurotus family that has anti-pyretic properties, meaning it boosts immunity to fever and sicknesses.  The King Oyster also has been shown in studies to increase testosterone by as much as five times, a factor that could be helpful in men with problems relating to impotence.  The King Oyster is found throughout Europe, Africa, and Asia, and is supposed to be pleasant to the taste and used as a culinary mushroom: on these last two points, I’ll take their word on it!

Lion’s Mane Mushroom

Lion’s Mane Mushroom (Hericium erinaceus) is another one, also known as Yamabushitake.  This guy is supposed to also fight inflammation, and also be an aid to boosting cognitive function…protecting from dementia and Alzheimer’s. It is also supposed to increase nerve-growth factor, an important component of brain “maintenance.”

 

Related article: Four Medicinal Mushrooms to Add to Your Natural Pharmacy

There have been several studies relating to “Psychedelic” or “Magic” mushrooms that have yielded dramatic results in treating depression and neurological disorders.  The most important thing with the mushrooms is identification, especially if you gather any types in the wild.  I have the National Audubon Society’s Field Guide to Mushrooms of North America, that has more than 700 photographs…color photographs that I believe are critical to proper identification.  I highly recommend investing in such a manual.

So, to summarize, you don’t have to like mushrooms in order to use them and stock up on tinctures and supplements.  Every time I see one I think of the movie “Attack of the Mushroom People,” and dread their smell and taste…hating the very sight of them.  Yet I respect their powerful and useful medicinal qualities and highly encourage you to research them further and employ them for your own uses.  Fight that good fight, drink coffee, and eat a good pizza…but hold the mushrooms!  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Post-Collapse Survival Bartering: 10 Items That Will Be Worth Their Weight in Gold

Click here to view the original post.

 

As a nation, we are faced with a host of different problems from many directions, both domestically and internationally.  The statistical improbability of a disaster occurring (such as war or economic collapse) decreases with the passage of time and the addition of other factors that lead into such.  For a couple of good “primers” on collapse and warfare (overall effects on societies and civilizations), I recommend two by Jared Diamond: Guns, Germs, and Steel,” and Collapse.”

When any kind of society or civilization becomes unraveled, usually the nation’s cash loses its value within days at the most.  We’re going to cover a few general categories of items to keep for barter (meaning “regular” or frequent trade), citing individual examples within each category.  In The Prepper’s Blueprint, the idea of bartering was covered extensively and it isn’t always acquiring tradable goods, but also tradable services.

If a long-term emergency causes and end to our existing monetary system and an end to the exchange of fiat currency that our world currently operates on, people will resort back to bartering for skills and services in order to make transactions.

Living in a bartering environment means one must possess certain goods or skills that others find value in. As Brandon Smith writes on the subject, ‘If you wish to survive after the destruction of the mainstream system that has babied us for so long, you must be able to either make a necessary product, repair a necessary product, or teach a necessary skill.’”

The Prepper’s Blueprint

Do Not Barter The Following Items:

Before I “hit the list,” I’m going to mention what I will not barter or only in an emergency, and why.

  • Ammunition, Firearms, or parts for firearms: The first two can be used against you, and the latter can be employed to fix something that can be used against you. [I will not barter with them ever]. That said, in a previous article, I mentioned the importance of knowing how to repair firearms. This is a barterable skill and one that will be of high importance in a post-collapse scenario.
  • Medicine: I need that for me and mine…and will not barter with it regularly [Only in an emergency…and never any antibiotics].
  • NBC gear and supplies: This takes the form of masks, suits, survey meters (Geiger counters), dosimeters, anti-rad tablets, and so forth [I will not barter with them ever]. To find these items for your preps, click here.

10 of the Best Items for Bartering

  1. Fire Starting Materials: Books of matches, disposable lighters, wicks and flints for Zippo’s. All these guys are worth their weight in gold in the event of a collapse.  Check out some of these fire starting materials for ideas. The great thing about this is they are always needed, simple to trade, and they don’t take up a lot of space to store.
  2. Over-the-Counter (OTC) First-Aid supplies: Small tins of band-aids, aspirin, Tylenol, antacid tablets, gauze bandages, first-aid tape, alcohol prep pads, cough and cold supplies. These are differentiated from “medicine” as I mentioned not to trade, in that they are small, sundry-type articles that are valuable and in short supply when times are tough.  They are also easily affordable and do not take up much storage space. Here are 50 of the most popular medical supplies that preppers put away for emergencies, and some of them can be bought for cheap at the Dollar Store.
  3. Multiple Toiletry Items: Hotel-types of small individual soap bars, shampoo bottles, towelettes, toothpaste, and shave cream. These you can ask a hotel or motel manager to order you an extra case: pay him beforehand and give him some extra.  In this way, they’ll all be in a big cardboard box and individually packaged up and ready to trade.
  4. Batteries: Will always be in short supply when you need them. It will be that way for others as well.  Just be careful to protect them from moisture when you store them and inspect them frequently to make sure there aren’t any leakages. There are certain batteries that are best for off-grid retreats. You can read about them here. Having an excess of these will be a good investment. As well, there are ways to make a battery last (practically) forever and this could be great knowledge to possess when TSHTF.
  5. Sewing supplies: Yes, needles, threads, thimbles, and safety pins. Sewing kits cost almost nothing when you buy one in the discount stores.  Clothing repair will be very important, as good serviceable clothing will be in short supply.
  6. Small tins and cans of meat: This is always usable as your own supply, of course, and can be bartered. 3 to 6-ounce cans of things such as sardines, herring, chicken, tuna fish, and the likes…they are small enough to be able to trade, and they’ll be worth their weight in gold for their portability.
  7. Candles: especially in the form of tea-lights, and small candles (of the types listed as “emergency” candles). They are inexpensive and easy to barter for when there’s no electricity.  Remember to store them vertically, as if you lay them on their side, the wick will gradually “migrate” toward the bottom…and then the candle will be messed up.
  8. Miniatures of alcohol: Alcohol has many, many uses in a long-term emergency and it is excellent for trading, whether someone wants a drink or wants it to tincture something. We’ve already had discussions on this “WCTU-sensitive” subject.  If you’re against alcohol, once again, that is for you to decide.  Others may need the alcohol to deal with the vehemence of the “righteous indignation” of others.  Whatever the case, they will be easy to trade and in a “controlled” fashion.
  9. Tobacco: Once again, to paraphrase “Alice ‘N Chains,” it’s your A couple of cartons of cigarettes are easy enough to store, as well as a box or two of good cigars.  Remember: they have anti-helminthic properties…they’ll fight intestinal worms.  They’ll definitely trade. Read more here.
  10. Sweets and other luxuries: This to include some chocolate, powdered cocoa, honey (I recommend a big box of the individual packets for personal use), packaged jellies and syrups. They’ll trade, and they’ll be more than sought after.

This list is not meant to be exhaustive.  For instance, seeds are not covered in this list but would make a good bartering item too. I gave you what my personal favorites are.  I didn’t include precious metals, small tool sets, and about a thousand items you can mention or list.  I listed the top ten that I would want to use to barter that will be in short supply.  Use your best judgment and set your own standards for yourself, and stock up on what you need for an economic collapse of its own or one that is subsequent to another thing such as a war.  Afterward, you may find that you’ve made some sound investments…and thought ahead.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Are You Ready? How To Survive Falling Through Ice

Click here to view the original post.

Every year, people die from falling through ice they thought was safe to cross. In near-frozen water, you have exactly 10 minutes to get out of the icy waters before your muscles become too cold to function. As well, your heart rate and blood pressure increases, so the chance of cardiac arrest and sudden death could occur. Know these preventative measures and how to survive if you find yourself in this type of emergency.

For any of you who have ever read Jack London’s “To Build a Fire,” the possibility of breaking through the ice and either drowning or dying from subsequent exposure to the elements does exist.  In most situations that can turn deadly, the way to avoid them is through diligence and proper preparation.  Water crossings in the winter are no different.  Let’s jump into it…figuratively speaking!

Know Before You Go

Firstly, never trust the water to be frozen completely.  If you follow this, you may say, then how can you ever cross the ice?  Well, just take into consideration there are many variables that influence ice thickness of rivers or lakes, and it’s always better to assume that there may be a problem…in this way, it doesn’t catch you unaware.

Take a look at your surroundings before starting to walk on the lake. Is there open water nearby or slush? These are indications of bad ice. Check the ice by cutting or drilling a hole in the ice to check for thickness.

How to Stay Safe

If you’re crossing a river, then you should have a rope that will reach to the other side at your crossing location.  This is for several reasons.  Firs, when crossing, you can use the rope as a lifeline if you wish.  Secondly, the ice may be sturdy enough to cross, but without your gear.  You may need a way to pull that gear behind you as you traverse the ice.  If you wear a 75-lb. pack and you weigh 200 lbs., this could stress the ice if it isn’t frozen completely solid.

Next, you want to cross at exactly the shortest distance possible.  This is common sense, as your wider expanses take more time to freeze.  Another factor is the speed of the river.  Sluggish rivers will freeze at least partially, down to about a depth of 3 feet or more.  This is generally safe to cross over.

If the ice starts to crack, gauge where you are and see whether you can make it the rest of the way, or if you should turn back, and do it quickly.  It helps to have a stout walking stick or pole with you.  If you don’t walk with one, then cut one from a dead limb if possible.  If a break happens, you can spread the pole out and keep from going under.  If the crack looks bad and you may not have time, lay down on the ice spread-eagled.  This will distribute your weight over the ice on a wider area, rather than having all of it at one point.  Use your rope to pull yourself back across.  This is where Yak-tracks or spikes/crepons will help you to use your feet as well.

Tie your rope off on one side.  Walk it all the way across if you can.  If it’s solid, when you reach the other side, tie it off there, and then go back.  With heavy gear, you can then affix it to the rope and drag it behind you to the far side, or go to the far side and pull the gear all the way across (the preferred option).  Snow also must be taken into consideration, as it can obscure what you see.  Always err on the side of caution.

How to Save Yourself When You Fall Through the Ice

If you go through the ice and get wet, you must extricate yourself, and you don’t have a lot of time: adrenaline will work for a minute, and then the cold will set in.  You must have a kit ready to use…firestarter, and emergency fuel to use.  Get that fire going, and start to warm up.  Therefore, it is best to follow the advice of the “Old Timer” in Jack London’s story: travel with a partner…as you both can help one another to cross, and if a mishap occurs.

Know What to Expect

  • The frigid waters will knock the breath out of you.
  • Control your breathing and try not to thrash around.
  • Don’t remove clothing. The air pockets trapped in your clothes could actually help you stay afloat.
  • The easiest way out is the way you came in, so turn in that direction for the fastest exit. This is likely where the strongest ice is.
  • Kick your feet to the edge of the water and begin easing your way out of the ice.
  • If you have a pocket knife or sharp tool, use it as traction to help pull yourself out.
  • Once you are on stronger ice, roll your body or crawl toward safety until you feel your feet are strong enough to walk.

Watch this video on how to mitigate the cold shock response and survive falling through the ice.

Take the proper precautions, and avoid being “Trapped Under Ice,” as Metallica describes the experience in their song.  Crossing frozen lakes and rivers can be a challenge, but it is doable, and it is another skill to practice in your quest for self-sufficiency and sustainment in a rural environment.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

“Nuclear Blast to your Front!  React!” – How the Army Trains to Survive an ‘Atomic Battlefield’

Click here to view the original post.

The title of this article is the exact preparatory command (situation), and the command of execution given to us in the Army to drill a nuclear attack.  Readers, we all hope every day that our “society does not come to a screeching halt via a nuclear attack.  But what if it does?  OK, we’ve “gamed” it from a perspective that you haven’t become a shadow-silhouette on a burned wall and been vaporized…that you’re not living in a “ground zero” targeted area.  If you are, then you have several options beforehand: if there’s warning, bug out and get out of the blast area, or move out of the area to a place that is not a target.

Their will be skeptics, and their ilk that will ask a litany of questions like: “How are you gonna save everyone?”, “What about those who can’t afford property…?”,  “Yeah, like we’re going to get warning!”

AD INFINITVM, AD NAVSEVM.

Survival is not a guarantee.

Are you’re willing to examine your lifestyle and do what it takes?  Make the necessary changes and act?  That is called “adaptation,” and it is what has enabled the species to survive…the minority who emerge from the rubble when the skeptical majority are dead.  We’re talking “hardball,” here, and it is “sink or swim,” although we don’t shoot for that…we want others to make it through…but there comes a time when you must cut your losses and take care of you and yours.

Related: 15 Priorities You Need to Follow In the Event of a Nuclear War

If you’re willing to do what it takes (sometimes in the face of skepticism and even ridicule) and go “against the grain,” you may give yourself the edge helping you survive.

Enough said there.  What if the worst does happen, and you happen to be five to ten miles away from a blast?  Skeptics, we do have information that will work besides the results of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: the “Atomic Soldiers” of the United States armed forces.  Yes, during the 1950’s, whole battalions were emplaced in the southwestern deserts of the U.S. and subjected to be the “test” subjects of nuclear explosions.  Those tests were real, and the results they generated were real.  We don’t want it to have been for nothing: take the knowledge they earned, and use it.

The U.S. Army Training Tips for Surviving an Atomic Battlefield

FM 21-75, a publication of the Department of the Army, entitled “Combat Training of the Individual Soldier and Patrolling” was released in June of 1957Chapter 7 is the point of focus, entitled “Survival on the Atomic Battlefield.”  This 10-page chapter enumerates many good techniques of what to do that can be adapted to civilian life and society when the split-second decision time comes down the pike.  Excellent diagrams relevant to situations: in the open, flat on the ground, behind a small rise, in a ditch, behind a wall, and in a prepared shelter of some kind.

We’ll condense some of it for those who may not be able to pick up one of these into some finer points, and add other:

  1. Think and act fast. Seek the closest available protection.  Do not try to reach distant shelter initially.
  2. Remain in that initial posture for protection for at least 10 seconds to avoid the blast, heat, and debris.
  3. If you’re in the open, flatten and face in the direction of the explosion with your face down against the ground and covering over your head and face with your hands/forearms
  4. You need to seek shelter within the first 12 to 24 hours, as radioactive particles in the form of dust will settle back down to earth in-line with wind and weather patterns.
  5. Radiation begins to deteriorate rapidly, however, you need to make plans of being in a permanent and shielded shelter with enough supplies to last for a month.
  6. The more shielding/earth/material between yourself and the detonation, the better a chance you will have to make it…and this also includes fallout…it is mass that blocks radiation from penetration.
  7. BIGGIE! Prior to anything happening during your routine/daily tasks, study everything around you before an attack!   This means to know where your fallout shelters (prior to Clinton nixing the Civil Defense program in ’96) are located in your area…know where strong basements and other areas to shelter in place are located.

Recommended Prep: Anti-Radiation Pills

Seem farfetched?  Rest assured, these steps are warranted.  Personally, I am not placing my fate or that of my family in the hands of politicians or attempting to court public favor or acceptance of what I have done…and my steps are all my own…not to be revealed to anyone.  You’ll have to weigh it in your own mind.  There’s plenty of literature out there.  We have mentioned Cresson Kearney’s Nuclear War Survival Skills plenty of times.  Another good resource is Bruce D. Clayton’s book “Life After Doomsday.”

The more you study and prepare, the better you’ll make the odds work for you…if you survive the initial attack.  In the end, the responsibility to act lies with you, and all the supplies, equipment, and even training in the world will not substitute for being able to make a timely decision and act upon it.  Should that fateful day arrive, the time to prepare for it is beforehand: don’t be left without a chair when the music stops.  Stay in that good fight.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

3 Places Preppers Would Never Think to Scrounge For Survival Supplies

Click here to view the original post.

This is a segment that you can take for ideas and build off of for yourself.  Survival is all about improvisation, and adaptability: those who adapt to the situation have a better chance at making it through the tough times.  This is a different kind of segment, though.  The information here is how to make it on what you can scrounge in the wintertime. Sounds simple, right? It isn’t.

We Live in an Imperfect World That is Not Prepper-Friendly

The reason is the “perfect” world we live in does not present you with many opportunities to train. For that matter, there isn’t a lot of encouragement either. Certainly, no one will encourage you: not your family members, your neighbors, or community in general, let alone the government…local, state, or federal.  That’s not “life.”

No, most of these guys just mentioned are only concerned with you playing to the system by getting up in the morning, going off to your work (to earn taxable income) so that you can pay your taxes, consuming foods, materials, and other necessities (with taxes), driving (using fuel that’s taxed) home…the one with your mortgage and property taxes, that have, well…a nice, “established” way for you to keep your lawn, grounds…you know…how to live, right?  In an acceptable manner, right?  A small cog in a giant machine, working and consuming until it’s time to call your number in.  Then your money and property… what you have left, that you paid taxes on all the way?  Time to tax it again until the government (kicking and screaming) magnanimously gives what’s left to your heirs.

The Only One Who Will Help You Succeed and Excel is You

As a general reminder, you never know when the next emergency will happen, so make sure you have the basic necessities to get through the most unpredictable situation.

3 Places That Preppers Would Never Think to Scrounge For Survival Supplies

Remember: these suggestions are SHTF/emergency suggestions…as most of this stuff is illegal, and if it’s not?  You’ll be “marginalized” until they come to remove you from Fisher Price-ville.

  1. Auto Wrecking Yard/Junkyard: It’s amazing the number of supplies you can come up with here. Seatbelts can be pulled out to their length and cut to use as straps.  Upholstery sometimes has fabric that can be cut or fashioned for makeshift shoes or clothing.  The number of field-expedient weapons you can find or fashion is limited only by your imagination.  Mirrors and glass are found here in abundance…glass for lenses to concentrate light and make fire…mirrors for signaling or channeling light.  Copper wire can be pulled out of the insides.  Metal antennas can make useful tools or weapons.
  2. Construction Sites: You can find lots of preparedness supplies here. For instance, wood for shelters, for lean-to’s, and to fashion snowshoes or fuel for fires. Insulation can be wrapped up in plastic bags and used.  Hardware and other construction materials, such as rebar can be used to make field-expedient tools and weapons.  In addition, construction sites are sometimes tapped into a water supply.  Don’t sleep in the building!  Everyone and their brother will be “grasping” such an idea!
  3. Dumpsters/Trash Sites: often the source of fuel for burning, scrap/discarded clothing, cheap items to harden your home, and cardboard…plenty of cardboard…plenty of plastic. The cardboard can be “sheathed” in the plastic, and stacked to make a ground cover (preventing conduction of heat), and cardboard also burns.  Do not discount the use of paper to insulate your body…newspaper crumpled up tightly gives loft to what you wear…more airspace.

The way to do it is to perpetually scrounge, and utilize things for purposes that they can fill, but were not originally designed.  This takes some practice.  You have to blend what you can pick up that is used or cast away by a man with what you can forage from the woods.  We did some pieces on how to find food during the wintertime, and how to make shelters for yourselves.  I give you this one extra caveat before closing the topic:

If it looks as if it can be lived in and is unoccupied, you may have it…but you’ll have a “visitor” eventually.

It is better to take materials and supplies (either man-made or natural) and establish a camp and shelter for yourself away from the haunts of people, out of sight…thence, out of mind.  This for safety and security, your first and foremost concerns.  Camouflage and conceal your shelter, and keep your supplies out of view, whatever you have with you and what you scrounge.  Perhaps you’re “gaming” this in your mind and thinking about challenging yourself with a training exercise.  Excellent thought!  Plan it out in advance and run with the ball.  Remember: Millions will tell you “you can’t,” and millions will not adapt and make it in the long run.  Step up to the line of scrimmage, and make the pass.  Good luck, and happy scavenging!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

3 Places Preppers Would Never Think to Scrounge For Survival Supplies

This is a segment that you can take for ideas and build off of for yourself.  Survival is all about improvisation, and adaptability: those who adapt to the situation have a better chance at making it through the tough times.  This is a different kind of segment, though.  The information here is how to make it on what you can scrounge in the wintertime. Sounds simple, right? It isn’t.

We Live in an Imperfect World That is Not Prepper-Friendly

The reason is the “perfect” world we live in does not present you with many opportunities to train. For that matter, there isn’t a lot of encouragement either. Certainly, no one will encourage you: not your family members, your neighbors, or community in general, let alone the government…local, state, or federal.  That’s not “life.”

No, most of these guys just mentioned are only concerned with you playing to the system by getting up in the morning, going off to your work (to earn taxable income) so that you can pay your taxes, consuming foods, materials, and other necessities (with taxes), driving (using fuel that’s taxed) home…the one with your mortgage and property taxes, that have, well…a nice, “established” way for you to keep your lawn, grounds…you know…how to live, right?  In an acceptable manner, right?  A small cog in a giant machine, working and consuming until it’s time to call your number in.  Then your money and property… what you have left, that you paid taxes on all the way?  Time to tax it again until the government (kicking and screaming) magnanimously gives what’s left to your heirs.

The Only One Who Will Help You Succeed and Excel is You

As a general reminder, you never know when the next emergency will happen, so make sure you have the basic necessities to get through the most unpredictable situation.

3 Places That Preppers Would Never Think to Scrounge For Survival Supplies

Remember: these suggestions are SHTF/emergency suggestions…as most of this stuff is illegal, and if it’s not?  You’ll be “marginalized” until they come to remove you from Fisher Price-ville.

  1. Auto Wrecking Yard/Junkyard: It’s amazing the number of supplies you can come up with here. Seatbelts can be pulled out to their length and cut to use as straps.  Upholstery sometimes has fabric that can be cut or fashioned for makeshift shoes or clothing.  The number of field-expedient weapons you can find or fashion is limited only by your imagination.  Mirrors and glass are found here in abundance…glass for lenses to concentrate light and make fire…mirrors for signaling or channeling light.  Copper wire can be pulled out of the insides.  Metal antennas can make useful tools or weapons.
  2. Construction Sites: You can find lots of preparedness supplies here. For instance, wood for shelters, for lean-to’s, and to fashion snowshoes or fuel for fires. Insulation can be wrapped up in plastic bags and used.  Hardware and other construction materials, such as rebar can be used to make field-expedient tools and weapons.  In addition, construction sites are sometimes tapped into a water supply.  Don’t sleep in the building!  Everyone and their brother will be “grasping” such an idea!
  3. Dumpsters/Trash Sites: often the source of fuel for burning, scrap/discarded clothing, cheap items to harden your home, and cardboard…plenty of cardboard…plenty of plastic. The cardboard can be “sheathed” in the plastic, and stacked to make a ground cover (preventing conduction of heat), and cardboard also burns.  Do not discount the use of paper to insulate your body…newspaper crumpled up tightly gives loft to what you wear…more airspace.

The way to do it is to perpetually scrounge, and utilize things for purposes that they can fill, but were not originally designed.  This takes some practice.  You have to blend what you can pick up that is used or cast away by a man with what you can forage from the woods.  We did some pieces on how to find food during the wintertime, and how to make shelters for yourselves.  I give you this one extra caveat before closing the topic:

If it looks as if it can be lived in and is unoccupied, you may have it…but you’ll have a “visitor” eventually.

It is better to take materials and supplies (either man-made or natural) and establish a camp and shelter for yourself away from the haunts of people, out of sight…thence, out of mind.  This for safety and security, your first and foremost concerns.  Camouflage and conceal your shelter, and keep your supplies out of view, whatever you have with you and what you scrounge.  Perhaps you’re “gaming” this in your mind and thinking about challenging yourself with a training exercise.  Excellent thought!  Plan it out in advance and run with the ball.  Remember: Millions will tell you “you can’t,” and millions will not adapt and make it in the long run.  Step up to the line of scrimmage, and make the pass.  Good luck, and happy scavenging!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

7 Ways to Beat the Flu with Holistic Remedies

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, you are all undoubtedly aware of how this awful this flu season has been and still continues to spread. According to the CDC, the flu is still widespread in many parts of the country.

There is still concern to be had as medicine shortages continue to some parts of the country. Now, what can you do about it in the home? Let’s go over a basic list of some foods and herbs that can help you safeguard from illness.

Firstly, keep in mind: each strain of influenza varies. Secondly, there are articles I’ve written in the past pertaining to HFV’s (Hemorrhagic Flu Viruses) that it would benefit you to read or refresh upon. There are two factors: TNF-a, and IL-6, that are Tumor Necrosis Factors and Interleukin factors, respectively. These are cytokines that are crucial in white blood cell production to fight illness. The problem with HFV’s (to recap) is that they stimulate these two factors to overproduce: the body literally fights “itself” in what is termed a cytokine storm.

Beat the Flu with These Holistic Remedies

The Ebola Virus and the Avian Flu virus (commonly known as “bird flu”) are examples of HFV’s. I also did an article on what foods and herbs not to take. So, what’s a body to do? There are holistic boosters that you can take that will not raise the levels of these two cytokines during this flu season. Let’s list them here:

1. Garlic (Allium sativa) – simply put, the #1 herbal “broad-spectrum” holistic antibiotic. We’ve put together plenty of articles on it, and 2-3 cloves per meal will help strengthen your immune system and fight viruses, bacteria, parasites, and Dracula. As mentioned before, garlic tends to thin the blood and lessen clotting factors, so don’t use it just before or just after a surgery, or if you regularly have complications with clotting.
2. Vitamin C and Vitamin E: These two are mentioned together because they are complimentary…they each potentiate (or increase) the actions of the other. Preventatively, you can take 500 mg of Vitamin C per day…and (according to such notables as Dr. Linus Pauling) 4-5,000 mg during a time of illness. Vitamin C is water soluble: what you don’t use, you’ll excrete through the urine. Vitamin E you can take 400 IU per day, and it is good for tissue repair and potentiates the effectiveness of Vitamin C. As well, the elderly may benefit greatly from Vitamin E and it helps to protect their age group from pneumonia. It is a fat-soluble vitamin and will stay in your tissues longer than C. Both in tandem are excellent when a person is sick.
3. Fluid Intake: water is key. A person should take in anywhere from a ½ gallon to 1 gallon per day to maintain good hydration. Along with this, I did an article that mentions electrolyte packets you can take orally, available over-the-counter that replace Sodium, Potassium, and others…also containing Vitamin C.
4. Ginger Root: slice it up or dice it up, and throw about a teaspoon to a ½ tablespoon in a salad. It is very good for the stomach, and also aids against the flu.
5. Protein: Everyone who has been reading my articles know how much I emphasize the importance of protein in your diet. The building-block of muscle and of tissue repair, your protein levels become debilitated when you have the flu. Use high-protein sources, such as chicken breast, salmon, or lean beef or steak. You can combine any of these protein-laden foods with the next flu-fighter, that is………
6. Salads: Yes, green, leafy vegetables, such as spinach, kale, and herbs such as cilantro. The latter removes heavy metals from the system, such as lead and mercury. The former two are packed with iron, potassium, and other vital minerals that you need to maintain fluid balance and to heal up.
7. Citrus Fruits: granted, we already mentioned Vitamin C, but the citrus fruits have more than just C. The principle of Herbalism is that the whole herb or food is always more effective than any of its individual parts. The whole fruit also contains other vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber, an important part of your digestion (that normally slows down considerably during the duration of an illness such as the flu).

These are all guaranteed to give you a good start when combined with adequate rest and sleep. I want to close by stressing the importance of exercise and physical training as a preventative measure against illness of any kind. It has been proven time and again by physicians and scientists that the better shape you’re in, the more your immunities and the overall system will fight illness when it comes along. Here’s to your health, and stay in that good fight! JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

7 Ways to Beat the Flu with Holistic Remedies

ReadyNutrition Readers, you are all undoubtedly aware of how this awful this flu season has been and still continues to spread. According to the CDC, the flu is still widespread in many parts of the country.

There is still concern to be had as medicine shortages continue to some parts of the country. Now, what can you do about it in the home? Let’s go over a basic list of some foods and herbs that can help you safeguard from illness.

Firstly, keep in mind: each strain of influenza varies. Secondly, there are articles I’ve written in the past pertaining to HFV’s (Hemorrhagic Flu Viruses) that it would benefit you to read or refresh upon. There are two factors: TNF-a, and IL-6, that are Tumor Necrosis Factors and Interleukin factors, respectively. These are cytokines that are crucial in white blood cell production to fight illness. The problem with HFV’s (to recap) is that they stimulate these two factors to overproduce: the body literally fights “itself” in what is termed a cytokine storm.

Beat the Flu with These Holistic Remedies

The Ebola Virus and the Avian Flu virus (commonly known as “bird flu”) are examples of HFV’s. I also did an article on what foods and herbs not to take. So, what’s a body to do? There are holistic boosters that you can take that will not raise the levels of these two cytokines during this flu season. Let’s list them here:

1. Garlic (Allium sativa) – simply put, the #1 herbal “broad-spectrum” holistic antibiotic. We’ve put together plenty of articles on it, and 2-3 cloves per meal will help strengthen your immune system and fight viruses, bacteria, parasites, and Dracula. As mentioned before, garlic tends to thin the blood and lessen clotting factors, so don’t use it just before or just after a surgery, or if you regularly have complications with clotting.
2. Vitamin C and Vitamin E: These two are mentioned together because they are complimentary…they each potentiate (or increase) the actions of the other. Preventatively, you can take 500 mg of Vitamin C per day…and (according to such notables as Dr. Linus Pauling) 4-5,000 mg during a time of illness. Vitamin C is water soluble: what you don’t use, you’ll excrete through the urine. Vitamin E you can take 400 IU per day, and it is good for tissue repair and potentiates the effectiveness of Vitamin C. As well, the elderly may benefit greatly from Vitamin E and it helps to protect their age group from pneumonia. It is a fat-soluble vitamin and will stay in your tissues longer than C. Both in tandem are excellent when a person is sick.
3. Fluid Intake: water is key. A person should take in anywhere from a ½ gallon to 1 gallon per day to maintain good hydration. Along with this, I did an article that mentions electrolyte packets you can take orally, available over-the-counter that replace Sodium, Potassium, and others…also containing Vitamin C.
4. Ginger Root: slice it up or dice it up, and throw about a teaspoon to a ½ tablespoon in a salad. It is very good for the stomach, and also aids against the flu.
5. Protein: Everyone who has been reading my articles know how much I emphasize the importance of protein in your diet. The building-block of muscle and of tissue repair, your protein levels become debilitated when you have the flu. Use high-protein sources, such as chicken breast, salmon, or lean beef or steak. You can combine any of these protein-laden foods with the next flu-fighter, that is………
6. Salads: Yes, green, leafy vegetables, such as spinach, kale, and herbs such as cilantro. The latter removes heavy metals from the system, such as lead and mercury. The former two are packed with iron, potassium, and other vital minerals that you need to maintain fluid balance and to heal up.
7. Citrus Fruits: granted, we already mentioned Vitamin C, but the citrus fruits have more than just C. The principle of Herbalism is that the whole herb or food is always more effective than any of its individual parts. The whole fruit also contains other vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber, an important part of your digestion (that normally slows down considerably during the duration of an illness such as the flu).

These are all guaranteed to give you a good start when combined with adequate rest and sleep. I want to close by stressing the importance of exercise and physical training as a preventative measure against illness of any kind. It has been proven time and again by physicians and scientists that the better shape you’re in, the more your immunities and the overall system will fight illness when it comes along. Here’s to your health, and stay in that good fight! JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

10 Ways To Avoid Diseases in Wild Game When Survival Hunting

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, for the most part, hunting season is over in most of the United States.  The reason for this article is if you must do any hunting after the “S” hits the fan.  There are a few things to keep in mind about diseases and wild game.  It is simple stuff, however, do not allow its simplicity to lull you into a false sense of security: these diseases can kill or cripple you.

Common Animal Diseases You May Come in Contact With

What we’re referring here to specifically are termed zoonotic infections.  These are infections that are concentrated and/or endemic to wild animal species and can be transferred (hence infecting) humans and/or domestic animals.

Some examples here are Tularemia (also known as “rabbit fever”) found in rabbits and hares.  It is brought on by ticks (indeed, many of these zoonotic infections are transferred to humans by arthropod vectors (disease-carrying arthropods, such as ticks or fleas), although it can persist into the winter months and infect a human before it kills the host animal.

Brucellosis is another one, and much costlier, as it spreads to livestock, causing cattle to spontaneously abort their young prior to completion of gestation.  Brucellosis can also pass to human beings.  Back in 1996, Cryptosporidium passed to an individual who used deer scent (a combination of deer urine and deer glands); it was passed through the bottle of scent.  Other diseases are Giardia (Giardia lamblia), Trichinosis, and tapeworm infestations.

One of the methods for these transmissions with wild game is the fecal-oral method of contamination.  The hunter touches the feces or urine of the slain animal and then manages to ingest it by touching it to the mouth.  Another way is when the animal is dressed out, fecal contamination of the meat occurs when the intestines are not controlled properly/tied off effectively, or perforations/cuts are made in the intestines that allow the feces or stool to leak out and leach into the abdominal cavity.

10 Ways To Avoid Diseases in Wild Game

The best way to prevent all this is to know these game animals carry contaminating organisms.  Let’s outline a few safety basics for wild game to help you prevent illness.

  1. If the animal defecated upon being shot, try and clean the feces off the exterior prior to incising and skinning. This is best accomplished with warm water and some type of sanitizer.  After a thorough scrubbing, even hand sanitizer (in copious amounts) will aid you in this.
  2. Tie off that bunghole properly: Really, this is a big one. There is a nifty little tool made of plastic that you insert into the animal’s anus and twist.  It latches onto the sphincter and enables you to pull out and cut around the bung.  Then, of course, tie it off well and tightly before you complete the skinning and gutting.
  3. Rubber Gloves: latex, rubber, or what have you. Use them, and do not use them sparingly.  When you dress a deer, you usually cut yourself if you’re not very careful.  Give yourself the edge and work with the gloves to keep contamination of feces and any blood-borne pathogens to a minimum.
  4. When butchering, never lay the meat on the ground. Tarps are good, but I prefer a folding metal table.  Keep the meat away from all the offal/guts, and any feces.
  5. Clean up by putting guts and fecal matter in a trash container/trash bag. Don’t just leave it out there in the woods for someone else to walk into.
  6. Have several washing stations set up, at least two: a “general” scrub station with plenty of soap and water, and a “final” cleaning station for the very end of it, complete with sanitizers and disinfectants.
  7. Utensils: this is a big one. Don’t be like “Windows” off of John Carpenter’s “The Thing,” who slices his thumb for a blood sample, gives the sample, and wipes the Barlow knife off on his pants leg…both sides of the knife.  That won’t cut it (no pun intended).  You need to wash and sanitize your skinning and butchering knives after you’re all finished, and especially after gutting…before those knife blades touch your meat.
  8. Cooking: you can be thorough (boil then burn – that is, boil the meat, and then burn it over the grill), or just ensure that it is cooked very well according to food safety temperatures that vary per type of meat or poultry.  If you want to be the “Werewolf of London” and have it rare?  It’s your roulette game.  Severe gastroenteritis is no laughing matter, and you’ll be a candle burning at both ends for about a week if you follow me.
  9. Do not allow your pets to eat any of the raw meat or waste products of the wild game! Your pet’s life can depend on it!
  10. There are many field guides available for the inspection and butchering of game animals. Invest in one so that you’ll know what an animal that is ill looks like…inside and out.

Just a few tips in case we “go dark” and it hits the fan…chances are that you’ll have to hunt to feed your family.  Make sure you do it safely.  Give yourself an “edge,” as in those times you’ll have enough to worry about without adding food poisoning or disease to the equation.  Get into good habits from the beginning, and then they become almost second nature.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Re-Purpose Used Motor Oil

Click here to view the original post.

[Editor’s Note: We are all looking for greener ways of living. As much as we value this, we still drive our cars up and down the roads – and those cars need motor oil to run. So, what happens to all of that motor oil when you get your oil changed? It’s reused and turned lubricants and other items. But there are other ways you can use it around the home and we would like to offer an “open invite,” especially for those who are mechanics or heating experts to share ideas on how to better use this. Please post your comments and suggestions to share with the rest of us!]

Used motor oil is a big business.  It’s the kind of business that government loves.  The quantities usually are taken out of your car or truck periodically.  They’re usually an amount the average person doesn’t want to fool with.  Then there’s the law:  that state you must take the oil to a facility that is able to handle it when getting rid of it.  As all of these places usually collect the oil, it’s akin to car insurance: you have to have such a place.  Usually, John and Mary Citizen just take the oil to the friendly guy at the gas station or auto parts store.  Thanks, friendly guy!

Here are some stats for you

  • One (1) gallon of used oil provides 2.5 quarts of lubricating oil after it is re-refined and that 2.5 quarts.  This is what 42 gallons of crude oil would produce when refined.  Hmmm! One gallon of used as opposed to 42 gallons of crude…for a little more than 50% recovery?
  • Metals are recycled out of the oil.  Ethylene glycol (that’s antifreeze) is also produced from recycling used motor oil and resold as recycled antifreeze.

Get paid for it

There are places you can find that will pay you for it, but you have to find them. There are going to be different rates for different companies in varied locations, but one place in Texas pays 50 cents/gallon of used motor oil with a minimum of 250 gallons for them to come and pick up for collection.

Also, pay no attention to the naysayers: if they can’t do it themselves, they’ll blame everyone around them for their situation and say it’s impossible…or they’ll just say it can’t be done.  If you don’t have the space to store the oil, why not pool your oil in a tank with another family or two who has space?  Then everyone splits the proceeds when the time of collection comes.

Heat your home

There are also heaters (large-scale, and space heaters) that will burn used motor oil.  To be sure, they’re a little pricey, but you may just be able to swing a purchase of one on e-bay or come up with the cash for a good one.  There is a Mother Earth News oil heater that was improved by a guy; the website offers plans for one for purchase and some parameters on a simpler model that can be constructed from an abandoned water heater.

This video has some interesting uses for used motor oil that can be applied to garden items and lubricating rusty tools.

I’m sure there are a number of different uses for the used oil.  I have filtered some of it with cloth and burned the used oil in a lamp (similar to this one), but it was more for curiosity.  Thing is, though, after the “S” hits the fan, that oil may have more than one use.  We’d love to hear whatever your experiences have been with this and welcome any comments and suggestions to use that used oil.  Hope to hear from you soon!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Prep of the Week: The Ultimate Toboggan for Winter Bug-Outs

Click here to view the original post.

It’s important to keep an ever-vigilant eye out for great prepper deals. You should never go broke trying to get prepped. Right now, you might be able to find some great winter related preps.

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, I recently wrote about bugging-out in winter and how having a toboggan would come in handy. Well, I found a good one!  Yes, I had an older, junky, dark-green toboggan/sled that I kept in my vehicle.  I was in Target this past week, as we’ve been really getting hammered in Montana with the snow…and what to my wondrous eyes should appear?  The toboggan.  I knew it existed, but had never found it until now.

Yes, it ran me $19.99 (no sales tax in Montana) out the door, and here’s a picture of it:

Is that not a beauty?  You’ll have to fight your kids off for it, seriously!  Now, see that red piece in the middle?  That is a “seat” made out of some kind of rigid plastic foam…and it’s glued in place so loosely that you can just grab an edge or corner and peel it right off the bottom…and good riddance!  It is made of a high-density polyethylene, and I’m here to tell you, it’s sturdier than any kid’s sled I’ve ever seen.  Right up there with strength and rigidity with the bigger ones used to haul wood and game in Wal-Mart that I’ve mentioned before.

It’s 48” in length, 24” wide, and about 8” in depth and lists to hold up to 200 lbs.  The way these things stack?  If you have a spouse and two kids, you can pick up four of them and they’ll nest neatly within one another.  They only weigh 5 lbs. apiece.  I’m going to modify mine and drill 4 holes on each long edge and 2 on the short edges to enable me to put bungee cords or a net over the top.  Probably the cords, as they have more use for other things.

You will have to check your local Target for availability because it’s no longer available for online purchases. The store item # for this guy is 091050553, and you can find it in the kid’s toy section.  Besides just gear, remember: this thing can have a secondary use as a litter for a wounded patient.  Just make sure to pull it over a smooth path if you can, but you never know when a patient is ambulatory and needs to be transported.  The tow rope is pictured as black/dark, but actually, it’s white with thin red “pinstripes.”  Although it looks kind of stupid up close, it’s barely noticeable, and you can always switch it out.  I’ll keep mine as it is.  I found the last one, and if they had more I would have picked up two.

It’s a really good quality, and it doesn’t take up much room at all.  In addition, if you needed to hunker down for the night, you could reverse it, put it up on poles or bungees, and have a makeshift “roof” for yourself.  I put the old green dinosaur in the woodshed, and this new sled is riding with me.  I highly recommend it…for gear, or if you need to transport someone, or for an expedient shelter-roof, this sled is inexpensive, and it foots the bill.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Prep of the Week: The Ultimate Toboggan for Winter Bug-Outs

It’s important to keep an ever-vigilant eye out for great prepper deals. You should never go broke trying to get prepped. Right now, you might be able to find some great winter related preps.

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, I recently wrote about bugging-out in winter and how having a toboggan would come in handy. Well, I found a good one!  Yes, I had an older, junky, dark-green toboggan/sled that I kept in my vehicle.  I was in Target this past week, as we’ve been really getting hammered in Montana with the snow…and what to my wondrous eyes should appear?  The toboggan.  I knew it existed, but had never found it until now.

Yes, it ran me $19.99 (no sales tax in Montana) out the door, and here’s a picture of it:

Is that not a beauty?  You’ll have to fight your kids off for it, seriously!  Now, see that red piece in the middle?  That is a “seat” made out of some kind of rigid plastic foam…and it’s glued in place so loosely that you can just grab an edge or corner and peel it right off the bottom…and good riddance!  It is made of a high-density polyethylene, and I’m here to tell you, it’s sturdier than any kid’s sled I’ve ever seen.  Right up there with strength and rigidity with the bigger ones used to haul wood and game in Wal-Mart that I’ve mentioned before.

It’s 48” in length, 24” wide, and about 8” in depth and lists to hold up to 200 lbs.  The way these things stack?  If you have a spouse and two kids, you can pick up four of them and they’ll nest neatly within one another.  They only weigh 5 lbs. apiece.  I’m going to modify mine and drill 4 holes on each long edge and 2 on the short edges to enable me to put bungee cords or a net over the top.  Probably the cords, as they have more use for other things.

You will have to check your local Target for availability because it’s no longer available for online purchases. The store item # for this guy is 091050553, and you can find it in the kid’s toy section.  Besides just gear, remember: this thing can have a secondary use as a litter for a wounded patient.  Just make sure to pull it over a smooth path if you can, but you never know when a patient is ambulatory and needs to be transported.  The tow rope is pictured as black/dark, but actually, it’s white with thin red “pinstripes.”  Although it looks kind of stupid up close, it’s barely noticeable, and you can always switch it out.  I’ll keep mine as it is.  I found the last one, and if they had more I would have picked up two.

It’s a really good quality, and it doesn’t take up much room at all.  In addition, if you needed to hunker down for the night, you could reverse it, put it up on poles or bungees, and have a makeshift “roof” for yourself.  I put the old green dinosaur in the woodshed, and this new sled is riding with me.  I highly recommend it…for gear, or if you need to transport someone, or for an expedient shelter-roof, this sled is inexpensive, and it foots the bill.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

When Survival is at Stake, Your Animalistic Instincts Could Save Your Life

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, I have mentioned the work, Go Rin No Sho” (Book of Five Rings) by Miyamoto Musashi for study.  Musashi, as he is referred to informally, was the consummate swordsman of his day, and arguably the greatest swordsman Japan ever produced.  He was a Samurai, and he wrote the book to summarize what he had learned in his life.  He passed away just weeks after Go Rin No Sho was completed.  Musashi also made beautiful paintings and drawings of ink and watercolor.  He sculpted metals and wood.  He wrote poetry, and the mentioned work was his masterpiece: so important, it became the central instructional doctrine for Kendo, combat with the sword.

Look to Nature to Learn About Survival

One of the doctrines that he held dear was to look to nature for the forms used in practice, as well as for philosophies on life and how it works. 

I have written several articles on the advantages to studying animals, both in the wild and those you have with you as pets and even livestock.  Let’s focus on a few of the animals and take a closer look.

The Cat: As you already know, the cat is my favorite animal…and this fact has targeted me for innumerable insults and jibes.  No matter.  There is a reason the cat is my favorite: I had the opportunity to work as a volunteer for fish and wildlife when I was a teenager, and I took care of a mountain lion every day for four years.  He had lost a foreleg and been found.  For all intents and purposes, he was mine.  Eventually, he was placed with a man who had his own private preserve just for injured animals that couldn’t be in the wild anymore…not for any kind of public viewing.  I learned much from that mountain lion: he gave me an understanding of cats that I could never have found on my own.

The cat is the ultimate solitary hunter.  He relies on keen eyesight and smell, speed, and good judgment.  What can we learn from watching him?  Watch how he is on the heights: the cat doesn’t worry about how high up he is…but finding a place that is firm for his feet to stand upon, and making his way.  The cat attacks when he is ready: not before.  He sets himself in a position to make the most of his charge.  He charges the prey and conserves: perhaps he’ll chase a short distance, but he will not waste all of his energy, as he relies on stealth and cunning.  The cat will defend himself to the death when cornered.  He’ll place his back to the sturdiest feature and fight with all his weapons, all his strength.  Your housecat is this way: he is the same, with all of the qualities of his wild siblings.  Watch him and learn, you’ll see.

The Dog:  Fiercely loyal, often termed “Man’s Best Friend.”  The dog is highly intelligent, very outgoing and a good companion to have around in an emergency.  His intelligence can be relegated to the background: when he’s “into it,” and fighting?  His ferocity is almost unbelievable.  He is usually good-natured unless he’s been mistreated.  Nevertheless, we can learn that there is a time for all things, as with him this holds true: a time to be your friend and time to be the protector of the house.  He is brave, and at times reckless.  When he is loved as a member of the family, he will die to protect that family from harm.  He knows when to back off when to circle and hold his ground.  He flattens his ears and sets his forelegs to make a charge, and then a quick leap to strike the leg or go for the throat.  If he’s been taught to serve man as such, he’ll track his quarry…the one man sets for him…until he’s run to death.  With a pack, he is almost invincible: relying upon the strength of the pack…as his brother, the wild wolf.  He will go with man: to the mountains, on the sea…he is as bold as the man who leads him, and he will follow that man to the end.  Loyalty we can learn from him, and perseverance.

The Crow, or Raven: Once believed to be the very eyes of the gods, he is much more than just a carrion bird.  He is intelligent, purposed, and opportunistic…taking advantage of every option presented to him.  He can work alone or with his fellows.  His intelligence is mirrored by his alertness, his keen senses always ready to react to danger.  Excellent eyesight, excellent hearing, and the ability to solve minor problems…a problem-solving animal.  A crow will use a stick to dislodge a piece of food.  He shows solidarity: he works as a watch-crow, a lookout for his fellows.  He summons them when he finds a large quantity of food.

Now, take what has been mentioned and reflect on it.  Examine the qualities of these animals, and find that you can examine other animals and see things I have not mentioned.  In the wild, the waterfowl can alert you to the presence of water, the deer grazing on the hill suddenly bolt for the woodline: an intruder must be near.  A flock of birds taking off from one section of trees will tell you that something has disturbed them.

And more.  Study how they walk, how they feed, and the positions they take when they rest.  Many forms in martial arts are based on the forms they present.  Study survivors who rely upon all their heritage in the form of instinct…something we have denied ourselves unless we take hold of it.

Proverbs 6:6 Go to the ant, you sluggard, and learn its ways and seek its wisdom.

Stay in that good fight: with knowledge, with instincts, and with study.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

Mantracker: Covering Your Tracks and Avoiding an Ambush

Urban Survival: When the Cities Fall Apart, These Strategies Will Keep You Alive

Land Navigation: Finding Your Way in an Urban Environment SHTF Style

ManTracker: How to Be One and How to Avoid One

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Easiest Way To Create an Emergency Water Supply That Lasts All Winter

Click here to view the original post.

There are reasons that everyone disdains converting snow and ice to water, such as “it’s not cost or heat effective,” or “you can’t get much from it,” etc.  In a survival situation, though, you may not have that much of a choice and this could be your only long-term water supply.  With many surface water bodies freezing solid, it renders it difficult to remove the ice and then melt it down.  Snow is the most-maligned of the two, but you can still take water from it.  Let’s go over some of the numbers and explore a few methods to get some water in the wintertime when you’re out in the wilds.

Learn About Snow Water Equivalent

The volume of ice can be converted to the volume of water by multiplying the ice’s volume by 0.92 for water volume.  This can be helpful, especially if you have a way of measuring blocks of ice or ice that has been formed within a container where you know the dimensions.  Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) is the most common way to measure the amount of water that is in a given amount of snow.  The “magic” number here is 10% of the volume of the snow is equal to the volume of water.  Therefore, if you had a large container (such as a kid’s plastic swimming pool) filled with 2 feet of snow?  Your amount of water would equal 2.4 inches, for the remaining area and volume of the pool.

The Simplest Way to Harvest Water in Winter

I mentioned these just to give you an idea.  Naturally, you won’t be lugging around a Coleco plastic swimming pool in the woods with you.  You can, however, pack in gallon-sized Ziploc plastic bags, and here’s where your math comes into play to figure volume.  You also need something to heat it up in.  Barring stumbling across a sizeable container made of metal you can throw on the fire, you may just have to take your time and use a good military issue Army canteen cup, or a steel bottle or container of some kind that will tolerate a heating over/on an open flame.

Ice can be found and “harvested” in the form of icicles and then gathered in volume prior to heating it and converting it to water.  This conversion of snow and ice to water will be an ongoing thing while you’re out in the wild, as if you do not have a method to keep your water in a liquid state, then it will refreeze.  This is one area that a Camelbak can be useful.  The bladder can be kept against the skin or next to the body, wrapped up in layers of clothing and using your body heat to keep it liquid.

One of the problems with the winter is the reduced amount of direct sunlight.  There are not many sunny days (comparatively speaking), and the sunlight is not often strong enough or long-lasting enough to make good use of.  Another thing you may consider is an ice auger to be able to drill a hole in a lake and extract water for your use.  Of course, you’ll have to hurry, and you’ll have to purify that water either chemically, by boiling, or via filtration, but it will work.

Make sure your converting ice and snow to water complement your other activities, such as cooking or resting and warming yourself up by a campfire.  Don’t just allow those coals to warm you: put them to work!  Thaw out ice or snow for water each chance you have to build a fire.  This way you’ll stay one step ahead, and continually replenish your container.  Stay warm, melt that snow and ice, and remember it is important: most people tend to drink less in the winter because it’s cold.  Thirst is a late sign of dehydration.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Ultimate 30-Minute Travel Workout

Click here to view the original post.

We should never underestimate or neglect the importance of physical training in your life.  This piece is for those of you who travel frequently during the week…overnighters or for a few days, at a distance not too far.  More than 15 million people do this per week.

Truck drivers are self-sufficient folks; however, this article is for them, too.  Businessmen and those who make commutes of about a hundred miles or so with a one to two-day layover by vehicle may benefit from this piece.  What we’re talking about is toting some of your weights with you, in your vehicle.  Dumbbells are what I’m referring to here, with a “short-term” workout you may find to your benefit.  Traveling businesspeople and salesmen are not immune to needing physical training, so this may help them, too.

Don’t Forget to Pack Your Weights!

There are many motels and hotels that we are obliged to stay in, whether directed by our firms (and paid for) or paid out-of-pocket…budget “rest stops” to cut down on the costs.  Most of the time these places do not have weight room facilities or perks: they’re just a room with a roof over your head.  Take a set of dumbbells with you in the trunk of your vehicle and give yourself a workout in the morning.

 Let’s suggest some exercises for you:

Biceps and Triceps Day

  1. Alternating Curl –  3-5 Sets/8 Reps
  2. Triceps Extensions – 3-5 Sets/8 Reps
  3. Wrist Rolls –  3 Sets/20 Reps
  4. Radial Curls – 3 Sets/8 Reps

Chest and Shoulders Day

  1. Dumbbell Bench Press – 3-5 Sets/8 Reps
  2. Dumbbell Military Press – 3 Sets/8 Reps
  3. Shoulder Shrugs – 3 Sets/8 Reps

Lower Body

  1. Abs (Right, Left, Center) – 3 sets of 10 reps (beginners)
  2. Wall Squats (with or without weights in your lap) – 3 sets: 30 to 1 min for beginners
  3. Flutter Kicks – 3 sets of 10 (8-count), with 30 to 1:00 min rest between

These are some good starters for you.  Best advice if you’re just beginning: pick yourself up a good manual on how to lift weights, accompanied by one on diet and nutrition.  Check with your certified, friendly, pencil-armed, family physician when he’s back from shooting 18 holes prior to any exercise program or acting on this information.  T

The point to make is that there are a ton of different systems to pick up that will meet your needs.  For the ladies, I found a system…a set of dumbbells (the Pro-Form Select-a-Weight system) and the dumbbells go up to 25 lbs., but they are interchangeable in increments of 2.5 lbs. and all you have to do is set it to what you want and lift the weights.  Easily placed into your vehicle.

Here’s a picture:

For men, the systems are a little more expensive, if you want this modular type of setup.  I found the Bowflex SelectTech 552 Dumbbells that go up to 52 lbs., at various prices.

Here’s a photo of it:

 

The advantage here with these modular systems would be the speed and simplicity of changing plates, as well as not needing to have weights shift all over the place when you’re traveling.  If you don’t like either of them, you can always pick up a set of dumbbells with plates that are removable the conventional way.  Tailor your system for your ability to lift, and pack them in your vehicle.  Simple.  Also: you may want to throw in a sit-up bar that clips to the bottom of a door, and a chin-up bar that can be set into a doorframe to widen your scope of activities.

You want to stay in shape even when you’re traveling, and tailor-make a program to fit with your routine of work and rest.  A set of dumbbells can give you a portable weight set to use in the privacy of your room that is easily packed up for when you need to hit the road again.  Stay in that good fight and fight it to win.  We welcome hearing your routines and techniques you’ve learned that can help everyone else out, so please write us a comment.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Winter Survival: How to Navigate in the Snow

[Editor’s Note: As winter rages on, it brings to highlight the importance of knowing how to navigate in snow and extreme winter weather. The worst-case scenario in this winter emergency is not knowing the terrain and getting so lost you succumb succumbing to exposure and possibly starvation because you don’t have the equipment necessary for survival. Author, Jeremiah Johnson has outlined the essentials on how to navigate in the snow and what equipment you will need to protect yourself from exposure.

ReadyNutrition Readers, I have written several articles in the past on land navigation fundamentals and the importance of those basics.  Most of those basics still hold true in the “Winter Wonderland” of the snow and ice: those basics merely need to be modified for the changes of the season.  Once again, as with all things I recommend to you to practice these techniques and familiarize yourself with them prior to something coming up…a significant event where you must do it.  Practice does make perfect, and repetition promotes a good follow-through.

That being said, how hard is it to navigate during the winter?  Well, it is tougher in several perspectives.  First, with snow blanketing the landscape, the appearance of the terrain is changed.  Secondly, the landscape is also physically altered: it is a different thing to walk across six inches to several feet of snow.  Right now, where I live, I have almost three feet of snow on the ground.  The winter weather conditions are another item: it’s a far cry from a summer stroll when you walk into a cold wind that is throwing sleet right into your face in the middle of February.

Know Your Terrain

First, let’s address the appearance of the terrain.  This holds true, especially in wilderness or rural areas.  You can’t always discern natural landmarks, such as a creek or stream that may very well be on your map.  It may be frozen and covered over with snow.  The same for a lake or pond.  One of your keys to success in this area is to thoroughly know the area you will be in prior to these winter conditions existing.  Another is to pick out landmarks that do not change with the weather and that are clearly visible.  A mountain or high hilltop would be a good example, or a river that does not freeze over, or one with a bridge marked on the map that traverses it.

Know Your Pace-Count

You can find your position by relating it to a known and recognizable point.  Next, let’s address the physical alteration of the terrain.  I have recommended that you purchase snowshoes for yourself in the past.  Remember some of the land nav. articles I wrote before?  I told you to measure a 100-meter pace-count by marking your starting point and your finish point with a couple of “flags” or pieces of colored, coated, copper wire.  If you did that (and elevated it above the ground) on a couple of trees…you can use it in the wintertime.

Now you’ll need to find out two things: your pace count with snowshoes on, and the same while wearing a backpack or rucksack.  There’s also a “backup” to help you, and that is to estimate that distance by sight and correlate both your estimated distance and your pace count.  As you’re traversing the wilderness, it would be wise to have a good walking stick with you…something about as long as your height.  This will help you to test the ground for “soft” spots and help to steady you as you make your way across the snow and ice.

Winter conditions are also a lot of fun – Not! The sun isn’t shining, the wind isn’t calm, and a cup of hot chocolate is not in your free hand when your car breaks down in the middle of the winter.  Usually, it is horrible, to add to the physical and situational stress.  Once again, I exhort you to pick up a good pair of goggles that do not fog up, and appropriate shielding for the face…because the sun won’t be shining, the wind will be in your face, and that mirage of the “Swiss Miss” holding out a hot chocolate for you thirty meters to your front, sitting on the boulder?  That’s a mountain lion.

Make sure you’re dressed in all-weather to combat the weather.  I recommend Gore-Tex from head to toe.  A GPS compass will help, but here it is important to rely on the basics, because batteries do die, electronics can be fouled up by extremes in weather and temperature, and it’s always best to rely on the “primitive” and skills, rather than just try to “game” it with your Android compass app, or some other “toy” that can play a dirge for you if you depend on it and it fails.

Practice stepping out with those snowshoes and learning your pace count with them to traverse the drifts.  It is also a physical challenge regarding water and other supplies, such as food and first aid equipment.  Remember: your other challenges and obstacles do not cease just because you are in the process of finding your way across a valley in the wintertime.  Practicing good techniques with your map, your compass, a proper pace count, and terrain association (matching what you see on the ground with your maps and charts) are the keys to winning in the wintertime, along with perseverance.  A good cup of coffee also helps!  Happy trails!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Winter Survival: How to Navigate in the Snow

Click here to view the original post.

[Editor’s Note: As winter rages on, it brings to highlight the importance of knowing how to navigate in snow and extreme winter weather. The worst-case scenario in this winter emergency is not knowing the terrain and getting so lost you succumb succumbing to exposure and possibly starvation because you don’t have the equipment necessary for survival. Author, Jeremiah Johnson has outlined the essentials on how to navigate in the snow and what equipment you will need to protect yourself from exposure.]

ReadyNutrition Readers, I have written several articles in the past on land navigation fundamentals and the importance of those basics.  Most of those basics still hold true in the “Winter Wonderland” of the snow and ice: those basics merely need to be modified for the changes of the season.  Once again, as with all things I recommend to you to practice these techniques and familiarize yourself with them prior to something coming up…a significant event where you must do it.  Practice does make perfect, and repetition promotes a good follow-through.

That being said, how hard is it to navigate during the winter?  Well, it is tougher in several perspectives.  First, with snow blanketing the landscape, the appearance of the terrain is changed.  Secondly, the landscape is also physically altered: it is a different thing to walk across six inches to several feet of snow.  Right now, where I live, I have almost three feet of snow on the ground.  The winter weather conditions are another item: it’s a far cry from a summer stroll when you walk into a cold wind that is throwing sleet right into your face in the middle of February.

Know Your Terrain

First, let’s address the appearance of the terrain.  This holds true, especially in wilderness or rural areas.  You can’t always discern natural landmarks, such as a creek or stream that may very well be on your map.  It may be frozen and covered over with snow.  The same for a lake or pond.  One of your keys to success in this area is to thoroughly know the area you will be in prior to these winter conditions existing.  Another is to pick out landmarks that do not change with the weather and that are clearly visible.  A mountain or high hilltop would be a good example, or a river that does not freeze over, or one with a bridge marked on the map that traverses it.

Know Your Pace-Count

You can find your position by relating it to a known and recognizable point.  Next, let’s address the physical alteration of the terrain.  I have recommended that you purchase snowshoes for yourself in the past.  Remember some of the land nav. articles I wrote before?  I told you to measure a 100-meter pace-count by marking your starting point and your finish point with a couple of “flags” or pieces of colored, coated, copper wire.  If you did that (and elevated it above the ground) on a couple of trees…you can use it in the wintertime.

Now you’ll need to find out two things: your pace count with snowshoes on, and the same while wearing a backpack or rucksack.  There’s also a “backup” to help you, and that is to estimate that distance by sight and correlate both your estimated distance and your pace count.  As you’re traversing the wilderness, it would be wise to have a good walking stick with you…something about as long as your height.  This will help you to test the ground for “soft” spots and help to steady you as you make your way across the snow and ice.

Winter conditions are also a lot of fun – Not! The sun isn’t shining, the wind isn’t calm, and a cup of hot chocolate is not in your free hand when your car breaks down in the middle of the winter.  Usually, it is horrible, to add to the physical and situational stress.  Once again, I exhort you to pick up a good pair of goggles that do not fog up, and appropriate shielding for the face…because the sun won’t be shining, the wind will be in your face, and that mirage of the “Swiss Miss” holding out a hot chocolate for you thirty meters to your front, sitting on the boulder?  That’s a mountain lion.

Make sure you’re dressed in all-weather to combat the weather.  I recommend Gore-Tex from head to toe.  A GPS compass will help, but here it is important to rely on the basics, because batteries do die, electronics can be fouled up by extremes in weather and temperature, and it’s always best to rely on the “primitive” and skills, rather than just try to “game” it with your Android compass app, or some other “toy” that can play a dirge for you if you depend on it and it fails.

Practice stepping out with those snowshoes and learning your pace count with them to traverse the drifts.  It is also a physical challenge regarding water and other supplies, such as food and first aid equipment.  Remember: your other challenges and obstacles do not cease just because you are in the process of finding your way across a valley in the wintertime.  Practicing good techniques with your map, your compass, a proper pace count, and terrain association (matching what you see on the ground with your maps and charts) are the keys to winning in the wintertime, along with perseverance.  A good cup of coffee also helps!  Happy trails!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Biological Warfare: Is Smallpox a Threat? Recent Government Activity Suggests It Is

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, we have done several articles on biological weapons, as well as specific diseases that one might encounter with an attack by a so-called “rogue” state.  But we also know the value of a good “false flag,” that is an operation by a government and made to appear to be something different.  The burning of the Reichstag prior to World War II and blaming it on Marius Van Der Lubbe is one example.

In this vein, recently a vaccine for Smallpox has come to the forefront of news reports. An article from Outbreak News Today is reporting on an investigational smallpox vaccine that has successfully passed one of its clinical trial phases.  As a matter of fact, it is so successful that USAMRIID (the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases) has been doing the testing…and is developing this as an alternative to the current U.S. smallpox vaccine.

“If approved, this vaccine will have a direct impact on improving force health protection for U.S. Soldiers and other service members who are required to be immunized against smallpox,” said COL Gary Wheeler, commander of USAMRIID.

According to Paul Chaplin, President and Chief Executive Officer of Bavarian Nordic, IMVAMUNE has been given to more than 7,800 subjects in 21 clinical studies, including this trial and one other Phase 3 study. He said the company plans to file a Biological License Application with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration later this year.

“This program has only been possible through the consistent and strong support of numerous U.S. Government agencies and demonstrates what can be achieved through a successful public-private partnership to protect the public from the deliberate release of the smallpox virus,” Chaplin added.

If the disease was eradicated more than 40 years ago, then why all the concern now?

Smallpox does not exist in its natural state outside of laboratories.  It is, however, kept as a biological weapon in many countries, including North Korea, China, Russia, and Iran, as well as the United States.  USAMRIID is located at Fort Dietrich, Maryland, the premier research facility for bioweapons in the United States, as well as a “repository” for many devastating pathogens such as Ebola Virus and Avian Flu (Bird Flu) Virus.

The kicker: the U.S. government has ordered $133 million of the smallpox vaccine, and Canada recently ordered just over 65,000 doses of this experimental vaccine, going by the name “IMVAMUNE” and produced by the Bavarian Nordic corporation. 

Prepare for pandemics and other disasters with this comprehensive preparedness guide

How This Deadly Pathogen Can Affect You

Firstly, I strongly recommend going into the archives and reading the articles on bioweapons and smallpox.  I have detailed a good deal of information about herbal aids with such a threat.  In addition, emphasis must be placed on the fact that it is possible to obtain such medicines in Canada and bring them into the United States.  Before you are rendered completely aghast, remember there are legal methods for obtaining such meds, provided they aren’t banned in the United States.

But if the United States government is testing them for its use it makes it highly likely that you may be able to import some for yourself.  We faced a similar situation back around 2009-2010 with stockpiles of Tamiflu running out.  Granted, it is not a “perfect medicine,” but it is better to have something and have the choice of whether to use it or not than not to have it and have no choice whatsoever.

Again, as with all SHTF scenarios, you’ll have to weigh what you can do and what you will do in order to ensure that you have a fighting chance with all of it.  Stay in that good fight.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Your Computer May Not Survive a Collapse But These Off-Grid Archiving Strategies Will

Click here to view the original post.

I will admit that I am not the most technologically “savvy” individual, and I’m certainly not armed with all the modern “conveniences” that most people take as a necessity.  Cell phones, Kindle devices, M-pad/I-pod/UFO-whatever-for-music…don’t use ‘em.  That being said, I know they have their merits, but it’s the same type of lesson I tried to impart to my son when he went into the service.

He picked up one of those high-speed wrist compasses…the digital kind…but I constantly remind him to use that “old-fashioned” lensatic compass as his mainstay.  He listens, although he prefers to use his gizmo.  I’m just happy he carries the lensatic with him and knows how to use it.  I made sure he knew how to use it.

Create a Survival Library with Hard-Copy Notes and Archives

In this light, remember that all of our technology can collapse in the blink of an eye.  The collapse can be precipitated by any number of things…grid failure/brownouts, an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) strike, a nuclear war, or just a societal collapse that has a “downtrickle” of losing critical infrastructure and modern power systems.  In that light, it is best to take your digital and electronic libraries and ensure they are duplicated into hard-copy.  Consider investing in a typewriter to pass this valuable information on. Let’s give some suggestions, and you can take them, and tailor them to suit your needs.

  1. Whenever you watch any kind of training video/DVD, you should always take notes and summarize it. Pick up the key points, supplementing them with your own notes and diagrams to help clarify the instruction.  A composition-type notebook works well for this.  I take rough notes on a sheet of paper, and then recopy them into the notebook.
  2. Summarize books and other works: Turn a 300-page book into 8-10 pages of intense notes…summarize and shoot for brevity and clarity in your notes. This is not to say, “don’t keep books,” but rather, read them and take good notes that you can glance at to glean any important information you may need to use.
  3. Print out the important how-to’s and “archive” notes: don’t just store it on hard drive or jump drive! Although that is important, you want to make sure your information is printed off.  Strive for accuracy, compactness, neatness, and organization in all of your notes.
  4. File similar subjects in a binder/common protector: This is especially important when you’re dealing with things such as first-aid and medicine. Protect the info., and keep it well-organized
  5. Military Med Chests: Yes, made out of strong aluminum, these stackable canisters are perfect to place your archives and books inside after wrapping them up in plastic…preferably contractor-grade bags around 6 mils in thickness.
  6. Durable plastic bins: These can work if they’re really tough and are water-tight. The biggest problems with notes, archives, and books are water, mildew, bugs, and fire, in that order.  You want to make sure everything is in plastic and sealed up tight.
  7. Duplicate everything…1-6 up there? You should have one copy out for your general use, and another sealed up in a safe place.

The last measure mentioned is not just for you and your family.  The last measure is to provide information for those not here with us yet, or those not old enough to use the information right now.  Think beyond yourself and your own lifetime, or even the lifetimes of your kids.  You want to leave a legacy?  Who cares if they know who you are?  There will still be those who will thank you for leaving records and how-to’s they can use.  Want a good example?  Read the book “Lucifer’s Hammer,” by Niven and Pournelle.  Be more than a student, or a secretary.  Be a custodian…of information…. a caretaker, taking care for future generations.  Hard copy for all information…to include books!…is the way to save the knowledge.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

3,000 Survival Books You Can Download for Free

10 Books That Could Actually Save Your Life

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Chemtrail Poisoning: 3 Natural Herbs That Protect Against and Detox Your Body From Heavy Metals

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, undoubtedly you have all read articles that I wrote on several herbs that I recommended as a mainstay to help you fight disease and maintain good healthy systems.  How many times have I figuratively jumped up and down to expound on the benefits of garlic?  Well, garlic is back in the picture again, along with two other herbs.  This time to help you to protect yourself against the chemtrails, and against the heavy metals you find in food, water, air, and virtually omnipresent throughout the home.  In truth, we face a toxic array of chemicals: a labyrinth that is difficult to find an exit from.  These herbs are the “clew” to give you a good start.

Chelation Therapy Could Be the Key

First, what is chelation therapy?  It is a little-known and often misunderstood arena of holistic health care.  It is a simple concept.  Chelants are organic substances that (through the activity of ions) manage to bind themselves to metal ions, termed chelation; in so binding, chelation makes it possible for the metal to be excreted from the body.

Studies too numerous to count have found that chemtrails (those lovely, wispy, cloudlike-trails in the sky) produced by jet contrails) contain numerous chemicals and metals, especially Aluminum and Magnesium among others.  These metals (when inhaled or ingested, such as when they settle on crops and fresh produce or penetrate the water supply) cause many different ailments in the body, such as Alzheimer’s Disease, and other associated degenerative disorders of the brain and its neuron complex.

We’re going to cover three herbs you can use to start out your medicinal arsenal to battle the intake of these metals, from whatever source they originate.  Let’s do it!

3 Herbs That Protect Against Chemtrail Poisoning

  1. Garlic (Allium sativa): Aww, you knew it was coming! Yes, JJ’s favorite…the greatest of all the herbal “broad spectrum” healers!  Metals are no different: garlic does a number on them.  Garlic chelates lead, mercury, and cadmium…major “pests” of metals found in water and food.  It binds to them and effectively pulls them out of the body.  Safe, not invasive, and inexpensive…be advised: the stuff you buy fresh in your grocery store is indeed excellent…soft-neck garlic possesses the greatest and strongest herbal medical potential.
  2. Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum): Oh, yeah, baby! Cilantro is another “big gun” for your arsenal.  The herb neutralizes intercellular deposits of metals…those are metals that go into the cells.  Cilantro changes the ionic charges of the metals, and this enables their grasp on the cells to be broken…where they pass into the urine.  Mercury, lead, and aluminum are the ones that it acts upon the most.
  3. Chlorella (Chlorella regularis): The last batter up, for the winning home run! Yes, indeed, chlorella binds to the metals and takes them out of bone, brain, vital organs, and muscle to pass through and away from you.  Chlorella is green algae that is unicellular that contains several types of chlorophyll.  It is also high in protein (45% after it’s dehydrated), along with other nutrients.  It is inexpensive and available in Wal-Mart as well as health food concerns.

So, what we have outlined are three that you can use immediately in the battle to detoxify yourself and reduce the amount of heavy metals in your system.  I have recommended these because they are safe, effective, readily available, and not at all expensive.  You can blend them into your diet effortlessly and get off to a flying start.  If you research each one, you’ll find they have numerous other uses.  They can be cultivated with ease (yes, even chlorella), and stocked up for your supplies.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Physical Fitness and Survival: Why Your Body Needs Recovery Time

Click here to view the original post.

 

We often focus on tasks to do: physical exercise, and numerous physically-demanding work, such as woodcutting, building, gardening, snow removal, and so forth.  I have written in several pieces about the importance of recovery, but I am emphasizing it here in-depth.  Most people are so busy in the course of the day that they neglect to take the time to physically recover from what they have done…and recover properly.

Your Body’s Recovery is Important

Such a recovery means more than just simple rest.  It entails nutrition and understanding how the human body’s physiology works.  As I have stressed in the past, your protein intake is critical to tissue repair.  I also emphasized how you must take in protein and carbohydrates within a ½ hour at the conclusion of demanding physical exercise that lasts one hour or more.  You may also have to increase that protein/carbohydrate intake more frequently.

If you have worked a physically-demanding occupation, you may have a good basis for understanding already of these concepts and it may just be a matter of touching upon some of the finer points.  Construction workers put in 8, 10, or 12 hour days with only a couple of short breaks and a lunch break in the middle.  A tremendous amount of hydration is required during their day.  Your muscles are 80% water.  Stands to reason that dehydration means a loss of muscle tissue.

Remember glycogen that I mentioned in earlier articles?  When you work hard physically or exercise, glycogen is converted into glucose to fuel your body.  This is taken directly from stores in your body.  After that glycogen is depleted and you’ve “hit the wall,” then your body will break down its own proteins in the form of muscle tissue and converts those proteins to glycogen.  For every half hour of extra physical labor you perform without replacing lost glycogen, protein, and carbs, your body will take 5-6 grams of proteins from out of your muscles to do the job.  That is referred to as “cannibalism,” which is where the body “eats” its own proteins in order to compensate for loss or deficiencies.

What does that mean to you?  Knowing this, you must continually replace those substances in the form of food and water as you work periodically.  Then when the work is completed, you must nourish yourself fully and get the proper amount of rest you need.  A high-quality protein powder is worth its weight in gold in this manner.  It is simple to use and quick as well.  You can expect to spend about 75 cents to a dollar on a serving, but it goes right to your cells and starts the repairs on the cellular level.

Rest is Key

When you’re done with the work (which is a workout, as I’ve mentioned previously), you need to head first to the chow hall and then to the couch.  Sleep is very important.  One of the things I do is to take a shake about a ½ hour before bedtime, and my evening vitamins as well.  While you’re sleeping, your body metabolizes the nutrients more slowly, and the “uptake” is better as you’re resting.  If your work is not going to take the entire day, then try to break it up and give yourself an hour of lunch and another hour to just relax.

A day of complete rest during the week will help you to “reset” everything and to jump back up on the grinding wheel just that stronger and more invigorated.  It’s a matter of time management and knowing when to divide the time between labor and the recovery that you need.  It will take some practice, but you can help yourself out in a few ways:

  1. Always have a good supply of drinking water on hand that you can partake often. Remember: Thirst is a late sign of dehydration, and you need to consume (on average) about a gallon of water per day.
  2. Take sandwich bags and measure off a scoop/serving of your protein powder. Then throw it in the jar later with your milk and mix it up…keep your milk/fluid in a cooler where you can get it and employ it quickly.
  3. Keep batches of good snacks on hand: sunflower seeds, beef jerky, fruit (fresh or dried), nuts, and so on to help give you those quick bursts of food and energy to carry you through.
  4. Supplements: I use ginseng and Vitamin E throughout the day (see my articles on both), as well as other supplements and vitamins.
  5. Nervines: for the evening…tea of chamomile, catnip, or peppermint to relax you. I also recommend Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) to help your sleep be more full.

Your body is a machine that you have to maintain.  Rest and recovery are just as important as the work you’ll be performing.  If you plan your recovery time, it gives you something to shoot for, a goal to look forward to at the end of the day.  It is all about discipline and maintenance.  Take the time to get into a good routine for yourself in everything you do and it’ll take the guesswork out of it.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Money and Control: Why the FDA is Cracking Down on Natural Medicine Supplies

Click here to view the original post.

If you are an avid believer in alternative medicine, you need to be aware of a growing concern. In January, the FDA had a press conference stressing the importance of ‘protecting public health,” and is moving to pass a policy to reduce the “increase in safety concerns, including serious adverse events” resulting from homeopathic products”, the FDA says.

With a record number of people turning to homeopathy, as well as the recent “war on opioids” in the news, the FDA decided to announce new policies on the use of homeopathic drugs.

“The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reportedly declared that “virtually all” homeopathic drugs are illegal. Reports that the FDA is cracking down on the use of natural medicines have been circulating for a while. However, in a recently released “guidance document,” the FDA is now quoted as saying that homeopathic drugs are considered “new drugs” that are allegedly being sold illegally. The FDA released its new guidance document last month, and sources in support of the use of homeopathic drugs are still attempting to translate what the FDA is calling a “draft guidance” that’s been released for “comment purposes only.”

Source

“We respect that some individuals want to use alternative treatments, but the FDA has a responsibility to protect the public from products that may not deliver any benefit and have the potential to cause harm,” states the FDA. This more aggressive stance toward homeopathic drugs was done in order to “protect the public from dangerous products.”  Homeopathic products, especially those sold to treat infants and children, those containing ingredients with significant safety concerns (such as belladonna, and those sold for serious conditions such as opioid addiction, heart disease, and cancer) are under the most scrutiny.

Why the FDA Wants to Crack Down on your Holistic Supplies

While the FDA  has long criticized homeopathy for not having enough scientific evidence to support its claim of improving health and for some homeopathic products being dangerous to the public, some wonder if the FDA has ulterior motives and if this is coming into play now for a specific reason.

First, now that Obamacare is no longer mandatory, there is a tremendous backlash from the healthcare industry, the insurance industry, and the pharmaceutical industry. Secondly, prescription drugs are one of the fastest-growing categories of medical costs thanks to lobbyists and bought-and-paid-for politicians and with homeopathy becoming an up and coming market niche in recent years (reaching into the billions of dollars), perhaps the FDA wants to ensure they get a piece of the pie or monopolize and control the market entirely.

Big Pharma Wants Your Business

As a citizenry, we have been living in a drug-dependent culture…prescribed in the light of day by an established medical hierarchy not wanting to lose its “cash cow.”  We’re talking hundreds of billions of dollars here! With more people coming to the realization that these expensive, debilitating, synthesized, FDA-approved pharmaceuticals are in fact the snake oil they’re being warned about, they are opting out and finding more natural medicinal treatments. This means that the FDA and Big Pharma is losing out.

Moreover, Europe is still reeling under the auspices of the “Codex Alimentarius” designed to do the same thing: regulate holistic and herbal supplements into oblivion.  I have written numerous articles on how to come up with kits and supplies to tailor to the individual needs of your family members.  I have also written several articles on antibiotics, and how to find such things from sources that most may not take notice of, such as pet stores and pet supply websites.

As such, it would behoove you to stock up on as much as you need before all of this is signed into laws that restrict you from obtaining what you need. Don’t take the chance of being caught without the essentials.  Get back to your basics and re-read what has been written in the archives if you haven’t printed it out.  Once you read it again and formulate a plan, take action.  When you find out what supplies you need, I recommend going to the Natural Health stores and buying what you can and find out about markdown items.  Another thing you can do is arrange with the owner or manager to give you a discount if you buy a large quantity.  They’ll do it if you use some PR, especially if you’ve been shopping there for a while.

Another thing you may want (and this would probably only be for those of you who have fostered a one-on-one relationship with the proprietor) is get them to special order certain things you wish at cost, just as a favor to you.  Remember: unless you attempt it, it can’t be done.  The worst thing they can say is “no,” and that’s not the end of the world.  So, maybe you don’t need to do this all in one fell swoop, but it may be wise to get a hold of what you need and stock up on it now.  Today’s “talk” of banning something is tomorrow’s ban.  Fight that good fight and fight it smart.  JJ out!

 

Additional Information:

Read the FDA press statement on this issue here

Make Your Own Tinctures

When The Meds Run Out, These are The Natural Alternatives That Could Save Your Life

30 Most Popular Herbs for Natural Medicine

Natural First Aid: 5 Items To Put In Your Emergency Medical Kit Today

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Ambidextrous Shooting: How to Train Your Weaker Hand for a Gunfight

Click here to view the original post.

 

Image result for ready nutrition shooting gunReadyNutrition Readers, you are all well-aware of charity…where your left hand should not know what your right does.  In survival, it is the opposite: you need to train yourself bilaterally…that is, to be ambidextrous to a certain degree.  In the manner that you lift weights and exercise, should you train in survival skills. When you do bicep curls, do you perform them with only your dominant hand?  No, of course not.  You train with both hands and both arms and develop yourself symmetrically and equally.

Active Shooter Body Armor – Serious Stopping Power

How about things that require you to perform to survive?  Firing a rifle or pistol, for one.  If you’re right-handed and (God forbid) you are wounded in the hand, or suffer from a broken finger, then what?  Then you must follow after Gunny Highway’s advice (Clint Eastwood’s Marine Gunnery Sergeant in the movie “Heartbreak Ridge”).

Training for Ambidextrous Shooting Abilities

We’re going to talk through it for a right-handed firer (since most people are right-handed).  Lefties, just do the same thing as I’m instructing here with the opposite hand.  Pistol first.  You are going to fire your pistol with the left hand, as your right hand is badly broken.  With a revolver, this is simpler, but with a semiautomatic handgun?  Well, your spent brass ejects from the right.  Therefore, your point of aim has to be the same…from your right eye…but you’re firing with your left hand.

This is going to take some practice for you.  You’re going to be firing the semiautomatic pistol with your left hand, but “crossing over” to use your right eye…and fire from your right-hand side.  Your sight picture is the same as it would be if you were firing with your right hand…but it will feel a bit different, as it is with your left, now, and your arm still needs to be outstretched and straight.

Aiming at Your Target

Your target needs to be in alignment with the muzzle of your weapon, and your arm needs to be straight out, and aligned with your firing eye (in this case, the right eye).  This is going to take some practice on your part, and practice makes perfect.  It has to be such that you can shift at a second’s notice and fire just as true with your left hand as your right.

Now to develop your other eye: use the revolver.  Yes, you can practice a good sight picture and proper aim with your left eye with a revolver, as you don’t have to worry about a hot piece of brass in your face.  You must train to be ambidextrous.  With many years of practice, you should be able to take on a target with both eyes, and both hands.

The rifle is a bit different.  Remember a long time ago how I said that all rifles should have a bipod?  Well, you’ve just been injured with a broken right wrist, and you’re a right-handed firer.  Now what?  Well, with the bipod…you have support.  Then it’s just a matter of positioning yourself behind the weapon.  You can seat the weapon on your right shoulder and fire with the left hand.  This, too, takes practice.  Same thing as before.  Semiautomatic rifles will kick brass in your face if you fire with the left shoulder.  You can pick up a brass deflector for an AR-15 that will help in this department.

Bolt-actions and lever-actions are good-to-go in this regard.  Practice firing with the left hand with these, so as not to distract your progress with brass flying in your face.  Same thing here.  Your point of aim must be developed on the left-hand side.  This will take time, practice, and patience, with emphasis on that third factor.  You aren’t going to master it overnight.  You can start out with an air rifle.  The air rifle fundamentals of marksmanship…Aiming, Breathing, and Trigger-Squeeze…are the same as with a firearm.  It is less costly, however, and easier to manage in a home-indoor range.  You can develop the skills with air rifle or air pistol to become an “ambidextrous” firer.

Practice this concept for all things…the use of hand tools, the use of cooking utensils and implements, and other weapons, such as the bow and arrow and the knife.  It is a form of preparation that will improve you overall.  Don’t be limited by an injury.  Don’t allow an injury to keep you from defending yourself or performing a task necessary to stay alive or save life and limb.  It is all part of your training, and let the training never stop!  Stay in that fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Peasant Communities Survived On This Simple and Nutritious Food For Centuries

Click here to view the original post.

Peasant food, while simple and frugal, has been around for centuries – in every culture around the world. Using fresh roots, herbs, and foods available to them, households would whip up a soup the family could feast on for days. Soups such as pot-au-feu, minestrone, cawl, and Acquacotta would give the family sustenance during hard times. But why is this simple meal so nutritious?

The Health Benefits of Soup

During the winter months, one of the things we neglect is taking in an adequate amount of fluids.  This is understandable, as cold doesn’t make you feel thirsty the way hot weather does.  Nevertheless, the fluid dynamics and balance requirements are the same, and sometimes more: we expend more energy in the winter trying to stay warm.  Guess what?  We still need about a gallon of water per person, per day.

That being said, let’s discuss some facts of digestion.  Shunting is the term where, when you’re digesting, all of the blood in your periphery (arms, legs, and such) shunts inward to your thoracic cavity…where you’re actively digesting your food.  The term “food coma,” is a humorous description of lack of mental alertness while your body digests the meal.

Then again, we make it hard on ourselves.  The best time to eat a large, sit-down meal is for dinner when you’re able to be home and to digest your food and then turn in for the night.  During the day?  You’re running around and active…then you turn into a “stone” after that huge meal of chimichangas or gigantic beef brisket sandwich and fries.  Then you don’t understand why you feel as if you’ve been hit head-on by a train.

Take the Anguish (and guesswork) Out of It

Soup is a must from a dietary standpoint.  It is more easily digested, and the ingredients you need (protein and carbohydrates) are broken down faster without taxing your system as hard.  In addition, vital electrolytes (such as sodium and potassium) are more easily taken in.  In other articles, we discussed the thermogenic factor of food: how protein takes more energy to break down, but with greater return.  We also discussed how 10% of your intake is spent digesting the food.

Soups and broths make it easier on your body by giving you the nutrition you need in a form that is more easily digestible.  Do you remember that piece I did on the Thermos, and how it is worthwhile to pack your own lunch from a practical/economic standpoint?  There was more to it than dollars and cents.  You can give yourself the best of food, in a form that it is easier to handle.  Let’s talk about some steps to it…maybe I can give you some good ideas that you can use.

5 Tips for Making Soup as Nutrition-Packed as Possible

  1. If you’re going to buy your soups, then invest in high-quality material: organic, non-GMO, with some actual good statistics to it. Look for protein, look for your electrolytes, and stock up on these.
  2. Next, pick up some good meats…what is your favorite, in a high-quality (look for leanness, no additives, and organic if you can swing it financially. Grill them or broil them, and store them in your fridge. Here’s a tip: If you grill meat with garlic…as in fresh, sliced cloves, the garlic neutralizes cancer-causing agents in the meat that affect your colon…and garlic lowers your risk of colon cancer and stomach cancer substantially.
  3. Take your meats, chop them up nice and small…and add them to your soup, along with extra vegetables and herbs to your liking…such as onions, garlic, fresh carrots. Heat up your soup, and then add these after you’ve taken it off of a boil.  Throw it in your thermos.
  4. If you make your own? Stick with high-protein legumes, such as lentils, kidney beans, and such.  Legumes also lower cholesterol.  “Batch” up about 5 gallons at a time to make it cost-effective, break it down into quart containers, and freeze your excess.
  5. The Blender is your Buddy! Yes, you can go back to that article I wrote about using the blender to make that hamburger into a “puree,” then adding to the base, or just throwing it in some tomato juice.  Hi Ho Lycopene and Protein!  You’re only limitation is your imagination.

Not to mention the fact that if you’re packing it around with you, this decreases the travel time to obtain food, eat, and go back to the grind.  That thermos can be your best friend: pack it with good, reliable proteins, fluid, and electrolytes in the form of a hearty soup.  Who knows?  You might start a trend in your workplace.  Then after the winter, you will be able to start the spring in better shape, as eating healthy will prevent that transformation into the Michelin Man.  Bon Appetit, and stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Health Benefits of Omega-3 and Why You Should Make it Part of your Diet

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, did you know that 2 out of the 3 Omega-3 fatty acids can be derived from seafood? This article presents a little information about Omega-3 fatty acids, a really important substance for your metabolism.  Human beings (and mammals in general) are not able to produce these fatty acids in our own bodies; however, we can obtain them in different forms in our diet.  Then our bodies transform them into the “forms” we need.

There are three types of Omega-3’s that are important for people, and they are as follows:

  1. ALA – also known as Alpha Linolenic Acid, and these can be found in certain oils in plants and nuts.  Here are some sources for these:  walnuts, flaxseed oil, hemp oil, and seeds, such as pumpkin and sunflower.
  2. EPAEicosapentaenoic Acid, found in fish and ocean-oils
  3. DHADocosahexaenoic Acid, also found in fish and ocean/marine oils.

Here are some sources for EPA and DHA:  fish oils, oils from krill, squid, and octopus, and egg oil…this latter being an oil found in eggs, such as chicken eggs (non-fish lovers, again, you’re probably happy!) Alternatively, you can purchase omega-3 oils in capsule form.

Omega-3 Health Benefits

Our vaunted medical establishment recognizes the importance of Omega-3 fatty acids; however, it will not commit to actually saying they benefit individuals in the prevention of disease.  They use the term “may,” a “fallback” to state is may or may not…and they’re not liable, etc., for anything they tell you.  Well, here are some of the areas Omega-3’s may help you:

  • Inflammations, cancer, cardiac disorders (cardiac death, sudden death, and MI, or Myocardial Infarction).
  • It may also help against different types of skin diseases, such as dermatitis, and also help with cognitive functions in the aging process.
  • Omega-3’s may also help in treating mental disorders, such as depression and psychosis.

One of the problems with true and good reviews on supplements is that very few medical doctors will go “out on a limb” and challenge the approved, authorized system regarding them.

The American Medical Establishment wants you to stay underfed, weak, out of shape, working (working ensures more taxes, and more grants for them, remember), sick, and constantly using a steady supply of prescription medication.

Do you want real advice?  Go talk to a bodybuilder, a professional athlete, or a weightlifter.  Look at one of them, and then look at the doctors who are claiming supplements do not work.  Use your own eyes and make a decision.

These doctors all invest in the pharmaceutical industry and demonize all holistic foods and supplementation.

The Omega-3’s work and they’re also needed by you for tissue repair from their anti-inflammatory effects.  Fish are high in protein, and if you shop it right, they aren’t as expensive as you might believe.  Some good sources are cod, mackerel, sardines, and salmon.  You can also pick up that rod and reel and go out for some bass, crappie, or trout to take in a steady supply of Omega 3’s.  For those who just can’t do the fish?  Well, there are supplements.

Your friendly neighborhood Wal-Mart has fish oil, salmon oil, and cod liver oil in happy, non-fish-tasting capsules.  They’re not too expensive and you can take one or two of them a day as a supplement.  I also must mention that phytoplankton and marine algae also contain all three types of the Omega-3’s, and you can pick these guys up either in dried form at your better health food stores, or in capsule form there, and in Wal-Mart.  For dosages consult with the package directions by the manufacturer/grower of these different foods.

If you haven’t already done so, consider making Omega-3 fatty acids part of your diet, either in the consumption of foods or as an adjunct with supplements.  You’ll be giving yourself a healthy edge…your number one piece of equipment for survival is your body.  Never forget that, and if you put in “garbage” you can’t expect to roll a Lamborghini off of the assembly line.  Start those fishing rods up soon!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

NASA Admits Pole Shift is Close: Here’s What You Can Do to Prepare

Click here to view the original post.

With all of the horrific weather anomalies, and the increase in earthquakes and volcanoes over the past six months…pronouncing themselves especially just in the past week…there is a cause for concern.  In the article, Earth’s Magnetic Poles Show Signs They’re About to Flip – Exposing Humans to Radiation and Planet-Wide Blackouts,” written by Kastalia Medrano of Newsweek, NASA finally admits to a long-time fear – the Earth’s poles are close to shifting.

Here is an excerpt from that article:

“Historically, Earth’s North and South magnetic poles have flipped every 200,000 or 300,000 years—except right now, they haven’t flipped successfully for about 780,000 years. But the planet’s magnetic field is at long last showing signs of shifting. NASA”

“That devastation could arrive through multiple avenues. The combination of powerful space particles, like unfiltered solar rays, cosmic rays and ultraviolet B rays (the stuff your sunscreen bottle warns you about), would smash through our battered ozone layer and lead us the way of the dinosaurs.”

Why Is This Happening?

As you will read, the earth’s molten core of iron and nickel is beginning to leach out, affecting the magnetism of the entire earth.  Nothing about wildlife was mentioned in the article, but I point out this could very well explain some of the strange and bizarre behavior we have been witnessing regarding animals worldwide.

So, what can we do about such a thing?  I highly recommend reading the article.  It explains that with a magnetic shift we could see radiation levels increase around the globe, and several scientific firms suggest that parts of the planet could become uninhabitable, and at least inhospitable.

How to Prepare

I suggest visiting Cresson Kearney’s site that I have recommended repeatedly, for the book Nuclear War Survival Skills.”  You will be killing two birds with one stone: you should already be taking steps in case a nuclear war breaks out, as tensions with North Korea are high, and Russia and China are not our buddies, either.  Kearney diagrammed and detailed the levels of thickness and materials used for shelters, both home-expedient and those constructed for the specific purpose.  It also gives all the information you’ll need on radiation itself.

I also did a few articles in the past on radiation-removing supplements and herbs, such as zeolite clay, chlorella, and spirulina.  Along with Potassium Iodide supplies, it would behoove you to stock up on these materials.  A survey meter (Geiger counter) would be invaluable, as well as individual dosimeters.  Don’t smirk: you can still obtain them, and you should.  Also, while there’s still the time, I advise building a Kearney Fallout Meter from materials you can pick up at the grocery store and hardware store.  The complete plans for it are available on the site I mentioned above.

Advanced Tactical Gas Mask – Are You Ready for a Biological, Nuclear or Chemical Attack?

The NOAA and NASA websites are excellent sites for gathering information about what is currently happening.  In addition, as I have mentioned before in other articles, that military Lensatic compass would be a plus.  If and/or when the poles do shift, electronic equipment such as digital compasses and wrist computers might not function, but the Lensatic compass will be going wild.  As a forethought to such, I strongly advise obtaining maps of your immediate area…good terrain-featured, topographical maps…the kind that gives landmarks you can find with your eyes.  Terrain association is an important skill.  If you’ve ever busted a compass and cannot verify the azimuth you’re walking on…the ability to see the terrain and match it to what you see on the map is invaluable.

That will get you started if you haven’t already begun.  In this case, an ounce of prevention is worth more than a pound of cure…it can be worth much more than that.  Remember Aesop’s fable of “The Grasshopper and the Ant,” and if you have never read it, now would be a good time to print a copy and keep it where you can read it from time to time.  Herein lies the conundrum, for only the wicked flee when none pursue…but also, the wise saw trouble and took cover, while the foolish went on and was destroyed.  There is a balance for both, and (to paraphrase the Rolling Stones) time is on your side.  For now, if you make the most of it.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

NASA Admits Pole Shift is Close: Here’s What You Can Do to Prepare

With all of the horrific weather anomalies, and the increase in earthquakes and volcanoes over the past six months…pronouncing themselves especially just in the past week…there is a cause for concern.  In the article, Earth’s Magnetic Poles Show Signs They’re About to Flip – Exposing Humans to Radiation and Planet-Wide Blackouts,” written by Kastalia Medrano of Newsweek, NASA finally admits to a long-time fear – the Earth’s poles are close to shifting.

Here is an excerpt from that article:

“Historically, Earth’s North and South magnetic poles have flipped every 200,000 or 300,000 years—except right now, they haven’t flipped successfully for about 780,000 years. But the planet’s magnetic field is at long last showing signs of shifting. NASA”

“That devastation could arrive through multiple avenues. The combination of powerful space particles, like unfiltered solar rays, cosmic rays and ultraviolet B rays (the stuff your sunscreen bottle warns you about), would smash through our battered ozone layer and lead us the way of the dinosaurs.”

Why Is This Happening?

As you will read, the earth’s molten core of iron and nickel is beginning to leach out, affecting the magnetism of the entire earth.  Nothing about wildlife was mentioned in the article, but I point out this could very well explain some of the strange and bizarre behavior we have been witnessing regarding animals worldwide.

So, what can we do about such a thing?  I highly recommend reading the article.  It explains that with a magnetic shift we could see radiation levels increase around the globe, and several scientific firms suggest that parts of the planet could become uninhabitable, and at least inhospitable.

How to Prepare

I suggest visiting Cresson Kearney’s site that I have recommended repeatedly, for the book Nuclear War Survival Skills.”  You will be killing two birds with one stone: you should already be taking steps in case a nuclear war breaks out, as tensions with North Korea are high, and Russia and China are not our buddies, either.  Kearney diagrammed and detailed the levels of thickness and materials used for shelters, both home-expedient and those constructed for the specific purpose.  It also gives all the information you’ll need on radiation itself.

I also did a few articles in the past on radiation-removing supplements and herbs, such as zeolite clay, chlorella, and spirulina.  Along with Potassium Iodide supplies, it would behoove you to stock up on these materials.  A survey meter (Geiger counter) would be invaluable, as well as individual dosimeters.  Don’t smirk: you can still obtain them, and you should.  Also, while there’s still the time, I advise building a Kearney Fallout Meter from materials you can pick up at the grocery store and hardware store.  The complete plans for it are available on the site I mentioned above.

Advanced Tactical Gas Mask – Are You Ready for a Biological, Nuclear or Chemical Attack?

The NOAA and NASA websites are excellent sites for gathering information about what is currently happening.  In addition, as I have mentioned before in other articles, that military Lensatic compass would be a plus.  If and/or when the poles do shift, electronic equipment such as digital compasses and wrist computers might not function, but the Lensatic compass will be going wild.  As a forethought to such, I strongly advise obtaining maps of your immediate area…good terrain-featured, topographical maps…the kind that gives landmarks you can find with your eyes.  Terrain association is an important skill.  If you’ve ever busted a compass and cannot verify the azimuth you’re walking on…the ability to see the terrain and match it to what you see on the map is invaluable.

That will get you started if you haven’t already begun.  In this case, an ounce of prevention is worth more than a pound of cure…it can be worth much more than that.  Remember Aesop’s fable of “The Grasshopper and the Ant,” and if you have never read it, now would be a good time to print a copy and keep it where you can read it from time to time.  Herein lies the conundrum, for only the wicked flee when none pursue…but also, the wise saw trouble and took cover, while the foolish went on and was destroyed.  There is a balance for both, and (to paraphrase the Rolling Stones) time is on your side.  For now, if you make the most of it.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Collapse Investing: 7 Clever Ways To Prepare for a Cashless Society With Precious Metals

Click here to view the original post.


ReadyNutrition Readers, this article is a little bit of a different flair.  A basic “how-to” guide to garnering some precious metals to have on your person.  Why?  Let’s take a hypothetical view.  What if some major disaster occurs and you need to take a cab somewhere…it’s your only option?  It is just before the major panic sets in.  Everyone else has the same idea.  Cab to the highest bidder and you have a heavy sterling silver chain to go along with that cash.  Guess who gets the ride?

7 Ways To Pick Up Some Micro-Marketed Precious Metals

It’s as simple as that.  So, let’s take a look at how to pick up some “micro-marketed” precious metals.  There are plenty of different sources that (most of the time) will bargain with you or will be oblivious.  Let’s list some of them:

  1. Consignment stores: often have jewelry at basement prices and will bargain with you, especially if the goods belong to the store’s owner.
  2. Thrift stores: that’s right! Thrift store personnel (from the manager on down) do not usually have a clue as to what jewelry comes into their establishment.  Here look for necklaces, bracelets, earrings, and rings…most of the time silver, and occasionally gold.
  3. Storage Units: each month they turn out a bunch of people who can’t pay…placing (or throwing) their stuff outside of the unit and giving it 24 hours or so to pick it up. At times you can even cut a deal with the owners to go into a unit “blind” and take care of what’s in there.  Drawback: you’re responsible for the stuff…but you’d be surprised about what people throw into these things.
  4. Flea Markets: Once again, you’ll be among the oblivious (fellow shoppers and vendors), and you’ll find a deal…it just takes time.
  5. Want Ads: yes, often you’ll pick up jewelry, coins, and ingots (silver or gold) at pennies on the dollar.
  6. Estate/Deceased Person’s Sales and Auctions: Yes, indeed, especially when the person is not some multi-millionaire…that’s when you must bid against a plethora of social debutantes that can outslick you.
  7. EbayThat’s right, I said Ebay. They happen to have a very active silver market, where you can find a large selection any time or day of the week. After spending a lot of time hunting down junk coins on Ebay, writer Joshua Krause perfected his procedure for spotting and procuring the best price for silver and wrote about it. You can read more here.

Coins and jewelry are the best types of PM’s to pick up and are great for bartering.  This is not because they’re always the highest precious metal content, but because of the form they’re in.  For more on that, research Frankie the Dead Roosevelt (or FDR’s) executive order of 1933 going door-to-door to confiscate the gold.  That’s right: in these United States.  This gives you a little bit more “insulation,” as you can wear the jewelry, collect the “coins,” and hide both.

It would behoove you to have a few items at your disposal.  Firstly, knowledge of the grades of silver and the carats of gold.  With silver, shoot for sterling (.925 mark on it), but with coins, you’ll need to know the type of coin and the year to be able to determine the silver content.  Same for gold.  Don’t become “gypped,” because crooks will take little ringlets with a stamp of “14-carat” on them…and they are…and attach them to a chain that is at best 14-carat gold paint. Learn more about testing your precious metals.

A magnifying glass is a great aid.  A word of warning: most of the oblivious will suddenly have their pupils change into dollar signs and their fangs will come out.  If you are looking at something with a magnifying glass and they see you?  You can bank on them checking out what you run right up to the counter to buy for one or two dollars.  Be smart and be incognito…and you’ll prosper.  If you feel this is dishonest, then tell them what you’ve found, and they’ll thank you every time you do it.  Sink or swim, it’s your decision.

Keep a small “stash” of these items on your person.  Naturally, other things such as diamonds, precious, and semi-precious stones will need more of an eye and knowledge to assess.  These you can carry on you to an extent.  Just make sure they’re real.  Another thing: before you deal with someone, make sure they’re real before you give the piece of jewelry to them.  Ignorance is not always bliss, especially where the ignorance is feigned.  When you buy?  Hey, they put it out, and it’s not your job to look out for the store’s welfare.  Trust me: the store will be there with or without your purchase.  The thing was a donated item anyway…and 501-C-3’s are non-profit corporations that all make a profit…every one of them.

Think of these things and about building up a small personal supply of such precious metals you can carry around with you for when the “S” hits the fan, or when you have need of an edge.  Good hunting and keep your eyes open…the bargains will jump up for you.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

This Ancient Remedy Is Still One of the Most Powerful Compounds for Health

Click here to view the original post.

Herbal foods that are taken beyond just a culinary reason and are consumed for naturopathic purposes are a beautiful thing.  Why?  Because they aren’t invasive…and you are supposed to follow the least invasive path to taking care of ailments.  Curcumin is the focus of this article.  It will help with heart disease, with Alzheimer’s, with joint pain, with diabetes.  What I’ve listed there is far from exhaustive.Let’s clear up the confusion about it first.  Curcumin is not an herb but is a component of one: Turmeric, or Curcuma longa.  The herb’s root forms into a rhizome, an “L” shaped underground protuberance.  The spice Turmeric usually contains only a small amount of curcumin: anywhere from 2-5%, which is not much and is not necessarily bioavailable.  This latter term refers to the ability of the body to utilize it.

Curcumin has been used in India and the Far East for thousands of years quite effectively against dozens…I repeat, dozens…of different ailments, from Crohn’s disease to Cancer.  Curcumin is an antioxidant, an anti-inflammatory, and it is a cancer-fighter.  In previous articles, we covered oxidation (the tendency of a “free radical” to “steal” an electron from a healthy cell) and how it is a process of aging and disease.

The yellow color of curcumin is responsible for the orange color of turmeric.  It is more than 200 times more powerful than blueberries as an antioxidant.  It increases HDL (High-Density Lipoprotein) in your system…the “good” cholesterol…that helps move fats and lipids out of cells and prevents blood clotting in the arteries and veins.

Its anti-inflammatory properties are extremely useful in helping digestive disorders.  More than 60 million Americans are afflicted each year with some type of bowel disorder, and curcumin is extremely effective against all of them, from ulcerative colitis to cancer of the colon.  In addition, it is effective against lower and upper respiratory infections.

The best curcumin can be found in your better health concerns.  You guys and gals know I’ve recommended Wal-Mart for many herbs for both quality and affordability, but not with this one.  The dose will be dependent upon the quality and concentration of the curcumin.  If you buy it as a powder, you can load it into gel-caps or tincture it.  For the latter, it’s good to use grain alcohol, but you can use other liquors.  Just remember that the alcohol concentration varies between them, and you want to have a minimum of about 52% alcohol or higher to preserve it longer and keep that freezing point very low (we’ve covered that topic in other articles).

One last consideration is that if you use curcumin, you also want to use black pepper.  Yes, black pepper contains piperazine that potentiates the effect and effectiveness of the curcumin.  As we know, black pepper is about as rare as glass and probably less expensive.  This is a combination that is not invasive, and you can easily blend in with your routine and meals.  Try it out: do some more homework and see how you can use this remarkable compound simply, effectively, and affordable.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

10 Prepper Uses for Safety Pins

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, Skeptics, and Skeptical Readers, greetings!  Let’s explain reasoning a little bit more in detail than regards the simple subject of this article.  My intent as a writer has never been to delve into the “High-Tech” and pricey solutions to things that you may face.

Many survival magazines offer “Sales” rather than “Solutions” to your needs to prepare.  In too many articles, people have lambasted me for suggesting low-cost solutions that are both “doable” and within the budget.

If you want secure communications, go ahead and suggest a SEAL Magnaphone with built-in scrambler, or a $15,000 current-gen pair of NVG (Night Vision Goggles), then go ahead and buy it.  If your main goal with any article is to suggest something “better” than the advised thing, that’s great.  The majority of the readers, however, are looking for simplicity combined with affordability.

Anyone can buy $100K worth of gear.  Now, what does that person do when the gear is either defunct, “appropriated,” or unusable for one reason or another?

My work attempts to propose solutions that can be employed without bankrupting a person, and also some knowledge of what can be used when all of the laser sights, night vision devices, ATV’s, cameras, reticle-dot sights, and all else are just useless circuitry.  Those days are coming: mark my words.  In the meantime, we have to develop our skills and win with the tools that we have at hand.

10 Prepper Uses for Safety Pins

Safety pins.  Simple little things, yet so much can be done with them.  I highly recommend toting at least a half dozen with you of various sizes, large to small.  They cost practically nothing.  Here’s the tip: Take the safety pins: learn and practice what you can do with them.

We’re going to run a condensed, hardly-exhaustive list of uses for the safety pins.  Here we go:

  1. Temporary repair fasteners for clothing
  2. Fishhooks
  3. Probe-tool (medical use)
  4. Lockpick
  5. Suture substitute
  6. Lance
  7. Support (individual or as a chain)
  8. Bandage/dressing support
  9. Cleaning tool
  10. Toothpick/minor dental first-aid tool

The list could go on and on.  Tear open a swatch in your pants leg while you’re out in the woods?  If you don’t have time to sew it up, use the safety pins.  Fishhooks.  All you need do is notch a couple of notches for barbs (when you do, notch “upward” in the direction of the safety pin’s point) for improvised fishhooks.  Tie off your line through the top-notch of the safety pin.

For use in removing metal or wood splinters or foreign debris: make sure you sterilize the end of the safety pin prior to use as a probe.  Burn the end of it for about ten seconds with a lighter or match, and then dip in alcohol if you can.  You can also use this technique for lancing a bad wound to allow pus to escape.

As a suture substitute, you can approximate the edges of the wound if it’s a bad bleeder with the safety pins.  This is temporary!  Seek medical attention immediately to prevent infection and further complications.  You can make a chain of them to hang an IV bag if necessary, or to close up and secure bandages and dressings.

Pin them where you can get to them easily.  If you wear a hat, then pin 4 to 6 of various sizes in your hatband.  You won’t even notice they’re there.  When some kind of need arises, though, you’ll remember that you have them.  Taking common, everyday items and making more out of them than their original intent is the kind of adaptive ingenuity you’ll need when the SHTF and an emergency arises.

And (not completely knocking your high-tech gadgets) when you pick up a piece of equipment, know two things: complete mastery of its capabilities and functions, and what you will replace it with when you no longer have it to use.  Always train from low-tech to high-tech, and you won’t be caught with your pants down.  And if that happens?  You may have busted a button; therefore, a safety pin will help…if you have it.  Fight that good fight.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Stay Warm in a Long-Term SHTF Event

Click here to view the original post.

 

As well-informed readers, you know the world situation does not appear to be improving.  At any time, we could well find ourselves in the middle of a SHTF event…be it economic collapse, a nuclear attack, or a string of natural disasters.  Regarding this last item, the steady string of hurricanes bringing a deadly swath of death and destruction to the United States has been happening as we speak.  The unmentioned problem: we’re on the “butt” end of winter, and as such, you’ll have to take extra precautions in the event it hits the fan.

10 Ways to Stay Warm in a Long-Term SHTF Event

This is going to be a very specific list; however, it is not exhaustive.  There will always be more to add, and there is never enough: that’s the bottom line.  This will get you started on your checklist, either physical or mental to ready your preparations before the winter hits.

  1. Warm clothing: and plenty of it. Gore-Tex top and bottoms are an absolute necessity, and plenty of warm socks, thermal underwear, and good boots that are waterproof, have plenty of Thinsulate and good soles, and give good ankle support.
  2. Sleeping bag, Gore-Tex cover, and sleeping pad: Remember to go for the best in terms of quality and performance. Another essential in this regard is a good compression bag and a wet-weather bag.  A soaking wet sleeping bag is not fun.  Stay warm, dry, and insulated from the conduction of lying on the ground.
  3. Plenty of hand warmers: Why? Because if you’re going to give an IV in the middle of the winter, you want to warm up the bag, that’s why.  Because you may need to thaw something out and not be able to light a fire due to operational security reasons.  Because you may need an immediate aid for frostbite (Read “To Build a Fire,” by Jack London).  Those hand warmers are very useful, from first-aid measures to thawing out a frozen canteen.
  4. Several rolls of plastic, preferably 6 mil or equivalent in thickness: If you live in the suburbs in a house or apartment and there’s a nuke tossed nearby, you may lose your windows or sliding glass door. This isn’t good in the winter.  Along with the plastic rolls you should “squirrel” away some fir strips (1” x 2” or 1” x 3”) to use to tack in place over the edges of the plastic after you cut it to overlap your broken windows.  Nail them in place, and it will keep the wind from tearing away at the edges that would occur if you just affixed the plastic sheets with staple guns.
  5. Plywood: to cover up those same holes beforehand and any holes in the walls or roof. Remember to affix the plywood to the outside of the window or sliding glass door, as if it’s on the inside, Tiny Tim can kick it in easily.  COVER WITH THE PLYWOOD AFTER YOU HAVE COVERED WITH THE PLASTIC!  The plastic will keep the cold, wind, and water out…and the plywood will help protect it…and keep Tiny Tim from stealing it by taking it off with a razor knife if the plastic is outside of the plywood.  You may also want to consider cutting a firing slit and a peephole in it.  Remember to do the same with the plastic…cut a section on three sides as a “flap” and overlap this with duct tape and more plastic.  Velcro on the edge of the flap will keep it in place.  Velcro at the top will permit you to move the flap if you need the firing slit so as not to need to tear the plastic.
  6. Small Woodstove: You can find a ton of them that put out an amazing amount of BTU’s.  Prep the area of your home.  If you have a fireplace, you can stick it right in there and run the flue pipe right up the chimney.  If you don’t have a fireplace, then create an area.  Run that pipe through a window, and get some sheets of asbestos board to set the stove on.  Also, consider making an expedient form of protection for the chimney pipe against the wall.  Use common sense and do your research.  No heat in the house for winter?  No good.  This wood stove can be used to cook, melt snow, boil water, and of course to heat the home.  One EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) and you can say goodbye to the electricity.
  7. Toilet: I have been recommending the kind of toilet that has a seat with a bucket and lid incorporated into a metal-frame chair. This kind is very good.  For liquid waste, I suggest a bucket.  This can be dumped.  The solid waste can be taken out of the bucket with the use of plastic bags for liners and then burned.
  8. Matches, lighters, and fire-starting equipment, as well as lanterns and candles: safe to say, the word for each of them is “P” for plenty.  You can never have enough.  You will need to start fires, and you’ll also need some light.  Also: before you go buying a whole bunch of “fire starters” … the ones that resemble particleboard…you can make your own out of fire-logs for a fraction of the cost.
  9. Plenty of fuel: you will need wood, so now is the time to lay in a good supply of it.
  10. Several tents: You want to be able to put the family under canvas if for some reason your home becomes untenable and you must vacate.

These are simple items that are easy enough to obtain for now.  The time to obtain them is now, and not after the disaster strikes.  The winter poses tremendous challenges that have to be taken very seriously.  When the “S” hits the fan, it is best to have these preparations in place and know how to use all of them.  JJ out!

 

Related Articles:

When You Lose Power this Winter, Here’s What You’ll Need

10 Must-Haves to Stay Warm in the Harshest of Conditions

Winter Warmth When the Grid is Down

Are You Ready Series: Extreme Winter Storms

How We Kept The Cottage Warm in Winter

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Stay Warm in a Long-Term SHTF Event

 

As well-informed readers, you know the world situation does not appear to be improving.  At any time, we could well find ourselves in the middle of a SHTF event…be it economic collapse, a nuclear attack, or a string of natural disasters.  Regarding this last item, the steady string of hurricanes bringing a deadly swath of death and destruction to the United States has been happening as we speak.  The unmentioned problem: we’re on the “butt” end of winter, and as such, you’ll have to take extra precautions in the event it hits the fan.

10 Ways to Stay Warm in a Long-Term SHTF Event

This is going to be a very specific list; however, it is not exhaustive.  There will always be more to add, and there is never enough: that’s the bottom line.  This will get you started on your checklist, either physical or mental to ready your preparations before the winter hits.

  1. Warm clothing: and plenty of it. Gore-Tex top and bottoms are an absolute necessity, and plenty of warm socks, thermal underwear, and good boots that are waterproof, have plenty of Thinsulate and good soles, and give good ankle support.
  2. Sleeping bag, Gore-Tex cover, and sleeping pad: Remember to go for the best in terms of quality and performance. Another essential in this regard is a good compression bag and a wet-weather bag.  A soaking wet sleeping bag is not fun.  Stay warm, dry, and insulated from the conduction of lying on the ground.
  3. Plenty of hand warmers: Why? Because if you’re going to give an IV in the middle of the winter, you want to warm up the bag, that’s why.  Because you may need to thaw something out and not be able to light a fire due to operational security reasons.  Because you may need an immediate aid for frostbite (Read “To Build a Fire,” by Jack London).  Those hand warmers are very useful, from first-aid measures to thawing out a frozen canteen.
  4. Several rolls of plastic, preferably 6 mil or equivalent in thickness: If you live in the suburbs in a house or apartment and there’s a nuke tossed nearby, you may lose your windows or sliding glass door. This isn’t good in the winter.  Along with the plastic rolls you should “squirrel” away some fir strips (1” x 2” or 1” x 3”) to use to tack in place over the edges of the plastic after you cut it to overlap your broken windows.  Nail them in place, and it will keep the wind from tearing away at the edges that would occur if you just affixed the plastic sheets with staple guns.
  5. Plywood: to cover up those same holes beforehand and any holes in the walls or roof. Remember to affix the plywood to the outside of the window or sliding glass door, as if it’s on the inside, Tiny Tim can kick it in easily.  COVER WITH THE PLYWOOD AFTER YOU HAVE COVERED WITH THE PLASTIC!  The plastic will keep the cold, wind, and water out…and the plywood will help protect it…and keep Tiny Tim from stealing it by taking it off with a razor knife if the plastic is outside of the plywood.  You may also want to consider cutting a firing slit and a peephole in it.  Remember to do the same with the plastic…cut a section on three sides as a “flap” and overlap this with duct tape and more plastic.  Velcro on the edge of the flap will keep it in place.  Velcro at the top will permit you to move the flap if you need the firing slit so as not to need to tear the plastic.
  6. Small Woodstove: You can find a ton of them that put out an amazing amount of BTU’s.  Prep the area of your home.  If you have a fireplace, you can stick it right in there and run the flue pipe right up the chimney.  If you don’t have a fireplace, then create an area.  Run that pipe through a window, and get some sheets of asbestos board to set the stove on.  Also, consider making an expedient form of protection for the chimney pipe against the wall.  Use common sense and do your research.  No heat in the house for winter?  No good.  This wood stove can be used to cook, melt snow, boil water, and of course to heat the home.  One EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) and you can say goodbye to the electricity.
  7. Toilet: I have been recommending the kind of toilet that has a seat with a bucket and lid incorporated into a metal-frame chair. This kind is very good.  For liquid waste, I suggest a bucket.  This can be dumped.  The solid waste can be taken out of the bucket with the use of plastic bags for liners and then burned.
  8. Matches, lighters, and fire-starting equipment, as well as lanterns and candles: safe to say, the word for each of them is “P” for plenty.  You can never have enough.  You will need to start fires, and you’ll also need some light.  Also: before you go buying a whole bunch of “fire starters” … the ones that resemble particleboard…you can make your own out of fire-logs for a fraction of the cost.
  9. Plenty of fuel: you will need wood, so now is the time to lay in a good supply of it.
  10. Several tents: You want to be able to put the family under canvas if for some reason your home becomes untenable and you must vacate.

These are simple items that are easy enough to obtain for now.  The time to obtain them is now, and not after the disaster strikes.  The winter poses tremendous challenges that have to be taken very seriously.  When the “S” hits the fan, it is best to have these preparations in place and know how to use all of them.  JJ out!

 

Related Articles:

When You Lose Power this Winter, Here’s What You’ll Need

10 Must-Haves to Stay Warm in the Harshest of Conditions

Winter Warmth When the Grid is Down

Are You Ready Series: Extreme Winter Storms

How We Kept The Cottage Warm in Winter

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Stay Warm in a Long-Term SHTF Event

 

As well-informed readers, you know the world situation does not appear to be improving.  At any time, we could well find ourselves in the middle of a SHTF event…be it economic collapse, a nuclear attack, or a string of natural disasters.  Regarding this last item, the steady string of hurricanes bringing a deadly swath of death and destruction to the United States has been happening as we speak.  The unmentioned problem: we’re on the “butt” end of winter, and as such, you’ll have to take extra precautions in the event it hits the fan.

10 Ways to Stay Warm in a Long-Term SHTF Event

This is going to be a very specific list; however, it is not exhaustive.  There will always be more to add, and there is never enough: that’s the bottom line.  This will get you started on your checklist, either physical or mental to ready your preparations before the winter hits.

  1. Warm clothing: and plenty of it. Gore-Tex top and bottoms are an absolute necessity, and plenty of warm socks, thermal underwear, and good boots that are waterproof, have plenty of Thinsulate and good soles, and give good ankle support.
  2. Sleeping bag, Gore-Tex cover, and sleeping pad: Remember to go for the best in terms of quality and performance. Another essential in this regard is a good compression bag and a wet-weather bag.  A soaking wet sleeping bag is not fun.  Stay warm, dry, and insulated from the conduction of lying on the ground.
  3. Plenty of hand warmers: Why? Because if you’re going to give an IV in the middle of the winter, you want to warm up the bag, that’s why.  Because you may need to thaw something out and not be able to light a fire due to operational security reasons.  Because you may need an immediate aid for frostbite (Read “To Build a Fire,” by Jack London).  Those hand warmers are very useful, from first-aid measures to thawing out a frozen canteen.
  4. Several rolls of plastic, preferably 6 mil or equivalent in thickness: If you live in the suburbs in a house or apartment and there’s a nuke tossed nearby, you may lose your windows or sliding glass door. This isn’t good in the winter.  Along with the plastic rolls you should “squirrel” away some fir strips (1” x 2” or 1” x 3”) to use to tack in place over the edges of the plastic after you cut it to overlap your broken windows.  Nail them in place, and it will keep the wind from tearing away at the edges that would occur if you just affixed the plastic sheets with staple guns.
  5. Plywood: to cover up those same holes beforehand and any holes in the walls or roof. Remember to affix the plywood to the outside of the window or sliding glass door, as if it’s on the inside, Tiny Tim can kick it in easily.  COVER WITH THE PLYWOOD AFTER YOU HAVE COVERED WITH THE PLASTIC!  The plastic will keep the cold, wind, and water out…and the plywood will help protect it…and keep Tiny Tim from stealing it by taking it off with a razor knife if the plastic is outside of the plywood.  You may also want to consider cutting a firing slit and a peephole in it.  Remember to do the same with the plastic…cut a section on three sides as a “flap” and overlap this with duct tape and more plastic.  Velcro on the edge of the flap will keep it in place.  Velcro at the top will permit you to move the flap if you need the firing slit so as not to need to tear the plastic.
  6. Small Woodstove: You can find a ton of them that put out an amazing amount of BTU’s.  Prep the area of your home.  If you have a fireplace, you can stick it right in there and run the flue pipe right up the chimney.  If you don’t have a fireplace, then create an area.  Run that pipe through a window, and get some sheets of asbestos board to set the stove on.  Also, consider making an expedient form of protection for the chimney pipe against the wall.  Use common sense and do your research.  No heat in the house for winter?  No good.  This wood stove can be used to cook, melt snow, boil water, and of course to heat the home.  One EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) and you can say goodbye to the electricity.
  7. Toilet: I have been recommending the kind of toilet that has a seat with a bucket and lid incorporated into a metal-frame chair. This kind is very good.  For liquid waste, I suggest a bucket.  This can be dumped.  The solid waste can be taken out of the bucket with the use of plastic bags for liners and then burned.
  8. Matches, lighters, and fire-starting equipment, as well as lanterns and candles: safe to say, the word for each of them is “P” for plenty.  You can never have enough.  You will need to start fires, and you’ll also need some light.  Also: before you go buying a whole bunch of “fire starters” … the ones that resemble particleboard…you can make your own out of fire-logs for a fraction of the cost.
  9. Plenty of fuel: you will need wood, so now is the time to lay in a good supply of it.
  10. Several tents: You want to be able to put the family under canvas if for some reason your home becomes untenable and you must vacate.

These are simple items that are easy enough to obtain for now.  The time to obtain them is now, and not after the disaster strikes.  The winter poses tremendous challenges that have to be taken very seriously.  When the “S” hits the fan, it is best to have these preparations in place and know how to use all of them.  JJ out!

 

Related Articles:

When You Lose Power this Winter, Here’s What You’ll Need

10 Must-Haves to Stay Warm in the Harshest of Conditions

Winter Warmth When the Grid is Down

Are You Ready Series: Extreme Winter Storms

How We Kept The Cottage Warm in Winter

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Family Preparedness Essentials: Assessing Your Emergency Medicine Supply For the Home

Click here to view the original post.

 

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, it doesn’t take a stretch of the imagination to see that we’re living in perilous times and on the brink of a slew of problems.  There are several flashpoints throughout the world that can translate into war at any time, such as Ukraine, Syria, and North Korea. Knowing these things, your preparations and training need to continue.  You can continue this preparation by conducting a home assessment regarding medicines and supplies you will need.

What do I mean by this?  I mean for you to specifically identify all the needs of each of your family members and begin acquiring them.  Family members have varying needs depending on age and physical condition.  Now is the time to ensure you have all the meds you need and the vitamins you will need when the SHTF.  Allow me to sound the personal “trumpet” that I have been sounding throughout the years and in many articles:

You guys and gals need to get into good physical shape: it cannot be overemphasized.

Assessing Your Emergency Medicine Supply For the Home

That being said, how do you start?  It is simple enough if you just insert a measure of organization and preparedness planning into it.  Let’s do it, shall we?

  1. Start by identifying family members who have special needs and/or ongoing, long-term treatment in terms of medication.  Examples of conditions can be Type I Diabetics, Blood Pressure/Circulatory patients (meds such as Calcium Channel blockers, etc.), and family members with respiratory compromise (such as COPD, or severe, chronic asthma).
  2. Make a chart/sheet for each family member and identify what they need: The correct medicine, the amount needed/dosage, the quantity that is on hand, and a plan to attain more of it.  BE SPECIFIC!  Accuracy is critical: you cannot afford a “transposition error” either in dosage or in the name of the med.  “Flexiril” and “Flagyl” should never be confused, for example.  One extra “zero” at the end of a dosage could mean death; one zero “short” could mean substandard, inadequate dosage.
  3. Shop the sources: yes, the price is almost as important as quality…because you will need quantities. Check out all the discount pharmacies or even the Dollar store that you can, and do your research.  Also, convince your happy, Hallmark-Card family physician to write these extra prescriptions for you.  If he or she won’t do it?  DX’em.  That’s an Army term: meaning dump/discard them.  If you don’t use the stones now, you won’t use them when the SHTF.
  4. Pet Antibiotics: yes, “protect the pets,” as I’ve explained in other articles. Pet amoxicillin, pet erythromycin, pet Praziquantel (Biltricide).  All of these “goodies” and more are available…to keep those “pets” readily supplied with medicine.  ‘Nuff said there. Read more here.
  5. Vitamins/supplements: Concentrate on the multi-vitamins, and others that are crucial, such as Vitamin C. Again, you need to be sharp when it comes to quality and quantity.  Never sacrifice quality for quantity, except if the comparable product is so close to the “top dog” that the difference is negligible. As well, consider purchasing seeds for sprouting so you get vital nutrition during emergencies.
  6. Herbal/Naturopathic supplies: Here is where your research is going to be critical. DO NOT EXPECT TO BE “SPOON-FED” INFORMATION, especially by your photo-frame-phony-photo family physician.  You have to assess on your own what herbs will do the backup for your family member’s (or your) needs if the med supply dries up or is unavailable.  There’s a secondary reason: you need to learn and memorize these herbs “cold,” because you may have to scrounge for them as well…in a ruined, burned-out health food concern, or out in the wild with wild-crafting.
  7. OPSEC: yes, the last thing. Don’t allow anyone outside of the immediate family (and even with them…screen ‘em!) to know about your medicines.  You need to safeguard them in protective containers that will safeguard them from elements and secret them from the eyes of marauders or other jerks that will pillage them.

Now is the time to get all of this stuff done.  You are responsible in the end for taking care of yourself and your family.  Do not procrastinate!  You may not have a perfect example to follow, but you can allow common sense, savvy, and street smarts to guide you on the path you need to pursue.  Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today.  The “bad days” will come upon us in an instant.  Less than an instant.  Fight that good fight, and stock up on those supplies you’ll need to take care of your family now…because you won’t be able to on the day after it hits!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

This Winter Tool Should Be In Every Prepper’s Reserve Supplies

Click here to view the original post.

No, I don’t sell sleds or make any money from the sale of sleds.  I just wanted to recommend one for you for this winter to help you with any winter works.  A simple thing, really, but it can make a lot of distance for what you do.  It also has prepping uses.  The sled can be used to haul wood, a game animal you’ve hunted, or even to help you remove snow with a shovel.

The one I’m referring to I picked up at Wal-Mart several years ago, but you can find them on Amazon.com for the same price or cheaper…about $50.  You want the one that resembles a “boat,” made of black plastic.  The ones from Wal Mart are made of polyethylene and have a rope for hauling or towing attached to the front edge.

Here’s Why You Need This For Winter

Now, you can haul a tremendous amount of weight over snow and/or ice…even gravel or fairly-even rough ground.  Naturally, with snow and ice, there is less resistance on the bottom of the sled.  When I’m not cutting wood (I do so all winter long) and moving it around, I’m often out in the woods and I like the ability to use the sled for different things.  I can throw a large rucksack and some extra gear in it and drag it around with me all over the place.  It also ensures if I’m sleeping outside that I’m going to stay really dry.

What I did is to drill holes (1/8” in diameter) into the frame in 6 places.  In each of these holes, I emplaced hard, plastic construction dimples for mounting screws into walls and drywall.  These I drove into the hole with a hammer.  I have these rods that I stick into the holes to run across the sled, as in a “half-hoop,” almost akin to the ribs on a Conestoga/covered wagon of old.  Overtop of this, I place a tarp, and using utility clamps, I secure it in place on top of the hoops, and further tie off the corners and stake them into the ground.  Voila!

I have a self-enclosed lean-to/tent that I place my pad on the bottom and then climb into my sleeping bag for a snooze.  Naturally, it’s on level ground, or else my little sled-lean-to might sail away on its own!  If I have to move out in a hurry?  No problem.  Just detach the rods, throw my ruck inside, and close the edges of the tarp down so they sit inside the sled.

I can carry a lot of weight in this manner.  Sometimes I cut dead fallen timber during the wintertime on the last day out in the woods before I come home and load it in the sled.  I can (and have) towed it from the back of my vehicle.  The sleds are really durable and can take a tremendous beating.  The two I have now I’ve owned since 2012 and they’ll be good for another 20 years.  They can store either by standing them up and leaning them against your place, or turn them upside down and lay them on the ground.  Just know where you left them if you get a lot of snow!

There are other uses, too.  What if I have to pop smoke and leave in the dead of winter?  I can haul a lot of gear with the sled…to about 500-600 lbs.  In addition, I can move an injured person around.  Guess what?  In an area that a helicopter could get to, it could even be used as a basket to lift an injured person with, if they didn’t have one aboard for the purpose.

I highly recommend picking up a couple to help you get through the winter months, especially if you live in a rural or wilderness area.  They are not expensive, highly durable, and will pay for themselves in no time.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Backed by Science: 4 Ways Olive Oil Improves Your Health

Click here to view the original post.

 

So, the holidays are effectively behind us.  Now it’s time to get back to the business of eating healthy foods and staying in good shape.  Easier said than done, I know: but an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure in this regard.  If you make such steps part of your everyday routine, then they become much more than just a routine: they become a way of life.  The most important piece of equipment that you need for surviving and preparations is a healthy you.

That being said, let’s discuss olive oil.  Plenty of nutrients, and plenty of benefits.  Nutrients include fat, calcium, and Vitamins E and K.  Olive oil is packed with essential fatty acids, such as oleic (55-85% of the oil), linoleic (9%), and linolenic (up to 1.5%).  The first is monounsaturated, and the latter two polyunsaturated.  All of these are heart-healthy, without any trans fats (that clog the arteries), as it has not been hydrogenated.

The Best Type of Olive Oil and It’s Proven Benefits

The best olive oil is Extra-virgin, coming from a cold pressed olive.  Olive oil contains phenols, and these are powerful, disease-combatting antioxidants.  As we have explained in other article, antioxidants combat free radicals, which are atoms and/or molecules missing a hydrogen ion.  The free radicals are responsible for oxidation, and the deterioration of cellular structures.  These processes are assigned to aging in the human body.

Combats Antioxidants

The antioxidants combat this by donating extra hydrogen ions to the free radicals and thereby neutralizing their abilities to cannibalize a hydrogen ion from healthy cells.  Taking a look at the world, cancer rates are higher in Northern Europe than in the Mediterranean and Southern Europe, where olive oil is a regular part of the diet.  The same is indicated in the United States, and citizens of Northern European extraction tend to have higher incidences of cancer, especially in the stomach and intestinal tract.

Raises Good Cholesterol 

Polyphenols raise HDL (the “good” cholesterol) while lowering LDL (the “bad” cholesterol), and triglycerides in the bloodstream.  This helps to lower the risk of developing heart problems and diseases of the arteries.  It contains Omega-3 fatty acids that are beneficial to the joints and can prevent problems with arthritis.  All of these things mentioned have to do with consumption of olive oil with food.

Great for Food Preparation

Olive oil is also good to cook with and to put in foods and salads.  It is excellent for use with oils in any kinds of infusions.  I use it as a base and then mix into it pure Vitamin E, and then add just a bit of lemon oil.  This is very beneficial for the skin and the lips, and simple to make…as simple as pouring all of the ingredients I mentioned into a bottle and shaking it up.

Can Benefit Pets

Your pets can benefit from the use of olive oil, as if you dab a cotton ball with it, you can control ear mites inside of your pet’s ears…the olive oil suffocates the mites if you apply it lightly to the outer ear canal.  You can also use it to clean and soften the toe-pads and feet of the pets.  It also works on ticks: coat them with it, and they won’t be able to breathe, and they’ll let go…less dangerous than burning them off or squeezing them so their mouthparts may stay in the skin.

Try it out.  It can be used medicinally, as a soothing base for an oil, or simply on a salad and in your food.  It’s been around for a long time, and it works.  It is more healthy for you than the processed, hydrogenated oils that are little more than facilitators of illness and heart attack.  You’ll be able to find it in virtually any grocery store or health food store.  Try it out…you’ll like it, and it’ll do you some good in many ways.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

What the Prepper Needs to Know about Emergency Caches and How to Protect Them From the Hordes

Click here to view the original post.

What to do when the world comes apart?  Well, you’re going to do as well as you prepared for it.  One of the things that should be taken into consideration is either a BO (Bug-Out) location or a temporary hide site.  Either way, for the winter months there are some preparations that need to be taken, and in a certain way.

Combine Cache Points for the SHTF Retreat

The most important point that the reader must understand is DO NOT CACHE ALL OF THIS IN ONE PLACE! Everybody wants that “central location,” because everything is “there,” and it takes less time than making three or four different points.  No, belay that thought, helmsman!  Staggering it makes it more likely that some creeps will not get the whole treasure-trove.  Same with all of the cached stuff such as food, medicine, etc.  Bust it up into “thirds” and put it in three different places that you can find, but are not equidistant from one another.  If you place all three in an equilateral triangle configuration, the way man’s mind thinks when he’s searching is to look along those “organized” lines.

Protect Your Caches from the Hordes with These 8 Considerations

Whatever your BO location is (a cabin, shack, or semi-permanent structure) there are some factors that need to be considered, especially for these winter months.  Be it a cabin, tepee, or permanent lean-to on someone’s land with permission…whatever the scenario, here’s what you need:

  1. The Perfect Spot: Because caches are the ultimate backup plan, you want to find an ideal location before you begin hiding your gear. Keep OPSEC in mind when you are finding your cache sight.
  2. Wood: A good supply of wood, that is not in the structure…off the ground (palletized), covered, and camouflaged. There are reasons for all of this, and we’re going to go with a cabin, just to simplify things.  Have a wood supply in there already?  You can bank on the fact that anyone who may get there before you will burn it…and fight to keep it.
  3. Hide the essentials: “Disable” the woodstove or remove it. Remove a section of the chimney pipe and close the hole in the ceiling.  Wrap the pipe up in plastic and stash it where it can be accessed without being covered with ice and frozen over.  Then (if you can) remove that woodstove and/or camouflage it.  Make it inaccessible and disguise it.  Those that find the cabin and think there’s no woodstove will probably leave.
  4. Food: Floorboard cache is the best way here, as it can’t be frozen over by the ground.  It’s hard to “thaw out” an underground cache during the wintertime that has no fixed hatch to enter. Consider these must-have survival foods.
  5. Keep it bare: Keep that cabin “stripped” in terms of any creature-comforts…only a modicum of cooking utensils and supplies. You want it to “appear” as threadbare and uninviting as possible.
  6. “Secret Squirrel” cache: This is going to take some planning, some effort, and some funds.  Remember the “bunker” the father and son found in the movie “The Road” in that backyard?  You want something maybe not quite as large, but an excavated area with walls, a floor, and a roof/top/door to be able to enter during the wintertime after you dig away the snow and a few inches of dirt.  Load it up with anything that can take a freeze…perhaps some MRE’s, dried foods, sturdier canned goods, ammo, medical supplies and medicines, and a weapon or two….and make sure it’s away from the cabin.
  7. Lean-To’s: all the items can be cached, including a “rocket” stove or a portable wood-burner. The lean-to (more akin to a shack) you can preposition pressure treated plywood and 4” x 4” s as well as 2” x 4” s with pre-marked and pre-drilled holes that you put it all together with lag screws and bolts.  Make sure you keep a wrench and socket set on the site!  Stick with pressure-treated only, as it will take the elements and the changes in temperature and moisture better.  Make sure you have all the pieces clearly marked, a “blueprint” on a laminated sheet of paper, and that you have put it together.  Practice makes perfect and can save you a lot of time and cut the stress down.  These supplies you want to palletize and keep covered up and protected from moisture, bugs, thieves, etc.
  8. Tools: This may seem small, but it’s not. You want to preposition a chainsaw with extra chains, fuel, and oil, and a chain sharpener (yeah, after the SHTF, you’ll have time to sharpen those chains!).  Pack up a good ax, a bowsaw and extra blades, a hammer, extra nails, a good hatchet, and digging tools (shovel, pickaxe, digging bar).  It’s an extra expense, yes, but you won’t have to tote a set of all of these up there with you if you have to run.  Have a set with you?  So what?  They’ll be worth their weight in gold when it all comes apart, and you’ll always have a use for a backup, as nothing lasts forever. As well, consider adding these items to your caches.

The only limits here are those set by your own imagination and desire to succeed.

Make no mistake: those who prepare this kind of thing beforehand are going to have it a lot easier than those who wait until the last minute or try to do it “post-collapse.”  Having a place you can run to…and not just one, but several…follows the Army’s “PACE” concept…. Primary, Alternate, Contingency, and Emergency.  Multiple layers of backup in everything you do…a “forced” redundancy…will carry you over and prevent losses, mistakes, and leave you with something if it all goes down.  Don’t be left holding the bag…have a bag of “something” you stock up with before it all goes down the drain.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

How To Build A Survival Cache

What’s Missing From Your Survival Cache Could Be Your Greatest Mistake

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

SHTF Medical Emergencies: Why This Antibiotic is the Most Popular Type Stored

Click here to view the original post.

 

Ready Nutrition Readers, before you scoff completely at the title and smirk at the use of a manufactured pharmaceutical, there are a few things I ask you to keep in mind.  I have written before on my stance regarding both naturopathic and traditional medicines, and I will reiterate that position once more if you have either forgotten it or not read it:

 Herbalism is the parent of modern medicine, and the two “branches” should complement one another and never be in contradiction.

I have the utmost respect for the educational background of physicians.  The definition of a true physician is one who uses his skills to for the benefit of a patient in need and helps that patient as best as can be done.  Don’t discount modern medicine completely.  Where one of the two branches cannot work, or does not work effectively, the other should be able to pick up the slack.  In this light, do not relegate all of the chemistry and science behind medicines that do work.  Sometimes we need that extra “edge” when facing an illness we cannot rectify through traditional home remedies.

Why Amoxicillin is the Most Popular Type of Antibiotic

One of the best medicines to stock up on is Amoxicillin, a drug that has been actively used in the service since 1972.  It is a pretty broad-spectrum antibiotic that is great for bacterial infections, such as ear infections, sinusitis, respiratory ailments, UTI (Urinary Tract Infections), Lyme disease (yes, we’re entering tick season now), pneumonia, and other ailments.  A well-rounded antibiotic, it has a shelf life of more than 15 years.  That in itself should ring a bell for you as a happy prepper.

I had mentioned in past articles that you can obtain antibiotics such as this one without a prescription for your pets.  Yes, prep for your pets, if you see what I’m saying. Amoxicillin can also be used with skin infections and is one of the antibiotics prescribed when there is a problem with the dental emergencies…especially with tooth extractions.  There are those who are hypersensitive (that suffer an allergic reaction) to amoxicillin, and adults should be aware of their own history regarding this.

The best thing: check with your friendly family physician to screen all of your family members for sensitivity to amoxicillin.  Then you’ll be able to act upon that information.  Amoxicillin should be stored in a cool, dry place that will not be subject either to sunlight or sudden and extreme changes in temperature.  Barring hypersensitivity reactions, it is too valuable an antibiotic to discount as part of your preparedness arsenal.  Easy to utilize in accordance with an illness as mentioned before, stocking up on this can do nothing but increase your chances of illnesses in the times to come.

Consider stocking up for your pets, and as with all things, prior to using any information in this article, clear it all with your friendly family physician.  You’ll find it to be both within your budget and beneficial to your prepping and survival plans…plans that will have paid for themselves when the SHTF.  Keep in that good fight, and take care of one another!  JJ out!

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get prepper advice, homesteading tips, and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Hawaii’s False Alarm: 10 Ways to Prepare for WWIII

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, by now you’re poignantly aware of the false-alarm that was raised in Hawaii on Saturday 1/13/18.  For 38 minutes there was wholesale panic and alarm after the following message alert was sent out to cell phones and over the TV and radio throughout the state:

“BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”  (Hawaii Emergency Management Agency)

This message was later rescinded as a false-alarm.  Great, huh?  In the meantime, people panicked.  News reports told of people gathered in hotel lobbies in a state of semi-paralysis, wondering what to do.  One woman (a schoolteacher) attempted to enter a shelter only to find that it was locked.  A professional golfer and his family hid beneath a mattress in the bathroom of a hotel, hoping the attack was not happening.  Other people placed their children inside of storm drains, and still others called authorities with no answer.

Preparing Falls to You

The bottom line: the government was not prepared to deal with it had it been an actual emergency, and individuals were next to helpless in the face of the threat.

The government will not be able to help you, even if they wanted to.  That leaves you, Mr. John Q. Public or Mrs. Mary Public to inform, prepare, and act with your family should an event such as this become reality.  Are you prepared?  Do you have a plan in order?

Inform yourself:

The Family Preparedness Guide to Surviving a Nuclear Disaster

15 Priorities You Need to Follow In the Event of a Nuclear War

What You Need to Know About Nuclear Attacks

An Urban Guide to Surviving a Nuclear Attack

Naysayers and skeptics would have you say there’s no need.  So, the government of Russia holds yearly drills to shelter all Muscovites in the subway system and in municipal shelters.  China has been building community shelters in rural areas. But there’s no need, right?

10 Ways You Need to Prepare for WWIII

Skeptics will tell you it won’t happen, but they’ll be pounding down your door to take supplies from you and yours…maybe more…when it comes and catches them unprepared.  How about getting a plan together beforehand?  Emergency actions.  You’ll have problems if you’re in the city…any city that may be a target.  You must try, though…there will be a lot of people who will not…until the last minute, and then they’ll just be reacting in a frenzy.  Let’s make a basic, starter plan.

  1. Research existing fallout shelters: Under the Clinton presidency, the civil defense system was shut down in 1996. Go to your local municipal government building and you may be able to find lists or plans of older buildings that have a fallout shelter rating…and then locate the one nearest your home. Here is information from FEMA on emergency shelters and safe rooms.
  2. Food: you’ll need a substantial supply, and be able to transport that supply if you’re in an urban area, or in an area that is likely to receive either a direct strike or some fallout. MRE’s, freeze-dried food, canned goods, dried food…these for starters.
  3. Water: this is tougher, as it is no light matter to transport several hundred gallons of water anywhere. You want a method for purifying it, concentrating on drawing no supply from a radioactive source, and then taking care of any toxins, by germs or the products or waste of man.  Filters and chemical purifiers are warranted here.
  4. Medical supplies/tools/ weapons/ communications gear: the latter may be no good to you after a strike (because of the EMP, or Electromagnetic Pulse effects of either an EMP weapon or a nuke discharged in the atmosphere for such a purpose)
  5. Each Family member needs an individual plan: when it happens, everyone needs to know where to go and what to do…a linkup point to meet one another and rally.
  6. A hide location out of the blast area safe from fallout: yes, a prepared bug out location that is ready for all of you to make your way there either together or separately. Note: this last one is the “biggie” for the naysayers…yet this is the way it is.  There are all kinds of “moaning” comments, such as “Well, who can afford a place in the mountains?” or “You’ll never be able to travel when it hits,” yada, yada, ad infinitum.  In the end, it’s on you, and it’s tough if you don’t, but it is not anyone’s responsibility but your own.  Nobody is obligated to ensure that you survive, or take the necessary measures to help you do so.  If you can afford the property, you better buy it in advance or structure your lifestyle to enable you to live in an area that meets the requirements for survival.  If not, you do what you can.  The skeptics can stay where they are, physically and mentally.  Be under no illusion, though, that if they need to depart their area, they’ll come to yours and take what you have: their needs “justifying” their actions.
  7. You need to have a primary and alternate route to reach haven, and the means to make it there:  As I mentioned, this is all on you: ultimately you are responsible for the steps you need to take
  8. Definitive Action: When the alarm goes off? Better to be “wrong” one thousand times and in your shelter, executing your plan safe and sound, than for the real thing to occur and you disregard it, and stay in the backyard on the lawn chair guarding the barbeque grill.
  9. Remain in that shelter for a sufficient amount of time: this is where a Faraday cage-protected radio or scanner may come in handy. Remember that the Compton Effect from an EMP lasts for a while, so don’t pull those devices out immediately…or have several cages with duplicate radios in it so you can afford to lose one if necessary.  Monitor to see if any “all clear” is given, or if it’s safe to emerge.  If it’s real?  Oh, you’ll know, all right.
  10. Use your instincts, as well as your knowledge: We’re “hard-wired” for this. If it feels “wrong,” it probably is wrong.  If the guy running up to you with a smile is offering his help?  He probably wants to do something the opposite of friendly.  If it feels as if you’re walking into a trap if you’re sheltering somewhere, then it probably is.  Murphy’s Law: what can go wrong, will go wrong.  Use your instincts and trust in them.

These are suggestions, and you’re not obligated to follow them.  They may be able to provide you with a framework if you don’t already have a plan in place.  You’re not obligated to enable the rest of the world to survive it: just those who are dependent on you.  A strength of mind, body, and heart, and the ability to make a quick decision based on common sense are what will give you an advantage when others are panicking.  Those who are wise will see trouble and take cover beforehand…and the foolish will go on and be destroyed.  One final thing: OPSEC (Operational Security) is paramount.  Don’t let anyone know what you have and where you have it…keep your plans to yourself.  Good luck, and stay in that good fight.  JJ out!

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Blunt Force: Take an Attacker Down in Seconds

Click here to view the original post.

Yeah, ReadyNutrition Readers, this article is about the bat.  Not that flying mammal, or the derisive term used for a mother-in-law in anger…the All-American baseball bat.  This wonderful piece of sporting equipment is very effective in defending yourself in addition to hitting one over the fence in center field.  I know, I know, naysayers, you surely can’t carry a bat around with you wherever you travel….yada, yada.  Seriously, there are several reasons to “tote” this everyday self-defense item around with you.  Let’s cover them.

Batter Up!

For those of you who wish to know, my baseball bat of choice is an aluminum “T-ball” bat, a 24” job that sits directly next to my leg and within the groove of my vehicle’s front seat.  I recommend aluminum over wood for several reasons.  Firstly, there’s no danger of the bat splitting at the handle or breaking apart: it is sturdily-constructed.  Secondly, it will not rot or deteriorate…and the aluminum bat will not rust.  Thirdly, they’re pretty cheap: you can lay your hands on one in a used sporting goods store or thrift store for between $5 to $10.

It is not just for beating someone up.  The bat can also be used to bust out of the vehicle if it’s trapped and you can’t open the door.  Just bust out the window with the bat, and get out.  How about hiking around?  You can use that bat to keep an animal at bay if need be.  The point is, you may also have to protect yourself without a signature, such as the sound of a gunshot.  The bat is a lot quieter in this regard.

It is also a weapon that gives you some defensive distance.  Muggers coming in, a pair of them armed with switchblades?  If they are after me, I’ll show them how to dance with that bat in a manner they never viewed on “Star Search.”  That bat gives you the distance to strike without exposing yourself to some goon who wishes to come in close.

In the following video, the demonstrators use a baton, but the same defense movements can be used with a bat.

5 Ways You Can Practice With the Bat For Self-Defense

Once again, if you don’t train with it, there’s no point in toting it with you.  Another thing: even if you’re trained, it won’t do you any good unless you act.  The finest equipment in the world won’t do you a bit of good if you can’t employ it.  You need to practice a few things.  Here are a few tips:

  1. Find the perfect length and weight for you: I prefer that 24-incher, because I can swing it with one hand or with both. I prefer both, as I can mete out more punishment with both.  Heft it and swing it.  Once again, it will take some getting used to.
  2. Old tires: Perfect to practice on with your strokes using an aluminum bat. You can hang the tire from a rope, or suspend it on a post.  Whatever way is best.  I recommend this because the tire can take a good beating.  Your heavy bag is for your hands and feet, not for the baseball bat.
  3. Your vital areas on an opponent (really everything, but your points of focus) are the lower legs, the arms, the neck, and of course, the head. Practice striking these areas.
  4. Learn to “butt stroke” with the bat: holding the pommel/handle as a “pivot” point, choke up from the “fat” end, and strike with this “fat” part…akin to the “butt stroke” of a rifle butt. Targets here include the groin, the neck (calling for a “side” stroke of sorts), and the face or the side of the head.  Keep this point clearly in mind: this will mean you will have to sacrifice your safe distance to get inside.  USE THIS ONE TO FINISH HIM OFF!  When you’re pretty sure you have him, this should be a finishing move.  Either that or a “coup de grace,” such as under the “family jewels” in a stroke designed to end the fight immediately.
  5. Use strokes to enable you to keep your distance and keep your attacker at bay. The bat works great on a pack of dogs or a pack of hoodlums.

Learn this Krav-Maga Technique to Defend Against a Bat Attack

Practice and training will be your keys on this.  You must know that bat as if it is a part of you to maximize your effectiveness.  I briefly mentioned the bat in an article on improvised weapons, and I return to a point I made there.  Throw a baseball glove and ball in the back seat with you when you’re in a very “legally unfriendly” state or area, such as New York City or in California.  This way you can cover if they give you a hard time.

Want practice?  You can also go to a batting cage.  Yes, that’s right!  Hitting baseballs is fun, and it helps you to develop good hand-eye coordination.  Do that for an hour or two and it’s also a good workout.  You need every advantage you can give yourself.  Fight that good fight, and try out that bat.  Remember, if you’re being mugged, it’s one strike and you’re out.  You want to get a “hit” your first time at bat, so practice up and turn a sporting good into a tool that you may be able to use to save your life.  JJ out!

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Surviving a Mad Max World: How To Avoid Marauders and Looters After the Collapse

Click here to view the original post.

[Editor’s Note: A mad max scenario is one of the worst-case scenarios one can prepare for. The adage “if you can’t protect you don’t own it” rings true in this case. Long-term survival plans that reflect this type of disaster suggest preppers getting away from urban and suburban living and heading for hills. While this would be the safest option, there are dangers that lurk for those who plan to “live off the land.” Because in a post-collapse world – they will come for all that you own.]

 

Seems almost self-explanatory, right?  I mean, what could be so involved with the term “living with the land,” right?  There is a lot to it.  There’s a reason to do this:

Living with the land will help you to live, and avoid the greatest hunter of all: man. Men…mankind…has the same instincts as you, the same success in the generations as you.  Although this is not an “anthropological” treatise, it holds a lot of anthropology within it, because there are a few key points you must keep in mind: Your weakness is a weakness shared by other men; your strength is a strength possessed by other men; what you can do can be done by other men.

The commonality is both your strength and your weakness.  You become cold, and so does the man (or men) hunting you. The dark poses impediments and unknown dangers, and it does the same to your hunters.

Turn the Hunters Into the Hunted

You can turn the hunters into the hunted…for you are a hunter: it is “hard-wired” in you through a thousand generations of successful hunters, warriors, and killers. You need to eat, and so do your pursuers.  You need water, and so do they.  You can track, and so can they.  You have senses that can detect man, and so do they.  All of this, yes, you know, I’m sure.

But have you considered it all?  Really considered it?

The land: to blend with it, and to live with it without being obtrusive is the key to avoiding the hunters…and remember that they have the same limitations as you.  The more pure and “clear” you keep your senses, the better they’ll work for you.  We have done some pieces on the way the eye works, and the sense of smell.  This is the time to do your work…your training to use these senses to their maximum capabilities.  Let’s cover some basics as to what to expect when you’re living with the land and avoiding marauders, foreign soldiers, forces of a dictatorial government, and so forth.

10 Ways To Avoid Marauders and Looters After the Collapse

  1. Don’t travel the heavily-traveled: stay off of paths and trails and cover your tracks, as most people (and anyone hunting you) will use them. Busting brush will ensure you’re safer.
  2. What’s easy for you is easy for them: taking the harder path will oftentimes confuse and discourage them.
  3. You lay a trail for dogs or men: your scent for the dogs and your tracks for the men. Defeat both: use “blue” (water) features to disguise and throw off the scent, being careful not to leave footprints in banks or mud.
  4. Opposite actions and times: You sleep during the daytime, travel at night. I have emphasized this (to the “chagrin” of naysayers galore) in previous articles…you have to develop the ability to move at night.  When they’re eating, be on the move.  When they’re awake, you stay in a hide site.
  5. Boobytrap all avenues of approach and high-traffic areas: punji stakes, pits, and IED’s (Improvised Explosive Devices). Heaven forbid!  Do you want to win, or just play “good guys and bad guys” in the woods?  There is going to come a time to act and not just sit around with all of your canned fruits and stored supplies.  Hopefully, that time will come later, so that you can prepare for it.
  6. Key choke points use for an ambush, and to circle around them: As they pass through a defile, backtrack on them.  Or ambush them in the defile.  A rock slide is a beautiful thing that can be initiated with a minor amount of explosives
  7. Use the animals as cover: following them will throw off the trail of the dogs. It will also say something for your tracking ability to be able to follow a small herd of deer or elk.
  8. Your pursuers can be “distracted”: I’ll leave it to you to figure out what to leave for them….the standard fare can be imagined. Your job is to avoid them or to “deal” with them, not to “win them over to your side.”
  9. Do not underestimate their tenacity: they may have you greatly outgunned, with multiple “shifts” to put on you to allow you only a scant amount of rest and sleep. This is where endurance and physical training comes into play: the “thing” that nobody wants to hear about.
  10. If it looks as if it’s a good hide site in plain view?  Then it’s not, and they will be sure to check it.  Don’t put yourself underground even before they catch you.

One of the things you’re going to have to do is practice, as well as reinforce your plan of action for when the time comes.  Sound boring?  It’s better than going to some mall and spending all day meandering around with a herd of beeves.  You have to develop these skills so they’re ready to employ at a moment’s notice.  The knowledge is not enough: you have to put it into practicum.  That’s the only way to test yourself and know your capabilities.  Falls in line with the Army saying, “Know yourself and seek self-improvement.”  Don’t stagnate: improve.  Learn to live with the land, or you may not make it through…when “the man” comes around.  JJ out!

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get prepper advice, homesteading tips, and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Surviving a Mad Max World: How To Avoid Marauders and Looters After the Collapse

[Editor’s Note: A mad max scenario is one of the worst-case scenarios one can prepare for. The adage “if you can’t protect you don’t own it” rings true in this case. Long-term survival plans that reflect this type of disaster suggest preppers getting away from urban and suburban living and heading for hills. While this would be the safest option, there are dangers that lurk for those who plan to “live off the land.” Because in a post-collapse world – they will come for all that you own.]

 

Seems almost self-explanatory, right?  I mean, what could be so involved with the term “living with the land,” right?  There is a lot to it.  There’s a reason to do this:

Living with the land will help you to live, and avoid the greatest hunter of all: man. Men…mankind…has the same instincts as you, the same success in the generations as you.  Although this is not an “anthropological” treatise, it holds a lot of anthropology within it, because there are a few key points you must keep in mind: Your weakness is a weakness shared by other men; your strength is a strength possessed by other men; what you can do can be done by other men.

The commonality is both your strength and your weakness.  You become cold, and so does the man (or men) hunting you. The dark poses impediments and unknown dangers, and it does the same to your hunters.

Turn the Hunters Into the Hunted

You can turn the hunters into the hunted…for you are a hunter: it is “hard-wired” in you through a thousand generations of successful hunters, warriors, and killers. You need to eat, and so do your pursuers.  You need water, and so do they.  You can track, and so can they.  You have senses that can detect man, and so do they.  All of this, yes, you know, I’m sure.

But have you considered it all?  Really considered it?

The land: to blend with it, and to live with it without being obtrusive is the key to avoiding the hunters…and remember that they have the same limitations as you.  The more pure and “clear” you keep your senses, the better they’ll work for you.  We have done some pieces on the way the eye works, and the sense of smell.  This is the time to do your work…your training to use these senses to their maximum capabilities.  Let’s cover some basics as to what to expect when you’re living with the land and avoiding marauders, foreign soldiers, forces of a dictatorial government, and so forth.

10 Ways To Avoid Marauders and Looters After the Collapse

  1. Don’t travel the heavily-traveled: stay off of paths and trails and cover your tracks, as most people (and anyone hunting you) will use them. Busting brush will ensure you’re safer.
  2. What’s easy for you is easy for them: taking the harder path will oftentimes confuse and discourage them.
  3. You lay a trail for dogs or men: your scent for the dogs and your tracks for the men. Defeat both: use “blue” (water) features to disguise and throw off the scent, being careful not to leave footprints in banks or mud.
  4. Opposite actions and times: You sleep during the daytime, travel at night. I have emphasized this (to the “chagrin” of naysayers galore) in previous articles…you have to develop the ability to move at night.  When they’re eating, be on the move.  When they’re awake, you stay in a hide site.
  5. Boobytrap all avenues of approach and high-traffic areas: punji stakes, pits, and IED’s (Improvised Explosive Devices). Heaven forbid!  Do you want to win, or just play “good guys and bad guys” in the woods?  There is going to come a time to act and not just sit around with all of your canned fruits and stored supplies.  Hopefully, that time will come later, so that you can prepare for it.
  6. Key choke points use for an ambush, and to circle around them: As they pass through a defile, backtrack on them.  Or ambush them in the defile.  A rock slide is a beautiful thing that can be initiated with a minor amount of explosives
  7. Use the animals as cover: following them will throw off the trail of the dogs. It will also say something for your tracking ability to be able to follow a small herd of deer or elk.
  8. Your pursuers can be “distracted”: I’ll leave it to you to figure out what to leave for them….the standard fare can be imagined. Your job is to avoid them or to “deal” with them, not to “win them over to your side.”
  9. Do not underestimate their tenacity: they may have you greatly outgunned, with multiple “shifts” to put on you to allow you only a scant amount of rest and sleep. This is where endurance and physical training comes into play: the “thing” that nobody wants to hear about.
  10. If it looks as if it’s a good hide site in plain view?  Then it’s not, and they will be sure to check it.  Don’t put yourself underground even before they catch you.

One of the things you’re going to have to do is practice, as well as reinforce your plan of action for when the time comes.  Sound boring?  It’s better than going to some mall and spending all day meandering around with a herd of beeves.  You have to develop these skills so they’re ready to employ at a moment’s notice.  The knowledge is not enough: you have to put it into practicum.  That’s the only way to test yourself and know your capabilities.  Falls in line with the Army saying, “Know yourself and seek self-improvement.”  Don’t stagnate: improve.  Learn to live with the land, or you may not make it through…when “the man” comes around.  JJ out!

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get prepper advice, homesteading tips, and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

If You See These 14 Signs It’s Time to Bug Out

Click here to view the original post.

 ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this article is presented by request of one of the readers.  Here is the requesting comment, as posted to the recent METL (Mission Essential Task List) article of mine:

RedClay: “How about a list of circumstances for when it’s time to bug out. I’m amazed on prepper discussion boards about bugging out, at how many people are going to hit the road to bug out BEFORE the crowds mob the roads. But how will people know when to bug out? What combination of signs or circumstances will one depend on, in that decision? If one waits until it’s obvious, then everyone will know & be on the roads.”

So, as you can see, this is a common question in everyone’s mind, and not unusual by any means.  We have presented articles in the past to help you gauge by different sources how to prepare and when something is likely to happen.  Let’s jump into this in-depth!

One of the problems with preparation is the desire for an exact forecast of when the end of the world is going to occur.  First, allow me to state I’m Jeremiah Johnson, not the Prophet Jeremiah.  Secondly, anyone who claims to be a Prophet (not to delve into didactics) may not necessarily be one.  So, what to do?

If You See These 14 Signs It’s Time to Bug Out

What you do is observe what is happening and estimate…comparing possible with probable and coming up with the best course of action…and act when you know and feel it is the time to do so.

There are keys to show you that everything is going down.  The more that occur simultaneously, the higher the probability that it’s time to get out of town.  Let’s list some of them (and some of these may surprise you):

  1. A complete collapse of the markets (a lagging indicator, but hitting rock bottom is a sign that it is gone), to include the Baltic Dry Index, and all commodities markets.
  2. The President, Vice-President, and members of Congress and the Pentagon “disappear” very suddenly and noticeably… (probably heading to a bunker on your taxed dime)
  3. National Guard and Active Duty troops and vehicles are out on the highways all of a sudden, moving out of cities and off of military establishments.
  4. A nationwide bank “holiday” for all banks occurs, with all accounts frozen…this would be very bad.
  5. Foreign military forces on the move either in the vicinity of or to the United States
  6. Outright declaration of either hostilities or an emergency condition by the MSM (mainstream media)
  7. Over a course of time: key members of industry, banking, and the government take “extended vacations” and disappear from the public eye.
  8. Sudden shortages or halts in the shipments of food, medicines, fuel, or any other necessary item…without any warning. Think Venezuela.
  9. Heavy troop and police movements and coordinating activities in major metropolitan areas
  10. Hospitals tasked with any kind of mass-casualty emergency preparations
  11. Numbers 1-10 happening simultaneously in foreign nations along with the U.S.
  12. Increased police and military checkpoints and restrictions on travel domestically or internationally
  13. Decoupling of financial markets and banks overseas and in foreign nations.
  14. Recall of any and all ambassadors and staff back to the United States on short notice.

We have mentioned a list of things here, but the list is not extensive.  I moved to Montana years ago and have taken necessary steps that my preparations are now in place.  This is key: to accomplish these objectives long before any of those listed items materialize, as those are “late” signs that something will occur.

If people all paid attention to things, then perhaps we would have a Civil Defense system in place.  The truth of the matter, to respectfully address RedClay’s concerns, is that even at the penultimate moment of truth, most will ignore the signs.  It’s not that everyone cannot be saved or alerted: it is that they will not pay attention to the signs even when it’s all coming down around them.

Best advice: have your plans in place long before all of this happens, be prepared to depend on yourself and your family alone, prepare today as if disaster will strike tomorrow, and don’t let anyone know your business.  Keep in that good fight.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading Material:

How To Create a Coordinated Bug Out Plan

The Prepper’s Conundrum: To Bug in or Bug Out? Part 1, Part 2, Part 3

What If Your Preparedness Plan Isn’t As Sound As You Think

Using Layers to Build Your Preparedness Supply

Bugging Out: Preparing Multiple Escape Routes and Vehicles for a Major Emergency

Every Prepper Should Have Multiple Bug-Out Bags. Here’s Why.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Post-EMP: How to Get Out of Dodge in the Snow

Click here to view the original post.

 Evacuating during the harsh winter elements is already a difficult feat, but what if you find yourself in a post-EMP environment while driving and have to bug out in the snow? There is no vehicle to comfortably take you to your bug out location. For many, you will be on foot and all you have to get you through this disaster is what is in your car. Do you have the preps and the skills to make this icy trek?

Honestly, ask yourself, what will you do?  Well, there are some options, and we’re going to cover them.  Naturally, many of these will not apply if you live in a state that doesn’t receive much snow, such as in the deserts or the more “balmy” states.  Still, you may be able to take a few things away from this.  Let’s do it!

How to Get Out of Dodge in the Snow

First, are your “Go/Bug-Out” bags ready?  If you’re traveling somewhere together as a family and the distance is more than a few miles, emergency bags and gear should be in the vehicle for every member of the family: no exceptions!  We’ve covered bags until we’re blue in the face.  Here are some essential gear must-haves (just to “refresh” your memory):

Protecting Your Feet is a Top Priority for Winter Survival

Remember, your basic survival needs are your top priority when the conditions are harsh. Now, the snow!  Myself?  I cannot (repeat, cannot) go anywhere at all unless I have my snowshoes with me. Another option and one that I mentioned before is to find the kind of snowshoes made of durable plastic and either orange or yellow, used by the utility and electric companies for a song.  Yeah, they’re not exactly “tactical” in color, but if you desire, you can paint them with spray paint.  They’re that color to enable guys who are working to be able to find them after their lunch break is over, not to run with…but they work and are strong.

There are plenty of other “high-end” snowshoes, and you’ll have to shop the market.  You want a pair that can carry your weight and at least 20 lbs.  The contractor ones will do this, and they’re not very large or cumbersome.  Keep them together with 2 D-hooks, and throw them in the back of the vehicle.  Next, you need to practice on them.  If you’ve never done it, walking on the snow is a different task, especially if you’re carrying gear.

Winter Clothing

Gore-Tex is ideal for shielding your body from the relentless winter weather. A word to the wise – if you can cover yourself in Gore-Tex – do it! Just one below freezing night out in the backyard without it, and you’ll run to the store when the day comes.  That Gore-Tex enables you to stay warm and dry, and it “breathes,” keeping you from being a humidifier and soaked to the skin.  You need good, thick socks and quality boots…I recommend Rocky Gore-Tex boots with at least 1000 grams of Thinsulate, for starters.

On a side note, make sure a good ground pad is with you.  In the wintertime, you’ll need all the insulation that you can get from the ground.  I jump back to the toboggans again: if you have a light rucksack as a “go” bag, you may be able to tote it…and haul other stuff in the toboggan, such as tools, clothes, and have space for extra food and supplies you may pick up on the way.

Bug Out Considerations

There are a lot of considerations before you head out on foot. What’s your plan? First of all, keep a map of the area you’re driving, and have it handy before you go.  If things go south and the “S” hits the fan, you need all the intel you can get on site…where you’re located at the time it happens.  Knowing where malls, stores, gas stations, pharmacies and the like are will help, and you can mark them on the map.  Depending on where you are, you may choose to stay with the vehicle for a while, but if this is done?  You may want to get it off the main road and camouflage it somewhat.

We talked about a Toboggan before for a load around the house…but what about the vehicle?  Well, how about a kid’s sled/toboggan?  You can find some sturdy ones that can take a beating…use your own judgment.  If you have a big family, you may wish the one I recommended from Wal-Mart that is about $50 and can haul about 500 to 600 lbs.  This one is where you can put the gear inside and drag it behind you on a nylon tow rope that comes with it.  Strap it to the top of your vehicle, or throw it on the bed of the pickup.  The kid’s toboggan would be of use for 1 person or one for each.  The sides would enable the gear to be stowed without slipping off.  Drill holes in the sides and use bungee cords to strap the gear down all the same.  Better safe than sorry.

If you stay with the vehicle, make sure you have a plan: you can’t stay with it forever.  It may be good for a night or two to come up with a plan (especially if you have kids, to help them get over the initial shock and disorientation).  The “end of the world” is usually bad on the nerves.  Use that time to focus the family on what you will do.  You may have to leave the vehicle immediately, as you want to return home as quickly as possible.  The situation is going to be your call, and what you believe your family can handle…and how you function as a group.

Finally, don’t forget “Yak-Trak’s” or some other type of devices to slip over your boots to enable you to walk or run on ice.  They range in price and quality, but you should be able to find them in your sporting goods or big-box stores.  So, plan ahead, make evac from your vehicle in the winter a training priority, and stay frosty!  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

The Green Beret’s Winter Survival Guide

Winter Wilderness Survival: Take Care of Your Feet and Your Odds of Survival Increase

15 Items That Should Be In Your Vehicle During the Winter

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Post-EMP: How to Get Out of Dodge in the Snow

 Evacuating during the harsh winter elements is already a difficult feat, but what if you find yourself in a post-EMP environment while driving and have to bug out in the snow? There is no vehicle to comfortably take you to your bug out location. For many, you will be on foot and all you have to get you through this disaster is what is in your car. Do you have the preps and the skills to make this icy trek?

Honestly, ask yourself, what will you do?  Well, there are some options, and we’re going to cover them.  Naturally, many of these will not apply if you live in a state that doesn’t receive much snow, such as in the deserts or the more “balmy” states.  Still, you may be able to take a few things away from this.  Let’s do it!

How to Get Out of Dodge in the Snow

First, are your “Go/Bug-Out” bags ready?  If you’re traveling somewhere together as a family and the distance is more than a few miles, emergency bags and gear should be in the vehicle for every member of the family: no exceptions!  We’ve covered bags until we’re blue in the face.  Here are some essential gear must-haves (just to “refresh” your memory):

Protecting Your Feet is a Top Priority for Winter Survival

Remember, your basic survival needs are your top priority when the conditions are harsh. Now, the snow!  Myself?  I cannot (repeat, cannot) go anywhere at all unless I have my snowshoes with me. Another option and one that I mentioned before is to find the kind of snowshoes made of durable plastic and either orange or yellow, used by the utility and electric companies for a song.  Yeah, they’re not exactly “tactical” in color, but if you desire, you can paint them with spray paint.  They’re that color to enable guys who are working to be able to find them after their lunch break is over, not to run with…but they work and are strong.

There are plenty of other “high-end” snowshoes, and you’ll have to shop the market.  You want a pair that can carry your weight and at least 20 lbs.  The contractor ones will do this, and they’re not very large or cumbersome.  Keep them together with 2 D-hooks, and throw them in the back of the vehicle.  Next, you need to practice on them.  If you’ve never done it, walking on the snow is a different task, especially if you’re carrying gear.

Winter Clothing

Gore-Tex is ideal for shielding your body from the relentless winter weather. A word to the wise – if you can cover yourself in Gore-Tex – do it! Just one below freezing night out in the backyard without it, and you’ll run to the store when the day comes.  That Gore-Tex enables you to stay warm and dry, and it “breathes,” keeping you from being a humidifier and soaked to the skin.  You need good, thick socks and quality boots…I recommend Rocky Gore-Tex boots with at least 1000 grams of Thinsulate, for starters.

On a side note, make sure a good ground pad is with you.  In the wintertime, you’ll need all the insulation that you can get from the ground.  I jump back to the toboggans again: if you have a light rucksack as a “go” bag, you may be able to tote it…and haul other stuff in the toboggan, such as tools, clothes, and have space for extra food and supplies you may pick up on the way.

Bug Out Considerations

There are a lot of considerations before you head out on foot. What’s your plan? First of all, keep a map of the area you’re driving, and have it handy before you go.  If things go south and the “S” hits the fan, you need all the intel you can get on site…where you’re located at the time it happens.  Knowing where malls, stores, gas stations, pharmacies and the like are will help, and you can mark them on the map.  Depending on where you are, you may choose to stay with the vehicle for a while, but if this is done?  You may want to get it off the main road and camouflage it somewhat.

We talked about a Toboggan before for a load around the house…but what about the vehicle?  Well, how about a kid’s sled/toboggan?  You can find some sturdy ones that can take a beating…use your own judgment.  If you have a big family, you may wish the one I recommended from Wal-Mart that is about $50 and can haul about 500 to 600 lbs.  This one is where you can put the gear inside and drag it behind you on a nylon tow rope that comes with it.  Strap it to the top of your vehicle, or throw it on the bed of the pickup.  The kid’s toboggan would be of use for 1 person or one for each.  The sides would enable the gear to be stowed without slipping off.  Drill holes in the sides and use bungee cords to strap the gear down all the same.  Better safe than sorry.

If you stay with the vehicle, make sure you have a plan: you can’t stay with it forever.  It may be good for a night or two to come up with a plan (especially if you have kids, to help them get over the initial shock and disorientation).  The “end of the world” is usually bad on the nerves.  Use that time to focus the family on what you will do.  You may have to leave the vehicle immediately, as you want to return home as quickly as possible.  The situation is going to be your call, and what you believe your family can handle…and how you function as a group.

Finally, don’t forget “Yak-Trak’s” or some other type of devices to slip over your boots to enable you to walk or run on ice.  They range in price and quality, but you should be able to find them in your sporting goods or big-box stores.  So, plan ahead, make evac from your vehicle in the winter a training priority, and stay frosty!  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

The Green Beret’s Winter Survival Guide

Winter Wilderness Survival: Take Care of Your Feet and Your Odds of Survival Increase

15 Items That Should Be In Your Vehicle During the Winter

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Post-EMP: How to Get Out of Dodge in the Snow

 Evacuating during the harsh winter elements is already a difficult feat, but what if you find yourself in a post-EMP environment while driving and have to bug out in the snow? There is no vehicle to comfortably take you to your bug out location. For many, you will be on foot and all you have to get you through this disaster is what is in your car. Do you have the preps and the skills to make this icy trek?

Honestly, ask yourself, what will you do?  Well, there are some options, and we’re going to cover them.  Naturally, many of these will not apply if you live in a state that doesn’t receive much snow, such as in the deserts or the more “balmy” states.  Still, you may be able to take a few things away from this.  Let’s do it!

How to Get Out of Dodge in the Snow

First, are your “Go/Bug-Out” bags ready?  If you’re traveling somewhere together as a family and the distance is more than a few miles, emergency bags and gear should be in the vehicle for every member of the family: no exceptions!  We’ve covered bags until we’re blue in the face.  Here are some essential gear must-haves (just to “refresh” your memory):

Protecting Your Feet is a Top Priority for Winter Survival

Remember, your basic survival needs are your top priority when the conditions are harsh. Now, the snow!  Myself?  I cannot (repeat, cannot) go anywhere at all unless I have my snowshoes with me. Another option and one that I mentioned before is to find the kind of snowshoes made of durable plastic and either orange or yellow, used by the utility and electric companies for a song.  Yeah, they’re not exactly “tactical” in color, but if you desire, you can paint them with spray paint.  They’re that color to enable guys who are working to be able to find them after their lunch break is over, not to run with…but they work and are strong.

There are plenty of other “high-end” snowshoes, and you’ll have to shop the market.  You want a pair that can carry your weight and at least 20 lbs.  The contractor ones will do this, and they’re not very large or cumbersome.  Keep them together with 2 D-hooks, and throw them in the back of the vehicle.  Next, you need to practice on them.  If you’ve never done it, walking on the snow is a different task, especially if you’re carrying gear.

Winter Clothing

Gore-Tex is ideal for shielding your body from the relentless winter weather. A word to the wise – if you can cover yourself in Gore-Tex – do it! Just one below freezing night out in the backyard without it, and you’ll run to the store when the day comes.  That Gore-Tex enables you to stay warm and dry, and it “breathes,” keeping you from being a humidifier and soaked to the skin.  You need good, thick socks and quality boots…I recommend Rocky Gore-Tex boots with at least 1000 grams of Thinsulate, for starters.

On a side note, make sure a good ground pad is with you.  In the wintertime, you’ll need all the insulation that you can get from the ground.  I jump back to the toboggans again: if you have a light rucksack as a “go” bag, you may be able to tote it…and haul other stuff in the toboggan, such as tools, clothes, and have space for extra food and supplies you may pick up on the way.

Bug Out Considerations

There are a lot of considerations before you head out on foot. What’s your plan? First of all, keep a map of the area you’re driving, and have it handy before you go.  If things go south and the “S” hits the fan, you need all the intel you can get on site…where you’re located at the time it happens.  Knowing where malls, stores, gas stations, pharmacies and the like are will help, and you can mark them on the map.  Depending on where you are, you may choose to stay with the vehicle for a while, but if this is done?  You may want to get it off the main road and camouflage it somewhat.

We talked about a Toboggan before for a load around the house…but what about the vehicle?  Well, how about a kid’s sled/toboggan?  You can find some sturdy ones that can take a beating…use your own judgment.  If you have a big family, you may wish the one I recommended from Wal-Mart that is about $50 and can haul about 500 to 600 lbs.  This one is where you can put the gear inside and drag it behind you on a nylon tow rope that comes with it.  Strap it to the top of your vehicle, or throw it on the bed of the pickup.  The kid’s toboggan would be of use for 1 person or one for each.  The sides would enable the gear to be stowed without slipping off.  Drill holes in the sides and use bungee cords to strap the gear down all the same.  Better safe than sorry.

If you stay with the vehicle, make sure you have a plan: you can’t stay with it forever.  It may be good for a night or two to come up with a plan (especially if you have kids, to help them get over the initial shock and disorientation).  The “end of the world” is usually bad on the nerves.  Use that time to focus the family on what you will do.  You may have to leave the vehicle immediately, as you want to return home as quickly as possible.  The situation is going to be your call, and what you believe your family can handle…and how you function as a group.

Finally, don’t forget “Yak-Trak’s” or some other type of devices to slip over your boots to enable you to walk or run on ice.  They range in price and quality, but you should be able to find them in your sporting goods or big-box stores.  So, plan ahead, make evac from your vehicle in the winter a training priority, and stay frosty!  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

The Green Beret’s Winter Survival Guide

Winter Wilderness Survival: Take Care of Your Feet and Your Odds of Survival Increase

15 Items That Should Be In Your Vehicle During the Winter

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Easy Ways You Can Recycle a Christmas Tree

 

According to several sources, between 35 to 40 million natural (real) Christmas trees are cut down and sold in the United States, and roughly 1 million more are cut down and exported to Mexico.  A statistic in Wikipedia shows that in 2012, over 24 million trees were sold: a total retail value of over $1 billion.

Yes, survivalists and preppers, you read that correctly: with 24 million trees, a retail of over $1 billion.

The weight?  More than 54,000 tons for (average) 36 million trees.  One of the problems with statistics such as these…they “deaden” the conscience…as they are such staggering numbers as not to be able to be held in the mind.  They just become a statistic.  The real focus is the retail value…$1 billion.  If the trees sell for that much, then the state and federal government are “pocketing” about half a billion dollars, or $500 million.  Wow, that’ll provide for a lot of Congressional dinners of shrimp and steak, and sumptuous feasts for our honored representatives!

It’s also great for that all-important period even greater than the week of Christmas…the last fiscal quarter of the year…the “sacred” Fourth Quarter earnings!  Yes, sir, this is where the U.S. economy faces its “make or break” mark, as 75 – 80% of our economy is based on consumption.  Replete with numbers from the happy expenditures, the merchants joyously ring in the New Year without sleigh bells, but cash registers jingling and the ringing of silver-like and copper-like alloyed coins clinking happily in the black plastic compartments!

Seriously, for a sobering look at all that is “produced” in terms of consumption and waste, try this article, entitled “Christmas Waste Statistics – Making Christmas ‘Green’

5 Ways to Recycle Your Christmas Tree

So, what to do except do what everyone else does, right?  No, how about for starters, try and recycle some of that tree for other uses instead of simply throwing it out.

1. Pine Needle Tea – After all the “accouterments” have been removed, and the ornaments packed away, cut down the boughs.  Take some of them and the leaves (yes, those coniferous needles are really leaves) and boil some of them up…as mentioned in past articles.  More Vitamin C in them than you can shake a stick at, no pun intended.

2. Emergency Shelter – You can also practice with those pine boughs.  Practice?  Yes, practice making a lean-to out in the backyard.  Here’s your chance!  They can’t get you for doing such…the tree isn’t a “tree” anymore, it’s your personal property!  No license or certification required! Practice building a lean-to, and making groundcover using the interlaced boughs out in the backyard.  Use all the boughs.

3. Firestarting Material – Dried boughs and needles burn extremely well and make excellent fire-starting material. Here are some other fire-starting ideas.

4. Wood Carving – Next is the tree itself.  Cut it up.  Do you like to carve wood?  Pine is nice and soft.  Practice whatever (if anything) comes to mind.  Or cut it up and set it aside to cure and be used for firewood or kindling.

5. Firewood – Those urban and suburban city convenience stores and grocery stores sell those little packets of “firewood,” all wrapped up in plastic with a carrying handle for the exciting family fire and “roughing it” in the ‘burbs.  Why not save that 5 to 7 dollars and use the tree? Read more on how to efficiently acquire firewood.


Here’s a novel concept: collect up the trees of neighbors who just want to throw it out, and do something with them.


Training is Where You Make It and What You Make of It

Prepping and survival are more than just consumption and storage of supplies and materials for the day it hits the fan.  You don’t have to be a “tree-hugger” to utilize a Christmas tree after its holiday utilitarian function has passed. Have a nice holiday, and think beyond it in all that you do.

 

To rekindle a fire, you just may have to carry the torch, or blow on the embers and refuel it yourself.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Easy Ways You Can Recycle a Christmas Tree

Click here to view the original post.

 

According to several sources, between 35 to 40 million natural (real) Christmas trees are cut down and sold in the United States, and roughly 1 million more are cut down and exported to Mexico.  A statistic in Wikipedia shows that in 2012, over 24 million trees were sold: a total retail value of over $1 billion.

Yes, survivalists and preppers, you read that correctly: with 24 million trees, a retail of over $1 billion.

The weight?  More than 54,000 tons for (average) 36 million trees.  One of the problems with statistics such as these…they “deaden” the conscience…as they are such staggering numbers as not to be able to be held in the mind.  They just become a statistic.  The real focus is the retail value…$1 billion.  If the trees sell for that much, then the state and federal government are “pocketing” about half a billion dollars, or $500 million.  Wow, that’ll provide for a lot of Congressional dinners of shrimp and steak, and sumptuous feasts for our honored representatives!

It’s also great for that all-important period even greater than the week of Christmas…the last fiscal quarter of the year…the “sacred” Fourth Quarter earnings!  Yes, sir, this is where the U.S. economy faces its “make or break” mark, as 75 – 80% of our economy is based on consumption.  Replete with numbers from the happy expenditures, the merchants joyously ring in the New Year without sleigh bells, but cash registers jingling and the ringing of silver-like and copper-like alloyed coins clinking happily in the black plastic compartments!

Seriously, for a sobering look at all that is “produced” in terms of consumption and waste, try this article, entitled “Christmas Waste Statistics – Making Christmas ‘Green’

5 Ways to Recycle Your Christmas Tree

So, what to do except do what everyone else does, right?  No, how about for starters, try and recycle some of that tree for other uses instead of simply throwing it out.

1. Pine Needle Tea – After all the “accouterments” have been removed, and the ornaments packed away, cut down the boughs.  Take some of them and the leaves (yes, those coniferous needles are really leaves) and boil some of them up…as mentioned in past articles.  More Vitamin C in them than you can shake a stick at, no pun intended.

2. Emergency Shelter – You can also practice with those pine boughs.  Practice?  Yes, practice making a lean-to out in the backyard.  Here’s your chance!  They can’t get you for doing such…the tree isn’t a “tree” anymore, it’s your personal property!  No license or certification required! Practice building a lean-to, and making groundcover using the interlaced boughs out in the backyard.  Use all the boughs.

3. Firestarting Material – Dried boughs and needles burn extremely well and make excellent fire-starting material. Here are some other fire-starting ideas.

4. Wood Carving – Next is the tree itself.  Cut it up.  Do you like to carve wood?  Pine is nice and soft.  Practice whatever (if anything) comes to mind.  Or cut it up and set it aside to cure and be used for firewood or kindling.

5. Firewood – Those urban and suburban city convenience stores and grocery stores sell those little packets of “firewood,” all wrapped up in plastic with a carrying handle for the exciting family fire and “roughing it” in the ‘burbs.  Why not save that 5 to 7 dollars and use the tree? Read more on how to efficiently acquire firewood.


Here’s a novel concept: collect up the trees of neighbors who just want to throw it out, and do something with them.


Training is Where You Make It and What You Make of It

Prepping and survival are more than just consumption and storage of supplies and materials for the day it hits the fan.  You don’t have to be a “tree-hugger” to utilize a Christmas tree after its holiday utilitarian function has passed. Have a nice holiday, and think beyond it in all that you do.

 

To rekindle a fire, you just may have to carry the torch, or blow on the embers and refuel it yourself.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To House the Whole Family in a SHTF-Emergency

Click here to view the original post.

 One of the complications of a major disaster event taking place (with or without warning) is not having supplies and equipment before the event takes place.  In line with this dearth is the shortage of preparations for members of the family who live in other locations who may wish to band together.  I’m going to propose a solution here that is slightly “unconventional,” so try to remove your mind from the constructs imposed upon it by your entire life spent from the army of skeptics and closed-minded establishment mindsets.

The imposition is that we all are channeled to live in “cookie-cutter” houses, plopped down akin to so many Hershey kisses in a row: identical construction in an approved, regulated, homeowner’s association-sanctioned manner.

We’re referring to the end of the society, and if you’re a multi-millionaire and you want a house for each member of the family retreating to your location, more power to you.  We do what we can in life, and do the best we can.  In the absence of millions, there is another route.  Let’s go over the basics first.

The principle is for all the family members (and anyone close to that family) having a place to meet up and reside together when it all falls apart.  From a logistics perspective, unless you have a gigantic manorial-type residence, your space and resources will be stretched thin.  What I propose here are sheds…cabins, if you prefer.  You can build them yourself or you can buy them.

Once again, much of this is going to depend on the geographic location you reside, and the social and legal impositions placed upon you.  Only you know them.  Armies of bureaucrats who want to tax you into insolvency are behind the hordes of conformists (commonly labeled as homeowners’ associations) and “friendly” neighbors who wish to impose their wills upon you.

To succeed in this endeavor, you’re going to need to have a tight family that will help one another, even if many live in different states with their immediate families.  You can stick-build these sheds out of plywood and lumber, roof them with steel roofs, insulate them, and throw them up on top of footers to prevent them from becoming “permanent structures” and taxed by your happy community.

Each shed can be fitted with an aperture to run a stovepipe to the outside, and the stove and pipe can be placed into each cabin/shed.  Each shed can contain several mattresses and sets of linen and blankets, as well as bed frames.  You can place into the sheds a few folding chairs and tables, and a cupboard or two.  To the untrained eye, it will all appear to be storage.  And add to the camouflage!  Place some tools and supplies in each one…different stuff…that can easily be removed if need be.  Give the appearance of storage sheds.  Then your family members can arrive and set up shop.

If you have, for example, two brothers and a sister…then each family group can use a shed or double up with two families to a shed.  To be on the safe side, as many family groups as possible should set up sheds on their own property to enable the whole family to flee to their property if the need arises.  Situations change, and what may be the optimal location today may not be when everything occurs.  By duplicating this “template,” you up the chances to enable your family to have a retreat in at least one safe area.

Sheds can be purchased that are already fully constructed, but if you do, you’ll need to insulate them and modify them in to have a wood stove in each of them.  Bathroom considerations are another factor.  One shed can be built or purchased and converted into a water storage facility that can be used for bathing, showering, and the like.  I strongly recommend investing in several (or building several) composting toilets to save the water and have something that will yield a beneficial supply of fertilizer when the warm weather returns.

If these are not within your budget, the only tents I would recommend are either Wall tents used for expeditions and/or hunting, or military-issue GP mediums or GP large made of canvas that can resist all the elements.  In the end, it’s your decision that you’ll have to weigh in your own mind and heart.  Food for thought, in the perilous times in which we live.  We’d like to hear any questions or thoughts on the matter.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Many SHTF Uses for Alcohol

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, this article is not to expound on alcohol’s qualities as a beverage, but on the different type of alcohol and the uses it has.  This valuable commodity has several uses from a survival perspective that are worth examining.  In this piece, we will be examining the three most common types available to you.  Let’s jump right into it and give you something you can use!

Ethanol (C2H5OH) is the common form of alcohol that you consume as a beverage/within a beverage.  There are different percentages of alcohol per different beverages.  Here are some rough “guidelines” of the percentages:

Vodka (usually 40%), Brandy (usually 40%), Scotch (40-60%), Grain alcohol (85-95%), Gin (37-60%).

Methanol is also known as wood alcohol (CH3OH).  As the name implies, it is taken from wood, and its main use is in industry, and in high-performance engines such as racecars and “monster” trucks, as well as other specialty engines.  Methanol does not give a flame off when burning and can be put out with water.

Isopropyl alcohol (also called “rubbing” alcohol) sees a use in several different household needs from cleaning to disinfecting.  Isopropyl (C3H8O) alcohol is widely available in all your grocery and big-box stores and varies in concentration from about 50% all the way up to 99% (usually found in feed stores or hardware stores in that concentration).

Now for winter considerations, here is an important chart for you that lists the freezing points (the point of transition between the liquid becoming a solid and vice-versa) of alcohols:

Source:  http://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/WO2010029344A2/imgf000023_0001.png

We must keep in mind that this is primarily used for ethanol, the type that is consumed as a beverage.  I’m not listing freezing points of the other two types for a reason: you can’t drink them or consume them.  Hear me out, as I give you the main point:

You can pick up a bottle of ethanol and keep it in the vehicle without having it freeze, especially grain alcohol, the preferred ethanol to be used in tinctures.

Natural Medicine

It can be seen, then, why in my previous articles I mentioned the advantages to making naturopathic aids and herbal solutions in tincture form for several reasons.  Firstly, it is not difficult for even the novice who is interested in herbs.  Secondly, the tincture lasts at least three years, if you were to assign an “expiration” date on it.  Lastly, if you make a tincture that is, say, 60% alcohol?  As you can see by the chart, it will not freeze until it reaches -23 degrees Fahrenheit.  That’s pretty cold!

An electromagnetic pulse may take out the grid and all your heat, but your herbal tinctures will be safe for a time.

Other Important Uses

There are other uses for the alcohol, as well.  Rubbing alcohol is important for first aid, and can be used as a fire-starting fluid.  Do any of you live in a cold area during the winter?  Well, have you ever had your windshield-wiper fluid line freeze up?  Chances are most of you drive models of vehicles that keep the line heated.  If not: you can rely on alcohol!  Pour yourself a small spray bottle worth of rubbing alcohol (the ones at Wal-Mart you can pick up for a couple of bucks and it’s 90% concentration).

Pour your alcohol into the spray bottle, and when you must clean off the windshield, it won’t freeze and can take off that grease and grime.  A “squeegee” helps, along with some rags you’ll have to get rid of or wash periodically.  You can use it on the headlights and taillights as well during these months when your vehicle becomes covered with road salt and filth from the macadam.  Great for cleaning up those wiper blades, as well.

The alcohols can be used for barter goods, as well, and as mentioned have many uses for disinfectants and wound-cleaners.  Ethanol is not the preferred method for this next tip, but it can work when you have nothing else: an anesthetic.  You may just have a patient who is not compromised from a respiratory perspective (say a gunshot wound to the leg or arm), and a few drinks may be just what is needed to remove that bullet or those shotgun pellets.  Use your best judgment and think outside of the box without going overboard.

In summary, alcohol is a very valuable commodity that has many uses now and will be invaluable after the “S” hits the fan.  When used responsibly and safely, it can give you a powerful edge with everything from making medicines to starting a fire.  Use your imagination, and it will serve you well.  Looking forward to some comments, tips, and suggestions from all of you Readers out there.  Please share your experiences and insights, and stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Read More About Ways to Utilize Alcohol:

Could This Be the Perfect Generator for Preppers?

45 Survival Uses for Alcohol

8 Recipes For Making Homemade Extracts

Six Kinds of Currency That Might Emerge after the Collapse

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Winter Survival: Practical Preps for an Emergency Bug Out

Click here to view the original post.

            

“I got to, got to, got to, get away…turn me loose, baby.” –  Jimi Hendrix, “Stone Free”

Yes, ReadyNutrition guys and gals, there comes a time when you just “got to get away,” so to speak.  This doesn’t mean to the sands of (what used to be) St. Bart’s.  This means “E&E,” or “Escape and Evasion,” as we used to call it in the Army.  But what if your car is not working because of an EMP…and you have two feet of snow on the ground?  What if you have a sheet of ice so thick on the ground that the Olympic Hockey Team could practice on it?  The “suck” factor will be high, and the adrenaline will be pumping.  You have to get out of there.  Are you prepared?

You can be.  Firstly, let’s refresh a few things that have been mentioned already.  You have your BOB (your happy “Bug-Out Bag”) if you wish to call it that.  It should be packed and ready in your vehicle.

And at this stage of the game, you should have already switched off for your winter needs, as we covered in numerous articles before.

You need both a Gore-Tex top and bottom for extreme cold weather.  First things first!  What are you facing?  If it’s the ice, you need a pair of Yak-Trak’s or Crepons (like these) to place upon your feet with metal spikes on the bottom to give you some traction.  Yes, these guys will run you about 30 to 40 bucks, and it’s well worth it.  The rubber harness that holds either springs or spikes/metal cleats are durable and will last you for more than a couple seasons if you use them regularly.

Remember JJ’s principle of redundancy: You use one pair for daily use, and the other pair you “squirrel” away for an emergency.

You don’t want to have that everyday pair break down right at the critical moment.  According to Murphy’s Law, what can go wrong will go wrong.  You can even the odds if you buy two of each item…one for regular use and one for emergency/backup.  OK, so you have just emerged from the car and ran across a large deserted parking lot full of ice to the woods.  At the tree line, you notice that the snow has drifted to a depth of a foot and a half.

Next on the agenda is a pair of snowshoes.  Now, depending on where you live, you may need a really good pair…the kind that is about 32-36” in length.  For your immediate getaway and for lightness and convenience, there is an alternative to carry with your backpack.  Snowshoes used by utility men and electrical linemen.

These guys are made out of really durable plastic…the kind that a nuclear weapon might have a hard time melting.  Just joking, there, but you see the point.  These snowshoes are more compact and are usually a bright orange color.  Some plastic surface bonding spray paint will take care of that.  They make them orange so that in the course of their work when they set them down they won’t lose them.  It makes sense.  Now you’ll have to adapt them to your use and purpose.

They’ll slip over the top of your shoes/boots, and can be adjusted with straps.  They work.  There’s a lot of different kinds.  I prefer the ones that are a little more “rounded” than the rest, so they resemble a large tennis racket head.  This gives you plenty of surface area.  Throw them on and take them off later with ease.  These will run you about $30, but you can find them in your second-hand stores if you search hard enough.

Lastly, how about a toboggan?  Yeah, sounds stupid, I know…until you realize you would like to haul some stuff with you away from your now-worthless SUV that the EMP has fried.  The toboggan I’m referring to is basically a plastic sheet (the tougher the better) with two holes located at the top…yeah, a kid’s toy.

Until you have jerks shooting at you and you need to go down a long stretch of hill.  Or until you have about 50 lbs. of stuff you don’t want to leave with the vehicle.

Do yourself a favor and make sure you have about a 10 to 15-foot section of rope with you, burned on both ends that can haul or lift a couple of hundred pounds.  This will make life easier for you to drag that toboggan with you.  The toboggan can also be used as a ground cover or as a wind barrier if you have to start a fire.  Your only limit is your imagination.

So, these are some simple and cost-effective methods to help you E&E in the Great Winter Wonderland!  Make sure you test your equipment and practice with it.  If you’ve never used it before, you’ll be at a disadvantage when the SHTF and you have to do it for real.  Practice makes perfect, and there’s no better time to start than the present.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Emergency SHTF Packing: How To Efficiently Pack a Bug-Out Bag

Click here to view the original post.

This article is a continuation and the second part of the load management series written at the request of Mr. Brent Westbrook, a ReadyNutrition Reader.  In the first part, we covered how to stagger a load by weight and pack it according to function for a vehicle.  Guess what?  Many of the basics used to emplace that load are followed here, in how to pack a rucksack (another word for a backpack).  Let’s get right down to it!

Packing a Bug-Out Bag + Gear Suggestions

For those who have been reading my articles for a while, you know that my personal preference is the large-frame Army Rucksack (also called a Large “Alice” pack) …the one from the turn of the century and thirty years before.  It has an aluminum frame, it’s made of nylon, and it can take a lot of punishment.  That being said, the mechanics and reasoning for packing it are still the same.

You must ensure with a ruck that the load is balanced, as high as possible to keep pressure and weight off your back and that you can get to your equipment in a hurry.

Items on the bottom are those rarely used

I pack at the bottom of mine stuff that I do not intend to use at all or very seldom, such as extra clothes and extra food.  Pack your clothes in a wet-weather bag ( the military issue is preferable to me, although I’m aware there are many civilian firms that follow the premise of waterproof bags).  In the middle of the ruck, you want some ammo, more clothes, and some specialty equipment that doesn’t see immediate use.  You be the judge of that.  Toward the top, I keep Gore-Tex pants and jacket, as well as an issue sleeping bag with a Gore-Tex cover in a compression bag and then in a wet-weather bag.

Keep your basic needs in mind when packing bug-out equipment

Food in various forms is “nested around the outside edges, and then the drawstring is cinched down.  At the very top, I have a poncho and a poncho liner (that I can reach and remove easily).  Over this is my ground pad (I use a thick Coleman that is good with or without inflating it), and I have a bivouac hammock in a waterproof bag.  Those are all cinched down with the straps.  In my outside pockets (and waterproofed) I have ammo, food that I can eat quickly, fire-starting equipment, and my water supply.  I use stainless steel one-quart canteens.

This with the canteens is for several reasons.  I don’t tote more than a gallon at a time.  I leave some “headspace” so if the canteens freeze and expand, they aren’t ruined.  I can place the steel ones on a fire and thaw them out to get to the water.  They also take a beating.  For myself, I don’t mind the extra pressure on my back, as (in the wintertime) my jacket and the kidney pad take care of that.  I prefer a low silhouette.  I won’t get into how much mine weighs, but you should be comfortable taking a “squat” with it, and it should not take you to the ground.

The really important thing is that you want everything as secure as much as possible.  When the load shifts, it becomes unbalanced, and the distribution of weight is uneven, making for unequal steps and an unequal load-burden on your body parts.  You also have to take into consideration all of the other stuff you’re going to tote beside the rucksack, such as a load-carrying vest, a rifle, and extra water and ammo.  This adds to the weight, as well as being necessary to have adjusted and fitted to your body correctly to facilitate a smooth, noiseless movement through the brush.

Practice packing your bags so that it becomes second nature

This is something that will require practice and experimentation on your part, as there are not too many cut-and-dry rules to follow.  You should make sure your first-aid gear, ammo, and fire-starting equipment are the most readily available items…water and food notwithstanding.  You can tailor your pack, by the way, I explained it either with more or less of the items I mentioned in an order that is at least similar to the one I present here.  Good luck, and take the time to perfect it, as it is your “home away from home” and you’ll rely on what you carry.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Ancient Weapons and their SHTF Uses

Click here to view the original post.

                          

This article dedicated to A Arizonian: 360 24/7!

ReadyNutrition Readers, we wrote a piece on the warrior mentality in a previous article, and this was to return you to the basics that covered skills and a mindset that has enabled our species to survive throughout the ages.  We’re going to add onto that by mentioning there is a time for technology and a time for the primitive.  Well, there have been a number of comments suggesting such weapons, and we’re going to run with the ball here – mentioning a few weapons besides the standard bow and arrow, and the knife – and then suggesting how to go about using them in your arsenal.  Let’s do it!

5 Ancient Weapons and their SHTF Uses

Spears

Yes, a spear.  There are several different kinds, depending on the function you want to use it for.  My personal preference is to make your own or have it forged to your specifications.  You want to be sure of a head that is sharply-pointed and well-bladed, preferably three or four blades, and the base is about twice as wide as the shaft.  This will permit the head to penetrate with a larger hole than the shaft.  What use, you may ask?  Hunting on the QT, and also defense in like manner.  A heavy spear will penetrate deeper brush than an arrow shaft.

These had heads that tapered to a point, as you can see, but a middle grip with two formidable ends that enabled it to be thrown or used here in close-quarters.  Watch the movie, and you’ll see how effectively it was employed.

Sword

A matter of preference here.  The Scottish Claymore, the German or Viking Broadsword, the Arab Scimitar, or the Roman Gladius.  All swords have different techniques for their use.  Someone is bristling at my leaving out the Japanese Katana.  There it is.  Each sword must be trained with differently, as they perform quite differently in battle and require practice in varied methods to be effective.  If you’re going to pick up a sword, you need one that is fully-functional and either comes edged or can take an edge.  Pay particular attention to the type of steel offered in it and research it for its hardness and tempering.  Such weapons can be worn strapped to the back, to the belt, or carried in its sheath and attached to a rucksack or backpack.  Remember this: cheap you buy, cheap you get, to coin a tried and true phrase in the vernacular.  If you’re going to a Halloween party, then it’s your call, but if you may use it to fight?  You don’t want one manufactured in Pakistan for $20.

Morningstar, or Mace

The ones attached to a continuous handle are a little easier to use than the ones on a chain.  Yes, these are the weapons you saw on Bugs Bunny as a kid employed by Yosemite Sam and friends.  The ones on the chain can propel and swing the actual ball of the mace with great force; however, you need to practice with them, as you can seriously injure yourself if you don’t have control over the swing and arc.  Purchase the ones with the spikes, made out of steel or heavy iron…they leave a lasting impression!

Boomerang

The “Feral Boy” in the movie “The Road Warrior” used one made out of metal.  Once again, you need to practice with this to be effective, and in this, you need two of them…one for practice and one to use when the “S” hits the fan that is in mint condition.  Give yourself a wide open area such as an uninhabited field as a practice ground.

Throwing Knives

Throwing knives are also considered an ancient weapon and if your accuracy is on point, they can be deadly. As well, the Chinese throwing star, also known as “Shuriken” are a part of any Oriental Ninja’s weaponry…a must-have for villains and heroes alike!  Seriously, these things can be highly effective…if you practice with them and make yourself an expert in their use.  I’ve heard plenty of comments about “How are you going to use that if you come under fire?” or “You’ll never be able to use that to hit a moving target in combat conditions,” yada, yada.

You are the warrior: you pick the time and circumstances of the encounter, and employ a weapon in the manner you’ve trained with it at the optimal time.

What we’re talking about here is the use of weapons after the complete breakdown of society, the complete collapse.  You’ll want to save that ammo unless you know how to make your own smokeless powder, your own primers, mold your bullets and have a lifetime supply of brass.  Even then, you’ll want to use weapons such as these in times that their silent employ could very well mean the difference between life and death.

Please keep this in mind: They can be just as dangerous to you (and others whom you do not intend them to use against) if you do not know how to use them properly and practice with them to acquire expertise in their employ.

Just a few suggestions, here, to get you started.  There are plenty of armorers and arms manufacturers that specialize in authentic, fully-functional ancient and medieval weaponry.  Do your research and find quality weapons and equipment, and train.  Don’t buy that mace for $20 and then be surprised when the spiked ball comes off and goes through the windshield of a parked car.  Don’t buy the $1,000 Katana, on the opposite end of the spectrum, and succeed only in cutting off one of your own feet while practicing.  If you can, practice with “dummy” weapons until you have the motions and fluidity down, and master the weapon fully before employing it in a real-world situation.  Be safe, stay in that good fight, and embrace “I can” as your core focus.

Oftentimes, the “I can’t/naysaying” crowd are telling you that you can’t do it…but they themselves have already done it…they just don’t want you to succeed with it.  Or, they tried it and didn’t succeed, and therefore don’t want you succeeding when they failed.  Either way, they’re not contributing to your success or survival.

The “I can,” is stronger than their “you can’t.”  The “I can” will enable you to survive and succeed where others fail.  If you conceive of it, study it, practice it, master it, and believe in yourself, you can do it: in anything in life.  You can!

Train intelligently, and train without ceasing.  Fight that good fight, and win it.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Think Before You Speak: Daily Situational Training

Click here to view the original post.

 

Survival and preparedness entail a lot more than just acquiring a whole bunch of supplies.  You need to be in good physical condition, have some training under your belt, and be ready to use all your training, education, and experience at a moment’s notice when the balloon goes up.  One of the things we take for granted, however, is that daily situations can be used to our advantage and test how we respond.  Let’s start with this:

  1. Situations arise that require tact, diplomacy, and the ability to keep a cool head, and
  2. It is more than just a “test,” as it can train you to better respond to people and situations that arise.
  3. The situation can also let you assess how you did, and give you the basis to make an improvement in the future.
  4. There is an art of camouflage daily to be used prior to the “S” hitting the fan.

Let’s get started!  I want to give you an illustration of something that happened to yours truly.

I have an “out of the way” place in one of the local towns that I frequent to write.  On this day (no different than any other), I set up my laptop and materials in a quiet area.  I went out to my vehicle to grab my coffee.  As I came back, the person who owned this facility motioned me to come over.

“I just wanted to talk to you.  We have tenants who just took an office in this facility.  They see you writing and they’re afraid of you.  They think you’re homeless, and they’re scared of you.”

Shocked, I said, “Did I do anything that upset any of these people?”

“No, not at all,” said the facility owner, “it’s just that they see you sitting close to the entrance and they feel nervous.  We know you here, and I’m not asking you to leave: just to sit in that area over there where most of the other people sit,” the person said, indicating a common area with tables and chairs.

I was pretty ticked off, but I smiled on the outside and took in a deep breath on the inside.

“So, you just want me to sit over there?  Sure.  Anything else I can do?”

“Well,” said the owner, “we all know here that you’re a writer, but these people don’t know that, so in a few days when you’re set up, I’ll bring some of the supervisors around to meet you…you know, and then they’ll know that everything is all right.”

I smiled, and said, “No problem.”  I mentioned a thing I had done a week before to help this owner, and the owner acknowledged it.  “I’ll always be part of the solution, not the problem.  I’ll be more than happy to allay their fears.”

The owner beamed, thanking me and assuring me that it was nothing that I had done and nothing personal or against me.  The owner then mentioned a few other tenants in the facility that had spoken up on my behalf (since they had known me for quite some time), and then the owner thanked me once more.

As yet, I haven’t met any of these people, but it is business as usual, with me not making a big deal out of it (even though some of the people who had spoken on my behalf were mortified at what the owner had said…all of that in front of them.

Here is this for you as well:

“If you have overcome your inclination and not been overcome by it, you have reason to rejoice.” – Titus Maccius Plautus, Roman playwright

My initial reaction was one of anger.  Once again, a prime example of the superficial nature of our society manifested itself.  Not only that, but I am clean-cut, dress neatly and conservatively, and am quieter than quiet in my public endeavors.  I am not ever a “stand-out” in a crowd.  There was no reason for anyone to feel any “angst” with my presence, as the only thing I do when I’m writing is drinking coffee and pound the keys.  Yet they did.  Chalk it up to another stultifying experience that leaves one feeling as if they are shell-shocked when they did absolutely nothing.  Chalk one up to the way the “herd” mentality is of humanity.

What I did that kept the anger under control was that I thought of the situation, and I thought of the other people in the area.  I did not want to make them look bad because I was not in control of my anger.  As it stands, by listening to the owner, keeping my mouth shut, and agreeing to do what it took to make the situation right…. these were the elements that saw me through.

Camouflage yourself in your everyday life: anything “different” can be perceived as a threat against the herd, and the herd is not a herd of cattle but a pack of wolves.

There are not many places to work undisturbed if you come into any town for the day to do some work here in Montana…they’re few and far in between.  What’s more: why make an enemy or a malcontent?  I could stand up and protest, use the “First Amendment” clause, and still lose the battle.  But a little bit of diplomacy, tact, and discretion enabled me to not go around the problem, but work through it.

What we do in situations determines the shape of things that happen to us in the future.  I wished to share this example not to present myself as the “apex” of control, but to show that control of oneself can be maintained with effort, and it’s good training.  It is far better to be disciplined in this regard than allow things to fall apart in between the ears.  I leave you with this last thing, and bid you “good luck” in situations you face that are as mine.  Make them training events, and you’ll benefit from the challenge.  JJ out!

“Say not always what you know, but always know what you say.” – Roman Emperor Claudius

 

 

Additional Reading:

8 Prepper Principles For a Prepared Mind

How Do People Really Behave When Disaster Strikes?

Never Drop Your Guard: 7 Tips To Improve Your Situational Awareness

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Art of Reconnaissance: How to Improve your Viewpoint

 

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this article will cover some basic techniques for observation, as well as some information on how the eyes and mind work.  Why?  To fine tune your skills and give you an edge, as well as promote information for your further studies.  You can use this information when you are in a fixed position and watching…whether on sentry duty, or for reconnaissance.  These are not tips that are only for snipers or long-range shooters: they’re for the average guy and gal.  Let’s get started.

Gain a Better Viewpoint With These Recon Basics

Our eyes are the eyes of a predator: pointed forward, with the greatest focus in our field of vision being directly in front of us.  We see the following in order: movement, color, and the silhouette.  Movement is the greatest factor, and this is wired into our systems to detect threats against us.  Two eyes provide us with depth perception: the ability to gauge distance and determine where an object is in relation to us and to other objects.

One of the challenges for you is to develop your peripheral vision.  Take something such as a door inside of your house, and focus on it.  Maintaining the focus of your eyes on that door, allow the “softened edges,” or the unclear areas at the edges of your focus to come into view without moving your eyes.  Keeping your eyes riveted to that focal point, allow the whole eyes to see everything “on the sides of that focus,” and all of this without moving the eyes.

The “unclear area” is your periphery.  By unclear, I mean that you can see it, but the edges are not as sharp, and the detail is not as defined as the central focus.  Your practice is twofold.  First, practice trying to identify things on the sides of your focus without moving your eyes.  Next, see the limits that your eyes take in objects.  This is very important.

You can focus on a spot on the horizon, but if you keep that focus, guess what?  You will not miss an object moving into your field of vision is you train yourself well to see in the periphery.  This is because the movement will “register” in your eyes and on your brain, and then you can shift your focus onto it to see it more clearly and identify it.  Color, as mentioned above, means several things.  Color change is especially important: suddenly, a mound of snow lifts up and a bright yellow “thing” emerges…yes, a man in a ski jacket.  You will be able to detect changes in the color of the general surroundings, and with training to use the periphery of your vision can perfect it to be a valuable tool.

Silhouette is a little trickier: this involves seeing and identifying something by the outline.  Vehicles are usually easy, but personnel (especially if they’ve camouflaged themselves) are more difficult.  “Sneaky Pete’s” tend to break up their outline with foliage, artificial netting/wraps, and other niceties.  This is another reason that you want to know the distances you are observing, say, over an open area.  If you have nothing in front of you, the “speck” on the horizon…you want to know beforehand that the 1” speck is really a 6’ tall man at that distance.

Keep your eyes moving periodically, to shift your point of forward focus.  Left to right or right to left…as long as you keep it regular.  As we learned in Jumpmaster school in the service, don’t look for “deficiencies.”  Formulate images and impressions of the “normal” area you must observe.  Allow any variants (the “deficiencies,” as we had in school) to jump out at you.  If you have a perfect sight picture, you’re going to notice the Yeti emerging from the trees.  It is out of the norm.  His motion, his looks, and (yes!) his silhouette.

One of the biggest challenges you’ll face when observing is the change in light levels, especially dark to dawn, and dusk to dark.  Dawn and dusk are traditionally great times for an attack.  This is because the light is just appearing in the former, and disappearing in the latter.  The rods and cones of your eyes cannot clearly help you determine what your eyes are seeing in accordance with the light provided.  The challenge is from a lighted area into one of shadow.  Very tough to see what is going on.  Another problem is the time you spend on watch.  Everyone should have a “short shift” of about 2 to 4 hours, but realistically this never happens.

Eyestrain and fatigue turn the eyes into acorns with drooling and head-tipping sure to follow.  When watching over the snow-covered ground, be sure to wear 100% UV protectant sunglasses.  You can have long-term retinal damage when your eyes are exposed to reflected sunlight for a long period of time.  Protect your eyes, and train them to see what you are observing for.  Practice makes perfect, and in the end, you will perfect these techniques to improve your effectiveness in the areas we discussed.  Keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!

 

Additional Reading:

A Green Beret’s Guide to Improvised Home Defense Strategies

ManTracker: How to Be One and How to Avoid One

Improve Your Natural Night Vision

Prepper Sustainability: How to Observe and Monitor Local Game

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Art of Reconnaissance: How to Improve your Viewpoint

 

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this article will cover some basic techniques for observation, as well as some information on how the eyes and mind work.  Why?  To fine tune your skills and give you an edge, as well as promote information for your further studies.  You can use this information when you are in a fixed position and watching…whether on sentry duty, or for reconnaissance.  These are not tips that are only for snipers or long-range shooters: they’re for the average guy and gal.  Let’s get started.

Gain a Better Viewpoint With These Recon Basics

Our eyes are the eyes of a predator: pointed forward, with the greatest focus in our field of vision being directly in front of us.  We see the following in order: movement, color, and the silhouette.  Movement is the greatest factor, and this is wired into our systems to detect threats against us.  Two eyes provide us with depth perception: the ability to gauge distance and determine where an object is in relation to us and to other objects.

One of the challenges for you is to develop your peripheral vision.  Take something such as a door inside of your house, and focus on it.  Maintaining the focus of your eyes on that door, allow the “softened edges,” or the unclear areas at the edges of your focus to come into view without moving your eyes.  Keeping your eyes riveted to that focal point, allow the whole eyes to see everything “on the sides of that focus,” and all of this without moving the eyes.

The “unclear area” is your periphery.  By unclear, I mean that you can see it, but the edges are not as sharp, and the detail is not as defined as the central focus.  Your practice is twofold.  First, practice trying to identify things on the sides of your focus without moving your eyes.  Next, see the limits that your eyes take in objects.  This is very important.

You can focus on a spot on the horizon, but if you keep that focus, guess what?  You will not miss an object moving into your field of vision is you train yourself well to see in the periphery.  This is because the movement will “register” in your eyes and on your brain, and then you can shift your focus onto it to see it more clearly and identify it.  Color, as mentioned above, means several things.  Color change is especially important: suddenly, a mound of snow lifts up and a bright yellow “thing” emerges…yes, a man in a ski jacket.  You will be able to detect changes in the color of the general surroundings, and with training to use the periphery of your vision can perfect it to be a valuable tool.

Silhouette is a little trickier: this involves seeing and identifying something by the outline.  Vehicles are usually easy, but personnel (especially if they’ve camouflaged themselves) are more difficult.  “Sneaky Pete’s” tend to break up their outline with foliage, artificial netting/wraps, and other niceties.  This is another reason that you want to know the distances you are observing, say, over an open area.  If you have nothing in front of you, the “speck” on the horizon…you want to know beforehand that the 1” speck is really a 6’ tall man at that distance.

Keep your eyes moving periodically, to shift your point of forward focus.  Left to right or right to left…as long as you keep it regular.  As we learned in Jumpmaster school in the service, don’t look for “deficiencies.”  Formulate images and impressions of the “normal” area you must observe.  Allow any variants (the “deficiencies,” as we had in school) to jump out at you.  If you have a perfect sight picture, you’re going to notice the Yeti emerging from the trees.  It is out of the norm.  His motion, his looks, and (yes!) his silhouette.

One of the biggest challenges you’ll face when observing is the change in light levels, especially dark to dawn, and dusk to dark.  Dawn and dusk are traditionally great times for an attack.  This is because the light is just appearing in the former, and disappearing in the latter.  The rods and cones of your eyes cannot clearly help you determine what your eyes are seeing in accordance with the light provided.  The challenge is from a lighted area into one of shadow.  Very tough to see what is going on.  Another problem is the time you spend on watch.  Everyone should have a “short shift” of about 2 to 4 hours, but realistically this never happens.

Eyestrain and fatigue turn the eyes into acorns with drooling and head-tipping sure to follow.  When watching over the snow-covered ground, be sure to wear 100% UV protectant sunglasses.  You can have long-term retinal damage when your eyes are exposed to reflected sunlight for a long period of time.  Protect your eyes, and train them to see what you are observing for.  Practice makes perfect, and in the end, you will perfect these techniques to improve your effectiveness in the areas we discussed.  Keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!

 

Additional Reading:

A Green Beret’s Guide to Improvised Home Defense Strategies

ManTracker: How to Be One and How to Avoid One

Improve Your Natural Night Vision

Prepper Sustainability: How to Observe and Monitor Local Game

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Art of Reconnaissance: How to Improve your Viewpoint

Click here to view the original post.

 

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this article will cover some basic techniques for observation, as well as some information on how the eyes and mind work.  Why?  To fine tune your skills and give you an edge, as well as promote information for your further studies.  You can use this information when you are in a fixed position and watching…whether on sentry duty, or for reconnaissance.  These are not tips that are only for snipers or long-range shooters: they’re for the average guy and gal.  Let’s get started.

Gain a Better Viewpoint With These Recon Basics

Our eyes are the eyes of a predator: pointed forward, with the greatest focus in our field of vision being directly in front of us.  We see the following in order: movement, color, and the silhouette.  Movement is the greatest factor, and this is wired into our systems to detect threats against us.  Two eyes provide us with depth perception: the ability to gauge distance and determine where an object is in relation to us and to other objects.

One of the challenges for you is to develop your peripheral vision.  Take something such as a door inside of your house, and focus on it.  Maintaining the focus of your eyes on that door, allow the “softened edges,” or the unclear areas at the edges of your focus to come into view without moving your eyes.  Keeping your eyes riveted to that focal point, allow the whole eyes to see everything “on the sides of that focus,” and all of this without moving the eyes.

The “unclear area” is your periphery.  By unclear, I mean that you can see it, but the edges are not as sharp, and the detail is not as defined as the central focus.  Your practice is twofold.  First, practice trying to identify things on the sides of your focus without moving your eyes.  Next, see the limits that your eyes take in objects.  This is very important.

You can focus on a spot on the horizon, but if you keep that focus, guess what?  You will not miss an object moving into your field of vision is you train yourself well to see in the periphery.  This is because the movement will “register” in your eyes and on your brain, and then you can shift your focus onto it to see it more clearly and identify it.  Color, as mentioned above, means several things.  Color change is especially important: suddenly, a mound of snow lifts up and a bright yellow “thing” emerges…yes, a man in a ski jacket.  You will be able to detect changes in the color of the general surroundings, and with training to use the periphery of your vision can perfect it to be a valuable tool.

Silhouette is a little trickier: this involves seeing and identifying something by the outline.  Vehicles are usually easy, but personnel (especially if they’ve camouflaged themselves) are more difficult.  “Sneaky Pete’s” tend to break up their outline with foliage, artificial netting/wraps, and other niceties.  This is another reason that you want to know the distances you are observing, say, over an open area.  If you have nothing in front of you, the “speck” on the horizon…you want to know beforehand that the 1” speck is really a 6’ tall man at that distance.

Keep your eyes moving periodically, to shift your point of forward focus.  Left to right or right to left…as long as you keep it regular.  As we learned in Jumpmaster school in the service, don’t look for “deficiencies.”  Formulate images and impressions of the “normal” area you must observe.  Allow any variants (the “deficiencies,” as we had in school) to jump out at you.  If you have a perfect sight picture, you’re going to notice the Yeti emerging from the trees.  It is out of the norm.  His motion, his looks, and (yes!) his silhouette.

One of the biggest challenges you’ll face when observing is the change in light levels, especially dark to dawn, and dusk to dark.  Dawn and dusk are traditionally great times for an attack.  This is because the light is just appearing in the former, and disappearing in the latter.  The rods and cones of your eyes cannot clearly help you determine what your eyes are seeing in accordance with the light provided.  The challenge is from a lighted area into one of shadow.  Very tough to see what is going on.  Another problem is the time you spend on watch.  Everyone should have a “short shift” of about 2 to 4 hours, but realistically this never happens.

Eyestrain and fatigue turn the eyes into acorns with drooling and head-tipping sure to follow.  When watching over the snow-covered ground, be sure to wear 100% UV protectant sunglasses.  You can have long-term retinal damage when your eyes are exposed to reflected sunlight for a long period of time.  Protect your eyes, and train them to see what you are observing for.  Practice makes perfect, and in the end, you will perfect these techniques to improve your effectiveness in the areas we discussed.  Keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!

 

Additional Reading:

A Green Beret’s Guide to Improvised Home Defense Strategies

ManTracker: How to Be One and How to Avoid One

Improve Your Natural Night Vision

Prepper Sustainability: How to Observe and Monitor Local Game

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

12 Tips to Pack Your Bug-Out Vehicle Like a Pro

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, this article is done on special request by one of the Readers.

Hi, really appreciate all the articles you and the others do on these websites! I’ve been searching for articles particularly on one would pack their vehicle mine being a truck in the event I had to get out. I know pallets that are shipped have a specific order on what goes on first comes off last. I have to factor in weight especially and usually pack the bed with the heaviest items over the axle or forward. I would also be interested in how you would organize backpacks as weight is also a major factor. Many Thanks.”

Well, we’re going to cover the vehicle loads in this article and follow up with one on backpacks and rucksacks in Part 2.  So, let’s jump into it!  One of the things that you must find out first regarding your particular vehicle is its load capacity.  How much weight can it hold?  How much can the axles take?  It is more than this, however: certain weight loads will shift with terrain and with the gradient driving upon.  A steep incline that tilts the bed of that pickup too far will end up turning that pickup into a dump truck.

In addition, you also need to assess what you’re transporting to minimize danger.  Ammo, flammable liquids, and so forth.  An accident with a power line can introduce electricity into the equation and create a secondary explosion that ends up being worse than the accident.  Let’s go through some basics.

  1. Strap down all your loads as best you can…and make this mandatory with anything that is liquid/fluids, such as water cans, fuel cans, etc.
  2. Make sure all your flammable liquids are in sealed and sturdy containers that do not leak and can hold up to rough handling.
  3. Pack those flammable liquids to the rear of the vehicle…the point being if they’re on fire, they’re away from the driver and passengers as far as possible. This will not stop gunfire, but that’s a different problem.
  4. Minimize those flammable liquids in the truck bed. Maybe one or two gas cans max.  If you need to haul that much, then you should have a trailer/cart of some kind.
  5. Stagger your load evenly…think of the term “Bilateral Symmetry” …that is a “mirrored” side…one water can on the left, and one water can on the right. Make the load even.
  6. Ammo in military-issue ammo cans. They’re water-tight with a rubber seal, and they can take a beating.  Pack these guys to the rear of a vehicle.  Use cargo straps to keep them from “hopping” around…tie them down as best you can, and stagger the load evenly.
  7. Whatever your maximum load capacity is, load up only to 90% of that at the most. Give yourself that “pad” either for extra items you may need to acquire, or changes in the loads if you have more than one vehicle in your entourage.
  8. All emergency gear (such as fire-starting equipment and pioneer tools – shovels, picks, a chainsaw, and rope/cables – needs to be stowed in the rear where it is accessible easily and quickly.
  9. Foodstuffs and food supplies: insulate them with pads, cardboard boxes, and Styrofoam for temperature controls, and pack them evenly toward the front.
  10. Weapons (besides the ones you’re carrying on you) should be accessible by the driver and the passenger in the cab or behind the seats.
  11. Medical supplies: in the middle of the bed, protected for temperature and packed to grab at a moment’s notice.
  12. Nest: Build a “nest” around these supplies of food and medicine with things such as blankets, sleeping bags, and rucksacks. The rucks should be packed to the rear, just forward of the ammo.

The reason ammo is packed in the rear is that if you must abandon the vehicle in a SHTF-scenario, you want to access the ammo and control the weapons (in the cab) and download these first.  They are a priority and sensitive items.

“Those who beat their rifles into plowshares will soon plow for those who do not.”

                                                      Ben Franklin

Weapons and ammo are vital to keep the other “B’s,” namely your beans and band-aids.  You can prioritize for yourself, but I mention this: if you’re just sitting around in a hide site for a week, unless you’re injured, you’ll need the food before the medical supplies.  The weapons?  If you have food and medical supplies and no means to defend them…you’re just holding onto them for someone else when it hits the fan.  Three B’s are “Bullets, Beans, and Band-Aids.”

Returning to the packing, if it is wintertime and you have water containers, make sure that you take out about ¼ out of your container to allow for expansion if the water freezes.  Don’t put in any additives such as “salt” or “alcohol,” as it will keep it from freezing but it pollutes your water supply and makes it either a “dehydrating solution” or a “diuretic.”  Both defeat the purpose.  Remember: water’s heavy, at 7.6 lbs. per gallon…you can use that figure to estimate the weight of any fuel you’re toting, as well.

Camouflage all that you have packed.  For your pickup truck (that’s what we’ve focused on here), if you stack supplies up on pallets and load the truck, ensure that everything is strapped down.  Make sure that you have a cap to smack on the back of the pickup.  If you don’t want to use it before SHTF, that’s fine.  Just make sure you can throw it on when it all collapses.  It will be worth its weight in gold to keep your supplies dry and shielded from the elements.

Get yourself a good bathroom scale and/or a hanging “hunting” scale.  Yes, you will want to inventory and weigh everything before packing.  Stick to that 80 to 90% of the load maximum, and you’ll do well.  Make a diagram for all that you’re loading up.  This will help you to place things properly and in a well-organized manner.  Cover your load and block off the inside by putting up cardboard in the windows of the cap.  Take the time to cut the window-blockers to form and duct taping them in place, so you can remove them if need be.  Don’t “spray paint” the windows, as you may need to use them in the future.

Practice placing all you will put into your vehicle in a “ready” posture…that is, in order ready to place into the vehicle.  Drilling it will make it smoother when the time comes to do it for real.  The better you are organized, the smoother a movement will go.  Finally, make sure your vehicle is in good working order with all fluids topped off and the tires in good shape.  Next part we’ll go over how to pack those rucksacks.  Stay in that good fight, and fight it smart!  JJ out!

 

Supplemental Reading:

Step-By-StepEmergencyy Planning Guide

Vehicle 72 Hour Kit Basics

15 Items That Should Be In Your Vehicle During the Winter

The Prepper Conundrum: Bugging Out

16 Things You Should Always Have In Your Car

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

12 Tips to Pack Your Bug-Out Vehicle Like a Pro

ReadyNutrition Readers, this article is done on special request by one of the Readers.

Hi, really appreciate all the articles you and the others do on these websites! I’ve been searching for articles particularly on one would pack their vehicle mine being a truck in the event I had to get out. I know pallets that are shipped have a specific order on what goes on first comes off last. I have to factor in weight especially and usually pack the bed with the heaviest items over the axle or forward. I would also be interested in how you would organize backpacks as weight is also a major factor. Many Thanks.”

Well, we’re going to cover the vehicle loads in this article and follow up with one on backpacks and rucksacks in Part 2.  So, let’s jump into it!  One of the things that you must find out first regarding your particular vehicle is its load capacity.  How much weight can it hold?  How much can the axles take?  It is more than this, however: certain weight loads will shift with terrain and with the gradient driving upon.  A steep incline that tilts the bed of that pickup too far will end up turning that pickup into a dump truck.

In addition, you also need to assess what you’re transporting to minimize danger.  Ammo, flammable liquids, and so forth.  An accident with a power line can introduce electricity into the equation and create a secondary explosion that ends up being worse than the accident.  Let’s go through some basics.

  1. Strap down all your loads as best you can…and make this mandatory with anything that is liquid/fluids, such as water cans, fuel cans, etc.
  2. Make sure all your flammable liquids are in sealed and sturdy containers that do not leak and can hold up to rough handling.
  3. Pack those flammable liquids to the rear of the vehicle…the point being if they’re on fire, they’re away from the driver and passengers as far as possible. This will not stop gunfire, but that’s a different problem.
  4. Minimize those flammable liquids in the truck bed. Maybe one or two gas cans max.  If you need to haul that much, then you should have a trailer/cart of some kind.
  5. Stagger your load evenly…think of the term “Bilateral Symmetry” …that is a “mirrored” side…one water can on the left, and one water can on the right. Make the load even.
  6. Ammo in military-issue ammo cans. They’re water-tight with a rubber seal, and they can take a beating.  Pack these guys to the rear of a vehicle.  Use cargo straps to keep them from “hopping” around…tie them down as best you can, and stagger the load evenly.
  7. Whatever your maximum load capacity is, load up only to 90% of that at the most. Give yourself that “pad” either for extra items you may need to acquire, or changes in the loads if you have more than one vehicle in your entourage.
  8. All emergency gear (such as fire-starting equipment and pioneer tools – shovels, picks, a chainsaw, and rope/cables – needs to be stowed in the rear where it is accessible easily and quickly.
  9. Foodstuffs and food supplies: insulate them with pads, cardboard boxes, and Styrofoam for temperature controls, and pack them evenly toward the front.
  10. Weapons (besides the ones you’re carrying on you) should be accessible by the driver and the passenger in the cab or behind the seats.
  11. Medical supplies: in the middle of the bed, protected for temperature and packed to grab at a moment’s notice.
  12. Nest: Build a “nest” around these supplies of food and medicine with things such as blankets, sleeping bags, and rucksacks. The rucks should be packed to the rear, just forward of the ammo.

The reason ammo is packed in the rear is that if you must abandon the vehicle in a SHTF-scenario, you want to access the ammo and control the weapons (in the cab) and download these first.  They are a priority and sensitive items.

“Those who beat their rifles into plowshares will soon plow for those who do not.”

                                                      Ben Franklin

Weapons and ammo are vital to keep the other “B’s,” namely your beans and band-aids.  You can prioritize for yourself, but I mention this: if you’re just sitting around in a hide site for a week, unless you’re injured, you’ll need the food before the medical supplies.  The weapons?  If you have food and medical supplies and no means to defend them…you’re just holding onto them for someone else when it hits the fan.  Three B’s are “Bullets, Beans, and Band-Aids.”

Returning to the packing, if it is wintertime and you have water containers, make sure that you take out about ¼ out of your container to allow for expansion if the water freezes.  Don’t put in any additives such as “salt” or “alcohol,” as it will keep it from freezing but it pollutes your water supply and makes it either a “dehydrating solution” or a “diuretic.”  Both defeat the purpose.  Remember: water’s heavy, at 7.6 lbs. per gallon…you can use that figure to estimate the weight of any fuel you’re toting, as well.

Camouflage all that you have packed.  For your pickup truck (that’s what we’ve focused on here), if you stack supplies up on pallets and load the truck, ensure that everything is strapped down.  Make sure that you have a cap to smack on the back of the pickup.  If you don’t want to use it before SHTF, that’s fine.  Just make sure you can throw it on when it all collapses.  It will be worth its weight in gold to keep your supplies dry and shielded from the elements.

Get yourself a good bathroom scale and/or a hanging “hunting” scale.  Yes, you will want to inventory and weigh everything before packing.  Stick to that 80 to 90% of the load maximum, and you’ll do well.  Make a diagram for all that you’re loading up.  This will help you to place things properly and in a well-organized manner.  Cover your load and block off the inside by putting up cardboard in the windows of the cap.  Take the time to cut the window-blockers to form and duct taping them in place, so you can remove them if need be.  Don’t “spray paint” the windows, as you may need to use them in the future.

Practice placing all you will put into your vehicle in a “ready” posture…that is, in order ready to place into the vehicle.  Drilling it will make it smoother when the time comes to do it for real.  The better you are organized, the smoother a movement will go.  Finally, make sure your vehicle is in good working order with all fluids topped off and the tires in good shape.  Next part we’ll go over how to pack those rucksacks.  Stay in that good fight, and fight it smart!  JJ out!

 

Supplemental Reading:

Step-By-StepEmergencyy Planning Guide

Vehicle 72 Hour Kit Basics

15 Items That Should Be In Your Vehicle During the Winter

The Prepper Conundrum: Bugging Out

16 Things You Should Always Have In Your Car

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Cash After the Collapse: 6 Multi-Purpose Preps You Need in Emergency Supplies

Click here to view the original post.

coffee1Hopefully, our readers will not suffer indigestion of their holiday meals or have a damper placed upon the holiday largesse of gift-giving and happy moments.  After all, a potential nuclear war or EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) attack should never interfere with the memories being collected in the new pages of the scrapbook album.  Still, if you have the time to tear yourself away from the “holiday treadmill,” you may wish to consider taking some actions that may benefit you later on.

Gathering supplies is one of the hallmarks of the modern prepper and survivalist.  We are going to suggest a few that have dual roles: for barter (primary) and for use (secondary).  That being said, many of us are short on storage space and are looking to find preps that serve multiple purposes will help you make the most of the space you have. Now, there are some of you that may not agree with adding these preps, but then again, that is your choice.  They are being presented here as another option for you to pursue.  We’re going to list those reasons behind each: primary will be “barter” with an explanation, and a secondary (your personal use) will be explained.

6 Multi-Purpose Preps You Need In Your Prepper Supplies

  1. Cigarettes: About 5 to 10 cartons, staggered between your most popular types (such as Marlboro, Camel, etc. You can also purchase tobacco in bulk qualities and repackage it in Mylar bags for long-term storage. Primary: For use as barter. Especially for those who do not smoke, they can be a “gold mine” to obtain something from those who do smoke. Secondary: Tobacco has medical use as an anti-helminthic (fights worms) and also a peripheral vasoconstrictor. It can be used as a bug repellant on plants when the nicotine is extracted by soaking it in alcohol and then sprayed.
  2. Alcohol: Stagger the amounts: minimum of (5) fifths of grain alcohol, (5) of Scotch, (5) of Vodka, and (5) of Gin. Many preppers suggest finding smaller bottles (Similar to the ones used on airplanes). As well, consider adding an alcohol still to your preps to make your own. Primary: For use as barter in small increments for those who need it for a responsible reason, or as a fifth for a “big” trade…something that someone has that you really need.  Secondary: All of these spirits can be used for tincturing, and the grain alcohol especially can be used as an emergency disinfectant. All can be used as an anesthetic as a last resort (and with patients who are conscious and not compromised from a respiratory or a cardiovascular perspective. Read more about the uses of alcohol.
  3. Coffee: Big “cash crop,” and your best bet is vacuum-sealed in metal cans or in aluminized bags of about a pound to half a pound at a time. I recommend picking up about a hundred pounds of it, if possible.  Don’t “X” out good instant coffee, either, as there will be many people who don’t have the time to brew it up. Here are some pointers on how to store coffee for long-term use. Primary: As mentioned, it will be in big demand about six months down the line, and you’ll never have trouble trading it for something. Secondary: Coffee has many advantages – including naturopathic and also helps to restore mental alertness, to help in cases of prolonged nausea and diarrhea, and (as you may know) it tastes great!
  4. Sundries: This would include soaps, deodorants, toothbrushes, and personal care items, such as razor blades, dental floss, and so forth. Good sources can be found in flea markets and thrift stores…especially with sundries from hotels…. individual small bars of soap and shampoo as are found in motel rooms …these are excellent to stock up on. Primary: They will be worth their weight in gold to barter, as they are of a pretty convenient size. Secondary: For your own personal use, they won’t go unused if never traded…they are excellent sizes for your own teams/units when patrolling and out in the woods for several days, or when conducting a reconnaissance.
  5. Fire starting materials: Matches, lighters, flints, wicks for lighters, and higher-end lighters, such as Zippos that can run off white gas or gasoline. Primary: for barter, just as has been mentioned. Secondary: you’ll always have a use for them
  6. Small First-Aid Supplies: to include Band-aids, alcohol prep pads, gauze bandages, medical tape, etc. Many of these items can be purchased frugally at discount stores. Primary: can be bartered effectively in small amounts. Secondary: for personal use.

We could continue, have fifty pages, and need a tractor-trailer to haul it all, but you get the point.  There is the potential to have in your supply room such items set aside dedicated primarily to barter and then able to be used by you in some capacity if the need arises.  I give you my personal rule on ammunition: I wouldn’t barter it or sell it under any circumstance.  Your “friendly traders” will trade for ammo, and then at nightfall, they’ll return and assault your position…and give it back to you the hard way.

You’ll have to use your own judgment and discretion with these items.  Obviously, if a gang of roughnecks wants to trade for booze?  It may behoove you not to have any if you catch my meaning.  Whatever problem you may have with any item on the list, that is your decision.  This piece was meant to stimulate thought and give you a few ideas.  In the long run, your survival and your family’s will depend on how proactive you are to this end.  JJ out!

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Interested in learning more about multipurpose preps? Check out some of these informative articles!

 

Six Kinds of Currency That Might Emerge after the Collapse

11 Emergency Food Items That Can Last a Lifetime

7 Kitchen Essentials That Deserve To Be On Your Preparedness Shelves

Vaseline: A Multipurpose Prep Item

39 Manly Uses for Coconut Oil in Your Bushcraft Kit

The Skinny: 6 Everyday Uses for Dry Milk

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

These Prepper Essentials Are What You Need to Continue Training After the SHTF

Click here to view the original post.

Here’s the bottom line – never stop the training.  Even after the world comes to a screeching halt, do not stop.  That may sound inane but there are several reasons behind it and several purposes in front of it.  There needs (as in all things) some structure to provide an organizational framework, so first let us define training after the “S” hits the fan.

You’ll have more time, and you’ll have less time.  You will not be held by specific time constraints, such as the 9-5 “rat-race” from Monday to Friday; however, you will still need to budget your time.  Necessities such as food (obtaining it, growing it, storing/preserving it), water, protection from the elements (wood for heat, for example), and protection from disaster-related factors (ex: radiation from a nuclear exchange, or tektites from an asteroid/comet impact) will occupy a great deal of time.

For a step-by-step guide to planning for short and long-term emergencies, click here.

You will need to train and study more than ever.

  1. First-Line Materials: These would be your books and physical archives set in paper and in notebooks.  All your printouts and information…you will be relying on these for all subjects from farming to defensive tactics. Here are some basics for creating a preparedness binder.
  2. Videos (Instructional): These DVD’s and films will be invaluable for refresher training, as well as introducing the youth to things they might have to have a “crash course” in a video to learn. The portable battery-powered DVD player is a must…ensure it works, has extra batteries and a charging system, and stick it in a Faraday cage until it is needed.
  3. SME (the Subject-Matter Expert): individuals who are experts in a field who are willing to teach the basics to students, whether adult or youth. Becoming a member of local groups in your area and even attending local classes before a SHTF event will help you find these invaluable people to learn from.
  4. Downloaded Material and a Computer in a Faraday Cage: scan everything you can possibly cover, and store the information on jump drives, external hard drives or pick up a computer with enough hard drive and wherewithal to handle it and the “strain” of periodically being used.

There are many categories to train upon, and the training isn’t ever complete: you’ll always need a refresher.  Physical training is paramount.  This includes exercise, such as weightlifting and calisthenics, as well as combat training and instruction with weapons and their employ.  Understand: when I was in the Army, we conducted PT (physical training) in the field.  You need it.

Exercise reduces the triglycerides in the bloodstream, and it also is responsible for a good portion of osteogenesis.  This last term is a formation of healthy bone tissue.  I’m not going to cover the subject entirely: the physical training stimulates the formation of new bone tissue and the “recirculation” of “recycled” material at the end of the cycle of ossification.  Exercise prevents the muscles from atrophying, and it is an excellent way to relieve stress.

Hand-in-hand is recovery, and this is a critical component of physical training that is mostly overlooked.  The importance of it cannot be understated and it must be instructed as part of a course.  After it hits, should our society (whoever has survived the initial destruction and shocks) revert and return to what made our society weak and ineffective, or should we chart a new course?

Many will take a “devil may care” attitude, and this is not what is needed to survive.  Freedom from the constraints imposed by a superficial “phony” society based on the material and superficial instead of value and substance may have been granted…but self-awareness and self-discipline must be followed at the individual and group level.  Many are the communities that emerge from a tyranny to merely replace it with another, or leave a failed society to continue it elsewhere and fail subsequently.

Training needs to incorporate history, science, and self-sustaining arts (farming, metallurgy, construction), as well as training to address the immediate and pressing issues faced by the family and/or community.  Why would anyone halt what they’ve already begun?  A training program doesn’t need (and shouldn’t!) come to a halt because the wheels of society do so.  The training serves a purpose:

Ongoing training in critical subjects sustains individuals and groups for continuity and it enables people to thrive.

That last word: thrive – is an important word, indeed.  It means more than just survival.  It means going beyond the bare needs of the physical and continuing in the quality of life…to build a future.  Many civilizations have built upon the ruins of an older society.  Look at the fall of the Roman Empire for a prime example…and the Dark Ages that ensued.  Eventually, our adaptive species began to adapt and “rewire” itself into formats that enabled progress and continuity.

Your challenge as part of a family or a group is to determine the critical areas and train in them without ceasing.  Train each available moment, taking the failures and experiences of the past to formulate something new that may work for the future.  Stay in that good fight.  How you train in peace is how you fight in war.  Do not stop the training, and keep with it fervently even after the SHTF.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

This Simple Shopping Trick Will Save You Loads of Money

Click here to view the original post.

 Well, Guys and Gals, now that the holidays are upon us, the shopping has begun in earnest.  Whether for ourselves or others, the stores are alive with festive happy shoppers shopping away in the shops until they’re bereft of money, energy, senses, or all of the above.  One of the things I’ve noticed throughout the years is the propensity of people to buy things that others can use right then and there, in the winter-time.  But why not think outside of the box?  And if it’s not for someone else, then think for yourself in this vein.

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

There are tremendous amounts of sales to be had from stuff that is not in the season, and you’ll find a lot of these things in sporting goods stores, military surplus stores, and thrift stores in general.  The prices for everything for the spring and summer are greatly reduced.  Why not buy it now, and save yourself the hassle of higher prices and scarcities later?

Consumer Reports has a great breakdown of which items are best to buy each month.

The technique: buying things you’ll use later in the times they cannot be used.

In the wintertime, you won’t find many bargains on wool socks, thermal underwear, or heavy Gore-Tex jackets.  You will in spring and in the summertime, though.  Why not buy it in the summertime and set it aside for the winter?  And now, in the wintertime…buy the stuff that will be used in five or six months.  You can talk to the managers and find good stuff, such as summer tactical vests, summer camouflage clothing and shirts, camping gear for the warm weather, and such.

Guess what?  Many of these stores (especially the thrift stores) have a large percentage of this stuff in the back…and the manager will be eager to make sales and generate profits for their district managers, VP’s, and along “up” the “food chain” of their concern.  Make a deal with these guys, to buy some nice stuff and come in on a non-peak time to buy some of it.  You can promise the manager to buy at least a hundred or two hundred bucks worth of stuff, or something along those lines.

He’ll be happy to clear out any inventory he couldn’t clean out before.  Also, remember: equipment (such as tents, cookware, etc.) is sold year-round.  You can find some good buys in all of the places just mentioned.  The “trick” is to know who you’re shopping for and what that person really likes.  A gift is a gift, and that person will feel even better knowing that you took special care to find him or her something that is unique to what their interest is in.  Use your judgement as to the condition of the gift and how it will be presented.

There are plenty of things you can find with the original tags still on them, if that is your main concern.  Do not discount the pawn shops and secondhand stores for things such as computers and software, as well as sporting goods and camping equipment.  If somebody has an interest in something that isn’t able to be done in this time of the year (such as a champion distance swimmer, for example), then find them some things they can set aside and use when they’re able to do what it is that they love to do.

I once knew a young man who lived near to me who was an outstanding athlete (football), and I found a really nice set of weights and a bench in the paper for sale…bought the whole nine yards at about 20% of what it would all cost…cleaned it all up, gave the bench a fresh coat of paint…and voila!  He and his parents were ecstatic.  That was ten years ago, and the kid is all grown up now, but he still smiles and tells me how much he uses (still!) that set of weights I bought for him.

You can do the same: find things that are unique and hard to come by.  If it won’t make a gift, then pick it up for yourself.  Remember, it is part of your preps if it’s for you, and good PR if it’s a gift for someone you know.  Having a good time should be part of the whole quest.  This is usually not the case for most, but it can be if you use this method for yourself.  Turn a shopping spree into a treasure hunt by targeting exactly what you’re going to buy.  Turn it into an occasion to hone your deal-making skills, and maybe even to barter.  Not using an “approved” Federal Reserve Note to make your purchases…wow, that’s a “fringe” thought, is it not?  Enjoy yourself and make it an adventure that can hone your skills.  Economics will always be part of survival, and everything can be a challenge that improves your skills.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Vitamin C: A Powerful Weapon During Cold and Flu Season

orange public domainFollowing Benjamin Franklin’s saying, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” you can bolster your chances to avoid the headaches of cold and flu season by an intake of Vitamin C.  Every article I have written on supplements I have included the caveat of asking your friendly family physician for permission.  This is not to cover my backside (although it does help), but because there are many people who may have underlying health problems that do not permit the use of certain supplements.  If you fall into that category, then check before you indulge.

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

That being said, let’s discuss Vitamin C and the benefits that can be derived from its intake.  The normal “FDA Recommended Daily Allowance” is 60 mg per person per day.  It is hard to “overdose” from Vitamin C, as it is a water-soluble vitamin.  What this means is that any excess of it not utilized by the body’s metabolism is excreted in the urine.  As a “Nice to Know factoid,” all vitamins are water-soluble except for Vitamins A, D, E, and K, the fat-soluble vitamins.  These guys are taken in and then stored in the fatty tissues of your body.  A good acronym to remember this by is the acronym “All Dogs Eat Kids,” as a mnemonic to help you recall this checklist when buying your vitamins.

The common cold occurs as exposure to the cold virus (usually of indeterminate type or origin) and then can progress to a bacterial infection when the tissues of the nose and throat are weakened and permit entry of bacteria.  Secondary infections, replete with blood and purulent discharge (pus) then follow.  Truly a miserable one-two punch but with proper planning, you can prep for this season!  Linus Pauling (a double Nobel Laureate: for Chemistry, and also the Nobel Peace Prize) recommended a daily intake of 70 to 250 mg of Vitamin C, also known as Ascorbic Acid.

This recommendation came not only as an answer to the common cold.  Pauling found in his research that Vitamin C is very important for wound healing and recovery from burns.  The pioneer in the field was Dr. Irwin Stone of Staten Island, New York, a biochemist.  His principal thesis based on studies and research conducted for more than thirty years concluded that the FDA recommendation of 60 mg was inadequate.  Dr. Stone determined the optimal amount of Vitamin C for the human body is between 3 grams and 5 grams…. translating into 3,000 mg to 5,000 mg.

Dr. Stone recommended a regimen of taking 1.5 grams (1,500 mg) of high-quality, high-level ascorbic acid in the form of a powder as a standard daily dose, taken in water or juice.  His self-tested method was to take 1,500 mg whenever the symptoms of a cold developed, and then repeating this for a total of (3) doses given with one hour in between each dose…until the symptoms abated.    In 1968, a Dr. Edme Regnier discovered that large doses of Vitamin C were effective both in preventing and treating the common cold, and his research completely corroborated the work of Dr. Stone.  His studies arrived at these results over a five-year period.

Dr. Linus Pauling (mentioned earlier) in his pioneering work also defined Orthomolecular medicine as the “preservation of good health and the treatment of disease by varying the concentrations in the human body of substances normally present in the body required for health” in 1968.  His work and research with Vitamin C is a study in holistic health that was taken very seriously by a young New Yorker who eventually earned a Ph.D. in Epidemiology from Berkeley in California.  That New Yorker, a Michael Weiner wrote several books based on Pauling’s studies and is today best known on his talk radio show as Michael Savage.

The good thing about Vitamin C is that it is a “wonder-vitamin” that is not dangerous nor invasive.  It does not come with the problems associated with other treatments of antibiotics and pharmaceutical regimens and can be readily found in vitamin form and by consuming foods rich in it such as fruits and vegetables.

One of the problems people face with nutrition in terms of vitamins and supplements is that they feel the need to have some “central authority-figure” certify their every move and consumption of them.  Although we mentioned there are some people that need to consult the doctor first, these are people with specific health concerns.  Ben Franklin also said, “In this world, nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”  You can use Vitamin C as a powerful aid to prevention and treatment of colds during the cold season.  It is not a “certain” cure-all, but it certainly will benefit you and is not dangerous as are many prescribed medications out there on the market.

These pioneers in medicine, such as Dr. Stone, Dr. Regnier, and Dr. Pauling all took a chance and went against the traditional medical establishment.  For every man or woman who states, “I can!” there are at least a hundred telling them that they can’t.  Advances for the entire human race are only made because a few take chances and learn from the failures and successes.  This is the spirit that will allow survivalists to survive what is coming…to rely on knowledge tested and earned by the exertions and sacrifices of others…so that we don’t have to continually reinvent the wheel.  Keep in that good fight, and fight to win.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Operational Essential Task Lists for When the “S” Hits the Fan

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, this is “Part 2” of our METL series.  To refresh, METL is a military acronym that translates into “Mission Essential Task List.”  Part 1 covered a METL for training and how to prepare yourself and your family in terms of what to study and practice.  This second part gives the tasks you will all need to be proficient in when the “S” hits the fan and everything comes unglued.

Try and understand that this list can be changed and modified to fit the needs of a family and their idiosyncrasies.  Each family is different and unique in terms of physical conditioning, skill-sets, geographic location, and family demographics, there will be different challenges facing each family even in the same disaster.

These are tasks that all the family members…the ones able physically, mentally, and chronologically…should be proficient in.  Let’s do it!

  1. First Aid: Everyone in the family should learn about bandaging and splinting (termed “sticks and rags” in the Army). How to dress a wound, run a simple set of sutures, clear and maintain an airway, perform CPR, treat for heat and cold weather injuries.  About a year ago, we did a series on Field First Aid that you may wish to refer to for a refresher on these tasks.  Also: if you have any family members who have special medical needs…all the rest of your family needs to know how to take care of them…from injections to the administration of oxygen.
  2. Essential Outdoor Survival Skills: Building a Fire, Disinfecting/Treating Water, Construct a Lean-to or Erecting a Tent, Cleaning and Cooking Wild game, fowl, or fish. These are some of the tasks.  Depending on your geographic locale and the season of the year, there may be a substantial number of tasks added that require proficiency.
  3. NBC (Nuclear, Biological, Chemical): training for each member of the family of how to properly seat and use a protective (gas) mask, how to decontaminate skin, clothing, and vehicles, how to read a dosimeter, how to construct and use a Kearney Fallout meter, how to use and read a Radiological Survey Meter (aka: Geiger Counter), how to find and take shelter from fallout, how to protect your equipment from an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse).
  4. Defensive Measures: Complete proficiency with firearms (field stripping, cleaning, zeroing, and marksmanship), how to patrol your property (we just covered that in a recent article), how to perform guard duty, radio watch, and gather local intelligence. How to work as a team with your family members in a defensive perimeter, with clearing a room or building, and how to make an orderly retreat/withdrawal while covering one another.  Emphasis needs to be placed on communications (both radio and visual, such as hand and arm signals).
  5. Map Reading and Land Navigation: Everyone who is able needs to learn to use a compass and read a map. Short and long land navigation exercises (on foot and vehicular) need to be trained.  Day and night land navigation need to be studied and practiced.  The field expedient methods of direction need to be known to all family members, such as finding north with the sun and the shadow-tip method and using the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia at night to find the North Star.  We have covered this information in previous articles at ReadyNutrition.  Everyone needs to know their pace count with and without gear.
  6. Physical Training: The family needs to be physically fit and healthy. Emphasis needs to be placed on calisthenics and/or weightlifting.  A family that is fit is a family that can fight.  Martial skills such as boxing or the oriental fighting arts need to be pursued.  Proper diet, nutrition, and study of both subjects need to be undertaken regularly.
  7. Specialty Skills: include (but aren’t limited to) how to hotwire a vehicle, how to drive a semi/motorcycle/snowmobile/pilot a boat, how to move cross-country in the snow with snowshoes/skis/sleds/toboggans, etc. The specialty skill can pertain to a peculiarity of your geographical region, or it can be a common task you all agree that it would behoove you to learn.

These are your tasks for starters.  These are tasks that everyone needs to know how to do when everything comes apart…to be able to operate as a family and as individuals working for the good of your family.  It is up to you to examine these tasks and build on them as you see fit.  Once they are identified, you can incorporate these tasks that need to be worked on into your Training METL given in the last article.  Keep fighting that good fight, and stay organized with a METL for yourself and your family!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Stay in Shape: How to Winterize Your Home Gym

We have covered a host of different articles on everything from protein intake to the use of supplements and vitamins.  One of the problems that occur with the advent of the cold weather is that John Q. Citizen slows his activities down during the winter and stays inside his home, becoming sedentary.  After the winter is thawed out, John is gone, to re-emerge from his house as the Michelin Man.

I have friends of mine that ask me all the time after the winter ends.  “JJ, I just don’t understand it…how did I get so heavy during the winter!”

It is not a mystery.

First thing you do, put down the fork.  Secondly, you have to exercise and train.  Nobody wants to in the wintertime, especially in their cold basement or if they have weights out on the back porch or in a shed.  The wintertime comes, and you have to keep up the exercise.  My gym is self-contained on the porch of my cabin.  I’ve lifted outside when it is -10 degrees F, straight up temperature.  There are a few things I do to lower the cold and its effects.  You can do these things, too, in your gym at home.

Take the bite out of cold outdoor winter workouts

If you have a basement gym or a porch gym, the first thing you do is close the gaps.  My front porch is wood, and I close up the gaps by laying down a rubberized mat…almost akin to a carpet.  It covers the floor/porch boards and prevents both moisture and cold from entering the porch.  I also have it closed off and weatherized for the winter.  I take a space heater and place it on a large piece of ceramic tile and heat it up for about 15 minutes prior to my workout.

I use weightlifting gloves, but when it goes below 32 F I need to use gloves that cover the entire hand.  I prefer mittens with leather-like palms.  Next thing, I place a blanket over the entrance to the porch and leave it just open a little on the sides to allow air to circulate.  I pre-prep all of my water bottles with warm water…and this way keep it from being bone-chillingly cold when I drink.

If you can’t pick up a rubberized carpet somewhere, you can take plastic (plastic sheeting or even plastic garbage bags opened up by slitting them at the edges), and lay it down on your surface, then cover this with a blanket.  It helps to keep you from losing heat into the floor and allows the room to be semi-insulated.  I wear full sweats and thermals during the dead of winter, a size too big to allow for a good “pump” when I’m done, and to allow me to move without tearing or shredding my clothing at the seams.

“Part of your survival will depend on your being in good physical shape.”

Remember to incorporate your winter chores into your workout!  I did several pieces on how woodcutting and snow-shoveling are more than just tasks…they are the exercise for you.  They should be factored into your routine for workouts.  The winter is not just a time to sit around and eat all of what you designate as “surplus” to be eaten instead of stored for preps.  Part of your survival will depend on your being in good physical shape.  Don’t stop training just because it is cold outside or that front porch seems so unfriendly to your routine.  Change that environment and make it work for you.  Stay in that good fight, and don’t stop the training!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Stay in Shape: How to Winterize Your Home Gym

We have covered a host of different articles on everything from protein intake to the use of supplements and vitamins.  One of the problems that occur with the advent of the cold weather is that John Q. Citizen slows his activities down during the winter and stays inside his home, becoming sedentary.  After the winter is thawed out, John is gone, to re-emerge from his house as the Michelin Man.

I have friends of mine that ask me all the time after the winter ends.  “JJ, I just don’t understand it…how did I get so heavy during the winter!”

It is not a mystery.

First thing you do, put down the fork.  Secondly, you have to exercise and train.  Nobody wants to in the wintertime, especially in their cold basement or if they have weights out on the back porch or in a shed.  The wintertime comes, and you have to keep up the exercise.  My gym is self-contained on the porch of my cabin.  I’ve lifted outside when it is -10 degrees F, straight up temperature.  There are a few things I do to lower the cold and its effects.  You can do these things, too, in your gym at home.

Take the bite out of cold outdoor winter workouts

If you have a basement gym or a porch gym, the first thing you do is close the gaps.  My front porch is wood, and I close up the gaps by laying down a rubberized mat…almost akin to a carpet.  It covers the floor/porch boards and prevents both moisture and cold from entering the porch.  I also have it closed off and weatherized for the winter.  I take a space heater and place it on a large piece of ceramic tile and heat it up for about 15 minutes prior to my workout.

I use weightlifting gloves, but when it goes below 32 F I need to use gloves that cover the entire hand.  I prefer mittens with leather-like palms.  Next thing, I place a blanket over the entrance to the porch and leave it just open a little on the sides to allow air to circulate.  I pre-prep all of my water bottles with warm water…and this way keep it from being bone-chillingly cold when I drink.

If you can’t pick up a rubberized carpet somewhere, you can take plastic (plastic sheeting or even plastic garbage bags opened up by slitting them at the edges), and lay it down on your surface, then cover this with a blanket.  It helps to keep you from losing heat into the floor and allows the room to be semi-insulated.  I wear full sweats and thermals during the dead of winter, a size too big to allow for a good “pump” when I’m done, and to allow me to move without tearing or shredding my clothing at the seams.

“Part of your survival will depend on your being in good physical shape.”

Remember to incorporate your winter chores into your workout!  I did several pieces on how woodcutting and snow-shoveling are more than just tasks…they are the exercise for you.  They should be factored into your routine for workouts.  The winter is not just a time to sit around and eat all of what you designate as “surplus” to be eaten instead of stored for preps.  Part of your survival will depend on your being in good physical shape.  Don’t stop training just because it is cold outside or that front porch seems so unfriendly to your routine.  Change that environment and make it work for you.  Stay in that good fight, and don’t stop the training!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Stay in Shape: How to Winterize Your Home Gym

Click here to view the original post.

We have covered a host of different articles on everything from protein intake to the use of supplements and vitamins.  One of the problems that occur with the advent of the cold weather is that John Q. Citizen slows his activities down during the winter and stays inside his home, becoming sedentary.  After the winter is thawed out, John is gone, to re-emerge from his house as the Michelin Man.

I have friends of mine that ask me all the time after the winter ends.  “JJ, I just don’t understand it…how did I get so heavy during the winter!”

It is not a mystery.

First thing you do, put down the fork.  Secondly, you have to exercise and train.  Nobody wants to in the wintertime, especially in their cold basement or if they have weights out on the back porch or in a shed.  The wintertime comes, and you have to keep up the exercise.  My gym is self-contained on the porch of my cabin.  I’ve lifted outside when it is -10 degrees F, straight up temperature.  There are a few things I do to lower the cold and its effects.  You can do these things, too, in your gym at home.

Take the bite out of cold outdoor winter workouts

If you have a basement gym or a porch gym, the first thing you do is close the gaps.  My front porch is wood, and I close up the gaps by laying down a rubberized mat…almost akin to a carpet.  It covers the floor/porch boards and prevents both moisture and cold from entering the porch.  I also have it closed off and weatherized for the winter.  I take a space heater and place it on a large piece of ceramic tile and heat it up for about 15 minutes prior to my workout.

I use weightlifting gloves, but when it goes below 32 F I need to use gloves that cover the entire hand.  I prefer mittens with leather-like palms.  Next thing, I place a blanket over the entrance to the porch and leave it just open a little on the sides to allow air to circulate.  I pre-prep all of my water bottles with warm water…and this way keep it from being bone-chillingly cold when I drink.

If you can’t pick up a rubberized carpet somewhere, you can take plastic (plastic sheeting or even plastic garbage bags opened up by slitting them at the edges), and lay it down on your surface, then cover this with a blanket.  It helps to keep you from losing heat into the floor and allows the room to be semi-insulated.  I wear full sweats and thermals during the dead of winter, a size too big to allow for a good “pump” when I’m done, and to allow me to move without tearing or shredding my clothing at the seams.

“Part of your survival will depend on your being in good physical shape.”

Remember to incorporate your winter chores into your workout!  I did several pieces on how woodcutting and snow-shoveling are more than just tasks…they are the exercise for you.  They should be factored into your routine for workouts.  The winter is not just a time to sit around and eat all of what you designate as “surplus” to be eaten instead of stored for preps.  Part of your survival will depend on your being in good physical shape.  Don’t stop training just because it is cold outside or that front porch seems so unfriendly to your routine.  Change that environment and make it work for you.  Stay in that good fight, and don’t stop the training!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Stay in Shape: How to Winterize Your Home Gym

We have covered a host of different articles on everything from protein intake to the use of supplements and vitamins.  One of the problems that occur with the advent of the cold weather is that John Q. Citizen slows his activities down during the winter and stays inside his home, becoming sedentary.  After the winter is thawed out, John is gone, to re-emerge from his house as the Michelin Man.

I have friends of mine that ask me all the time after the winter ends.  “JJ, I just don’t understand it…how did I get so heavy during the winter!”

It is not a mystery.

First thing you do, put down the fork.  Secondly, you have to exercise and train.  Nobody wants to in the wintertime, especially in their cold basement or if they have weights out on the back porch or in a shed.  The wintertime comes, and you have to keep up the exercise.  My gym is self-contained on the porch of my cabin.  I’ve lifted outside when it is -10 degrees F, straight up temperature.  There are a few things I do to lower the cold and its effects.  You can do these things, too, in your gym at home.

Take the bite out of cold outdoor winter workouts

If you have a basement gym or a porch gym, the first thing you do is close the gaps.  My front porch is wood, and I close up the gaps by laying down a rubberized mat…almost akin to a carpet.  It covers the floor/porch boards and prevents both moisture and cold from entering the porch.  I also have it closed off and weatherized for the winter.  I take a space heater and place it on a large piece of ceramic tile and heat it up for about 15 minutes prior to my workout.

I use weightlifting gloves, but when it goes below 32 F I need to use gloves that cover the entire hand.  I prefer mittens with leather-like palms.  Next thing, I place a blanket over the entrance to the porch and leave it just open a little on the sides to allow air to circulate.  I pre-prep all of my water bottles with warm water…and this way keep it from being bone-chillingly cold when I drink.

If you can’t pick up a rubberized carpet somewhere, you can take plastic (plastic sheeting or even plastic garbage bags opened up by slitting them at the edges), and lay it down on your surface, then cover this with a blanket.  It helps to keep you from losing heat into the floor and allows the room to be semi-insulated.  I wear full sweats and thermals during the dead of winter, a size too big to allow for a good “pump” when I’m done, and to allow me to move without tearing or shredding my clothing at the seams.

“Part of your survival will depend on your being in good physical shape.”

Remember to incorporate your winter chores into your workout!  I did several pieces on how woodcutting and snow-shoveling are more than just tasks…they are the exercise for you.  They should be factored into your routine for workouts.  The winter is not just a time to sit around and eat all of what you designate as “surplus” to be eaten instead of stored for preps.  Part of your survival will depend on your being in good physical shape.  Don’t stop training just because it is cold outside or that front porch seems so unfriendly to your routine.  Change that environment and make it work for you.  Stay in that good fight, and don’t stop the training!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Blood is Not Always Thicker Than Water: Why Some Family Members Shouldn’t Be Considered for the Prepper Group

Click here to view the original post.

 

This article will be a sensitive subject and a sore spot for many readers.  This piece is designed to provide “food for thought” for a difficult question that will arise for every family during their preparations.  I state emphatically that it will arise.  So many times, in our studies and preparations we approach things from a “dry,” pragmatic approach that accounts for everything in the manner of an accountant.  We figure out the dollar amounts of our canning supplies, figure out the logistical needs for the family, etc., and come up with totals on a sheet.

One thing not accounted for and factored into these calculations is human behavior and the effects that it has on the family and the family’s resources.

I have spoken with many people over the course of my time in the Rocky Mountains.  It seems that every family has their “Cousin It,” so to speak: A label I am employing to describe an incorrigible family member who has never “come around” in all the years of his or her life.  No matter what happens, you can always depend on “It” to remain constant.  Cousin It may have stolen, abused substances, been constantly combative or argumentative with family and neighbors alike…a “wild man with his hand against everyone, and everyone’s hand against him,” so to speak.

The big problem is that most families tend to “incorporate” these incorrigible family members into their plans for preparation and survival.  They feel compelled to give it a try…never taking past behavior into account.  Another thing families do is “lie” to themselves: “Cousin It will be alright…he’ll change his ways when it hits the fan, and we’ll get everything straightened out then.”

No, he won’t be alright when it hits the fan.  Adversity doesn’t build character: it reveals it.

You are allowed to cut your losses on this one.  Look to history.  Lot’s wife wanted to persist in what she wanted and was turned into a pillar of salt.  The rest of the family moved on, without looking back.  Brining us to the way to deal with such a thing:

You do what you can until you can’t do any more…and then weigh the welfare of the group.

This is a tough subject, isn’t it?  You’ll have to search inside of yourself and what you believe in…but you’ll also have to be a realist who takes into consideration others who may not be able to make such a choice…others depending upon you to make the right move.  If “Cousin It” happens to be drunken Uncle Ed who beat his wife and children regularly over the past 20 years and still hits the bottle…do you want him in the fallout shelter with you and the rest of your family?  Or how about Cousin Tina who is addicted to Oxycodone.  Are you going to let her in?

You can try with these people up until the time that the “S” hits the fan: after that, you’ll have to cut your losses in the interest of preserving yourself and your family.

The saying that “blood is thicker than water” is true, and many times teams of more than one family will be ruined because one or more of the family members…incorrigibles, if you will…are factored into the teams when everyone knows full well they cannot be depended upon.  This is a serious issue that will take a lot of time to discuss among the family members prior to a final decision.  I strongly believe this should take place, and then there should be a discussion with “Cousin It” as a group…prior to a collapse event.  Afford the opportunity for a “turnaround,” but give it the time to observe the actual actions of that family member.

When it hits the fan, a decision will have to be made, and that decision is not something that will just affect “Cousin It.”  If things have not changed and he or she is taken in?  It may mean action in the future that can jeopardize the survival of the whole group.  Think it over carefully, and most importantly, think objectively and not just with the heart.  It may mean the difference between life and death for more than just one individual.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition