Zucchini Bread Recipe-The Best One In The World

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Don’t you love baking zucchini bread? In the summer it seems we all have a lot of zucchini plants growing in the garden. I will be honest, the last two years I have had a struggle growing zucchini plants. I really have to laugh because NO one has trouble growing zucchini, right? Right. Well, luckily I had a few plants that produced some this year before the heat got up to 115 degrees. Today, I got my Kitchen Aid mixer out and the metal grater that attaches to it. Now, I could have used my cheese grater but I was afraid I might grate the skin on my fingers. I think I could have done it by hand faster than the Kitchen Aid, but that’s okay, the zucchini is grated and life is good.

This recipe is from a neighborhood cookbook printed when I lived in Sandy, Utah. It looks like the date on the cookbook may say 1980. Don’t you just love old cookbooks where you recognize names of neighbors that meant a lot to you when you lived near them? I’m thinking several people in this cookbook are probably deceased by now. Wow, this cookbook is 37 years old and it still brings me joy, even if the cover is missing.

Zucchini Bread Recipe

Ingredients:

2 cups sugar

1 cup oil (I used vegetable oil)

3 eggs

1/4 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 tablespoon cinnamon

1 tablespoon vanilla

2 cups grated zucchini with skins and all

3 cups flour (I used white bread flour)

Instructions:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Cream the sugar, oil, and eggs. Combine the spices, the zucchini, and the flour with the creamed mixture. This recipe is so old it says to sift the flour, but I didn’t. The recipe says to cook in two bread pans for 1 hour. I filled three one-pound loaf pans. I baked my smaller loaves for 50 minutes.

This is the size bread pan I used to make my bread and also to make this zucchini bread. Fat Daddio’s Anodized Aluminum Bread Pan, 6.37 Inches by 3.75 Inches by 2.75 Inches

PRINTABLE recipe: Recipe by Food Storage Moms

Add-ons for zucchini bread:

1 cup chopped walnuts

1/2 cup grated carrots

12-ounces chocolate chips

Extra cinnamon

Extra vanilla

Nutmeg, a little sprinkle

1 cup Raisins

Please tell me the add-ons you like to add to your zucchini bread, I love to hear from you. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. May God bless you and your family.

 

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How To Live A Homesteading Life Without Acreage

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Have you often wondered how to live a homesteading life without acreage? Yes, you can do it. Whether rural or urban, if you have a home you are a homesteader. Is your dream to have 5, 10 or 50 acres? I’ve always said if you can dream it, you can do. But, you can still be homesteading with an apartment, small condo, live in an HOA (I do), and very little land. Let me explain, I was under the impression a homesteading family had to have chickens, rabbits and acres, and acres of land. Well, that may be true, but I found out I have been living a homesteading life from the time I could sew, make bread, grow a garden and preserve my bountiful harvests from my garden. I also preserved food that I purchased from nearby Farmer’s Markets. My friend, Janet has a farm and she is an expert over at Timber Creek Farm.

As you know I am all over emergency preparedness, food storage, water storage and teaching pioneer skills. The reason I can teach them is that’s how I was raised. Homesteading is not just acreage, it is learning the skills of self-sufficiency. Here is a statement from “Homesteading-Wikipedia: Homesteading is a lifestyle of self-sufficiency. It is characterized by subsistence agriculture, home preservation of foodstuffs, and it may or may not also involve the small-scale production of textiles, clothing, and craftwork for household use or sale.”

Did you notice small-scale production of clothing, etc.? Well, think about it, how many of us had grown a garden our entire life, sewn clothes for ourselves, family and friends? I know a lot of us took Home Economics in junior high and high school. We learned manners, cooking, sewing and how to cook from scratch. Plus, the schools taught woodworking, which at the time may have been called “Shop”. My grandsons have made some really awesome items they could sell and make a profit from in those classes. May I say bartering right here???

People have been quilting for years, using every last scrap of fabric, it was called a pieced quilt. The fun thing about those quilts, you could see a piece of fabric from mom’s dress, dads shirts, and fabrics from just about every item of clothing in our closets. We didn’t have Target, WalMart or even Nordstrom’s when I was growing up.

We made our clothes from the fabric we purchased at the local fabric stores. Or we recycled the fabric from old clothes into a new masterpiece of clothing to wear. I realize sometimes you can purchase clothes today cheaper than you can sew them. I get it. I have always gone to the clearance centers since I was young and had to earn my own money for the clothes I wanted to wear. I just went with one of my daughters and two granddaughters to a thrift store and they bought some awesome shoes, shirts, and dresses! All for under $20.00.

The word homesteading can have 1000 meanings depending on who you talk to or who you ask. If you REALLY think about what you have done your whole life, you may be a homesteading person without really realizing it. Let’s add as many things to this homesteading life list as we can.

Homesteading Life

Gardening:

This is the gateway to growing healthy food that our family needs to sustain life. Please buy non-hybrid, heirloom, Non-GMO seeds so you can produce food year after year. You can save the seeds and grow food without the pesticides and herbicides sprayed on other seeds you may purchase. I love going out in the morning and checking my garden, pulling a few weeds and looking for critters.

Yes, we have nasty little pests here in Southern Utah. Do you love the feel of the earth in your hands? I love it, especially on a crisp cool morning. It’s quiet and you can feel a slight breeze blowing around you. I always take a garden Hod outside to gather the fruits of my labor. This one is my favorite: Pike’s Original Maine Garden Hod I like this one because it’s extremely sturdy and I can rinse my vegetables right outside and bring them in the house. I have two of these and I use them daily to harvest my crops from my raised garden beds.

Preserving food:

Canning and dehydrating your bountiful garden gives us the ability to preserve our food until we grow next year’s crop. Please note, I took a course called “Master Canning and Preserving” from our local USU state extension. It was a great course and now I’m certified. I knew 99% of the lessons we learned, but things change, so I am really glad I took the class. In this class I learned we don’t need to can fruit with sugar. WHAT? Here’s the deal, it is not a preserver, I get that, it only sweetens the fruit. I added sugar to my peaches, apples, apricots, pears and more because my mom did! I thought I had to add sugar, it is not a necessity. Here again, a healthier way to live a homesteading life.

I use this water bath canner: Ball Jar Collection Elite Stainless-Steel 21-Quart Waterbath Canner with Rack and Glass Lid (by Jarden Home Brands) and we used one of these at the class so I bought one: Ball FreshTech Electric Water Bath Canner, Silver

I use an All American Pressure Canner for pressure canning some vegetables and meats, to name a few items.: All American 21-1/2-Quart Pressure Cooker Canner Please be careful as these All American Pressure Canner’s cannot be used on glass top stoves, trust me I checked with several companies. The weight of the canner is already heavy without the weight of the water and the filled jars. They will crack.

My favorite dehydrator is the Excalibur, hands down and I have to have one with a timer. This means I can set it and forget it because the dehydrator will shut off when the timer goes off. It’s not necessary, but it’s a bonus. Excalibur 3926TB Food Dehydrator, Black
Cooking:

You have heard the term: “waste not want not.” If we learn to cook from scratch and not depend on the boxes of processed food we will live longer and be healthier at the same time. In other words, we’ll know what we are feeding our bodies.

Sewing:

If you know how to sew, please teach others as this is one pioneer skill we will all need. Please service your sewing machine often depending on how much you use it. I usually have mine serviced every 6 to 12 months depending on how much sewing I am doing. If you can take sewing lessons, do it, it’s very easy to sew simple items and therefore you can mend some clothes that need a little attention. Sewing by Food Storage Moms

Bread making:

Making bread will actually save you money in your grocery budget and teach this very important skill to the next generation. If you have fresh ingredients and my recipes anyone can make bread. Plus, my recipes are FREE, you don’t to buy a book, I promise. You can not only make bread, you can make cinnamon rolls, dinner rolls, bread sticks, croissants and more! They are no-fail recipes: Food Storage Moms Bread Making

Make Your Own Cleaners:

I still use bleach and other strong cleaners if I’m helping someone move and the home or apartment is really old and natural cleaners will not work. I do make my own laundry soap/detergent with essential oils added. I love using Dr. Bronner’s Castile soap because it goes really far just by adding water in a squirt bottle with the concentrated liquid. The quart bottles are fairly cheap and one bottle lasts for a year or more. I use coconut oil to make my own salves, I will share those recipes soon. Yes, I’m big into essentials oils.

My grandson taught me to wash my hair with baking soda and rinse it with vinegar. Oh, how I love that young man. Now half the family is using it to wash their hair. You have two bottles in the shower, one with dry baking soda and another with vinegar. Sprinkle the baking soda on dry or wet hair. Massage it into the roots. Let it sit for a minute or two, rinse the soda out with vinegar and then rinse out the vinegar. It’s called squeaky clean hair.

Chickens:

I don’t raise chickens, but I admire people who do. One friend of mine by the name of Leah wrote the best article about raising chickens. It’s a no-nonsense approach to whether raising chickens is right for you. Ten reasons why you should raise backyard chickens and five reasons why you shouldn’t. I love this girl and I think you will too!   Fabulous Farm Gal Raising Chickens

Yup, we can all try to be more like the old homesteaders! I’m trying to lead more of a simplistic life. That doesn’t mean life is simple, it can be hard if you are trying to make close, raise a garden, harvest and can, but it can be so fulfilling and save money too. Simplistic to me means to do without “things” that cost a lot, take up space, tend to be trendy, and seldom bring lifelong joy. I’ve been cleaning out closets, draws, cabinets and more trying to not just make room, but to eliminate the stuff that has cluttered my home and my mind. Try it, you’ll feel great. May God bless as you become more self-sufficient.

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What To Do When There Is No Medical Help

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No medical help? My biggest fear is for other people when there is no medical help after a major disaster. I’m prepared to do many things, even stitches if I had to do them. I can use a splint to help with a broken arm. Please note, I am not a doctor, nurse or anyone in the medical field. I have learned to heal my own body. When I was young we never ran to the doctor for anything. My mother used a purple violet spray on strep throat. Did it work? Well, I’m still alive. I grew up in the age of chicken pox, measles, and even polio. Medicine has come a long way, some ways for the better and some ways not so great. Trust me, I am not against using any doctors, I just think we need to be prepared to take care of ourselves if the SHTF, it’s not if, but when.

I have told you before Mark and I took some C.E.R.T. classes where we learned to use splints, dress or not dress certain burns, how to label the wounded that were too far gone to help, and so much more. This will be hard for me because I love to help people, but more people need to know how to do a few minor medical procedures than ever before. If and when we have a grid down you need some hard copy books in your possession to recognize some medical issues and do the very best you can.

This is how I see it, there are leaders and there are followers. After a disaster or grid down we will have both of these and more, like the disrupters. Some people may become hysterical after just a few days without electricity because they are not sure what to do. One or more people will take charge, some will look to you for help. This is why it is critical we have a few tools to get us through a minor or major collapse. No professional medical help will be a huge issue. Here’s the deal, all medical personnel, and emergency responders will be called to the hospitals or medical clinics. Possibly even your local schools will become a place of refuge to help those in need of medical help.

Well, this means we will be on our own. So, here are my thoughts to get us through something like this, all comments and responses will be greatly appreciated.

No Medical Help

Water:

Water will be a key element to hydrate those people who have very little water stored. I recommend storing at least 4-gallons of water per person per day. It’s quite likely some of your neighbors will have no water stored. I’m not addressing food storage today.

First aid kit:

I have a printable list for you, but I would take stock of all the over the counter drugs you use quite regularly. Please add Benadryl, my neighbors borrow mine all the time. I stock and rotate all my over the counter drugs as well as my essential oils. PRINTABLE: First Aid Kit

First aid book:

Please get a hard copy as we may not have the internet, The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way

First aid skills:

Please learn CPR, take a C.E.R.T. class and an EMT class. Community Emergency Response Team

Bleach:

I realize some people are really against bleach, well we will need lots of bleach to get rid of MRSE or dangerous sewage contamination. Please note, bleach only stores for typically 9-12 months. Look into pool tablets for SHOCK treatments for water containers, like a backyard pool, and store some of them as well.

Supplies:

You can never have too many supplies, start stocking up on all items we could use as a neighborhood to help ourselves and those around us. The pharmacies will be closed and empty after a major disaster. What you have in your house this very minute may be all you have to save your family. Supplies can be water, food, tools, knives, weapons, etc. Please order some N-95 masks or N-100 masks as you can afford them, you can never have too many. 3M 1860 Medical Mask N95, 20 Count

Blankets:

We can always use all our blankets to lay critically hurt people on the ground or cover them to try and prevent shock. Never give away usable blankets.

Make a roster for your neighborhood:

Please make a plan with those neighbors who are interested in participating in a monthly meeting to share skills and things we can all bring to the table, so to speak, after a disaster. I’ve said this before, that neighbor down the street with a chainsaw may be your new best friend. Only include those neighbors you feel comfortable working with and you can trust to step up and help.

Contact list of neighbors:

If we need to try and email or call family members of neighbors we need a list of contacts if and when any power is restored. If a certain neighbor is critically hurt we need to be able to contact a close family member or friend.

Critical items:

Walkie talkies, flashlights, headlamps, as well as whistles, are must have items. Remember disasters don’t always happen in the daylight hours. Please be prepared with batteries or solar flashlights.

Make a plan with neighbors:

Do it this week, next week may be too late. Only choose neighbors you can count on to be on your team. Decide who will be in charge and list the items each family has to contribute and teach others the skills we will all need to survive. Pass a list around and list what items we each have and the items we need to get. I’m not talking about sharing how much food or cash you have, this is mainly getting to know your neighbors. Seeing them at church each week is NOT going to get the job done. You must KNOW your neighbors or at the least the ones you want to have on your team if you are going to work together to make a difference during and after a disaster situation. Now, make a plan for survival as a team.

Garbage Bags:

Store a lot of large black bags to dispose of refuse to burn later and also to possibly to cover the dead.

Colored tape and large colored squares to label homes:

These are the tapes or colored cards we need in every home to help us know who needs help and who is okay for right now.

BLUE: handicapped person lives in this home
ScotchBlue Painter’s Tape, Multi-Use, 1.41-Inch by 60-Yard, 1 Roll

RED: needs immediate help
NPS CT-610 Triage Marking Tape 300′ Red

YELLOW: delay, does not need immediate help

NPS CT-611 Triage Marking Tape 300′ Yellow

GREEN: person or family is okay
NPS CT-612 Triage Marking Tape 300′ Green

Painter’s sticks:

Get them from Home Depot or your local hardware store work great for splints. Be sure and store non-stick gauze to wrap a broken arm on the splint.

Classes :

Take a class on how to do stitches and learn to use a stethoscope. If we can’t help majorly hurt people we will have to step over them and help those we can help. This sounds cold, but I learned this from my C.E.R.T. class. Those that are majorly hurt will have to wait for medical personnel. Yes, they may die, but we can only do what we can do.

I hope we never have to deal with any of this, but I know it’s inevitable, so we must be prepared for the unexpected. Please be ready to help your family when there is no medical help on the way.

What are your plans to be better prepared when medical help isn’t readily available?

Center for Disease Control

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The Best Chocolate Chip Parfait Cookies

Have you ever heard of chocolate chip parfait cookies? I’m always on the lookout for a new recipe to make chocolate chip cookies. When I think of a cookie, the first one that I think about is chocolate chip cookies. The second one would be my pumpkins cookies. Have you ever been to Jacob Lake in Arizona? Well, they have the most spectacular camping area and the best cookies made in the world. You can tell by the parking lot and all the people sitting outside eating cookies on the benches and rock formations. It’s a halfway mark from southern Utah to Flagstaff, Arizona. They also have a gift shop and a restaurant. There are always lines of people waiting to buy their cookies. Who would guess we would pay for cookies when we can make them at home? These cookies are different.

First of all the cookies are huge and a bit pricey, but we all buy them because we need to stop for a potty break, stretch our legs and get a snack after driving for two hours on a two-lane road with speed limits of 65 miles an hour or less. They have cookies of all kinds to please any palate. They have a cookie called “Chocolate Parfait” that is our family’s favorite. I have been working on a recipe to duplicate that cookie for months. It’s here!!

Chocolate Chip Parfait Cookies

Ingredients:

1 cup butter

1-1/2 cups sugar

1 egg

1 tablespoon vanilla

1 teaspoon salt

2-1/2 cups flour

2 cups milk chocolate chips

Instructions:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. I used my Kitchen Aid stand mixer to make these yummy cookies! You can use Silpat sheets or grease your cookie sheets. Cream the butter, sugar, egg, salt, and vanilla together. Add the flour until thoroughly mixed together. Gradually add the chocolate chips. I use my 1/8 cup or 2 tablespoons cookie scoop. Bake for 9-10 minutes and let them cool before removing them from the cookie sheets. This recipe makes approximately 3 dozen cookies.

Chocolate Chip Parfait Cookies

PRINTABLE recipe: Cookies by Food Storage Moms

My favorite things:

OXO Good Grips Medium Cookie Scoop

OXO Good Grips Silicone Cookie Spatula

Silpat 11-5/8″ x 16-1/2″ Non-Stick Silicone Baking Mat

The post The Best Chocolate Chip Parfait Cookies appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

The Best Chocolate Chip Parfait Cookies

Click here to view the original post.

Have you ever heard of chocolate chip parfait cookies? I’m always on the lookout for a new recipe to make chocolate chip cookies. When I think of a cookie, the first one that I think about is chocolate chip cookies. The second one would be my pumpkins cookies. Have you ever been to Jacob Lake in Arizona? Well, they have the most spectacular camping area and the best cookies made in the world. You can tell by the parking lot and all the people sitting outside eating cookies on the benches and rock formations. It’s a halfway mark from southern Utah to Flagstaff, Arizona. They also have a gift shop and a restaurant. There are always lines of people waiting to buy their cookies. Who would guess we would pay for cookies when we can make them at home? These cookies are different.

First of all the cookies are huge and a bit pricey, but we all buy them because we need to stop for a potty break, stretch our legs and get a snack after driving for two hours on a two-lane road with speed limits of 65 miles an hour or less. They have cookies of all kinds to please any palate. They have a cookie called “Chocolate Parfait” that is our family’s favorite. I have been working on a recipe to duplicate that cookie for months. It’s here!!

Chocolate Chip Parfait Cookies

Ingredients:

1 cup butter

1-1/2 cups sugar

1 egg

1 tablespoon vanilla

1 teaspoon salt

2-1/2 cups flour

2 cups milk chocolate chips

Instructions:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. I used my Kitchen Aid stand mixer to make these yummy cookies! You can use Silpat sheets or grease your cookie sheets. Cream the butter, sugar, egg, salt, and vanilla together. Add the flour until thoroughly mixed together. Gradually add the chocolate chips. I use my 1/8 cup or 2 tablespoons cookie scoop. Bake for 9-10 minutes and let them cool before removing them from the cookie sheets. This recipe makes approximately 3 dozen cookies.

Chocolate Chip Parfait Cookies

PRINTABLE recipe: Cookies by Food Storage Moms

My favorite things:

OXO Good Grips Medium Cookie Scoop

OXO Good Grips Silicone Cookie Spatula

Silpat 11-5/8″ x 16-1/2″ Non-Stick Silicone Baking Mat

The post The Best Chocolate Chip Parfait Cookies appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

20 Items To Start Your Food Storage Plan

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I am asked all the time, “how do I start a food storage plan?” Here’s the deal, you only have to start with a little rice, beans, some fruits, vegetables and some canned meats. Of course, we still need the basics to make bread, biscuits, and tortillas, I will list those items as well. I eat a bean burrito every day without cheese. I take a flour tortilla and add a scoop of beans and roll it up and eat it. If I have leftover veggies I throw them into my burrito.

When I started my food storage plan years ago I had powdered milk, pinto beans, flour, and sugar. Well, things have changed in the last 20 years as far as food storage items that are available to purchase. Before I share my food storage plan with you, please think about the food you eat most of the time. If you will never eat oatmeal, you may not want to store as much oatmeal. If you only make cookies with oatmeal, then you would store less than the family that eats oatmeal every day or at least twice a week.

Think about the fruits and vegetables you like to eat that are fresh, if you can buy those in some cans then do it. If you don’t use all of them by the end of the year donate them to your local food bank. I want you to think about how large your family is and buy according to how much you would actually eat. I based this on two people. You may eat more or you may eat less.

One thing you may want to consider as far using small “case lot” size cans like those listed below over the #10 cans of items is that you may not use up all the food in the #10 can in one year. Once open, the contents in a #10 can, depending on what item it is, you have one to two years of usable life if you transfer the food out of the can into an airtight container. Just putting those plastic lids on will not keep the food airtight. Please use mason jars or BPA-free plastic containers.

Thrive life sells some pantry cans with the same shelf-life as some of the #10 cans. Butter in #10 cans and Pantry containers

20 Item Food Storage Plan

  1. 30 pounds of pinto beans
  2. 96 cans of ready to eat beans
  3. 96 cans of vegetables
  4. 96 cans of fruit
  5. 96 cans of canned meat like chicken (tuna goes mushy pretty fast)
  6. 20 pounds of white rice
  7. 20 pounds of sugar and 4-quarts of honey
  8. 10 pounds of instant milk (it’s easier to mix and tastes better than powdered milk)
  9. 50 pounds of white flour and 50 pounds of hard white wheat (not ground)
  10. 2 pounds of baking powder
  11. 5 pounds of baking soda
  12. 10 pounds of salt, your favorite spices, cinnamon, chili powder, unsweetened cocoa, garlic powder, onion powder or the ones you use the most.
  13. 20 pounds of pasta
  14. 20 jars of spaghetti sauce
  15. 6 jars of peanut butter and 12 jars of jam
  16. 1-quart of vanilla
  17. 20 pounds of regular oatmeal
  18. 20 pounds of pancake mix and 4-1/2-gallons of syrup
  19. 10 pounds of SAF yeast
  20. 48 cans of cream of chicken soup

Here’s the deal, this is a really good start for those experienced with food storage and for others just getting started. I can cook from scratch with all of the items listed above. Give me a can of cream of chicken and the world is wide open with possibilities. Please remember to have a can opener and store lots of water. How much water to store.

American Red Cross

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How To Make Homemade Playdough For Kids

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Playdough is not just for kids. It’s about how to make homemade playdough for kids today. I have made this recipe for over 30 years for my daughters and my grandkids. I talked yesterday about making playdough being a vintage skill, pioneer skill or just one more plain skill to teach the next generation. This is a very easy and frugal playdough that all kids love to make. This recipe is not gluten free and you do not have to add food coloring or flavors, they are optional. I bet you can picture the kids molding playdough every day of the week and all you have to do is store the playdough in an airtight container to keep it soft and pliable. Baggies or pint jars work great! You can also make this playdough for birthday gifts and put different colors in pint mason jars placed in cellophane bags with a ribbon. I love homemade gifts!

I think anytime we can have our kids and grandkids interacting with each other rather than an electronic in their hands it’s a win-win situation! I have to admit my grandkids teach me how to use my cell phone and several things on the computer.

playdough

Playdough Recipe

4 Cups Flour
1 Cup Salt
2 Tablespoons Alum (it’s a spice)
2 Cups Water
2 Tablespoons Oil (Vegetable Oil is the ONLY oil that works for me)
1-4 Packages Dry Unsweetened Drink Mix (This is for color and fragrance in the play dough:1-4 colors)
1-2 Bottles Food Coloring (Optional)

Mix all the ingredients (no cooking required) in a mixer (I use my KitchenAid or my Bosch). Knead like you would your bread and store in plastic bags or airtight jars. You can add more food coloring if the dry unsweetened drink mixes don’t give you the color you want. I like my play dough “bright” in color so I sometimes need additional food coloring.
I pull out chunks of the dough and put them in separate bowls and add the food coloring to the dough in the mixer. I keep adding coloring until I achieve the color I like. You do not have to use any unsweetened drink mixes….the kids think it’s really awesome if the play dough has a little grape, pink lemonade, lime or fruit punch fragrance. It’s optional, just so you know.

Prep Time 30 minutes

Yield 6 jars, depending on size

Playdough

PRINTABLE: Recipe by Food Storage Moms

This is a great recipe to have on hand because you can make some playdough for your family today for fun, or for your family after a disaster. Have fun and let the kids help you make the playdough!

50 Things Everyone Should Know How To Do

My favorite things for playdough:

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50 Things Everyone Should Know How To Do

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50 things everyone should know how to do. You could call these vintage skills, pioneer skills or just plain skills. It all comes down to learning skills to teach the next generation. Some of these are practical skills, many are must learn skills, and others are fun skills. I would love to make this list 100 skills with your comments, so let’s get started.

Some of the ideas I have listed we all do and some are a little harder to master for some people, including me and my husband. I really believe we will need all of these skills and much more, but this is a great start. I bet some of you took sewing classes in Home Economics and woodworking in a shop class, and so on. Keep in mind, we won’t learn these skills overnight, we will have to take the time to learn them. Some we’ll be eager to learn and others we may never be interested in at all. I get it.

50 Things Everyone Should Know

1.Gardening skills based on your location and your climate.

50 things
2.How to save seeds. Remember, GMO seeds can’t be used the next year after they are harvested, they will not reproduce. Buy only non-GMO seeds, you’ll be glad you did.
3.Learn how to get rid of insects in your garden without pesticides.
4.Canning food.
5.Dehydrate your food.
6.How to compost.
7.How to make play dough.
50 things
8.Learn how to tie knots.

50 things
9.Train your dog(s).
10.Change a tire and change the oil.
11.How to hunt wild game and dress it out.
12.Learn how to fish.
13.Learn how to clean and cook fish.
14.Learn how to sew and quilt.
15.How to wash clothes without electricity.
16.How to use a clothesline.

50 things
17.Make your own laundry detergent. Laundry Detergent/Soap by Food Storage Moms
18.How to bake without power.
19.How to knit or crochet.
20.Grind your own wheat.
21.Learn how to make your own naturally healing salves.
22.Prepare your homestead for blizzards.
23.Prepare your homestead for tornadoes.
24.Stock your pantry.
25.How to grow herbs and preserve them.
26.Cook using cast iron.

50 things
27.Learn how to plant fruit trees for your climate.

50 things
28.Learn how to prune your fruit trees.
29.Learn how to purify water.
30.Learn basic carpentry skills and buy a few non-electric tools in case the power goes out for weeks or months.
31.Learn how to use alternative power sources.
32.Live within your means and pay off all debt.
33.Prepare a grab and go binder with important documents.
34.Put some things you can use in a box or bag to survive for 72 hours, at the bare minimum.
35.Learn about charcoal and which ones work the best.

50 things

36.How to make pancakes and other meals from scratch.
37.Learn basic first aid skills., CPR, EMT or Paramedic classes.
38.Have a first aid book in your home and car.

39.Gather your first aid products and organize the ones you need most often.
40.Know how to use honey for health benefits.

50 things

41.Learn how to start a fire in a safe location.
42.Learn how to grow potatoes in pots or in the ground, buy organic and you will always have some potatoes to eat. I love digging for potatoes. They are one of the easiest vegetables to grow.

50 things
43.Teach yourself how to use natural remedies such as essential oils.
44.Eat dinner together as a family.
45.Play board games with all electronics turned off.
46.Learn to cook using solar power. Cook with a Sun Oven by Food Storage Moms
47.Buy old cookbooks from thrift stores, they have great recipes.

50 things

48.Learn how to store water for emergencies. Storing water by Food Storage Moms
49.Learn how to store food for emergencies.
50.How to save your rain water, if your state allows it.

Here’s the deal, whether you have a farm, home, apartment or a homestead these are 50 things at the very minimum we need to teach our families. May God bless our world and our families.

Pioneer Skills by Food Storage Moms

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Why You Need To Store The Right Food Storage

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Do you sometimes wonder why you need to store the right food storage for your family? It’s a little overwhelming, right? Should I buy freeze-dried, dehydrated or what? Do you remember when you were growing up and our parents had a few 50-pound or 100-pound cans filled with powdered milk, beans, and sugar? Ours were shiny green. You can probably picture the wooden shelves filled with jars of canned fruits and vegetables, you know all the food storage we could see at a glance what we had stored just in case. There is nothing more exciting than seeing the food that we produced from the garden stored for the family for the year.

Here’s the deal, life is busy and I realize canning is not as popular as it was years ago. You can call those vintage skills or pioneer skills, either way, the USDA is no longer having testing kitchens for canning food. I learned this last fall when I took classes to get certified in the Master Canner Preserver Class from The USU Extension Service right here in Southern Utah. I was shocked to hear this, but according to the USDA, people would rather buy fresh food in season, or fruits and vegetables in cans or down the frozen aisle of their local grocery stores.

I still bottle a few jars here and there, not like I did when I had four daughters helping to do the work. I don’t have access to fresh fruit like I did up north either. Some of us are getting older and no longer want to bottle or can 50 jars of peaches, I get it. Let’s talk about the right food storage for you today. I’ll share some that I like to store.

Right Food Storage For You:

This is truly a personal topic because we all have different situations in our lives and our budgets. Here are some of my suggestions. Please note I use all of my food storage monthly and rotate it as needed. I only buy fruits, vegetables, meats, cheese and all the basics to cook from scratch.

Freeze-dried food:

The great thing about freeze-dried food is you can eat the food right out of the can. Some of the fruits, like pineapples, strawberries, and apple slices are my favorite healthy snacks. You can eat green beans and corn right out of the can, easy peasy to use if you have a can opener. Please remember to store a few good can openers. I can never have too many. No water needed unless you are going to cook with them, please do not use hot water with the freeze-dried cheese, yep it will cook it. I ONLY use tepid water with ALL freeze-dried food. Soak as noted on the cans, drain the water and use in your recipes as you would fresh food.

Pros:

Freeze-dried food in #10 cans will store longer than dehydrated foods. Typically 25 years if unopened and in a room with a temperature of 70 degrees or so. Check with the manufacturer where you purchase your food storage in #10 cans. I only buy from Honeyville and Thrive Life for my freeze-dried. I always check the price per ounce and include the shipping costs to decide which company I will purchase from.

Cons:

I almost hate to write a con because it’s the best way to buy the right food storage for long-term. The con would be they are more expensive. But for me, I can sleep at night knowing those cans will last my lifetime. So unless you are using them all the time, and not just for reserve, they really are very cost effective since you don’t have to replace them as often.

Commercially dehydrated foods:

This is a little more tricky because most commercially dehydrated food in #10 cans has a shorter life because it is processed differently than freeze-dried. The only thing I use dehydrated foods for are for cooking soups because they need so much water to re-hydrate them. Here again, I only buy from Honeyville and Thrive Life.

Pros:

They are cheaper than freeze-dried fruit and vegetables. These are cheaper to store and cook with even compared to fresh foods, in many cases. No chopping, peeling, etc. No waste, it’s fabulous.

Cons:

Shorter shelf-life compared to freeze-dried fruit, vegetables. etc. You can’t eat them right out of the can, you may chip a tooth. Shelf-life is typically 7-8 years. Check your manufacturer cans for suggested time frames.

Home dehydrated foods:

Now, I love using my Excalibur dehydrator with a timer. It’s fabulous, but I do not dehydrate for long-term storage. I dehydrate any excess fruits to make healthy snacks. I dehydrate vegetables for soups and stews. I love buying frozen vegetables because they are ready to dehydrate and use less space in a quart jar over the space they take in the freezer. I use them for soups and casseroles. Storage life, one-year maximum using my FoodSaver without oxygen absorbers.

Pros:

They are almost free because we are not wasting them, we are dehydrating them for another meal.

Cons:

Short shelf-life, one-year maximum.

Store Purchased Cans:

Here’s the deal, I hope you buy some cans that every family member would eat after a short-term disaster. Buy case lots when they are on sale and only buy the ones you like.

Pros:

You can use a can opener and a meal is ready in minutes with or without heating it up on a cooking device.

Cons:

The shelf life is not as long, typically one to two years and then the food starts tasting like the can. I often wonder what is being absorbed in the food from the can, but what can we say, it’s in a metal can.

Thank you for buying the right food storage four your family today, not tomorrow. Let’s teach the world to be prepared for the unexpected.

Tips for storing food in a small home

Honeyville Grain

Thrive Life

 

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Prepping For Retirement-25 Things You Need To Know

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Prepping for retirement is a not a whole lot different than prepping for a large family. The difference mainly is storing less of everything. Or is it? Here’s the deal, if you are totally stocked with just enough of the items listed below for you and your spouse you are set, right? But, what if some of your kids and grandkids are visiting and we have a pandemic break out. Maybe a hurricane, tornado or major flooding hits your community. The roads may be washed away from extreme rainfall, we have seen this in Southern Utah. Or maybe the power grid is compromised, this is my biggest fear. I can control my food stash, water, and many other things, but our government is about 40 years behind in upgrading our power system across the board. To me, this is deplorable.

Some of you may say, well, I have a generator. Well, that’s great until the fuel runs out. I’m not saying I’m afraid of living without electricity, I could do it. It wouldn’t be fun but I could manage it because I have a few solar devices. The worst case scenario would be no electricity for days, weeks, months and possibly years. Some of you may have read the book “One Second After.” That book gave some insights into what will happen after an EMP (ElectroMagnetic Impulse) such as the cars with electronic equipment would no longer work. Scratch that big new Suburban, it would flat out not work. The stores would be empty because the trucks that need to deliver the medicines to pharmacies or the food to the grocery stores will not operate either.

As a reminder, there are three books (not the Kindle version) you need to in order to be prepared for the unexpected. The first one is my book: Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation, the second book is a must read: Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath by Ted Koppel, the third and last book for survival is this one: The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way, by a Dr. Alton. Remember we may be on our own for days, weeks or months, possibly years. We need to have a few basic medical skills to perform ourselves. I applaud you if you know CPR or you are trained as an EMT, and better yet, a Paramedic. Bravo to you!

Prepping For Retirement

  1. Put an evacuation plan in place that outlines which roads or highways you will exit and where you will try and meet if you are separated from family members.
  2. Water, you know the drill, I prefer 4-gallons per day per person. The American Red Cross suggests 1-gallon person per day. I live in the desert, there is no way 1-gallon will be enough water for one person per day.
  3. Food, I do not count calories in the food I store. I store what I will eat and rotate it.
  4. Cooking devices, get a butane stove with butane tanks so you can at least boil water and cook a few hot meals.
  5. Fuel for your cooking devices, choose the ones you feel comfortable using in the appropriate stoves.
  6. Solar oven, as long as you have some sunshine where you live these are great to boil water and cook meals.
  7. First aid kit, picture all pharmacies and stores closed for days or weeks. Do you have enough supplies in your home today to cover you for say six months or one year? Please gather all supplies and put them in one location. Keep an audit as needed. First Aid Kit by Food Storage Moms
  8. Walkie talkies, these are the ones a local search and rescue team suggested to talk to neighbors through the walls of houses. This is critical so you can check on your friends, neighbors, and family near your home. Motorola MH230TPR Rechargeable Two Way Radio 3 Pack, FRS/GMRS
  9. Task force in your neighborhood, this would be an organized group with like minded people on a mission to help one another. Our neighborhood could actually do a prepping for retirement task force because we are mostly retirement age.
  10. Flashlights, batteries or solar flashlights.
  11. An ample supply of prescriptions, if you need to pay cash for those critical ones, do it, sell something to buy them if required.
  12. 72-hour kits, these are fine but we need so much more. These are a good start but we need so much more if evacuated for an extended length of time.
  13. Cash, small bills, the banks may be closed and the ATM’s will not work. You better forget about those automatic deposits in the bank, the banks will not be operating after a grid down. The power may not be restored for days, weeks, months or years. Ted Koppel nailed it on what will happen when the power grids are sabotaged. Our country is not prepared in any way to survive the aftermath of one. We must be self-reliant. If we are prepared we will not be fearful.
  14. Garden seeds, only Non-GMO ones because those are the only seeds that will produce year after year.
  15. Water purifier, I prefer the Big Berkey because it can purify so many gallons, depending on how many cartridges you have stored. The black cartridges remove more bacteria than the white ones.
  16. Portable hand washing machine, don’t forget to stalk up on laundry detergent.
  17. Portable toilet, complete with a shovel, kitty litter, and garbage bags…..lots of garbage bags.
  18. Hand operated kitchen and cooking essentials such as hand-cranked beaters and can openers are a must-have item(s).
  19. Menstrual supplies, trust me, a neighbor may need them, make some reusable ones. They may be gross to some people, but they work.
  20. Kitchen soap and a stainless steel pan that could be heated to wash dishes. Once the paper plates and cups are gone we will need a way to wash plates, bowls, cups, silverware, etc. Don’t forget to stock up on dish soap.
  21. Paper towels, toilet paper and hand towels that can be washed and dried.
  22. Get a clothesline with clothespins that work. Please practice hanging up wet clothes, I am using some cheap wood ones as firewood now. My motto is to buy right the first time.
  23. Tools, please keep your tools, you will need them, that guy down the street with a chainsaw may be your new best friend.
  24. Emergency binder, filled with important documents, ready to grab and evacuate with. Be sure and include two pictures in the binder. One to keep and one to share on a missing person board.
  25. Emergency contact names, phone numbers, and email addresses for your neighborhood task force. Hopefully, some part of the country will still have power.

Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected, especially prepping for retirement. May God bless you to teach your neighbors. We need to prepare! I hope they listen.

Food Storage Moms- another prepping article

FEMA: Federal Emergency Management Agency

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How To Clean And Maintain Your Cast Iron Cookware

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I’m thinking most of us grew up with cast iron cookware. Did your mom or dad cook eggs, or fry sausage in them? My mom used to make biscuits in one of her pans. I never really thought about it until I started cooking outside with my Dutch oven. My friend had just gone to help someone move and they wanted to give her a Dutch Oven because they no longer wanted it. She called me and asked me if I wanted it, she also mentioned it was rusty and dirty. I said, “Kathleen does it have a lid with a lip?” She said “yes,” and I said, “Do not get rid of that!” I told her we may need all the cast iron cookware we can get if we have a disaster. Here’s the reason why: we can cook outside with a few pieces of charcoal on the lid and underneath the pot. I told her not to worry about the rust or dirt, I would show her how to clean and restore it. Cooking chart: Dutch Oven Temperatures

Here’s the deal, you can go to thrift stores and hopefully find some cast iron cookware. I realize everyone is now on the lookout for cast iron cookware at garage sales, thrift stores, and antique stores. In most cases, you can scrub the rust off with a scrubber and then use some fine steel wool to make the cast iron smooth again. Now, if it’s really “flaky” I guess I would say it may be more money to have it sandblasted than buying a brand new one. Don’t you just love cooking outside with the smell of bacon and eggs in the air? I love it! Remember, some cast iron cookware is seasoned when you purchase them, yay! Then all you have to do is wash them with warm soapy water (I know it says not to this, but I need to know they are clean). Then you lightly rub some oil on them after heating them in the oven the FIRST time. Then store with some paper towels between the lid and the pan. I use bags to store mine in as well, except the ones I use every day.

Cast Iron Cookware

Here are the instructions on how to season used or old cast iron cookware:

  1. Scrub the used cast irons pans to get as much debris off of them as possible, sometimes you will see some black residue, that’s okay.
  2. Lightly sand the pans and lids with fine steel wool.
  3. Wash the cast iron cookware with warm soapy water and pat dry.
  4. Coat the pans completely with vegetable oil.
  5. Place a large piece of foil in your oven and place the lid and pan upside down to catch the drips from the oil.
  6. Heat your oven to 350 degrees.
  7. Bake your cast iron cookware for 60 minutes.
  8. Turn the oven off after 60 minutes and let the pans sit overnight, or until cool.
  9. Remove the pans and lids and wipe off any excess oil with a soft old cloth.
  10. I place paper towels between my pans and store them in bags, or at least the ones I don’t use often like this one for my 6-quart Dutch oven. My kitchen is so small I store most of my cast iron cookware in the garage. 12″, Dutch Oven Tote Bag

The largest Dutch oven I have is the 6-quart one because once you get to the 8-quart size the diameter is the same but they are deeper and heavier. I can’t lift an 8-quart Dutch oven full of food. Just giving you the heads-up here. What’s your favorite thing to cook in your cast iron cookware? I love to hear your ideas!!

Here’s a PRINTABLE on how to clean them: Clean and Restore

Here’s my post on how to make pizza with cast iron cookware: Cooking Pizza In Minutes

My favorite things:

12″, Dutch Oven Tote Bag

Lodge 6 Quart Cast Iron Camp Dutch Oven

Lodge Original Finish Camp Dutch Oven Lid Stand

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25 Things You Need To Learn How To Sew

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I have 25 things you need to learn how to sew. I have been sewing my entire life, or at least when my foot could reach the sewing machine pedal. My mom started out by teaching my sisters and me how to make an apron. You know the kind with a waistband, the skirt part was ruffled and we made the ties to keep the apron on our waist. Oh, I can still remember how excited I was to learn how to make an apron of my very own. I also remember that I had to make to make two rows of longer stitches in order to carefully pull the “gathers” on the skirt section of the apron. We’ve come a long way baby with sewing machine parts like a “ruffler,” it does the ruffling for you! WooHoo! My sister usually teaches me all the computer stuff and one day she said she wanted to make a ruffle on a handmade quilt. I said to her do you have a “ruffler” she said what is that?

The rest is history, she’s been making ruffles on quilts for years now. I used mine when I made twirly skirts for my granddaughters and dresses for my daughters when they were growing up. I have had a few different sewing machines to sew on over the years. I grew up using a Singer sewing machine, so when I got married I bought a Singer to sew on. It worked fine for many years. Then I purchased a BabyLock machine, it was a nice machine as well. One thing to consider when purchasing a sewing machine is what plans do you have for using it?

Is it just for mending or making napkins, or for making things that just need a straight stitch and maybe a zigzag stitch? Now, remember, you can sew by hand, you do not have to have a sewing machine. But it will take more time and patience. Today, I’m talking about things you may need to learn how to sew with a sewing machine. Trust me, if you have a good machine, I did not say the top of the line crazy money machine, you can sew. And you will love it!

25 Items You Need To Sew

If you have a store near you that sells fabric, they typically sell sewing notions too. Here’s a PRINTABLE list: Sewing

  1. Sewing machine with a case or cover, this is critical to keep the dust off of it.
  2. Bobbins that work with YOUR machine, bobbins may look the same, but they are not.
  3. Bobbin holder, this is what I use, I have two of them: Blue Feather Bobbinsaver, Red
  4. Thread gets old and brittle, please discard thread that may be 8-10 years old, it shreds.
  5. Good scissors (please do not use these for crafts since that will dull the blades). I have several sizes for different projects.
  6. Needles, both for machines and for sewing by hand. Typically the needles for machines have numbers for different uses. My favorite sewing machine needles are Schmetz Needles.
  7. Rotary cutter
  8. Rotary cutting board
  9. Pins-quilter pins are the best because they are easy to pick up.
  10. Pin magnet holder: Blue Feather Grabbit Pincushion Assorted Colors
  11. Tape measure
  12. Chalk pencil to mark things on your fabric.
  13. Beginner’s guide to sewing book. The Sewing Book: An Encyclopedic Resource of Step-by-Step Techniques
  14. Good seam ripper that cushions your hand.
  15. Painters tape for sewing a straight line or use the measuring guide on the machine.
  16. Container to hold your thread and your tools you sew with.
  17. A small container to collect the threads you cut-Bitty buddy: Gypsy Quilter TGQ007 The Bitty Buddy.
  18. A good iron and ironing board. I have a small ironing board, just big enough to iron small pieces of fabric. I have a larger ironing board for bigger projects.
  19. Magnet pin collector, this will pick up the pins or needles you drop so much easier.
  20. Oil designed for your machine.
  21. Threader: Clover Desk Needle Threader, Purple
  22. Sewing gauge: Dritz Sewing Gauge
  23. Six-inch or so squares of fabric (scraps) to test the new bobbin after inserting it in the machine BEFORE sewing the item you are about to sew.
  24. A sturdy table for your sewing machine, it must not wobble.
  25. Patience: it takes time and patience to learn how to sew, but once you do learn to sew, there’s no going back. Have fun!

Keep Your Sewing Machine Oiled/Serviced

One really important tip is to keep your sewing machine oiled and serviced. Please use the correct oil for your machine. I remember being asked to help sew a project at a church function and people brought their machines from home. Here’s the deal, if that machine was Aunt Mary’s and you have never taken it out of the case for 10 years, it needs to be cleaned, oiled and serviced by a qualified technician that services that brand. So, please do not donate that machine charity if it doesn’t work because you usually can have one repaired. I wouldn’t hesitate to buy a used machine, depending on the brand. It needs to be a brand where you can still get the machine parts in case it does need repairs in the future.

Brands I Recommend To Sew With

Now keep in mind I can only recommend those sewing machines I have purchased or sewn on myself. I’m sure there are other great machines. I love to sew and so will you if you have a good machine. Be sure when you’re shopping for a sewing machine that it has a feature to thread the needle. I can no longer see the little eye of the needle. Just giving you the heads-up here.

  • Bernina
  • Singer
  • Janome
  • BabyLock

Here are some things I look for when I have purchased sewing machines. Keep in mind things improve every year, but the Bernina machine I have today I will have the rest of my life, if I keep it serviced, which I do twice a year or more depending on how many projects I have going. My Bernina was a gift to myself from some money I inherited from my mother in 2006 after she died. It’s 11 years old and going strong. I know my mom is looking down from heaven smiling every time I sew with it.

Keep in mind when you purchase your sewing machine at a store where they teach classes on how to use it. They are usually included in the price of the machine. I have seen a Janome for less than $200.00 that I would buy in a heartbeat for a beginner learning how to sew.

I used to sew crayon bags for gifts for my daughters to have ready for birthday parties when the granddaughters were younger. I would make 200 of these and all my daughters used them as gifts for birthday parties.  Coloring Book Bags

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11 Ways To Prepare Your Family For Survival

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I have 11 ways to prepare your family for survival today, of course, number one would be purchasing my book called “Prepare Your Family For Survival!” I thank you from the bottom of my heart if you already have the book and are implementing the tools your family can use. We can all see what is going on around the world, right? I have heard a few people say they never listen to the news on the TV or read it on the internet. A familiar comment may be, “it’s too depressing to listen to.” Well, I’m hoping a few families in your neighborhood are getting together to make a plan to help one another should a disaster hit your neighborhood because it will, it’s not if, but when. Now, this could be a hurricane, flood, tornado, a pandemic, or a terrorist attack. I will say I do not sit around worrying about any of these.

I realize any one of these incidents could happen. We’ve seen them for years, but more often now if only because the world seems to be better informed. Or, is it because we have social media and we’re more aware of what’s going on. It’s nothing new, that’s for sure. We’ve seen the devastation from all the items I  listed above and many more scenarios as well. I want my neighborhood to work as a group, a team where we believe in the same things. A team of players that are like-minded. Do you know what I mean?

One of my favorite neighbors is a Marine, he is one guy I would want on my team. Here’s the deal, he is a no-nonsense kind of guy and kind in many ways at the same time. He is not showy at all and would take the shirt off his back for you. I think you know what I mean, a true friend you can work with after a picnic or an unforeseen disaster. Either one, I TRUST him.

What I am trying to do today, if you haven’t already done it in your neighborhood, is to form a task force. I am starting my group with people I know believe in emergency preparedness and storing food for any event that may hit our street. I will only invite the ones that I know understand the urgency, you know what I’m saying. They understand they NEED to prepare for the unexpected and store food storage, water and have a stash of emergency preps. Think how this neighborhood group could help motivate each other to be better prepared. They each have resources and talent to help make the group stronger overall. They might not all be affected by the disaster in the same way or to the same extent. Some may lose their homes, but others come through in much better shape, and thus better able to assist. Remember, there is strength in numbers!

I go to lunches or dinners in the neighborhood and some have said: “I’m going to Linda’s if we have a disaster.” Well, one of my readers made an awesome statement, she said her neighbors say the same thing and she answers “I may not share.” I understand and respect what she said. We cannot provide food, water and everything else for our entire street. Of course, we would not turn away anyone that is hungry. But I do believe God helps those that help themselves. Trust me, do not count on the government delivering food, water or a hot meal the day a hurricane devastates your community or a flash flood washes away some of the homes on your street. We must be self-reliant. Also, keep in mind that challenges may come your way in circumstances like a lost job, health problems, broken families and more. These sneak up on us and can cause real harm to the well being of your family, particularly if you aren’t prepared.

11 Ways To Prepare Your Family:

1. Get my book in the paperback cover over the electronic version:

“Prepare Your Family For Survival” by Linda Loosli available at all bookstores worldwide. You can click on the picture above and order if you haven’t done so. Thank you from the bottom of my heart!

2. Store Water:

As you know the American Red Cross suggests one gallon of water per person per day. I suggest you store four gallons per person per day. Please start with one gallon and beef it up, so to speak, as you can afford to do it. You won’t be sorry, I promise. How Much Water by Food Storage Moms

3. Food Storage:

Please order freeze-dried fruits and vegetables for long-term food storage. Compare the ounces in the #10 cans plus the shipping to make sure you are getting the best price available. Throw a few extra cans of chili or beans in the shopping basket the next time you shop. I store just about every kind of bean known to man! I eat beans every day. Remember to buy ONLY the food your family will eat. If they won’t eat it, don’t store it. Be sure and store the basics like spices, salt, honey, oil, instant milk (Thrive has a 25-year #10 can), baking powder, baking soda, cocoa, and vanilla to name a few.

4. Store Pet Food:

Now that I have a new puppy, Bentley, I’m back to storing at least three months of food for him. Remember, dogs need one ounce of water per pound of weight per day. For instance, Bentley weighs 9 pounds (he’s still a puppy) so I need to store 9-ounces of water per day for him.

5. Gas:

Please keep your gas tank at least 3/4 full at all times. You don’t want to be in line at a gas station if your neighborhood is evacuated. I’m a fanatic about this one. Yep, and I own it. Also, if there is a power outage the gas pumps will not work.

6. Cooking devices:

Do your research on what cooking device works for your home. I purchased butane gas stoves for all four of my daughters, plus a few butane tanks so they are ready to cook. Have more than one way to cook or boil water. Please remember, a gas barbecue uses way too much propane to boil a pot of water. Have more than one way to cook a meal. Yes, we can eat those beans out of a can, but after two weeks we may want a hot meal. Oh, and some hot cocoa!

7. Can Opener:

Please store at least three different hand crank can openers, you can never have too many. Your neighbors may not have any. Just giving you the heads-up here.

8. Flashlights:

Please store some lanterns, flashlights, and batteries. If you can afford solar flashlights those are even better! No batteries needed! Here are two of my favorite ones: Goal Zero Torch 250 Flashlight with Integrated Solar Panel or this one: Goal Zero Solo LED Flashlight

9. Contact List:

Fill out a contact list so you neighborhood team can contact your family members if you are hurt. Here is the one I designed: FSM Emergency Contact Info

10. 72-Hour kit:

Please remember a 72-hour kit is exactly that. It’s a start and good for approximately three days if you are lucky. Here’s a list to get you started, only choose the ones that fit your family’s needs and budget. FSM 72-hour kit adults or FSM 72-hour kit children or FSM 72-hour kit pets

11. Cash:

Please have small bills, like one, fives and tens being the largest bills you hide in a secure place. Here’s the deal, if we lose power the banks or ATM’s may not work after their generators run out of gas. When I worked at three different banks when I was younger, all three banks protocol for power outages was a lock down on the doors. In other words, those checks we all get in the mail or have electronically deposited may be down for days, weeks, or even months.

Please be prepared for the unexpected, I have only shared 11 ways to prepare your family for survival. Please tell me your ideas, lets make this list very long!!! Thank you from the bottom of my heart for being prepared.

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How Much Water Should You Store For Your Family

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How much water should you store for your family? I know I have mentioned before how much water we all need to store, but sometimes we need a little reminder to fill those empty water jugs sitting on the shelves that we may have purchased. You know the ones that we keep saying, “oh yeah, I need to fill those.” I totally get it. As I’ve said many times before, I recommend 4-gallons of water per person per day. One of the easiest ways to store water is to buy one WaterBrick for each member of the family, this equals one day’s worth of water for one person. They are 3.5 gallons (not the 4-gallons I recommend) but it’s easy to plan using these and I will explain how below. The WaterBricks that are 3.5-gallons are very close to 4-gallons and so easy to calculate how many you need. This is the water preserver I recommend: 55 Gallon Water Preserver Concentrate 5 Year Emergency Disaster Preparedness, Survival Kits, Emergency Water Storage, Earthquake, Hurricane, Safety

Let’s say you have four people in your family and you want to store, give or take, 4-gallons person per day. We need water to hydrate ourselves, water to cook meals, wash dishes with and for personal hygiene. I realize there may be several scenarios, but here’s the deal, I would rather have excess water than having less water than my family needs.

How Much Water Should You Store

WaterBricks:

Remember always store all containers on 2 by 4’s to keep them off the concrete, you don’t want them absorbing unsafe chemicals.

WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue

Here’s the approximate calculation for SEVEN days using 3.5 gallons instead of four gallons:

  • One person=Seven 3.5-gallon Waterbricks
  • Two people=Fourteen 3.5-gallon WaterBricks
  • Three people=Twenty one 3.5-gallon Waterbricks
  • Four people: Twenty Eight 3.5-gallon WaterBricks

Pros: stackable, spout accessory optional, handles that are easy to carry

Cons: somewhat pricey

55-Gallon Water Barrels:

Augason Farms Emergency Water Storage Supply Kit You may be able to purchase these locally, if not this is a good company and it has everything you need. Remember always store all containers on 2 by 4’s to keep them off the concrete, you don’t want them absorbing unsafe chemicals.

A family of four using 4-gallons per day per person would use just a little less than one 55-gallon barrel in THREE days. I would rather plan for more water than have less than needed. Just remember to get a pump for the barrel and a bung to open the cap on top.

  • If you want to plan on one-gallon person per day then you would have enough water for 55 days.
  • If you want to plan on one-gallon person per day for two people then you would have enough water for 27.5 days.
  • If you want to plan on one-gallon person per day for three people then you would have enough water for 18.33 days.
  • If you want to plan on one-gallon person per day for four people then you would have enough water for 13.75 days.

Pros: fairly cheap

Cons: hard to pump out the water and hard to store the large containers

Blue Cans:

The cans are 12-ounces and the cases hold 24 cans which equal 2.25 gallons per box. They are expensive because they have the best water that lasts 50 years, even at 145 degrees. I call my cases my “set and forget” water. Yes, they are expensive but it’s worth it to me to have some of this long lasting and convenient to use approach to water storage. They are cheaper if you live where you can pick them up rather than have them shipped. Here are the locations and the website Blue Water Cans They need zero water purifier or preserver.

Blue Can – Premium Emergency Drinking Water

Remember always store all containers on 2 by 4’s to keep them off the concrete, you don’t want them absorbing unsafe chemicals.

Pros: long shelf life, easy to stack, can store up to 145 degrees

Cons: expensive

One Gallon Jugs:

If you store water in one-gallon containers this is quite easy to calculate.  With this scenario, you can take the days desired and multiply the gallons needed.

  • If you want to plan on one-gallon person per day then you would have enough water for one day.
  • If you want to plan on one-gallon person per day for three days you will need three one-gallon jugs.
  • If you want to plan on one-gallon person per day for seven days then you will need seven one-gallon jugs.
  • If you want to plan on one-gallon person per day for thirty days you will need thirty one-gallon jugs.

Remember always store all containers on 2 by 4’s to keep them off the concrete, you don’t want them absorbing unsafe chemicals.

Pros: practically free, if you reuse your water or milk jugs (please note I do not recommend these, but if this is what budget warrants, store the water where they will not damage the floor when or if they leak). You can use this water for personal hygiene or wash your laundry when needed.

Cons: short shelf life, they can crack, hard to really clean

Stay Hydrated Service Project

I saw something on the TV about the heat this summer and asking people to share a bottle or two with the homeless families living in our community. My granddaughter mentioned she had just participated in a program at her school that was a service project where the kids took one-gallon baggies and filled them.

We all need a minimum amount of one-gallon of water per person per day. I recommend four gallons per person per day, but this was a humanitarian project. One gallon baggie for each homeless person was filled with the following items. The group drove around with the director to find some homeless people to hand out the bags to as many people as possible. It’s not quite the one-gallon per person, but they can hopefully refill the bottle to keep themselves hydrated.

This is what they put in the bags:

Bottle of water

Fruit cups

Granola bars

Toothbrush and toothpaste

Comb

Small package of tissues

Mints and gum

A card typed with addresses to different homeless shelters, animal shelters, and hospitals

What a great idea to teach the youth to help others in need.

American Red Cross 

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Garden Skills We Need To Learn And Teach

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I have some garden skills we need to learn and teach others. I have had a garden my entire life. Sometimes the garden produces so much food we are posting on Facebook to come to our home and get some free vegetables. Then some years we can’t grow zucchini. Come on, Linda everyone can grow zucchini. I haven’t been able to the last two years. As you may know, I live in Southern Utah and we have the worst soil, it’s called rock hard red clay. After a couple of years planting stuff in large oversized pots I finally invested in some raised garden beds. Here’s the deal, it took me forever to find some acceptable, not too expensive 18-inch raised beds. You need your soil tilled or loamy at least 18 inches deep to grow tomatoes. Mark and I had to put them together, which was easy. I wish now I had invested in some spikes that will hold the pieces of wood in place that are safe to use for gardening. Live and learn.

If I were to build my dream garden, I would build the beds two feet tall by 12-feet long. Did you notice I said beds, as in plural?  I am way past the farmer or homesteading life by owning 5 acres or even one acre. I wouldn’t mind a 1/2 acre plot, we have had a 1/2 acre yard before and it’s just the right size for Mark and me.

Garden Skills

Soil:

Prepare your soil correctly, these are some garden skills for my area I learned at a local nursery. Our soil needs a lot of additives such as Azomite, Coco Coir Block, Worm Casings, Organic Bone Meal, Organic compost, and Vermiculite. I have learned I can’t add a lot of coffee grinds (free from your local coffee shop) because it produces too much nitrogen. Use sparingly, I learned that after I tried to keep the stray cats in the neighborhood from using my garden as a kitty litter every day. You can buy most of these at your local big box stores as well.

My favorite items for my soil:

Azomite Micronized Bag, 44 lb
FibreDust Coco Coir Block
Unco Industries Wiggle Worm Soil Builder Earthworm Castings Organic Fertilizer, 15-Pound
Miracle-Gro Nature’s Care Organic Bone Meal, 3 lb.
Espoma VM8 8-Quart Organic Vermiculite

Save Seeds:

Buy only Heirloom Non-GMO seeds that you can save and use year after year. Let’s strive to keep Monsanto out of our gardens. Every seed you save from the best plants holds a connection to both the future and the past generations. This is why the tomatoes we buy at the local grocery stores no longer taste like tomatoes. They are genetically modified organisms, in most cases. No flavor and they are sprayed with chemicals to ripen in unnatural ways. If you buy organic food at TRUE organic stores or farmer’s markets they should be good.

We need to go back to saving seeds so we can hand them down from our generation to the next generation. We need to take control of our food and learn and teach our communities how to grow a garden. Once you feel the earth in your hands you will be hooked, I promise. There is nothing better than a freshly picked tomato that is not genetically modified.

I highly recommend buying seeds from this company: SEED SAVERS We must save our seeds while we can because Monsanto is distributing seeds to so many companies where we can not save the seeds because they are only good for ONE PLANTING. Please watch the Netflix show “GMO-OMG, Is this the end of real food”, it tells the story about GMO foods we are eating. It will be worth your time.

Only buy the seeds that say: USDA/Organic from a reputable company. Seeds are cheaper than buying plants.

Tomato Cages:

The winds where I live can pick up unexpectedly and I wanted to have really good tomato cages, so I got the cages shown above called Sturdy Cages from a gardening center in the Salt Lake City area.  You can get some good sturdy Lifetime Tomato Cages, Heavy Gauge, Set of 4 on Amazon for a pretty good price. I purchased my “Sturdy Tomato Cages” at Glover Nursery in Salt Lake City, Utah. I have always said: “buy right the first time.”

Water:

Set up a watering drip system, if possible, to save on water and keep from over watering the plants. Mark and I purchased the black flexible tubing from our local nursery with 360-degree spray nozzles with a slow drip.

If you have kids or grandkids they will love to help you plant the seeds, watch them sprout, and then grow the vegetables during the growing season.  If you want to see a fun face check out how the glow when it’s time to harvest! Make sure the kids get a chance to pick the vegetables so they can learn the blessing of harvest time.

Once you get your garden to mature hopefully you’ll harvest enough to dehydrate or can for future meal prep. Nothing like serving meals that came from your homegrown efforts. No wonder our ancestors made it their focus. It meant life or death for them, in many cases. You’ll also sleep better at night knowing what you’ve accomplished and that the food is more healthy for you since you know what went into the soil. This can become a worthwhile hobby or neighborhood project, if planned out and done right.

We must learn and teach garden skills to our kids and grandkids to make our families self-reliant. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. May God bless you and your family.

Earth Easy website (one of my favorite websites)

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21 Things You Need To Think About Before Divorcing

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I have 21 things you need to think about before divorcing. My parents divorced when I was about seven years old. My mother picked my two sisters and me up from school early one day and I remember because I was sad I would miss the end of the year class party. We piled in the station wagon filled with clothes, toys and whatever and she told us we were going to see our grandmother for a few weeks. Well, after three months, I said to my mom “when are we going to see daddy?” I don’t remember when she told us she was divorcing our father. This was before we had cell phones, emails, and social media. Years ago before cell phones, you had to pay per minute to make “long distance” calls, so there wasn’t a chance for me to call my dad and talk with him. Wow, how things have changed. It’s probably more expensive today with the cost of cell phones, but we won’t go there right now.

Here’s the deal, we all grow up and are faced with many critical life changing decisions. Maybe we get married, maybe we have some kids. We have big dreams for our marriage, for our children, and grandchildren. Well, I don’t know about you, but life provides some learning curves when those dreams become shattered. People call me Pollyanna because I have a very optimistic view on life and the “D” word, called divorce. Let me make something clear right now, I am not advocating divorce, not at all. But over the last 50 years or so I have learned a lot about families divorcing. Divorce can be good, bad, and ugly when kids are involved. BUT, divorce can be best dealt with when adults and the kids grow up and realize that we can get through this if we work together and not against each other. This may take years, but it will be worth it if people will consider the kids. Yes, the kids. They need to try and take egos, power struggles, and negative thoughts out of the equation. Let’s get started.

Divorcing:

  1. Divorce may be the best solution if the parents are fighting all the time in front of the kids and no amount of counseling have helped. Are you willing to stay together if no one will stop fighting? I call it, poor example. Will the kids fight in their marriages? Possibly, because this is all they know.
  2. Bad habits such as excessive drinking are not good in any family. It sets a poor example that may carry on to the next generation. Are you willing to stay in the marriage if alcohol is damaging the vibes in the home? I am not talking about that occasion drink with dinner, not at all. I lived with an alcoholic aunt, enough said.
  3. What if dad or mom come home late every night after work, I mean very late. I get it if his or her job takes them away from the family like the military families we see. I understand there may be overtime. I am talking about excessive time away from the family. Parents need to set an example to show kids what a real family is all about. Let’s say the mother is home with the kids day after day and she is doing all the laundry, the cooking, the cleaning and helping the kids with homework. And she works part time. Is it fair to have the kids think this is a normal way to raise a family? I think not. I have seen families repeat this very same scenario generation after generation. It’s not right.
  4. Some religions, and probably most, would prefer families did not consider divorce. I get it. I wish life was a huge bowl of cherries. I am not saying give up and get divorced, but please don’t say married if you are unhappy and there is no love between you and your spouse. Kids can feel the bad aura in the house, trust me, they do. Whether it is good or bad. They are smart little cookies, those cute kids.
  5. Get counseling, or at least consider it, for the sake of the family. Professional counseling can help if you choose a counselor that’s a good fit. Sometimes counseling works if both parties are willing to learn and listen and work through the stuff.
  6. Cheating is not acceptable. I think it’s wonderful if you can forgive and move on. Unfortunately, past experience is hard to forget. I am not judging anyone, I’m just saying cheating hurts the entire family. I believe in wedding vows and keeping them. If someone cheats, please look at both sides and stay out of the couple’s life who is trying to work things out.
  7. I have always heard if you decide to get divorced, never, and I repeat, never talk bad about the parent that you are not blood-related to. In other words, if it’s your daughter, then please don’t ever say anything negative about her ex-husband or his family. It will hurt the kids and confuse them even more.  Just bite your tongue and be cordial.
  8. Remember, divorcing can be expensive. It’s not the first expense, it’s the years of fighting over this person not paying this or not picking up the kids when they are sitting outside on the front porch waiting for the parent who has visitation rights that day or weekend and never shows up.
  9. The good thing about divorce is sometimes the first set of parents were never a good match and a new angel comes into your family as in a new parent. Is it easy, nope? Is it hard, yes? BUT, you take “blended family” classes and learn how to deal with new step-parents or new siblings. I had a step-father and he was so good to my mother. He took on three young girls too, and it was a good match, for me anyway. I have never liked the word step-dad, he was my dad. He was not my birth father, but he raised me.
  10. Typically all retirement assets are split after divorcing. If you decide to get divorced think about all your assets and your beneficiaries of your insurance policies as well. Just be fair, you will make this transition so much easier.
  11. Maybe you no longer have anything in common. You try to enjoy what your partner enjoys doing, but you are miserable the whole time. As we age, our hobbies or ideas change.
  12. You feel belittled when making meals that are never quite good enough. Your partner is always talking down to you. You’ve had it for years and you have decided enough is enough.
  13. You know you are not loved and are told so every day.
  14. You may be blamed for all the bad things in your marriage even though none of them was just one partner’s fault.
  15. Physical health issues of a spouse or a child can put a strain on any marriage. This one is tough for anyone to handle. My birth father was in an Iron Lung because he had Polio. My grandmother watched my older sister, but I was a baby and was passed back and forth between relatives and friends while my father tried to recover. He got better but then my older sister got Polio.
  16. Mental and physical abuse of a spouse or child is no way acceptable, but it happens. Please don’t let the abuse continue, stand up and stop it, even if it means going to the police.
  17. Sexual abuse, this is certainly nothing anyone wants to talk about, but it happens more than we can even comprehend. I have seen a few very religious families torn apart by sexual abuse of their own children. I personally cannot forgive this sin.
  18. Mental issues, this one is a difficult one as well. I have seen many families suffer from their siblings not staying on their medication for bi-polar and other maladies. It takes patience to get through to doctors to get our loved ones on the right medications only for them to decide they no longer need to take them. They could also be on the wrong type of medication. This is a vicious circle.
  19. Abandonment is a tough one. We have seen family members just vanish or take their lives for whatever reason they could no longer handle the life they were living. The spouse that is left has to try and explain to the kids why this happened.
  20. Sometimes a family member is living a double life with two families in different cities. I’m not talking about Polygamy here.
  21. I live in Utah and have seen women who had no idea their spouse was doing illegal activities right under their noses. The spouses were eventually caught and divorce ended the marriage due to the incarceration of said spouse.

I know I’ve just scratched the surface when it comes to issues relating to divorce. There may be a number of reasons parents decide to end the marriage. Some things I personally wouldn’t tolerate would be spousal or child abuse. If it happens, we’re done! My husband belongs to the National Exchange Club, a civic club that does a lot for their local communities. Their national program is the Prevention Of Child Abuse. If you or someone you know is subjected to this vile situation please check out the Exchange Club and what they can provide.

I hope this helps someone today or next year who may be contemplating divorce. It can be a good, bad or ugly decision. May God bless you and yours when making the right decision for your family.

P.S. Be sure and split the food storage.

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How To Deal With Mental Health Issues After A Disaster

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Mark and I took a C.E.R.T. class several years ago that talked about how to deal with mental health issues after a disaster. Now keep in mind, we are not doctors or involved in any medical field. The initials CERT stand for Community Emergency Respond Team, in other words, first responders in our neighborhood after a disaster. I’m sure you can imagine what chaos may happen if and when we have a disaster. When we do have an unforeseen emergency most medical personnel will more than likely be called to the hospital or medical clinics. They may be called to go to local schools to care for those that are hurt depending on how bad the disaster may be. Here’s the deal, we had the most wonderful doctor come and tell us a few tidbits on how to deal with minor mental health issues. I can still picture the woman standing there and talking us through some statements that can help or traumatize people even more. I have outlined the topics we discussed below with her direction.

We need to be prepared for those people who live by us with mental health issues who are dependent on their medications. If the pharmacies are closed or the roads are shut down, where can we direct them to get help, if help is even available? If you have monthly emergency preparedness neighborhood meetings please suggest that all families think about any medications they are on to see if they can get extra inventory by paying cash for the prescriptions. I realize diabetes is a big issue as well, but today I’m only talking about mental health issues. Some medications doctors will not give 90 days worth, I understand that, but it doesn’t hurt to ask. I realize some insurance companies will not pay for 90 days, but it’s still worth checking on now before we really need those medications. Yes, drugs are expensive, but peace of mind is everything to me.

I have a few friends that pay cash for medications a year upfront so they know for sure they will have the medications throughout the year because they would die without them. It’s surprising how much cheaper prescriptions are if you pay cash over using your insurance. But don’t get me started on that soapbox. Please educate yourself, check around and see what the cash price is, you may be very surprised how much cheaper they may be compared to using your insurance plan. Of course, you have to get your doctor to agree to prescribe 90 days, 120 days or 12 months worth.

Mental Health Issues

Our CERT team or designated team members:

  • Get enough sleep
  • Eat a well-balanced diet
  • Balance work, play, and then rest
  • Be ready to receive help as well as give help
  • Connect with the people in your neighborhood
  • Use spiritual resources

We need to use the tools above to help others control their stress levels.

Seven phases after a disaster:

  • Introductions and descriptions, we need to show confidence when we talk to the people we are around after a disaster.
  • Review with the group the factual material about the incident that has occurred.
  • Share your initial thoughts/feelings about the incident.
  • Share your emotional reactions to the incident.
  • Review of the symptoms of stress experienced by the participants.
  • Instructions about normal stress reactions.
  • Closing and further needs assessment.

Provide support by:

  • Listening to the people in your neighborhood about their feelings and their physical needs. Victims often need to talk about what they have been through and they want someone to listen to them. Please don’t just brush them off.
  • Empathizing, show by your responses that you hear their concerns. Victims want to know that someone else shares their feelings of pain and grief.
  • Help family members connect to natural support systems, such as family, friends, and clergy.

Avoid these phrases:

  • “I understand”: we cannot understand unless we have had the same experience.
  • “Don’t feel bad”: The survivor has the right to feel bad and will need time to feel differently.
  • “You’re strong/You’ll get through this:” many survivors do not feel strong and question if they will ever recover from the loss.
  • “Don’t cry”: It’s okay to cry.
  • “It’s God’s will”: giving religious meaning to an event to a person you do not know may anger or insult the person.
  • “It could be worse” or “At least you still have….”: It’s up to the individual to decide whether things could be worse.

Survivors that need more help:

  • If survivors show evidence of being suicidal, psychotic, or unable to care for themselves, they should be referred to mental health professionals for support. (This will be infrequent in most groups of survivors.)

After taking this CERT class, it really made me aware of statements that are okay and not okay to say to people after a traumatic time in my friends’ lives. May God bless those who need to take charge in your neighborhood before the medical, fire department or emergency personnel shows up to take the lead.

My favorite things:

21st Century FEMA Course Manuals – Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Instructor Guide (IG-317), Disaster Preparedness, Fire Safety, Disaster Operations, Psychology, Terrorism (Ringbound)

Goal Zero Lighthouse 400 Lantern and USB Power Hub

Community Emergency Response Team

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How To Make Reusable Menstrual Pads

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It’s all about how to make reusable menstrual pads today. Are you prepared for that time of the month? You know that topic (Maturation) no one wants to talk about, typically. But, hey, it’s life and we need to be ready if the stores are closed or the shelves at those stores are empty, right? I look back when I was younger and I had to purchase tampons or menstrual pads. Why was I embarrassed to throw those items in the shopping basket? Now, I think what’s the big deal? But I didn’t think that back when I was 16 or 17 years old. I really start to giggle that I even worried about that sort of thing, but I did. Now I could walk down the grocery store aisle with them piled high with all the glory of knowing I have tampons and menstrual pads for my guests or the neighborhood after a major disaster. Oh, how life changes for the good, right?

Have you had your kids or grandkids come to the house and someone whispers, “Do you have any tampons or pads grandma?” Yep, I sure do in the cupboard. I’m a preparedness chick, remember? Now, today, let’s talk about the tampons and the pads, please stock a few boxes or packages just in case a visitor needs some, whether you no longer need them or not. Thank goodness, I’m past that period of time in my life. Hallelujah!

Here’s the deal, I am going to share with you how you can make your own reusable menstrual pads. Now, some people may think this is some weird idea. Maybe it is and maybe it isn’t. What if we are unable to go to the store after a disaster and you are totally out of the tampons or pads? Now what? Oh yeah, we could roll up a washcloth and put in our panties if we had too. You may need a small bucket to store them until you wash them. After a grid down we could wash them by hand, we may have to wash cloth diapers, so it’s better to be prepared BEFORE we need them and we can’t purchase them.

I can hear some people saying, there is no way I am making these, let alone going to use them. I get it, I really do. But on the other hand, I raised my daughters on cloth diapers. I have heard young mothers say, there is no way I am using cloth diapers. I get it, I do. BUT, if the store shelves are empty, are you prepared for what I call Plan B (cloth diapers, safety pins, and rubber pants). Just something to think about. They are washable and reusable and cheaper in the long run and better for the environment and landfill. These are pretty reasonable, I bought some cheaper diaper pins and I can’t even open them so be careful when you purchase diaper pins if you decide you may need to store them. And don’t forget the rubber pants. I have seen some pretty fancy reusable diapers, but I’m too cheap to buy those. Gerber Birdseye 3-Ply Prefold Cloth Diapers, White, Pack of 10 I would check your local store for some rubber pants to cover the diapers, along with some GOOD diaper pins.

Menstrual  Pads

What you’ll need to make these:

Flannel, old nightgowns, old flannel shirts or some yards of flannel purchased at your local fabric store.

Filler to put inside the flannel outside layers so they will absorb a little more each month. Warm & Natural Cotton Batting-Crib Size 45″X60″

Thread.

A sewing machine that has a zigzag stitch. Ask a neighbor if you don’t have a sewing machine, make it a neighborhood project. Order bagels and serve milk and juice. Make it a project everyone can do.

Scissors, a cutting board or rotary cutter, they all work. Anyone who sews has these items.

Here’s the deal I have seen some online reusable menstrual pads with wings or flaps. That’s too complicated for me, but if you want to add a flap that would be easy. I’m a shortcut chick, if it’s complicated I won’t make them. That’s how I roll. It has to be easy. Mine are a rectangle shape, easy peasy. Keep in mind, you can make these smaller in size and thicker for those heavier flow days.

time of the month

You can see above I cut some pink flannel into 12-inch sections.

time of the month

Then I cut the pink flannel into 4-inch sections. Therefore these are simple, 4-inch by 12-inch pieces of the pink flannel and the same size of batting. The batting is very absorbant so I used one flannel backside up, layered two pieces of the batting and layered the last piece of flannel right-side up. They are now ready to zigzag the edges. Easy peasy. If you need then thicker, add another layer of batting. Awesome! Cheap! Soft and reusable!

time of the month

Here they are from left to right, flannel, two layers of batting, the stack ready to sew, the pinned menstrual pad for the time of the month, the finished one that was zigzagged around. The farthest one on the right is the store purchased throw away kind. I then used my ruler and left-handed rotary cutter to even the edges after sewing. They are washable and will save you so much money! It’s all about saving money, being prepared for that time of the month and never running out of menstrual pads. May God bless you for being prepared for the unexpected. Someone in your neighborhood or family will need these, I promise!

P.S. these would be great for older people who may have a little incontinence.

 

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Are You Prepared For That Time Of the Month

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Are you prepared for that time of the month? You know that topic (Maturation) no one wants to talk about, typically. But, hey, it’s life and we need to be ready if the stores are closed or the shelves at those stores are empty, right? I look back when I was younger and I had to purchase tampons or menstrual pads. Why was I embarrassed to throw those items in the shopping basket? Now, I think what’s the big deal? But I didn’t think that back when I was 16 or 17 years old. I really start to giggle that I even worried about that sort of thing, but I did. Now I could walk down the grocery store aisle with them piled high with all the glory of knowing I have tampons and menstrual pads for my guests or the neighborhood after a major disaster. Oh, how life changes for the good, right?

Have you had your kids or grandkids come to the house and someone whispers, “Do you have any tampons or pads grandma?” Yep, I sure do in the cupboard. I’m a preparedness chick, remember? Now, today, let’s talk about the tampons and the pads, please stock a few boxes or packages just in case a visitor needs some, whether you no longer need them or not. Thank goodness, I’m past that period of time in my life. Hallelujah!

Here’s the deal, I am going to share with you how you can make your own reusable menstrual pads. Now, some people may think this is some weird idea. Maybe it is and maybe it isn’t. What if we are unable to go to the store after a disaster and you are totally out of the tampons or pads? Now what? Oh yeah, we could roll up a washcloth and put in our panties if we had too. You may need a small bucket to store them until you wash them. After a grid down we could wash them by hand, we may have to wash cloth diapers, so it’s better to be prepared BEFORE we need them and we can’t purchase them.

I can hear some people saying, there is no way I am making these, let alone going to use them. I get it, I really do. But on the other hand, I raised my daughters on cloth diapers. I have heard young mothers say, there is no way I am using cloth diapers. I get it, I do. BUT, if the store shelves are empty, are you prepared for what I call Plan B (cloth diapers, safety pins, and rubber pants). Just something to think about. They are washable and reusable and cheaper in the long run and better for the environment and landfill. These are pretty reasonable, I bought some cheaper diaper pins and I can’t even open them so be careful when you purchase diaper pins if you decide you may need to store them. And don’t forget the rubber pants. I have seen some pretty fancy reusable diapers, but I’m too cheap to buy those. Gerber Birdseye 3-Ply Prefold Cloth Diapers, White, Pack of 10 I would check your local store for some rubber pants to cover the diapers, along with some GOOD diaper pins.

Time Of The Month

What you’ll need to make these:

Flannel, old nightgowns, old flannel shirts or some yards of flannel purchased at your local fabric store.

Filler to put inside the flannel outside layers so they will absorb a little more each month. Warm & Natural Cotton Batting-Crib Size 45″X60″

Thread.

A sewing machine that has a zigzag stitch. Ask a neighbor if you don’t have a sewing machine, make it a neighborhood project. Order bagels and serve milk and juice. Make it a project everyone can do.

Scissors, a cutting board or rotary cutter, they all work. Anyone who sews has these items.

Here’s the deal I have seen some online reusable menstrual pads with wings or flaps. That’s too complicated for me, but if you want to add a flap that would be easy. I’m a shortcut chick, if it’s complicated I won’t make them. That’s how I roll. It has to be easy. Mine are a rectangle shape, easy peasy. Keep in mind, you can make these smaller in size and thicker for those heavier flow days.

time of the month

You can see above I cut some pink flannel into 12-inch sections.

time of the month

Then I cut the pink flannel into 4-inch sections. Therefore these are simple, 4-inch by 12-inch pieces of the pink flannel and the same size of batting. The batting is very absorbant so I used one flannel backside up, layered two pieces of the batting and layered the last piece of flannel right-side up. They are now ready to zigzag the edges. Easy peasy. If you need then thicker, add another layer of batting. Awesome! Cheap! Soft and reusable!

time of the month

Here they are from left to right, flannel, two layers of batting, the stack ready to sew, the pinned menstrual pad for the time of the month, the finished one that was zigzagged around. The farthest one on the right is the store purchased throw away kind. I then used my ruler and left-handed rotary cutter to even the edges after sewing. They are washable and will save you so much money! It’s all about saving money, being prepared for that time of the month and never running out of menstrual pads. May God bless you for being prepared for the unexpected. Someone in your neighborhood or family will need these, I promise!

P.S. these would be great for older people who may have a little incontinence.

 

The post Are You Prepared For That Time Of the Month appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

10 Things You Can Do For The Elderly

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The reason I want to share 10 things you can do for the elderly today is that I live by a lot of elderly people. Mark and I went to a surprise birthday party last night for a dear friend that turned 85 years old yesterday. His wife, Lyn sent the invitations through the mail so her husband, Vern would have NO idea he would celebrate his birthday with so many close friends. Here’s the deal, first of all,  you would never guess he is 85 years old. He is the guy in the neighborhood digging holes for trees, dragging the branches from trees he has cut down for people, and he would help anyone anytime. Yes, he has a bad back but that doesn’t stop him. He is truly an angel for the people who live near him. Everyone loves Vern and Lyn!

The house was packed with love at the party and I walked around to hug all the wonderful friends enjoying the night. I blew a kiss to J.C. because he was sitting on the couch and I couldn’t wade through the crowd. I did get to hug him as he left. I asked him where his wife Mae was….he started to cry and said she is not doing well. He said, “Linda, please come visit her, she needs a friend right now.” She is close to 80 years old and has really bad arthritis. Of course, then I start to cry and I hug him one more time and said I’ll check on her this week. This is the reason for this post today, to remind people to visit their neighbors, no matter how old they are.

Please note the picture above on the right-hand side is my husband Mark’s mother sitting on her mother’s lap reading. This picture was copied for everyone in attendance at a family reunion. Priceless……

Tips for the Elderly

Here are just a few ideas you may be able to use to help the elderly people that live near you.

elderly

  1. Grab a calendar and write down a name of someone you know that could use a hug.  Pick a different name for each day of the week. You could visit Mary on Monday, Terry on Tuesday and so forth. Remember some people over 75 go to bed early and wake up late so keep that in mind.
  2. Take a few bottles of lotion/cream in a bag when you go visit the elderly and ask your neighbor or friend if they could use some on their hands or feet, ask them if they would like a gentle massage to soften some dry skin. Sometimes they may even like a little nail polish on their fingernails.
  3. Your neighbor may love to have some help changing their sheets. This may seem odd, but trust me, sometimes they really need help changing them. While you talk, wash them and dry them and put them back on. The first time you ask people it may seem weird, but friends help friends, enough said.
  4. Sometimes a neighbor could use a little help straightening the kitchen. Who doesn’t love a clean kitchen counter top? Be aware of allergies of the elderly and ask them if they have a cleaner they prefer to use. In most cases, they have run out of cleaner and they are too tired to go to the store to buy some. Take your favorite cleaner with some rags and ask them if it’s alright to use the ones you brought. Trust me, most of the time they are grateful beyond words.
  5. Take some note cards and envelopes with stamps and ask them if they want to send a card to anyone. In their heart most of the time they are very eager to write a quick note to someone. This is a great moment to listen to these sweet friends share some great stories. Bring some stamps and put them in the mailbox for them.
  6. The elderly love to have someone to talk to, to laugh with and have someone listen to them. Hold their hand when appropriate. There is something about holding hands that send a message of love. Yes, some people do not want anyone to touch or hold their hands, but most love it. We can sense in most cases what makes them feel comfortable.
  7. Call ahead and ask if you can bring lunch to them, trust me they will love it! Be aware of allergies or Diabetes issues.
  8. Bake some treats like cookies and take a plate full of them to your elderly friends or neighbors. Sometimes it’s just too much of an effort to bake a batch of cookies. Who doesn’t love freshly baked warm cookies, right?
  9. If you make bread, grab a loaf and put a hot loaf in some open foil to keep it warm and deliver it with a bag to store it after it cools down. If you have an extra jar of jam, take it with the loaf.
  10. Invite the elderly in your neighborhood to the next community activity, they could use the invite and the ride.

May God bless you for being aware of the elderly in your neighborhood or community. I know for a fact they love visitors. Much love to all of you, Linda

My favorite things:

Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

Dixie Ultra Paper Plates, 8-1/2 Inch, 300 Count

Dixie Cold 9oz Cup, 360 Count

Scott Bulk Toilet Paper (13607), Individually Wrapped Standard Rolls, 2-PLY, White, 20 Rolls / Convenience Case, 550 Sheets / Roll

The post 10 Things You Can Do For The Elderly appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Are Vintage Skills A Thing Of the Past?

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Vintage skills, are they a thing of the past? Have we lost some of the skills our ancestors learned? The definition of vintage from the dictionary says this and I quote from Merriam-Webster: “of old, recognized, and enduring interest, importance or quality. Classic, of the best and most characteristic.” My friend, Tiffany wrote a great post about vintage skills and it made me think of the things my mother taught me. My mother taught me to sew, cook from scratch and garden. She taught me to make bread and preserve fruits and vegetables from the garden. I also remember taking sewing classes in Home Economics at school.

I called my grandson, Zack who learned to sew in junior high school. I asked him what the class was called, he said it was called “Sports Sewing”.  He learned to make a jacket and a gym bag! He learned on a BabyLock sewing machine. He loved the class, he even said it was cool! I learned to sew on a Singer sewing machine. I now have a Bernina machine. I dreamed about having a Bernina from the time I was about 26 years old.  Around that time I was working part time at a Bernina store in Logan, Utah. I was in charge of designing the display windows for people walking or driving by the storefront. I rotated the different fabrics in the store and sewed clothes with those same fabrics to put on display. It was a thrill for me to sew clothes for this popular store. Looking back I guess I was a little bit of a fraud using my Singer sewing machine to sew the clothes at home. LOL! I would go “practice” on the Bernina machines, and I dreamt one day I would own one of those babies.

Well, when my mother passed away in 2006, she left me a little money and I bought a Bernina! I was 56 years old and it was a cartwheel moment for me! It took me 30 years to get one! It wasn’t top of the line, but it was a well made sturdy machine. I will never part with that sewing machine. I know my mom is looking down from heaven and is so grateful I bought that machine to honor her and continue to use one of her vintage skills called sewing.

Vintage Skills

Sewing:

I have mended clothes for neighbors, family, and friends with my sewing machine. I have made twirly skirts for my granddaughters with matching appliqued t-shirts. I have made quilts and embroidered towels for baptisms and quilts for christenings. When I lived at home I sewed all of my clothes. If we had a prom dance coming up, my mom whipped out her sewing machine to get started sewing all the millions of pieces of fabric for our dresses.

My friend, JoAnn taught Home Economics when she was younger and we would compare our sewing ideas as we raised our kids together. It was nice to have a friend that understood the joy of sewing something. My sister, Carol has now taken her sewing to the next level of one of a kind perfectly sewn, appliqued quilts carefully quilted and bound with love.

vintage skills

Cooking from scratch:

I have to laugh because I know when I was growing up we had creamed tuna on toast at least once a week. I do remember having goulash, fried liver and onions to name a few things. We ate a lot of grilled cheese sandwiches on homemade bread, I know that! We ate a lot of beans, rice, soups and chili made from every kind of bean known to man! We also ate creamed chip beef on toast a lot. Sloppy joes were one of our favorite meals.

We had peanut butter and jam sandwiches for dinner many nights. We usually had cans of green beans and corn or some kind of vegetable to go with meals. Breakfast for dinner was a highlight, with pancakes, scrambled eggs and hashbrowns with syrup. If we had tacos with homemade salsa that was my all time favorite meals and one I cherish to this day!

Potatoes were a staple at our home, oh how we loved homemade French fries and twice baked potatoes. Sometimes we had open faced sandwiches with melted cheese on top broiled in the oven.

vintage skills

I vaguely remember a drive through with girls on roller skates at a drive-in restaurant. It was way too expensive for our family’s budget to eat there. I know when I was raising my daughters we rarely ate out for meals. We just didn’t do it. It wasn’t until my girls were grown that Mark and I ate out a lot when we were both working long hours.

Gardening:

My great-grandmother would be delighted at seeing organic grocery stores. Oh, that’s right, she grew organic food back when it wasn’t called organic. It was home grown food, or as we call it today, a garden. No pesticides or herbicides. Just the earth planted with saved seeds. Imagine that, seeds that produced year after year. We used a hoe, shovel, and replanted seeds year after year. There is something magical about tilling the garden, planting, watering and checking the garden every day for a sprout. Any sprout. Then when we saw flowers on the fruit trees or vegetables in the garden, we were elated! We couldn’t wait for that first fresh tomato or peach.

Canning/Preserving food:

My mother taught me, as well as my sisters, to can, dehydrate and use every morsel of food that was purchased or grown. No waste, ever. I carried on the tradition by teaching my daughters as well. We lived in towns that sold fruit pretty cheap and we canned and dehydrated everything we could get our hands on, and enjoyed the works of our labor for the year. Then we started again the next year, and so on. I know this was a lesson that taught my four daughters to be self-reliant and to value hard work to get needed things done.

Bread Making:

By now you know, I love to make bread, cinnamon rolls, dinner rolls or whatever so I can use my white bread flour or freshly ground whole wheat flour. I have taught probably hundreds of people to make bread over the years, and it always brings me joy to feel the bread dough in my hands. My daughter, Heidi makes the most beautiful loaves of bread and I have yet to form my loaves to turn out like hers. Kudo to my daughter, it makes a momma proud to see her daughter or daughters make bread, cinnamon rolls or dinner rolls. That’s how we roll, no pun intended.

Let me know the vintage skills you remember as a child, I love your comments and thoughts. May God bless us all to be self-reliant.

My favorite things:

Unco Industries Wiggle Worm Soil Builder Earthworm Castings Organic Fertilizer, 15-Pound

Dr Earth 803 1-1/2 Cubic Feet All Purpose Compost

5 Pounds of Azomite – Organic Trace Mineral Powder – 67 Essential Minerals for You and Your Garden by Raw Supply

The post Are Vintage Skills A Thing Of the Past? appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

4 Ingredient Pressure Cooker Meals

Today I have several 4 ingredient pressure cooker meals that are easy to make, any day of the week. I know how busy families are today and the easier we can make meals to prepare at home, the healthier we will be. I use my pressure cooker to make quinoa or rice on Sunday or Monday that will last Mark and I a few days. All we have to do is heat up the rice or quinoa to serve with some of the main meals listed below. I think most of these ingredients we all have in our pantry or refrigerator. If you buy your pork, chicken breasts, chicken tenderloins or beef on sale and freeze it, you are one step ahead of the game. I’m sure I have mentioned to you before I do not eat meat, but Mark does, so I shop the clearance area at some of the local grocery stores.  I look for the meat that’s priced very low and freeze it.

If you make a menu for the week that really helps because then you don’t have to think about “what’s for dinner?” I try to make a double batch of whatever I’m making because then I can store 1/2 of the recipe in a freezer container for another day. Thank goodness, Mark is easy to cook for, the only thing he really doesn’t care for is squash, so I eat his share! It’s easy to make 4 ingredient meals because they take less time to make and dinner is ready in no time. Did I tell you I love my pressure cooker? I have both the Instant Pot and the Fagor. I prefer the Fagor over the Instant Pot but either one will work. These times are for my Fagor pressure cooker. If you are using your Instant Pot, check for times that are applicable for the kinds of meat stated below in each recipe.

Please note I purchased both pressure cookers so I could compare one against the other. Fagor 670040230 Stainless-Steel 3-in-1 6-Quart Multi-Cooker They are both great pressure cookers but I’m partial to my Fagor. You could even put these ingredients and freeze any of them for later. I hope you these recipes as much as our family does.

4 Ingredient Pressure Cooker Meals

Pressure Cooker/Instant Pot Beef Roast

Ingredients:

  1. 3-pound chuck roast
  2. Garlic to taste
  3. Pepper to taste
  4. 1 cup water (required for Fagor pressure cooker)

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 60 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Sassy Flank Steak

Ingredients:

  1. 1-1/2 pounds flank steak
  2. 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  3. 1 tablespoon sherry
  4. 1 tablespoon honey

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 50 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Beef Goulash

Ingredients:

  1. 2 pounds beef stew meat
  2. 1 large onion chopped into bite-size pieces
  3. 1-11.5 ounce can V-8 vegetable juice
  4. 1/2 teaspoon pepper

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 50 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Hawaiian Island Pork Chops

Ingredients:

  1. 4 (1/2 -inch) thick pork chops
  2. 1-8-ounce can of sliced pineapple with juice (make sure you have one cup liquid, add water to juice as needed)
  3. 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  4. 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 60 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Pork Tenderloin

Ingredients:

  1. 1-1/2 pounds pork tenderloin cut into pieces
  2. 1 tablespoon sherry
  3. 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  4. 2 tablespoons brown sugar

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 60 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Garlic Lemon Chicken

Ingredients:

  1. 4 large chicken breasts or 8 tenderloin chicken pieces
  2. 1 clove garlic
  3. 1 cup chicken broth
  4. 1 tablespoon lemon juice

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 60 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Chicken With Lime

Ingredients:

  1. 4 large chicken breasts or 8 tenderloin chicken pieces
  2. Juice of 3 fresh limes or equivalent of bottled lime juice (make sure you have one cup liquid, add water to juice as needed)
  3. 2 tablespoons of chopped garlic
  4. 2 cups sliced mushrooms

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 60 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Chicken With Honey

Ingredients:

  1. 5 large chicken breasts or 10 tenderloin chicken pieces
  2. 1/2 cup honey
  3. 1/3 cup lemon juice  (make sure you have one cup liquid, add water to juice as needed)
  4. 1/4 cup soy sauce

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 60 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

PRINTABLE recipes:  4 Ingredient Meals by Food Storage Moms

I hope your family enjoys these pressure cooker recipes as much as we do, life is good when dinner is cooking in the kitchen. May God bless you for being prepared.

The post 4 Ingredient Pressure Cooker Meals appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

4 Ingredient Pressure Cooker Meals

Today I have several 4 ingredient pressure cooker meals that are easy to make, any day of the week. I know how busy families are today and the easier we can make meals to prepare at home, the healthier we will be. I use my pressure cooker to make quinoa or rice on Sunday or Monday that will last Mark and I a few days. All we have to do is heat up the rice or quinoa to serve with some of the main meals listed below. I think most of these ingredients we all have in our pantry or refrigerator. If you buy your pork, chicken breasts, chicken tenderloins or beef on sale and freeze it, you are one step ahead of the game. I’m sure I have mentioned to you before I do not eat meat, but Mark does, so I shop the clearance area at some of the local grocery stores.  I look for the meat that’s priced very low and freeze it.

If you make a menu for the week that really helps because then you don’t have to think about “what’s for dinner?” I try to make a double batch of whatever I’m making because then I can store 1/2 of the recipe in a freezer container for another day. Thank goodness, Mark is easy to cook for, the only thing he really doesn’t care for is squash, so I eat his share! It’s easy to make 4 ingredient meals because they take less time to make and dinner is ready in no time. Did I tell you I love my pressure cooker? I have both the Instant Pot and the Fagor. I prefer the Fagor over the Instant Pot but either one will work. These times are for my Fagor pressure cooker. If you are using your Instant Pot, check for times that are applicable for the kinds of meat stated below in each recipe.

Please note I purchased both pressure cookers so I could compare one against the other. Fagor 670040230 Stainless-Steel 3-in-1 6-Quart Multi-Cooker They are both great pressure cookers but I’m partial to my Fagor. You could even put these ingredients and freeze any of them for later. I hope you these recipes as much as our family does.

4 Ingredient Pressure Cooker Meals

Pressure Cooker/Instant Pot Beef Roast

Ingredients:

  1. 3-pound chuck roast
  2. Garlic to taste
  3. Pepper to taste
  4. 1 cup water (required for Fagor pressure cooker)

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 60 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Sassy Flank Steak

Ingredients:

  1. 1-1/2 pounds flank steak
  2. 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  3. 1 tablespoon sherry
  4. 1 tablespoon honey

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 50 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Beef Goulash

Ingredients:

  1. 2 pounds beef stew meat
  2. 1 large onion chopped into bite-size pieces
  3. 1-11.5 ounce can V-8 vegetable juice
  4. 1/2 teaspoon pepper

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 50 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Hawaiian Island Pork Chops

Ingredients:

  1. 4 (1/2 -inch) thick pork chops
  2. 1-8-ounce can of sliced pineapple with juice (make sure you have one cup liquid, add water to juice as needed)
  3. 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  4. 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 60 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Pork Tenderloin

Ingredients:

  1. 1-1/2 pounds pork tenderloin cut into pieces
  2. 1 tablespoon sherry
  3. 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  4. 2 tablespoons brown sugar

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 60 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Garlic Lemon Chicken

Ingredients:

  1. 4 large chicken breasts or 8 tenderloin chicken pieces
  2. 1 clove garlic
  3. 1 cup chicken broth
  4. 1 tablespoon lemon juice

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 60 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Chicken With Lime

Ingredients:

  1. 4 large chicken breasts or 8 tenderloin chicken pieces
  2. Juice of 3 fresh limes or equivalent of bottled lime juice (make sure you have one cup liquid, add water to juice as needed)
  3. 2 tablespoons of chopped garlic
  4. 2 cups sliced mushrooms

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 60 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Chicken With Honey

Ingredients:

  1. 5 large chicken breasts or 10 tenderloin chicken pieces
  2. 1/2 cup honey
  3. 1/3 cup lemon juice  (make sure you have one cup liquid, add water to juice as needed)
  4. 1/4 cup soy sauce

Instructions:

Place everything in your pressure cooker, lock the lid, set the valve to PRESSURE and set it for at least 60 minutes. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release the vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

PRINTABLE recipes:  4 Ingredient Meals by Food Storage Moms

I hope your family enjoys these pressure cooker recipes as much as we do, life is good when dinner is cooking in the kitchen. May God bless you for being prepared.

The post 4 Ingredient Pressure Cooker Meals appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Get Ready For Camping This Summer

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I want to give you some ideas on how to get ready for camping this summer. Now, here’s the deal, camping, and emergency preparedness go hand in hand, right? You may not have a trailer, camper or a tent, but sleeping under the stars is fabulous! Can you hear the rush of the stream going by? Do you love the smell of eggs, pancakes, and bacon cooking outside? I know I sure do! There is something about learning to start a fire outside in a safe location and where the law permits. Well, we can cook with a Dutch oven on some charcoal outside whether we are at a camping spot or in the back yard. Get up early so you can cook breakfast outside in the mountains!

I remember when I was growing up and every Saturday morning my family would drive up to the mountains where the county had some fire pits. Oh, my gosh, the memories of cooking breakfast over a fire pit still makes me smile.

Camping Tools:

Water:

You need water for each person to stay hydrated. I recommend a minimum of one gallon per person per day. I would take more only because that’s how I roll. I need a lot of water to make pancakes, soups or whatever. Remember to take the water you need to make certain meals. And don’t forget the clean-up. I love boiling water and washing dishes outside, plus it teaches our family what we would need to do if we lose water inside our home. Score, lesson learned! Sometimes the campsites have water and sometimes they don’t. Be prepared with extra water.

Food:

Make a menu for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Actually, my printable for food storage would work: Where do I start? By Food Storage Moms All you have to do is fill in the blanks, it even has a spot for what you need to purchase on the chart.

You can fill containers with pancake mix and then just add water. Be sure and bring a good spoon or my favorite tool: Tovolo Dough Whisk – 12″ (a reader told me about this stainless steel one).

Crack the eggs you would use for each meal into an airtight container and put them in the cooler. I like to open a container with eggs rather than cracking them at a campsite.

Divide your lunch sandwich ideas into baggies and label them Monday, Tuesday, etc. You can also make sloppy joes ahead of time and freeze them in a bag, just heat and you are ready to eat. Don’t forget the hamburger buns. This is why a menu is fun because it’s all spelled out. You may forget the ketchup, relish, and mustard for the hot dogs, right? I f you write it down, you are good to go.

Dinner is easy, make some meals in a bag that you can throw into your Dutch oven.

Take bags of salads you make ahead of time, don’t forget the salad dressing.

While we’re talking about coolers, make sure you fill containers with water that you can use for drinking AND keeping the cooler at a safe temperature. Open the bags of bacon and separate the amount you want into one bag for each breakfast. I buy the bacon ends, they taste yummy and are half the price.

Don’t forget marshmallows, chocolate squares, graham crackers, and hot chocolate!

camping

Cooking:

Here are some items you may need.

Dutch oven

Fry pans

Griddles

Charcoal

Matches

Kitchen items:

I love having my kitchen on wheels (making a tub with your kitchen necessities would be awesome) FSM Portable Kitchen

Can opener

Pancake spatulas

Serving spoons

Hot pads

Vegetable spray

Soap for washing dishes

Wash rags/dish towels/paper towels

Paper plates, cold cups, hot cups, and silverware

Hot dog sticks/Smore’s sticks (marshmallows)

Tubs to wash and rinse the dishes

Sleeping:

Tents

Tarps

Sleeping Bags

Lanterns for light

Flashlights

An emergency toilet would work for camping: FSM Emergency Toilet

I hope this post gets you excited about camping and cooking outdoors as a family or with friends. This is just a start. I’m sure you will come up with items I haven’t listed based on the food your family likes, particularly their favorites for eating outdoors. The size of your family will influence the quantities needed. It never hurts to take some extras, just in case.  Don’t forget toilet paper, bug spray, some firstaid items, etc. May God bless you for being prepared for the unexpected.

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Does Prepping Mean You Don’t Have Faith

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Does prepping mean you don’t have faith? I sometimes wonder how people really feel about the word prepping. Prepping to me is being prepared for the unexpected. It’s a way of life for my family and has been our entire life. Please realize that this has not been an overnight feat. It has taken me years to learn to garden, to can, and dehydrate the fruits of my labors, and learn the skills needed to survive. I had to learn the best way to store water and preserve it the best way. I had to learn how to properly purify the water I stored when needed.  I learned to use small stoves, solar ovens, outside cooking devices besides a gas barbecue. I learned how valuable a Dutch oven with a lid is to have stored. I researched all the important fuels that will work and which ones will burn longer, thus using less fuel. I could go on and on but I want to share some thoughts today with you.

I remember being at a neighborhood luncheon several years ago and asking if there was anyone there that has some food storage in case of an emergency? I had responses like, “I’m too old to start now.” Another lady said, “I have vitamins that will keep me healthy.” A few said, “I have a few #10 cans of food on a shelf.” Then I asked about water, it was silent. Several ladies mentioned our homes are so small here, I don’t know where I would store water let alone any food storage. This is when I became a real prepper, in a sense. Who did they think would take care of them? Did they think God or their supreme being would just take care of them? Did they assume the government would swoop in with pallets of food and water? I didn’t ask that question.’

When I was a young girl I heard the statement that God Helps Those Who Help Themselves. I don’t know where I heard it or where it originated, but it really had an impact on me. I’ve tried to apply that concept in how I live my life and use my talents and energy.

I’ve heard people say that if there was a God and if he loved us he wouldn’t let terrible things happen to us, particularly to innocent little children. I’ve also heard about a book titled something like “Why Bad Things Happen to Good People.” I haven’t read the book but hear it is worth reading. I do feel that life can be a real test of our willingness to do our best, work hard, look out for others and be willing to follow our own understanding of what our creator expects of us. Based on my own life experiences I’ve determined I need to look out for myself, my loved ones and do what I can for those around me, given the limited resources I have. That is what prompted me to start this blog and my website, to help others to be prepared, as best they can, for those unexpected events and situations that will come our way. No one is exempt from challenges, no matter how “faithful” they try to be. We see great people lose a job, get sick and unable to work, lose a loved one, have their homes torn apart by natural disasters, and more. I believe that God won’t throw anything in our path that we can’t deal with, given our best efforts and energy.

I’m not one of those who wants to live in some remote area away from family, friends and most modern conveniences. I’m not afraid to let people know where I live. You won’t be seeing me write about skinning a squirrel or making possum stew. What you will hear me repeat over and over is that we can be prepared one can of food or gallon of water at a time to deal with disasters and unexpected events in our lives. I’m not fearful since I’m prepared. I think God would be proud of any of us who use our initiative and resources to store things and learn how to use them now, before disaster strikes!

My favorite things:

Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

All American Sun Oven- The Ultimate Solar Appliance

Kelly Kettle Large Stainless Steel Base Camp Basic Kit  How to use one: Kelly Kettle Post by Food Storage Moms

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How To Make Homemade Corn Tortillas

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I have got to show you how to make homemade corn tortillas today! I have a friend, Melissa Richardson AKA, “The Bread Geek,” who shared her recipe with me several years ago. Now, I may have tweaked it a little, I can’t remember. But once you make these you will rarely buy them at the store. If you have some buttermilk and the Maseca corn masa flour you are good to go.

No mixer needed, just dump and stir, then knead a little. Oh, I better mention I store my Maseca corn flour (in a plastic bag) in the freezer to keep it fresh. Grab a bowl and get ready to make these.

homemade corn tortillas

Here is another trick…..I am famous for not reading directions…..well you need to spray the plastic wrap with vegetable spray or you won’t be able to get the tortillas off the press! You can see I flattened the balls with my hands before placing them on the tortilla press.

homemade corn tortillas

You can see I pressed the dough into a 6-inch circle, give or take. I then carry the plastic wrap with the tortilla over to the griddle and ever so slightly remove it from the plastic wrap and place it on the griddle. These honestly taste like gourmet restaurant corn tortillas. No fat, oil or sugar! Gotta love it! You do not need a tortilla press, but I grew up with my mom using one just like this one: Norpro 6-Inch Tortilla Press, Cast Aluminum You do not cook them on the press, it just flattens them. I have this one: Victoria 8 inch Cast Iron Tortilla Press and Pataconera, Original Made in Colombia, Seasoned Now you are ready to bake your tortillas on a hot griddle.

homemade corn tortillas

Yep, I immediately emailed all my daughters after making them and said, “oh my goodness…you have got to make these!!!!!!!” My family went crazy over them.  They are so delicious! These are NOT like the store purchased tortillas…..trust me! Thanks again Melissa for giving me the courage to try and make these….easy peasy! Get your griddle hot!!

Homemade Corn Tortillas

Ingredients:
  • 2-1/2 to 3 cups Maseca (Mexican corn flour)
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
  • 3 cups warm buttermilk
Instructions:
  1. Combine the dry ingredients (start with 2-1/2 cups Maseca) then warm buttermilk and add to mixture. Mix by hand until everything is wet. Cover and let sit 10-15 minutes. Knead lightly and add Maseca until a finger pressed into the ball of dough comes out mostly clean. Make two inch balls with the dough. Press, heat, and serve!

PRINTABLE recipe:  Homemade Corn Tortillas by Food Storage Moms

I thought you might like to see the difference between 4 types of common corn:

1. Dent or Field Corn: this is the corn typically used in Mexican cooking like tortillas. This corn is low in sugar but high in starch.

2. Sweet Corn: this is the corn usually found in cans or corn on the cob. It usually is white,  yellow or a combination of both.

3. Popcorn: this corn has a high moisture content. When you heat the kernels they explode from the steam, thus resulting in “popped” corn. Yummy with butter & salt! And caramel!

4.  Flint corn: mostly used as animal feed, usually ground into corn meal, this corn is used in many processed food items like chips and cereal.

I could eat these homemade corn tortillas every single day with beans and salsa! My mouth is watering right now.

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15 Paper Products You Need To Store For Survival

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Here are 15 paper products you need to store for survival, please start with a few and add more as your budget allows. This is the minimum number of items we will need but let’s talk about these today. I have been thinking about what’s going on in the world, and I feel very strongly that we need to stockpile a few of these items. I remember teaching an emergency preparedness class in Salt Lake City, Utah and one of the class members mentioned she felt like I was hoarding stuff. We were talking about storing toilet paper and paper products that could be used after a disaster. I wasn’t offended and I got the giggles because probably in her eyes I am a hoarder. But I’m not a hoarder of junk only necessities I use every day. I do not like running to the store to buy toilet paper. Oh my gosh, I have to tell you this story, I was at a local store a few weeks ago and I saw this woman carrying a package of toilet paper with four rolls in it. Oh my goodness, that wouldn’t last a week at my house.

To be honest with you, I had forgotten companies sell only four rolls of toilet paper in a package. I tend to go overboard with paper products but that’s how I roll. No pun intended. I live about ten miles from any store as you probably know by now, I am not a shopper. I load up my paper products as needed. I never know when the stores may be closed and I feel at peace knowing I’m prepared with paper plates, cups, etc. Plus, when my family comes we use paper products because we have such a large family. We have been known to have 25-28 family members with friends come for a weekend and paper plates are the way to go. I have several refillable water jugs so we don’t use water in plastic bottles. Some have names or initials all over them, life is good when family comes to visit. Please watch for sales and stock up on the following paper products you need.

Paper Products You Need

  1. Toilet paper/family cloths, facial tissues Food Storage Moms Family Cloths
  2. Paper Plates/plastic silverware
  3. Paper Cups
  4. Foil
  5. Paper Towels
  6. Washcloths or cloth diapers when the paper towels run out, I recommend these: Wash Cloth Towels by Royal, 24-Pack, 100% Natural Cotton, 12 x 12, Commercial Grade, Appropriate for use in Bathroom, Kitchen, Nursery and for Cleaning, Soft and Absorbent, Machine Washable, White Also, Costco has white washcloths pretty cheap.
  7. Bags: 33-gallon size,
  8. Baggies: these are the bread ones I buy and they’re pretty cheap, Inteplast Group IBS PB060315 Get Reddi Food & Utility Poly Bag, 6″ x 3″ x 15″, 3.5qt, 0.68mil, Clear, 1000 Bags
  9. Napkins
  10. Diapers
  11. Baby Wipes
  12. Cloth Diapers/rubber pants/diaper pins, these are essential because when the “disposable ones” are gone or sold out, you will need these: Gerber Birdseye 3-Ply Prefold Cloth Diapers, White, Pack of 10
  13. Menstrual Pads
  14. Homemade Menstrual Pads (I’m working on a post on how to make these)
  15. Tampons

Please remember this list is my suggestion to start with, please add the items you need as well. I hope my neighbors are stocking up with paper products because there is only so much toilet paper to go around! Please remember to store a lot of water, the American Red Cross recommends 1-gallon per person per day, I recommend 4-gallons of water per person per day. One idea that makes it easy to figure out how much water per person you have at a glance is to slowly purchase WaterBricks (the larger ones are 3.5 gallons). Yes, they are less than 4-gallons but you know that ONE of those is the right amount for each member of the family per day. These makes it easy peasy if you don’t have a lot of room to store water. Plus, they stack on top of each other and are easy to grab and take with you. They fit nicely behind a couch, in closets, or under beds.

Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. May God bless you and your family.

Water Bricks: Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue

MY BOOK: Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

American Red Cross

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5 Old Fashioned Pancake Recipes You Will Love

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I’m sharing my favorite 5 old fashioned pancake recipes you will love today, I promise! Let’s picture a brunch for a school graduation, with the tables decorated with bowls of every color filled with toppings for pancakes, crepes or waffles. It could be a party, a brunch or even breakfast for dinner. My daughter Heidi and her husband, Nate cook a huge brunch every Sunday and whoever drops by is always welcome. You know what I mean, there is always enough food for everyone. There could be 15 or 30 people, we never know. But the food is made from scratch and you can smell the yummy food as you walk through the front door. You can keep your pancakes warm in one of these: Norpro Tortilla Pancake Keeper I purchased two of these because I have a big family. I love fixing breakfast!

Some of these recipes will need a blender, a mixing bowl, hand mixer, dough whisk or spoon to mix the ingredients. You can use a griddle, a crepe pan or cast iron pan. So start thinking which recipe you want to make first, don’t forget the butter and whipped cream in some cases. You know you can use the whipped cream in the cans but there is nothing quite like fresh cream whipped with sugar and vanilla added.

Pancake Recipes:

Buttermilk Pancakes

 

pancake recipes

Ingredients:
2 cups bread flour
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 eggs
2 cups buttermilk
2 eggs
Instructions:
I start with a medium bowl and add the flour and make a well in the center. I then add all of the other ingredients and use my Danish whisk or one of my stainless steel whisks. I use approximately 1/4 cup of batter for each pancake and cook each side until golden brown. These are fabulous and fluffy!

PRINTABLE recipe:  Buttermilk Pancakes by Food Storage Moms

Chunky Monkey Pancakes

 

pancake recipes

Ingredients:
2 cups freshly ground hard white wheat flour or white bread flour
2 tablespoons baking powder
1 teaspoon sea salt
4 teaspoons honey
4 eggs
2-1/2 cups milk
1/2 cup oil
Sliced bananas
Mini chocolate chips, use amount as desired (I sprinkle just a few on each pancake)
Instructions:
I place all the ingredients in a bowl and whisk it until blended. It will be a medium thick batter or add more milk until you reach your preferred thickness. I use approximately 1/4 cup of batter for each pancake and cook each side until golden brown. Serve with maple syrup or caramel sauce.

PRINTABLE recipe: Chunky Monkey Pancakes by Food Storage Moms

Oven Puffy Baked Pancakes

 

pancake recipes

Ingredients:
6 eggs
1 cup milk
1 cup bread flour
1/2 cup melted butter
Instructions:
Preheat oven to 425 degrees, place all of the ingredients in a blender and whip until fluffy and blended. Quickly place the batter into a greased 9-inch by 13-inch cake pan, or fill a greased muffin/cupcake (12 cupcake pan) to the top of each cupcake spot. They will puff up.

Bake the cake pan or cupcake pan approximately 15-20 minutes or until golden brown. Serve with butter, powdered sugar, cinnamon/sugar, jam or syrup.

PRINTABLE recipe: Oven Puffy Baked Pancakes by Food Storage Moms

Swedish or Norwegian Pancakes

Pictured above with the cherries.

Ingredients:
1/2 cup bread flour
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
4 eggs
1/4 cup butter
1-1/2 cups milk
Instructions:
Combine all the ingredients in a blender and pour enough batter to make a six-inch circle on a hot griddle. Cook them until they can be flipped and cooked one more minute. Serve hot with fresh berries, bananas, peaches and freshly whipped cream.

PRINTABLE recipe: Swedish or Norwegian Pancakes by Food Storage Moms

Whole Wheat Pancakes

 

pancake recipes

Ingredients:
1-1/2 cups freshly ground hard white wheat
1-1/2 cups milk
3 tablespoons milk
3 tablespoons oil
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
Instructions:
Combine all of the ingredients in a bowl and whisk until smooth. I use approximately 1/4 cup of batter for each pancake and cook each side until golden brown. These take a bit longer to cook because of the whole wheat, but it’s worth it, I promise. Cook these on a hot greased griddle and cook each side as you do any pancake. These are delicious!

PRINTABLE recipe: Whole Wheat Pancakes by Food Storage Moms

My Favorite Toppings:

  1. Butter
  2. Syrup
  3. Jam or jelly
  4. Cherries
  5. Strawberries
  6. Raspberries
  7. Blueberries
  8. Bananas
  9. Sliced peaches
  10. Blackberries
  11. Cinnamon and sugar
  12. Brown sugar
  13. Papaya sliced
  14. Nutella
  15. Caramel sauce
  16. Powdered sugar
  17. Whipping cream

I hope you try making some my 5 old fashioned pancake recipes that have been in my family for 50 years or more.

My favorite things:

Norpro Tortilla Pancake Keeper

Lodge LPGI3 Cast Iron Reversible Grill/Griddle, 20-inch x 10.44-inch, Black

Presto 07061 22-inch Electric Griddle With Removable Handles

Top Rated Bellemain Stainless Steel Non-Slip Mixing Bowls with Lids, 4 Piece Set Includes 1 Qt., 1.5 Qt., 3 Qt. & 5 Qt.

OXO Good Grips 3-Piece Mixing Bowl Set, Blue/Green/Yellow

OXO Good Grips Silicone Flexible Pancake Turner/Spatula, Black

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Food Storage Secrets You Need To Know

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I’m sharing some food storage secrets you need to know before you go crazy buying food for your pantry. I’m talking about long term food storage today. Let me say one thing, I do not look at the calories in the #10 cans I purchase because I don’t count calories in the food I’m eating today. I probably should, but I don’t. This is how I see food storage for Mark and me, the food I purchase we must both like eating. Sure, I can hear some of you say, you will eat whatever if you are starving. Yes, I’m sure that may be true. Here’s the deal, I do not buy meals, nope, I will not. I cook from scratch and I don’t like the stuff listed on the packaged “meals” for long-term storage.

I may have told you before, I do not eat out except occasionally because the food at restaurants is cooked with lots of salt and butter. It’s called fat calories and they are expensive calories.That’s why people think it tastes so yummy but when you cook from scratch you get sick from all the butter and salt when you eat out. Here’s the deal I am not talking about just fast food places, I’m talking about simple restaurants and even fancy eating places too!

I have been at Costco or similar large box stores and they have these buckets with small packages of food for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, for emergency meals. Now, I understand this may be easier for you to just pick up a bucket, take it home and set it on your pantry shelf. Yes, that is very easy and it’s better than not having any food storage. You can see the calories listed, the serving sizes, etc. Good grief, Mark would be starving if he had the breakfasts shown on a bucket I saw.

I would much rather make my own pancakes from scratch or oatmeal for breakfast with or without syrup. I won’t need butter because I don’t put butter on my pancakes now. My point is this, some of those pre-packaged meals have ingredients you can’t pronounce. I almost feel guilty saying that because I use cans of cream of chicken soup, but that’s how I roll. I can make just about any meal with a can of that stuff. I have tried every recipe for making my own cream of chicken soup from scratch but I don’t care for any of them.

I know certain companies make you set an appointment to have a salesman come to your home to purchase their food storage. Well, I’m not sure if they still do this but I would feel trapped. I like to buy a few #10 cans every month or so. I can’t afford a pallet of food to be delivered to my home with ingredients I can’t pronounce.  When you have time sign up with companies you like to use. You can receive emails when they have items on sale.

I hope you check the price per ounce because all those #10 cans are the same size BUT they may differ greatly in weight and shipping costs. Believe me, there is a big difference in the amount in the cans. Just giving you thheads-upup. Please remember we must store water and lots of it.

Food Storage Secrets You Need To Know

I totally get it when people say to me, “where do I start” when buying food storage. It goes back to this printout I use at every class where I teach about food storage: Where Do I Start by Food Storage Moms? So before you buy, look at the sodium levels, look at the ingredients. I know the pictures look fabulous on the bucket or those small packages but wait. Before you buy several buckets, buy one bucket and do a taste test with them at home. Go back and buy more if you can eat them. Remember, if you won’t eat that stuff today, will you eat it next year? Buy a few packages of those ready to eat bags where you only add hot water and see if you will like eating them for days or weeks. Please test them before you buy a LOT of them.

I only buy #10 cans of fruits, vegetables, meats, milk, cheese and I have a few cans of bacon. This bacon is really tasty but now remember it is not thick sliced bacon, but hey, I will take bacon any day after a disaster. 1/2 Case (6 Cans) Yoder’s Premium Canned Bacon I have yet to try any butter from any company that I would eat on bread, except I will use powdered butter for cooking but not for anything else. To me it is inedible, BUT I do like this brand: 24 Cans Red Feather Creamery Butter From New Zealand Watch for sales, it goes on sale a few times a year.

Food Storage Secrets You Need To Know
I’m typing the statements where the black arrows are: the can on the left is from Thrive Life and it says the ingredients are, red peppers, nothings else. Great! The can on the right is from Honeyville Grain and it says the ingredients in the can is a vegetable blend, (freeze dried corn, carrots, peas, red peppers, and tomatoes), nothing else. Great! SOLD! This is what I buy, freeze dried fruits, freeze dried vegetables, some dehydrated vegetables, freeze dried meats. I can make soups, casseroles, stews with a combination of any of these. The bonus, is they store for 25 years under optimal weather conditions. Please do not store your food storage in your garage if the temperatures go over 70 degrees.
Please read the cans, buckets, and packages for food storage secrets you need to know before you order them for long term storage. Read the labels, and buy what works for your family. May God bless you for being prepared for the unexpected.

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Have No Fear If You Are Prepared For Survival

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You will have no fear if you are prepared for survival, I promise. There is something about going to bed at night knowing I have water, food, and a few emergency items I can survive with. Now, this didn’t happen overnight it was a little of this and a little of that collected over many years. Sometimes we need a little push to be prepared for survival or a pat on the back for being prepared to survive almost any situation. I sometimes have to sit back and say to myself, Linda all is well, God will take care of your neighborhood, you cannot do it all yourself. I take a deep breath and say, thank you God for reminding me that I can’t do it all.  I do not have the room or money to provide for my entire neighborhood, I am prepared to take care of Mark and myself. And a few others……

I do talk with one of my friends here a few streets over about what we will each do in case we have a disaster that hits our subdivision. We both talk about how this woman can help us cook after a disaster, this guy can fix anything we need, etc. I’m asked to speak in several churches and homes so people know I’m prepared. I was asked to write a book, Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation so people know where I live. It’s a fact, I know you may have read, “keep it a secret if you have food and water”, trust me if we have the internet anyone can find us. Some preppers use a pseudonym name because they are paranoid about people knowing who they are, where they live or whatever. We have to respect their feelings. But, I’m real and I live in Southern Utah. I have readers that email me and call me. Sometimes, they just need a hand to hold to learn how to use a pressure cooker. I get it. I really do.

I grew up with a garden, having a pantry with food, sewed my own clothes and made bread. We canned food and I taught my girls the same thing. Except, I regret I didn’t teach them to sew, but three have sewing machines. That counts, right? How can you mend if you don’t have a sewing machine? When I go visit my daughters and their families usually someone has something that needs to be taken in or mended. That’s how we roll, every house has to have a sewing machine. I’m proud to say that three of my grandkids have taken sewing lessons, hooray!

I have a few items to help you think about what you may need to add to your emergency stash, these are the bare minimum, but hey, it’s better than nothing.

Have No Fear If You Are Prepared For Survival:

  1. Water, one gallon per person per day minimum, I prefer four gallons per person per day, but do what you can ASAP.
  2. Food, today I am begging you to get a few extra cans of food, the government will not be there the day after any disaster, I know because I have lived through a few emergencies and we all know this is true. We must be self-reliant.
  3. Emergency stove, Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case you can cook just about anything on this little stove. Your gas barbecue uses too much fuel to boil water. Be sure and get extra fuel: Gasone Butane Fuel Canister (4pack)
  4. Flashlight, make sure you have batteries if you have a battery powered flashlight. I prefer to have a solar one: Goal Zero Torch 250 Flashlight with Integrated Solar Panel or this one I keep in the front window to keep it powered with the sun: Goal Zero Solo LED Flashlight
  5. Blankets, never give away blankets that can keep you warm if the power goes out.
  6. Portable toilet, this means store extra toilet paper, kitty litter and 10-gallon bags for your portable emergency toilet. Food Storage Moms Emergency Toilet Please remember those “time of the month” items your girls may need.
  7. Portable washing machine, we all want clean underwear no matter what, right? Food Storage Moms Portable Washer
  8. Please have a first aid kit and a good medical book like this one: The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way If your medications are expired, please pick some up today, not tomorrow if the pharmacies and stores are closed, they are closed. I can’t emphasize this enough, we must take care of ourselves, if we lose power the stores may close and so will the pharmacies. What you have in your home today is what you will have in one hour if we have a total power outage for days, weeks or months. Please be prepared for the unexpected.
  9. Please keep your gas tank at 3/4 full, if you need to flee your area, you don’t want to wait in line at a gas station to find out the tanks do not work due to lack of power.
  10. Keep small bills like ones and fives for cash if the power goes out, the banks, the stores, the ATM’s, etc. will not work.

This is a very short list to remind you to be prepared for the unexpected. May God bless you for doing what you can to be prepared. You will have no fear if you are prepared for survival.

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Everything You Need To Know To Start Your Garden

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I feel inclined to share everything you need to know to start your garden today. I now live in Southern Utah, so we can start a garden a lot earlier than up north. In Salt Lake City, Utah we always used Mother’s Day as the day we could finally get started with planting vegetables in our gardens. In other words, the middle of May. In Southern Utah, I decided it’s tax day, April 15th or the middle of April. We have all had good years of gardening and occasional years when we wonder what in the world happened to my squash or cucumbers. I used to have a huge garden, with a gas powered tiller and we grew all of our vegetables for the year. Now I have a very small yard and I had to learn to adapt to the clay soil here.

I have heard people say to me “I can’t get anything to grow in my garden.” I get it. It was so much easier to garden in the rich soil I had up north in Salt Lake City, Utah. You could practically dig a hole and plant a tiny plant and BAM that baby would grow like crazy! If I planted seeds, they would sprout and grow great veggies for my neighborhood. It took me a few years here in the desert to get the hang of growing a successful garden. We have a lot of critters here and the bugs are out of control.

I also learned not to put so many coffee grounds in the garden from the local coffee shop because they put too much nitrogen into the soil in my raised garden beds. I guess I put way too many in my planter areas to get rid of the cats in the neighborhood when my flower pots, potato pots, and raised gardens became their litter box. Yep, we learn something new every year, right? Coffee grounds are good, but not the amount I used, just to clarify my statement. The pH level was off and I had to add additional nutrients to offset those coffee grounds to have a successful garden. I call it a learning curve.

I have also learned when to plant and when not to plant certain seeds or plants in my area. I live in Southern Utah where my climate zone is #8A. If you have a local family owned garden center in your area, I highly recommend you go there and get a printout of the times you can plant certain vegetables and other plants or trees you would like in your garden. It’s all about the soil, the seeds, the plants and the watering. I would have to say soil is the biggest learning curve for people.

Start Your Garden:

  1. Good soil: I start with Miracle Grow planting soil. You can buy this at most big box stores or nurseries, plus the items listed below.
  2. Gloves: I buy them every year at the end of the growing season for 1/2 price.
  3. Shovels: One large, one medium, one short small handled one, and then the size we need to dig a small hole for the plants.
  4. Good seeds or plants (non-GMO): You can also start your seeds indoors, but I’ll talk about that another day.
  5. Root starter: I only use Miracle Grow Starter to transplant my seedlings or plants.
  6. Watering can: So you can mix up the Miracle Grow Starter with water.
  7. A good hose and sprinkler attachment.
  8. A pitch fork.
  9. A rake to level the soil.
  10. You may need to add some or all of the items I mention adding to my soil below. Those are the ones I’ve found work best in my planting soil, climate and other factors.  You may need to experiment with different plants and the unique nature of your location.

I have several four-foot by four-foot by 18-inch tall raised garden beds in my backyard. When I first moved here I tried growing tomatoes in pots. It’s too hot, so that didn’t work. The dirt in my yard is hard rock red clay. It almost takes a pick and shovel to dig any kind of a hole for shrubs or trees. I soon realized that my only option was to purchase some raised gardens.

I have a very small house and yard. I need to use as much space to produce food for pleasure and to survive if we had an unforeseen emergency or disaster. I had to learn how to garden here. I have been successful with gardening in this home for about six or eight years now. I have had a garden for as long as I can remember. In years past I canned everything possible from my garden, teaching my daughters the skill of gardening and canning. It’s really fun, I promise. But this desert area took me some time to learn how to garden.

I had been reading about composting (no, I do not compost food). My life is pretty busy and I can’t add that to my plate each day. So I buy organic compost and organic fertilizer. So there you have it, some people love to compost. I don’t.

I had also studied up on different products I thought I would need, but I wanted to hear it from the expert nursery owner if these were the right ones for my area. Bingo! I nailed it with the help of phone calls, reading, and research at various nurseries. Ballard Nursery in LaVerkin, Utah has the most knowledgeable people in my area! Woohoo!

I no longer own a wheelbarrow so I mixed up the following items listed below in each raised garden bed. I used my hands, a small pitch fork, and shovel to make the soil rich and loamy. It really is all about the soil!!!

The base for my garden beds is Miracle Grow soil available almost anywhere. Remember, I have raised garden beds. If you have awesome soil you probably won’t need this. Then I made a concoction of peat moss, Azomite minerals, Coco Coir, organic compost, bone meal, earthworm castings (organic fertilizer), Vermiculite, and a small amount of steer manure. My soil is 15-17-inches deep. You can buy most of these at your local garden centers. I bought some items online and some locally. I promise a garden is all about the seeds and the soil. We can all grow a garden, we just need practice. This is one more way to be prepared for the unexpected. Grow a garden and harvest your own food. It’s all about being self-reliant. Good luck with your gardening efforts.  Be sure to let me know your secrets to gardening success.

My favorite items you to start your garden:
Azomite Micronized Bag, 44 lb
FibreDust Coco Coir Block
Unco Industries Wiggle Worm Soil Builder Earthworm Castings Organic Fertilizer, 15-Pound
Miracle-Gro Nature’s Care Organic Bone Meal, 3 lb.
Espoma VM8 8-Quart Organic Vermiculite

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What You Need When You Travel With Your Dog

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Do you sometimes want a list that tells you what you need when you travel with your dog? Mark and I recently went to Salt Lake City, Utah for the weekend and, oh my gosh, it brought back memories of having a toddler or baby. All the stuff we have to take when it’s a puppy is a bit overwhelming. I decided I needed a list to check off, I really did! I have had Shih Tzu puppies or dogs since my youngest daughter was in the sixth grade. Camille came home from school one day and said her teacher was selling a ShihTzu puppy. Back then we didn’t even know what a Shih Tzu looked like or anything about the ShihTzu breed. Well, I went to the veterinarian in our neighborhood and asked him what kind of a dog would be good for our family of four young daughters. I said we wanted a quiet dog that would be loving and sit on our laps. I wanted one that would not shed. I knew I was going to have the dog groomed, but for me, that is better than having dog hair everywhere. I didn’t want a dog that shed because I have so many allergies. That sounds a bit strong, I don’t have that MANY allergies, just the normal pollen allergies. Dr. White said a Shih Tzu was perfect for us. It’s not the smartest dog on the block, but a very loving dog. He left out the Shih Tzu’s can sometimes be stubborn…..that’s okay we love them anyway.

Well, we decided as a family to purchase this cute female Shih Tzu puppy at the school where Camille attended. Keep in mind we had never paid for a pet, except maybe a goldfish or two. We nearly choked writing out the check for $150.00 for this cute little puppy we named, Chelsea. This was way before the Clinton’s were in office, just so you know. It just now donned on me that we had a puppy with the same name as President Clinton’s daughter. Wow! Anyway, we loved this puppy so much we added another one. We actually bred Chelsea so we could have a playmate for her. So here comes Charlie, a son. We kept and sold the other puppies to cover the purchase of Chelsea. Well, sort of, it’s expensive to have puppies. We had her neutered, I couldn’t put her through another pregnancy.

We enjoyed those two dogs for about 12 years and they died about six months apart. I really tried to go without having a dog around the house, I really did. But, I couldn’t. The next thing I know Mark is sending me pictures of some Shih Tzu puppies. Yep, I went to buy one and came home with two. I couldn’t decide which one, so I bought both of them. Thank goodness for doggy doors so the dogs can go in and out of the door to use the potty on their own. I was busy working and we couldn’t think of a name and we saw a can of Pepsi on the counter and named one Pepsi. I named the other one Boston because I liked the name. We had this set for ten years.

Then Mark and I retired, at least part time. We said to each other, we don’t want a dog. We don’t want a dog. Yes, we said this many times. THEN, this last year I really missed having a puppy around. So, the search was on for a new member of the family. Here comes Bentley, a black and white male Shih Tzu. Oh my gosh, they are so dang cute when they are squishy and waddling around the house. Yes, we love Bentley. Here is a list for travel that’s probably a bit overboard, but I want to be prepared for the unexpected. It’s almost the same as my 72-hour kit for pets.

Travel With your Dog:

PRINTABLE list: What You Need When You Travel With Your Dog

I hope this list helps you as much as it helps me! I don’t travel that much, but I don’t want to forget anything and have to go to a store for medicine for Bentley. If something serious happens I can go to a veterinarian with him. Thanks again my friends for being prepared for the unexpected. Even our beloved pets need to be prepared, so now you know what you need when you travel with your dog. May God bless you!

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Why And How We All Need To Store Lots Of Beans

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I must confess, I store lots of beans because I love beans, just about any kind of bean suits me. The price of food continues to rise every day and I think beans may go up in price because most people cannot afford meat for a protein. I actually stopped eating meat about a year ago because I read what animals are fed before the meat reaches our tables. I wish meat tasted more like it did when I was younger without all the hormones and antibiotics added. The added pressure from Monsanto to force farmers to use GMO corn in the feed or get arrested really goes against my grain, no pun intended. I love to hear that people are raising their own beef, goats, chickens, or rabbits. I applaud them for trying to feed their animals without GMO (genetically modified organisms) feed. I’ve said before I couldn’t kill an animal and then eat it. Yes, if I was starving I would, maybe. I have tasted grass-fed beef and it tastes a lot like the old days with real flavor. Oh, and fresh chicken without the hormones, is so much better. But, here again, I have made the decision to no longer eat meat, that’s how I roll these days.

I can still remember the deer Mark so proudly brought home after hunting the poor thing and hanging it up in the garage. Wow, then we dragged that baby into our kitchen. I have never looked at a deer quite the same out in the fields ever since that day. We cleaned it, cut it, and wrapped up all those red chunks of meat. I never could cook it so I could eat it. Yes, everyone told me to let it age for a few days, marinate it, or cook it with this or that spice and it would taste just like regular beef. Nope, none of it worked for me. BUT, I know a lot of awesome hunters who love hunting and eating the wild game, any kind is great for them!

Lots of Beans

You can buy beans in little bags sitting on the grocery store shelves, you can grow beans in your garden if you live in the right ‘zone”. You can even buy 50 or 100-pound bags of beans, just about any kind of bean you prefer to eat. You can buy #10 cans of beans and #10 cans of instant beans. The instant beans you just add water and cook for about 20-30 minutes, depending on the brand you buy. Nowadays I usually buy cases of vegetarian refried beans. I also buy kidney beans, black beans, garbanzo beans, navy beans (white beans), and chili beans. All you need is a can opener if we have a disaster and we lose power to open the cans. The ones that are ready to eat I can eat right out of the can if need be, no heat required.

Sometimes I think people think beans are only for chili, or soups. They are great for that, but they can be used in so many dishes, or on salads, can’t you just picture the salad bar with the kidney beans right now? Remember, if you don’t use up all the beans before they expire you can donate them to your local food bank, trust me they will love them!

1. Pinto beans are great for refried beans.

2. Kidney beans are great with veggies from the garden or to make chili.

3. Red chili beans I use to make chili.

4. White Northern beans are great with a little chicken broth, celery, and onions to make a pot of soup. Add ham if desired.

5. Blackeye peas are great for a side dish or to make hummus.

6. Anasazi beans great for southwestern dishes or soups.

7. Black beans are yummy in tacos or as a side dish. I wish I had the recipe for black beans from Texas. My sister lives there and they know how to make the best salsa and black beans.

8. Chickpeas (Garbanzo) they are awesome to make hummus or add to a salad.

9. Cannellini beans are great for soup.

10. Lima beans are great for soup or a side dish.

I always figure if I start with one cup dry beans I will have three cups cooked beans. You can store beans in buckets with Gamma Lids: Gamma Seal Lid – Red You can also get Gamma lids at some of your local grocery stores, but oh, how the price of these have gone up! They are so worth the price, no more sore fingers opening those 5-gallon buckets!

Here’s my favorite white chicken chili recipe:

Easy White Chili

  • 3 cans (15 ounces each) of small white beans (not drained)
  • 2 cans (12.5 ounces each) of canned chicken (drained), or use some leftover cooked chicken
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 cup mozzarella cheese (grated)
  • 4 ounce can green chilies (diced)
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 16-ounce jar of salsa
  • sour cream to garnish
  • Tortilla chips crushed for garnish

Instructions:

  1. Add all the ingredients in order into a slow cooker and cook on low 5-6 hours. Serve with crushed tortilla chips on the soup with a dollop of sour cream.

PRINTABLE recipe: Easy White Chili by Food Storage Moms

Anti-Gas:

I found this great product while teaching classes in a store in Salt Lake City, Utah. It is Organic Ajwain Seeds.  After you soak your beans, drain off the water and cover with fresh water and add the required amount of Ajwain seeds. You just add 1/4 teaspoon of Ajwain Seeds to 2 cups of dry beans while cooking.  The spice smells so good. It’s like a Mexican seasoning. It’s organic and adds flavor to the beans, as well as the anti-gas factor! I still add my favorite spices like cumin, chili powder, cinnamon, cocoa, etc. Ajika Organic Ajwain Seed, 2.2-Ounce

I believe storing lots of beans will help stretch the dollar and we can share a meal with a neighbor after a disaster or at a bean burrito party! Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected.
Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

Farberware Classic Stainless Steel 16-Quart Covered Stockpot

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How To Maintain Your Home Or Rental

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I’m sharing a few tips on how to maintain your home or rental today. Most of these are quite common, but sometimes a little reminder helps us all. Mark changes the 9-volt batteries every January in the smoke alarms so we are safe and secure. This year he forgot to change the battery in the carbon monoxide detector in the hallway. I’m sure you’ve been there when you hear that beeping and you’re trying to guess which smoke alarm is the “ONE” that is causing us to run around and check all of them! Well, I walk down the hall and I instantly see the carbon monoxide detector has ERR in red lettering. Here’s the deal with most carbon monoxide or smoke detectors, they need to be replaced every five years, according to the statement on the back of the ones we have. Good, grief, the carbon monoxide was way overdue to be replaced. So, I went to Amazon and ordered one because I don’t like driving ten miles to go the store to purchase one. This is the one I just ordered: Kidde KN-COPP-3 Nighthawk Plug-In Carbon Monoxide Alarm with Battery Backup

I’m sure you can pick one or two up at the hardware stores where you live. My home is small so one works fine. I remember helping a friend a few years ago to change some furnace air filters. I started by using her vacuum to clear the vents, luckily the hose was long enough to reach them since our subdivision has the furnace in the attic. The next step was to change out the filters. Oh my gosh, they were so full I’m glad she didn’t have a fire from the air being blocked to the furnace. Plus you save money in the long run because it keeps your air conditioner and furnace working longer. Whether you are buying or renting your home, these need to be replaced as often as needed.

maintain your home

You can see the one on the top right side, that’s what a new air filter looks like, yay for breathing cleaning air!

Maintain Your Home:

  • Change out batteries in the smoke alarm detectors and replace the unit when needed. Vacuum the dust from the detectors as well. Sometimes dust particles or spiders can enter the covers and set them off as if there is a fire present.
  • Change the batteries in your carbon monoxide detector and replace the unit as needed, typically every five years for replacements.

maintain your home

  • Keep the air furnace vents dust free and replace the air filters to save money and breath cleaner air.
  • Check for leaks under every sink, I have seen homes with mold because people hadn’t realized there was a slow drip in the pipes.
  • Vacuum under your refrigerator and check the water hose to the ice maker if you have one. I have also seen wet sheetrock behind the refrigerator when a family pulled it out to move. They had no idea the sheetrock was wet almost three feet up the wall from the floor. It was a very slow leak from the water line to the ice maker. Keep in mind, I was a realtor for ten years, I have seen just about everything that can go wrong in a house.
  • When you leave for a few days be sure and turn off the water to your water lines inside your home. Trust me, I have seen flooded homes from broken pipes, it’s a HUGE mess. The handle is “ON” if it lines up vertically and “OFF” if it’s turned laterally. It’s a good idea to know where to turn off the water before you have a flood and need to figure out where to turn it off.

maintain your home

  • Check your rain gutters if you have them, and remove debris as needed. They can backup with rain water and the water then can go under the eaves of your roof.
  • Check your roof for leaks, we hire someone to do this, we are not in a position to check our roof anymore. We had our roof checked when we had the dryer vent cleaned out.
  • Inspect your dryer duct at least every three months because fires can start easily in those dryer ducts from the lint buildup. Empty the lint catcher in your dryer every time you dry your clothes. U.S. Fire Administration
  • If it’s the middle of winter and you have possible freezing temperatures, open all the cupboards that have water pipes running in the exterior walls in your home to let the cold air release inside the room rather than be confined to the cupboard. I have opened many sweet neighbors’ cupboards when they were gone on vacation. You can also use a small heater to carefully thaw the pipes, but you may still have broken pipes as the frozen water shifts. I have also turned on the faucets with a slow drip, but that always makes me feel nervous about wasting water or overflowing the sinks. I had a friend who left on vacation and one of her kids didn’t turn the faucet off all the way in the bathroom. When she returned the sink had overflowed with water dripping onto her wood floors upstairs and flooded a large portion of the basement. The entire neighborhood ran to help with shop wet vacuums and fans until they could get some professionals out to clean up and repair the damage.
  • Keep your stove and oven clean, it’s safer because you have less of a chance for a fire flare up, and there is nothing better than a clean stove! I know because I have had a smoke alarm go off from the smoke coming from the bottom of the stove sprinkled with a little bacon grease, pizza cheese, or whatever…..

If you have more ideas on how to maintain your home or rental, I want to hear them because they will help everyone be prepared for the unexpected. If you haven’t picked up a copy of my book, please order one ASAP to make a plan with your family. May God bless all of you!

Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way

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What’s All This Be Prepared For The Unexpected Warning?

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Do you sometimes ask yourself this: “what’s all this be prepared for the unexpected” warning? Well, the only way I can explain why I feel it’s a warning is because if you look around the world, stuff, good and bad things are happening everywhere, but it seems like we tend to hear more of the bad stuff. It could be a flood, a severe ice storm, or a car wreck that disrupts traffic for hours. If could be a tornado, hurricane, an out of control fire, severe winds, a tsunami, or a power outage. I have read a number statements about current events in different forums and I remember seeing a young mother, say, “I’ve been told to be prepared for 10 years and nothing has happened where I live.” She is one of the lucky ones. I have lived in a few cities and something has happened in every city during my stay there, excessive winds, flooding, tornadoes, ice storms and more, and I learned how to fill sandbags very quickly. I’ve seen homes demolished before my eyes and there wasn’t anything anyone could do, except stay away and go to safe higher ground.

I remember buying a home back in 1983 in Farmington, Utah and the night we moved in some warm weather caused the snow in the mountains above us to melt extremely fast, as in flooding. The city had never had floods like that. A city called Bountiful, a few miles to the south, had floods and washed away many roads that same weekend. In the middle of the night, families were evacuated and had to get help from friends and family to save their homes. Several homes were totally destroyed by the wall of mud that came down the mountain side. No one had flood insurance because the city had never seen floods like this and they didn’t live in a “flood plain.” They have since built a water catch basin to collect the excess water stream to help minimize any future flood damage to the area.

It was a Friday night and Mark and I had just moved into a home we built in the Farmington area, and Saturday morning we started hearing sirens to evacuate and helicopters overhead telling us to leave our homes. Well, we were down trying to sandbag a home and remove as many items as we could from a home just down the hill from us. Keep in mind, we had never met these people. It’s surprising what your body and soul can do when you must help other people. It’s just a natural thing to do.

You may remember seeing St. George, Utah on the television with pictures showing floods they too had never experienced before. Homes slid off into the Santa Clara River across town from our home. We had a home in St. George at the time but were up in Salt Lake City, Utah for a visit. I called a neighbor to ask how our neighborhood was doing, we were fine but in Santa Clara, Utah, they were in trouble. Trying to be lighthearted, Mark will often say, “this is sure a funny way to run a desert!”

Today, I am more worried about water being contaminated and major power outages. I’m prepared for every scenario unless, like I have said before, my house crumbles after an earthquake hits our area. Our county is gearing up for 350,000 to 500,000 to head to the Southern Utah area from California and Nevada. Those states will run out of water or food because the roads may not be driveable and they only have one way to go and that’s to Utah. Now, once they hit our area, if they can make it, we will not have enough food or water for all those people. The advantage Utah has is the snowfall, it produces water for the state and other states as well. We also have several aquifers that other states do not have.

This is why it is critical to put together an evacuation plan for your family, wherever you live. If the states run out of gas for the cars or they have zero electricity, those gas pumps will not work. Now what? Please keep your gas tanks 3/4 full. What if the traffic is 20 miles long, will your car have enough gas to get you to the next town? How far is the next city, town or county? Will it be better to stay put in your home? Please talk with your family and bring up scenarios that you may encounter unexpectedly. It has happened to Mark and I and to several friends. Yup, we’ve seen and experienced things over the years that we never thought would happen to our neighborhood, community, and city. For the most part, we were ready, others weren’t.  We have always been grateful we worked to plan for unexpected emergencies. Be sure to be the family on your street that is prepared.  You’ll be so glad you did, and so will all your family members.  You may have enough to help others on your street.  Be willing to share your ideas and plans so others can learn from you and implement their own family preparedness plans.

Please store water: 4 gallons per person per day

Please store food: write down what you eat daily and store enough food for 3 days, then 7 days and then 30 days or more

Consider buying my book and study it together as a family: Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

Please meet with your neighbors and help make your neighborhood a village that will work together. This means you talk to each other and share your skills and what YOU can bring to the table. I just found out there is a nurse about one mile from my house. She will probably be called to the hospital to work after an unforeseen emergency, but it gives me peace of mind knowing we have two nurses in the neighborhood. God bless you in all you are doing.

American Red Cross

FEMA

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30 Pioneer Skills We Cannot Lose

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There are 30 pioneer skills we cannot lose at the very minimum I want to address today. Here’s the deal, I grew up sewing my own clothes, making bread, canning food, and gardening. Now, some of these skills we may perform every day, once a week or some we have never done and we don’t want to do them. I understand, I totally do. I’m left handed and I’ll  tell you, I have always wanted to knit or crochet and I could never understand how to do it because I was always being taught by a right-handed person.

If I have a special baby I know that is being born I have my friend Kathleen make a pair of knitted or crocheted booties. Oh my gosh, when I go to her house she always is knitting or crocheting something. She made a hat she knitted for me by measuring my head and it’s my favorite because SHE made it for me I have a blogging friend that I purchased some crocheted hand warmers from, I treasure them because Janet Garmen made them. She spins the soft wool and these keep me warm every winter. Timber Creek Farms I love how she designs them. I hesitate to say she has a homestead because to me she has a HUGE farm with every animal known to man. If you don’t follow her on Instagram you may want too! TC Farms I’ve yet to figure out the difference between a homestead and the old fashioned word FARM. Hence, her blog is called, Timber Creek Farms. There we have it.

When I was younger, my mother always wanted my great-grandmother’s spinning wheel. After my grandmother died, my mom received the spinning wheel she had always wanted. Now, keep in mind none of us knew how to spin wool, but we would visualize doing it. It’s called making wishes into dreams. Well, the dream never came to fruition, but when my mom died I asked for the spinning wheel. It’s quite large to put on display in my small home, but I am waiting for some inspiration on how to frame it so I can put this special family treasure on display.

As I remember, years and years ago, there was one restaurant drive-thru with some girls on roller skates carrying trays filled with hamburgers, fries, and drinks level with their shoulders to each car in the parking stalls. We still have some of those today, maybe not with roller skates, but it was a big deal back in the day. Could this be when people started doing the drive-thru dinners? I don’t know. What I do know is the fact that we are becoming an overweight country from eating unhealthy food from drive-thrus, restaurants, and cafes that add possibly way too much butter (trust me I love butter) and salt. Why do the food outlets do this? It’s quite simple, it makes the food taste better, not to me, but to some people. I think this is why Mark and I seem to get an upset stomach eating out because we only eat out once a month, if that, and the food is too rich.

I don’t know if you remember when I told you this, but when I used to work crazy hours I would pick up “take out” on my way home and eat at 10:00 P.M. Well, I started putting on weight with the food I picked up, it  was delicious but packed with lots of yummy butter and salt, probably more than I care to know about. I had awesome neighbors who would bring some homemade meals occasionally, they were gold to me. Nothing is better than homemade dinners! Mark and I would rather eat at home and just relax in the comfort of our home. When I decided to semi-retire, I said: “I never want to stand in line or wait for any meals ever again”. I have followed this statement for over 8 years now. We live about ten miles from town, and there isn’t one place I would rather eat than at my home.

Pioneer Skills

  1. Baking: I realize baking overlaps into cooking, but there is something about the feel of bread dough in your hands. Or, grabbing a bowl and creaming the butter with sugar using a wooden spoon or a Danish whisk. Then adding the remainder of the ingredients. Then having the kids use two spoons to drop by teaspoonfuls on the greased cookie sheets. I feel like making some pumpkin cookies right now. My friend, Melissa Richardson taught me how to use this: Danish Dough Hand Whisk / Mixer 11″ I prefer the 11″ inch size because it fits inside a wide mouth quart jar and it’s easier for my hands to mix up cookies, brownies or muffins.
  2. Bartering: Bartering is great after emergencies or to trade teaching skills to one another. Store coffee and liquor because people will really want or need those items. I traded a few bread making classes for a brand new red KitchenAid stand mixer.
  3. Beekeeping: I follow a friend over in Colorado via FaceBook and watch her progress through the different steps of beekeeping.
  4. Blacksmithing: I love going to places that how to do this, but I do not have horses, but I love watching this skill.
  5. Bread making: As you know I love making bread, any kind of bread. Please remember to use fresh bread flour and fresh SAF Instant yeast and your bread will never fail. I remember one blogger sent me a rather mean email accusing me of never having made my one-hour French bread because hers did not rise. Well, guess what, I got over 20 emails telling me the recipe was the best recipe they had ever tried. That same recipe was used when my girls sold door to door when they were younger to earn a little extra money. I do believe if it’s overcast my bread will not rise, old wives tale or not, I don’t know. I never make bread when it’s overcast. My bread always turns out. Now, not all the loaves are perfectly shaped, but the taste is awesome.
  6. Building: Mark and my family have built out basements in so many houses, we have lost count. I am now going to have one of my son-in-laws build me two 3 bed bunk beds. Yay, we can then sleep six in the grandkids room!
  7. Canning food: I’m so glad Mark and I took the Master Preserver Canning class here at the Utah State University extension service education center. I knew some of the articles I was reading on some websites were dead wrong and some foods that could not be safely canned. Yes, people will argue about it, but as one registered nurse said: “I hope they make it out of the ICU alive to tell about it.”
  8. Cooking: I wrote this one because I feel like we need to bring back cooking from scratch. You know by grabbing something from the pantry and or refrigerator and throwing a dinner together quickly,  and more healthy.
  9. Cooking outside: If you have charcoal, matches, tinder and a Dutch oven, you are ready to boil water and cook outside.
  10. Dehydrating food: I love dehydrating food, although it does not have a long shelf life like commercially processed foods.
  11. Family meals together: I think eating meals together as a family is something that people are not doing as much anymore. Is life too busy, or are there too many lessons on the calendar? I don’t know.
  12. First aid and medical care: I have neighbors on my street that call when they need a bandaid, cold medicine or Benedryl. Life is good if you have a good first aid kit if the pharmacies all shut down for days, weeks or months. It’s the prepper in me, always be prepared.
  13. Fishing: Mark goes fishing about once or twice a month with one of his best friends who owns a fishing boat. What joy fishing brings to both of them. I know we could eat as long as there are still fish in the lakes near us and there are a lot of them. We are blessed with a lot of water where we live. How long will the water be here is a good question. Right now they do “catch and release,” but we could have them start bringing the fish home if the need arises.
  14. Gardening: I wish more people would garden, there’s something really awesome about digging with your hands in the dirt, then watching the seeds sprout and picking the fresh fruits and garden veggies. Life is good!
  15. Grinding wheat: I’m all over this, you can put “wheat grinder” in my search bar and I show you several ways you can grind wheat.
  16. Growing fruit trees: this is something we used to do, but our lot is so small, I’m hoping to trade or barter homemade bread for a small box of fresh fruit when out friends’ trees start to produce. Yay!
  17. Healing our bodies: I am big into this, but I do have Dr. Alton’s book: The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way I love essential oils, but that’s about all I can say or the FDA may shut down my website, enough said.
  18. Hunting: oh my gosh, my nephew Collin is a hunting hero of mine, and they eat the meat they shoot. I still can’t believe we cut up the dead deer spread out on my kitchen table that Mark shot the first year we were married. I get the giggles thinking of it.
  19. Knitting: As I said above, this is an awesome skill, just think how we could use this with yarn that goes on sale, or better yet, we can buy the soft awesome yarn from Janet’s Timber Creek Farm above.
  20. Know your neighbors: I know I have talked about getting to know your neighbors, that guy down the street with a chainsaw may be your next best friend. Get together and make teams with people near you and exchange your skills and ideas. Trust me, we will need those people living near us after a disaster or unforeseen emergency.
  21. Manners: I love hearing children say please and thank you. It’s hard when I see kids screaming back at their parents at the stores I frequent. It’s not often, but we do need to teach children to respect grown-ups, other people’s furniture, and school property.
  22. Quilting: Do you remember your grandmothers using every scrap of fabric and hand piecing them together?
  23. Raising animals: the only animals we can have where I live are two pets. I couldn’t kill a chicken or goat to eat it anyway, but I have wonderful friends that have the skill and knowledge to do this.
  24. Repurposing old clothes: I love some of my grandkids, they buy clothes from the thrift stores and cut them down by sewing them to fit family members, if necessary.
  25. Saving garden seeds: I’ve personally never done this, but I know people who do as long as they are not Monsanto GMO seeds.
  26. Sewing: this proud grandma loves hearing when her grandkids are learning to sew, woohoo! If you can take lessons from someone on how to sew, do it. My hands aren’t that great anymore, but I used to love sewing. I could sew anything, with or without a pattern. I realize it is not relaxing to some people, but it is to me. Having the right sewing machine makes all the difference. I learned on a Singer, then BabyLoc, and when my mom died I used some inheritance money to purchase a Bernina sewing machine I have always wanted. Be sure and keep all your sewing machines, cleaned and oiled. Don’t forget to use good needles and thread, it makes all the difference in the world.
  27. Sharing: I love sharing my talent of making bread with people. I love to share my time to show people how to organize just about everything in their homes, or garages. Sharing meals with the sick or elderly brings everyone joy and blessings.
  28. Stonework: This is a great skill because we never know when we may have to do some stonework, inside our homes or outside.
  29. Water gathering and storage: Luckily today we don’t have to haul water, but we do need to store water for emergencies. I wrote about storing water a few days ago. Please don’t stand in line waiting for water bottles from your city if the water becomes contaminated. Not fun.
  30. Welding: this is an awesome talent and my son-in-law uses this skill to this day! AND it will come in handy when we construct the strong sturdy new bunk beds.

May you think about you own family pioneer skills that you can bring back to life and to maybe you can teach some pioneer skills to your neighbors, family, and friends. May God bless you to continue to be prepared for the unexpected.

FEMA Website

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7 Ways To Store Water For Your Family

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Today, I have 7 ways to store water for your family. I have been receiving a lot of comments and emails about storing water. Let’s make this as easy as possible. I may have shared this statement with you before: you can survive without water for three days (you need water or you’ll perish). I do not recommend going without water for three days, but it does make us think why we need to store water. I realize we all have budgets, no matter what our income may be. It’s been frustrToday, I have 7 ways to store water for your family. I have been receiving a lot of comments and emails about storing water. Let’s make this as easy as possible. It is frustrating where I live because I will contact a store to get water containers at a discount and send out at least three dozen emails, two or three times to people who live near me. I make it clear in the email I am not making any money on the tanks or containers, I just found a great discounted price for the neighborhood. Unfortunately, only one other family bought the 250-gallon water tank that was available at a great price. The supplier was even willing to deliver the unit to our homes. I was a little luckier with the WaterBricks, three families purchased them. I even got to help two of the families fill the WaterBricks with my lead-free hose. I get it, they are expensive. I try to explain to people, buy a set of the WaterBricks once a month and split the cost between friends, family, and neighbors.

I talk about buying one extra can of food a week or a month, start thinking one container (not the pricey 250-gallon one) a week or one a month. Please write it down: W A T E R, we can only survive three days without water and this is at optimal temperatures. Let’s get started with just a few ways I have for you today. Just choose one and do it.

7 Ways To Store Water:

  1. Gallon Jugs: These are not my first choice, but hey, you can wash clothes with the water you store in these, or use it for personal hygiene. Plus, the price is practically FREE if you buy milk in one-gallon jugs. The next time you empty your plastic milk cartons wash them out with a drop or two of bleach (unscented). The problem with drops of soap are the bubbles, but you can use either one. Just make it easy for yourself. Now, keep in mind these are not for long-term storage. Yes, they will eventually leak. Yes, you need to keep them off the concrete in your garage on 2 by 4’s, they work great. Put a drop or two of unscented bleach in each bottle and rotate the water every six months.
  2. 2-Litre Soda Bottles: Now, I do not drink soda, except for an occasional A & W rootbeer, but if you know someone who drinks it regularly or you are at a party, snag the empty bottles. You do the same with these bottles, wash the sticky stuff out with a drop or two of bleach (unscented). The problem with drops of soap are the bubbles, but you can use either one. Just make it easy for yourself. Now, keep in mind these are not for long-term storage. Yes, they will eventually leak. Yes, you need to keep them off the concrete in your garage on 2 by 4’s, they work great. Put a drop or two of the unscented bleach in each bottle and rotate the water every six months.
  3. Mason Jars: I have personally never “canned” water and doubt I ever will, but I have heard of people who like to store water this way. I don’t have space to store glass jars, plus, I live on the Wasatch Fault as in EARTHQUAKE….
  4. 55-gallon barrels: I have seen the exact barrels that are blue in color at Walmart for almost half the price of the ones I had purchased from well-known emergency preparedness stores. I actually turned the barrel upside down at Walmart to see if they matched the ones I had at home. Yes, I’m that crazy lady with gray hair on aisle 11, what can I say! I wanted to make sure they were BPA Free and were made by the same company as the ones that were more expensive. They were identical. Now, I have four of these gems on the side of my house with UV protector covers because of the heat here, as in 120 degrees in the summer. Please remember with these, you need a pump and bung wrench. I use one whole bottle of Water Preserver in these. 55 Gallon Water Preserver Concentrate 5 Year Emergency Disaster Preparedness, Survival Kits, Emergency Water Storage, Earthquake, Hurricane, Safety BUNG (tightens the lid): Duda Energy dwrench Aluminum Drum Wrench for Opening 10 gal, 15 gal, 20 gal, 30 gal and 55 gal Barrels Standard, 2″ Bung Racing Fuel Methanol, 2″ Please note, I bought like 20 of these for a class I was teaching and my one friend said, “I don’t need one of those, I will use pliers”. She ended borrowing mine, just giving you the heads up here. Be prepared with your own bung wrench. You will also need a pump, you can usually find a pump located on the same shelf where you buy your 55-gallon barrels. BPA FREE – TERAPUMP(TM) TRDRUM20 Drum Barrel Manual Siphon Pump PLEASE NOTE: the Water Preserver is great because we only have to rotate the water every 5 years rather than six months. Keep in mind, we can use the water to water our garden if you exceed the safe water period of 5 years. Please remember to keep space available for freezing temperatures, because the water will expand if it freezes.  Here are the UV covers I purchased, I bought them about eight years ago and they are still in good shape: The Barrel Bag WB-382 ”The Barrel Bag” 55-Gallon Drum Cover Black
  5. WaterBricks: You may know I have several of these and I love them. They are pricey, but I only had to buy them once. I bought two sizes, but my favorite ones are the 3.5-gallon size. They come with handles and a screw lid that makes them easy to haul for camping or evacuating your home. I use 1/2 teaspoon of the Water Preserver stated above and rotate them every five years. Please use a lead-free hose to fill ALL containers outside. NeverKink 8612-50 Boat and Camper Hose, Drinking Water Safe, 5/8-Inch-by-50-Foot I like the WaterBricks because they stack on top of each other, or under beds if you have enough space. I have 16 WaterBricks under a queen size bed.
  6. 5-gallon water jugs: You can buy this size just about anywhere in emergency preparedness stores or camping outlets. There is a big difference in weight between the 3.5-gallon WaterBricks and the 5-gallon containers. I can’t lift the 5-gallon jugs so these have never been an option for me. I’m just not strong enough to haul them and they are not easy to store unless you have a lot of room to place them on 2 by 4’s in the garage to keep them off the concrete. All water containers inside the house, garage, or outside must be at least 2 inches off the ground to keep them from leaching bacteria or other material that is not safe to consume.
  7. BLUE Cans: Yes these are very expensive and they come in cans the size of a soda can. Each case has 24 cans of water packed neatly in boxes that stack easily. I have had a lot of people think the price is outrageous. I get it, I saved for two years to buy 12 cases. I have them stacked behind a dresser. Here’s the deal, these can withstand temperatures of 145 degrees. I try to give a case to each daughter for Christmas as I can afford them. I call these my stack and forget water cans. They state they will last for 50 years. The water is placed in scientifically formulated cans. For more information check out this website: BLUE CAN WATER If you live near a distributor you can pick them up there. I tried to buy a pallet of these but I couldn’t get anyone to split it with me. Water is critical to our survival. Period. These do not need to be rotated ever and do not require any water preserver.

I hope this post about 7 ways to store water for your family gets you started on a road to storing water, one container at a time. I know the American Red Cross states that one gallon per person per day is adequate, I disagree, I like 4 gallons per person per day, but that’s how I roll. Please remember to store water for your pets. I have stated in my book “Prepare Your Family For Survival” on page 21, that our pets need approximately 1 ounce of water per pound of body weight each day. If your dog weighs 40 pounds, you will need to store 40 ounces of water for your dog per day. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. May God bless you and your family.

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How To Prep Without Anxiety

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Today it’s all about how to prep without anxiety. Maybe you never get anxiety, but I do, sometimes. I don’t have anxiety thinking about prepping. It’s the lifestyle I learned from my mom. Now, my mom had never heard of a Sun Oven or the word prepping. We just had a pantry full of food. I never thought about evacuating my home when I was younger, but life has changed. Life is not the same anymore. We never stored water, except what was in the 40-gallon water heater and our large water dispenser (Las Vegas water was nasty). Now, I’ve learned after many years that water heater water we may all have may or may not be safe to use if our water lines are contaminated. In the last couple years, Utah has had many cities with water that you could not drink, cook with or bathe in, let alone brush your teeth with. Yikes, in Utah? How could this be? Yep, it happens. There were mistakes with pipes connected incorrectly by county workers. One of the culprits was Ecoli. Well, we can all make mistakes, but this is not acceptable. So WE must be prepared to take care of ourselves. Please picture this, I saw people on the news via the TV lined up at city and county buildings to get bottled water because the stores were sold out. Please tell me you will not be one of those people.

I understand if you do not have the budget or the space to store what you need for months or years, but please get enough food and water for three days, then graduate to seven days. Okay, now you get it, start a little at a time, as in one can at a time. Remember, you do not need to buy 100-pound bags of beans if you don’t like to eat beans. I eat a bean burrito with vegetarian beans on a flour tortilla every day, no cheese. I could eat these cold or hot, it doesn’t matter. I can make the tortillas, but I buy a huge bag of tortillas at Costco, and cases of vegetarian refried beans. I count the tortillas out and place six of them in a bag to freeze them. When I get down to five tortillas, I go get a bag from the freezer. If I have zero power, I can make the best flour or corn tortillas on this planet, if I don’t say so myself. See, no anxiety with the tortillas, I can make them. Plus, I have cases of all kinds of beans and I have several #10 cans of beans.

Here’s the deal with beans, the older the beans, the harder those suckers become, and they will take longer to cook, as well as use a lot more fuel to cook them. Just giving you the heads-up here. Hence, I buy three to four cases of my favorite brand of vegetarian beans to store. I usually make quinoa or rice once a week, and if I have leftovers I add it to my burrito. Mark isn’t really fond of beans so it doesn’t make sense for me to make the tortillas from scratch like I used to when my daughters were growing up. I can still picture the foil rectangles lined up with one tortilla on each sheet. One daughter spread a 1/4 cup of homemade cooked mashed beans on each tortilla, then one daughter put a tablespoon of grated cheese, the next daughter rolled them and the next daughter folded the foil. We would make 100 burritos at a time. That’s how we rolled, literally, when the girls were growing up.

I must say, my daughter, Heidi found a dirt clump in one burrito once, that I missed when sorting the beans to cook. She couldn’t eat beans for years, so please watch for dirt clumps and rocks, just saying. You can also pressure cook beans if they do get old, so no worries if you have some old beans. I am not sure how much food value there would be in 40-year old beans, but hey, if we’re starving they say we would eat anything. Yikes, I am just about to admit I threw out my OLD beans, I still feel guilty about it. Just a little, not a lot.

I was talking to a friend today who said to me, “I must admit, prepping gives me anxiety.” I told her she is not alone, I hear it all the time. It’s okay, let’s just do a little at a time. I compare food storage and emergency prep to looking at the rows and rows of food at the grocery stores. I do not like grocery shopping, so I make my pantry of food storage my “grocery store.”

I had to meet a friend at the hospital the other day after she and her daughter were in a minor car accident. Thankfully, they were fine after having x-rays, a CT scan, etc. I stayed there about five hours trying to comfort them, and we talked about car insurance, etc. She only has one car that is now totaled, so this is why her daughter called me from the ambulance to come to the hospital. She needed a ride home and someone to hold her hand. I had chicken pot pies in the oven that needed to cook an hour for a friend who just had a hip replaced, but I headed there after I delivered those. The reason I am telling you this story is because while I was at the hospital my friend who was in a neck brace waiting to hear about the results of all the x-rays, and whatever, mentioned she was glad she had gone to the grocery store that day. BUT she forgot to pick up some coffee and asked if I could stop at the store to pick some up on our way home. Of course, I could do that for her.

Well, the results were fine, thank goodness and we headed to the pharmacy after we left the hospital to get some pain killers for her back pain from the accident. Well, we both forgot to pick up the coffee UNTIL she was home. She asked me if I could pick some up tomorrow, I said I didn’t have a car for two days. I told her she would need to get someone else to pick it up. I also live about 12-14 miles from her, so she would have to call someone else. I only have one car. The reason I am telling you this story is because I want you to store more than one bag of coffee if you drink coffee. What I am saying is NEVER have one can or bag at your house that may be critical to you if you have a disaster, a car accident or an unforeseen emergency.

I remember a reader commented on my blog a few days ago about having had two feet of snow dump in her neighborhood. She mentioned the garbage pick-up and mail delivery was stopped for two months! Wow, I have never had that happen to me where I live. She and her family were fine because they were prepared with food, water, and powdered milk. Although, the cat preferred fresh milk, great story! My point is this, I want you to think what you eat each day (no drive thru’s) and write it down. What do you eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner each day? Here is a PRINTABLE I use for classes when I teach: Where Do I Start by Food Storage Moms You can fill in the blanks for each meal, it doesn’t have to be perfect, you just write down what you need to make those meals. If the store shelves are empty or the roads are closed, you will have your own little grocery store at home so to speak.

Prep Without Anxiety:

  1. Write down what you eat every day for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. For instance, if you eat cereal, buy cereal and some powdered or instant milk. Add some canned or bottle fruit, you are set. If you like pancakes, buy pancake mix and syrup or jam. Who needs butter if we have an emergency, right? If you make pancakes, you already know what supplies you need to make those yummy pancakes. Be sure and have more than one or two choices because you may need food for 30 days or more. But today, just think about three days worth of breakfast ideas, then seven days. You can do it, I promise. Practice makes perfect. Please remember, we need water to make that instant milk or the pancakes each day. Plus, we need water to hydrate ourselves, for hygiene and eventually wash at least our underwear if a water shortage becomes long term. When cooking you’ll need a cooking device for those pancakes. I highly recommend this one. I bought one for all four of my daughters. A gas barbecue is fine but uses a lot of fuel. Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and don’t forget the fuel: GasOne Butane Fuel Canister (12 Pack)
  2. Lunch is easy if you think about it. Sliced cold cuts will not cut it because they need the refrigerator. Peanut butter and jelly is a staple in my home. Who doesn’t love peanut butter and jelly sandwiches? I started buying small jars because it goes rancid very quickly once the jars are open. I can still picture the #10 cans of peanut butter I bought when my girls were growing up. My family rarely ate jam or jelly on our peanut butter because it was too expensive. My mom used to make apricot jam from her trees and that was a real treat! We would have peanut butter sandwiches on my homemade bread with a jar or two of home canned peaches. If you think about it, store some canned tuna (not too many because tuna goes mushy) and some cans of canned meat. Add some jars or packets of mayo and you can make sandwiches, like chicken salad. I always store pickles. Can you just smell the bread and butter pickles? They add a lot to any sandwich. Now if you don’t make bread, store crackers or learn to make crackers. Learn to make biscuits with a cream sauce over them. You can make grilled cheese sandwiches and use up what you have in the refrigerator. Of course, keep the refrigerator and freezer closed as long as possible to keep the food safe if the power goes out for an extended period. I started storing smaller jars of mayo and Miracle Whip because it takes a month or more to use them up before they go bad. A few cases of canned fruit and vegetables are great pantry items. Buy only the ones you will eat. If you can your own fruit and vegetables, you are awesome! I love when the garden is in full bloom, who loves fresh tomato sliced tomatoes? I sure do!
  3. You need to know I am not big on processed food, but here’s the deal, let’s make dinner easy in case of an emergency. Take your family to your local grocery store and let everyone choose one food item they would actually eat for dinner. I love canned chili, this is an easy one for me. I can make just about anything from scratch, but let’s choose some foods that you can just heat and eat using your butane stove or right out of the can. I want you to think of it like camping. I remember making frozen meals to take in the trailer. Well, let’s think a little differently, like without a refrigerator. You may need to grab something from your home grocery store. Are you getting the drift now? The family will eat what they chose at the store to eat in an emergency. I remember making colored bags and filling them to take to young mothers who had a baby. For example, a jar of spaghetti sauce, a package of pasta, and a jar of Parmesan cheese. I added some cans of green beans and a can or two of fruit cocktail. All the family had to do was boil the water for the pasta, add the spaghetti sauce and heat the green beans. I call these my dinners in a bag.

I hope you realize that having a small grocery store at your home, so to speak, will help you beyond anything I can teach you, literally. Plus, you will save money by not going to the store as often. If you cook from scratch, you can even do more! Add some #10 cans of freeze-dried fruits and vegetables as your budget allows. If you can have three days of food, then seven, then thirty days of food stored, you rock. Remember, water is the number one thing you need to store. The American Red Cross suggests one gallon of water per person per day. I recommend four gallons per person per day. You can never have too much water. May God bless you and your family to be prepared for the unexpected. I promise, you can prep without anxiety with just one can at a time. Please just do it. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for following my blog. If you start with food, water, and a butane stove, everything else will fall into place.

My favorite things:

Danish Dough Hand Whisk / Mixer 11″

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue

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How I Started My Blog-Food Storage Moms

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I’m going to share my thoughts on how I started my blog-Food Storage Moms. Here’s the deal, it was about six years ago and I was teaching classes in my home so my neighbors would learn how to be prepared for the unexpected. I shared food storage samples in my home, asked speakers to come, showed people how to bake bread outside and so much more. I did this every Wednesday for about a year from 5:30 to 6:30 P.M. I started each Wednesday on time and ended on time. Some weeks I had two people, some weeks I had over 20 people. I did this FREE of charge because I wanted to make a team of people in the neighborhood that could work together if we had a disaster. I really appreciated those that came, but I had a passion for teaching more people about food storage and emergency preparedness.

This is how I started my blog called Food Storage Moms, one person at a time. I need to tell you a little about me, I hope you don’t mind me spilling my guts today. When my youngest child was in second grade, I was bored. My house was clean, organized more than I care to admit. I wish now I had been more laid back when my girls were growing up. I wasn’t and I own it. So, Mark and I thought maybe I should get a part-time job. Well, I lived in a small town with very few job options but I applied to be a teller at a bank. Well, long story short, I was hired for a full-time job. When Mark came home, I announced, “I start Monday and it’s a full-time job”! I still giggle thinking about that moment because I had always been a stay at home mom.

Before I knew it, I was promoted to the new accounts desk and the bank was purchased by another bank. I was lucky because the new bank kept me working. I was very grateful. The next thing I know, I got a call from another bank asking me to be a manager of a grocery store branch. I was grateful for this new adventure. Within a year, I was asked to work in private banking at the same bank. I loved it! I was asked to cover two branches. I learned how to do car loans, boat loans, and second mortgage home loans.

Then I decided I wanted to do REAL mortgages, you know the Freddie Mac, Fannie Mae, FHA and VA government loans. I had NO idea how to do them. I went to work for a company and worked there for three months and decided to withdraw some of my retirement money and I opened my own mortgage company. I hired an underwriter and almost all of my family members worked at the company over the next 15 years. Believe it or not, I did not know how to send or receive any emails when I opened my company, this was in 1997. Thankfully, I did a loan for someone who taught me over the phone how to email. I will be forever thankful to him. After five years, I decided to get my real estate license. Now, I could sell homes and do mortgages. I worked 60-80 hours a week, seven days a week. I was a machine, I have always been driven to do the best wherever I worked.

After 10 years in real estate and 15 years of owning my own mortgage company, I decided to retire. Well, within a year, I was bored yet again. That’s when I decided to teach the world about food storage and emergency preparedness. It was a natural passion for me because I had lived this way my entire life. So, here I am today. I am very grateful that you let me into your homes to teach you. I must say, I learn from you as well. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for following my blog.

My Blog:

Just so you know, when I started my blog, I had to learn to cut and paste stuff. Yep, I own it. I had to learn how to use WORD and make pdfs. I started my website with blogger, but I wanted more. So, then I started looking at other blogs. I HAD to have a WordPress website. I interviewed three web designers and I knew instantly I wanted Jenny at a website company right here in St. George, Utah. We clicked from the get go. She had someone that worked with her by the name of Chad. We clicked instantly as well. I always said, just design it, you both are experts. I don’t need choices, just do it. I want purple, and they took the ball and ran with it by designing my first website.

While they designed my website, I was setting up a business checking account, my LLC, and getting a business license. My sister, Carol helped me with printables and was patient beyond words with me. Remember, I had to learn to cut and paste and work on a real website. Yikes, am I crazy? I had NEVER used WORD! I was still using Word Perfect. Keep in mind, I’m 67 years old today. This was all new to me. I was setting up plugins, and I said to myself, what is a plugin? I remember shaking as Jenny taught me to use a WordPress website. What? I need to pay for hosting, well of course I do. Gotcha, Jenny, I have a self-hosted website. Before I knew it, I was into the website and training for about $5,000.00.

If you know how to do stuff yourself, it’s free or very cheap. I was clueless. Let’s just say, I have learned a lot over the last five years. I was paying for a life coach to help me stay focused. Lyn Christian, from Soul Salt Inc. rocks! I was paying for classes to learn how to use Google+. What the heck is Google+, I asked. I had never used it. I paid Jenny Melrose to coach me how to use Google+. I had to learn how to use Pinterest, Facebook, and Twitter. Now I use Instagram. I swear I kept thinking I can’t LEARN anything new.

About six months after I started my blog, my friend, Lisa Blair called me and said, “How come you only have three boards and 30 followers on Pinterest?” I said, “What is a board?” The rest is history, thank you, my awesome friend, Lisa for teaching me about Pinterest.

What the heck is Rafflecopter, you ask? You use it for giveaways. Then I learned how to use Co-Schedule and Buffer. Oh my gosh, I hope I don’t need to learn anything else. When I was invited to be in a Southern Utah blogger group five years ago I had the opportunity to learn from some really awesome bloggers. We met monthly for dinner for maybe two years, as I remember, to share tips and ideas. I learned about blogging conferences, SEO (search engine optimizer) and so much more from them. Thankfully, I went to many conferences that were in Salt Lake City, Utah, so I could stay for FREE with my daughter and attend them. I met some really awesome bloggers at each conference. I learned a ton from my Southern Utah blogger group and the conferences. The one thing I remember most about my Southern Utah group was the fact that if you want to be a successful blogger you have to work really hard for two years in order to make money to support the expenses of running a WordPress website.

I was ready for that, I worked 10-14 hours a day seven days a week for four years. Remember, this was all so new to me. I was still in my pajamas at noon. Wow, I look back now and laugh. I was still in my jammies for lunch!!!! I had to learn Amazon. I had never used Amazon before I started my website. I have Amazon ads on my website and I had to learn to put them on my WordPress website. Oh my gosh, can I REALLY do this?  I wish I was more techie, but I’m not.

Three years after the first website was designed, the old developer stopped supporting my “theme”. IT WAS BROKEN! “what do you mean it’s broken,” I asked. “It will no longer work,” Chad said. I had to pay for another website (same name and content). Now, I need to hire someone to design another “theme”. $$$$$ here we go again.

This is getting very expensive now. Dang, I wanted a Genesis “theme” the second time but Chad my web designer decided on a different theme. He designed the website I have today along with his brother, Dallan. My website was hacked about six times the first year, which means someone is breaking into your website and it goes down, as in no website for a few hours or days. In December my website was down seven days. I get so mad just thinking about that week. Breathe, Linda, breathe.

I was hacked at least four times the second year. Dang, now I need to learn how to use a security system with my website and with a backup. Sucuri.net is now my best friend. They keep my website from being hacked, or at least between that company and my new hosting company, Liquid Web, I’m pretty secure. My website is very expensive to run each month. It started out as a hobby but became a business before I knew what was happening. I was going to shut my blog down in March (my second hosting company was not adequate) and two people besides my wonderful husband sent me emails to keep going. One was Todd Sepulveda from “Prepper Website” and the other was Jasper from LiquidWeb. If you need an awesome hosting company, contact Jasper at jhopkins@liquidweb.com. HE and Todd are the two people that made me realize, I NEED to keep going, as in writing. I thank both of them from the bottom of my heart. I truly love my readers as well, what can I say.

Okay, back to my blog, then came sponsors. What, you want to pay to advertise on my website? I was so grateful and honored to get paid to put their, “banners” on my website. This would help big time with my expenses. What, you want to give me “stuff” to review. I was overjoyed to be able to show the world with pictures how to use emergency preparedness stuff. I received boxes weekly with samples to taste and promote. I was beyond thankful. I could tell my readers how I felt about certain products. I have only sent back one item I was asked to review, an emergency radio. To have so few questionable items to review is a wonder to me. That’s one in five years, I just couldn’t recommend it.

I started my blog and asked a friend, Kendra, to help in the beginning. After six months of blogging, the New York Times sent us an email about doing an interview. WHAT? We were both interviewed, via the telephone. You know how interviews go, the article said Kendra started the blog with a friend. WHAT? LOL! Anyway, after about six months or so, Kendra decided to continue doing her own blog and a new little baby was on the way. New York Times Interview with Food Storage Moms I can still feel my heart beating so fast just thinking about being interviewed by the New York Times. At the time, I only had 4,000 followers a month.

The next thing, I know, I get an email about writing a book. Well, I never wanted to write a book, but I agreed to the interview via phone. I had no idea what a BIG deal this was, at least for me. It’s really hard to get a publisher to agree to publish the book you want to write. A lot of writers have written books and had them self-published. Both Melissa Richarson and Randal Chase, who had written books, and who I knew I could trust, looked over the contract I was being asked to sign. Melissa has since written one more book: Beyond Basics with Natural Yeast: Recipes for Whole Grain Health It’s very HARD to write a book, at least it was for me. Several times, I thought, I can’t do this. I swear, I can’t do this. Mark kept pushing me, yes you can. YES, YOU CAN. My kids and grandkids kept telling me, YES YOU CAN WRITE A BOOK!!

A couple years later, I received an email asking if Ted Koppel who wrote “Lights Out”, could interview me and keep the interview quiet because he was writing a book about emergency preparedness. They taped my interview, I wasn’t in the book, but as you know, I highly recommend it: Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath

My Blog Tips:

  1. Choose the name you want for your blog, make sure you can get the exact name on EVERY social media channel known to man.
  2. Check to see if that name is available to purchase from a website company or a company like GoDaddy.
  3. If you are the techie type, you will save a lot of money because you can set it up yourself.
  4. Setup an LLC if you are serious about making money. This means you need an EIN number.
  5. It’s time to get a business license if your state and or county requires it.
  6. You need a good CPA to help you with taxes.
  7. Yep, this means you need a business checking account.
  8. You need a Privacy Policy, yep you have a business now. Sponsors won’t talk to you without a Privacy Policy in place. Trust me, they will look for one.
  9. Setup MailChimp or something similar to send out emails when your posts are published. Just so you know, the FTC (Federal Trade Commission) may be looking over your shoulder, so please don’t put a phony address on the emails you send out, big fines may apply if you are caught.
  10. If you want to sell something, you need a sales tax # for your state, if it applies.
  11. You need statements on your website that comply with the FTC. We must state that we MAY make money if someone clicks on links within our website.
  12. Make sure you have the dates of your blog at the very bottom showing it’s copyrighted material. January 1st of every year, change the date in the settings to confirm the new year if your “theme” doesn’t do it automatically.
  13. Make sure you have a backup of your blog, if your hosting company goes down, you may too.
  14. Set-up a security system besides the one your hosting company has, you can never be too safe.
  15. Set-up Rafflecopter if you want to do giveaways. It’s honest and there shouldn’t be any cheating when Rafflecopter chooses the winners.
  16. Hire a virtual assistant once you can afford to pay one. I did for about six months. Katie Clark was awesome from ClarksCondensed (com).
  17. Set up as many automatic schedulers that you feel appropriate for your budget. This means apps will do the scheduling for you. Yes, they cost money, but time is money. Remember, it’s a business. In order to make money, you must spend money. I’m starting to sound greedy, and I don’t want it to come across as that. I recommend, ViralTag, Co-Schedule, Buffer to start with.
  18. Choose a really good hosting company. They can make or break you, literally.
  19. Find bloggers you can trust and share ideas with. I will forever be thankful for Mary Ellen Seavey and Jazmin Rode for coming into my life through blogging. They have taught me more than any conference I have attended.
  20. Get a good camera, and buy photo stock pictures as well.

Thanks for letting me blab about my life and my blog today. Together we can teach our neighbors to bake bread, start a fire, make tortillas, a batch of beans, use a Sun Oven or boil water in a Dutch Oven. We can wash our clothes, make a portable toilet and washing machine. Please remember to get clothespins, these are my favorite ones: Kevin’s Quality Clothespins Set of 50.

May God bless you and your neighborhoods, we are prepared for the unexpected.

 

The post How I Started My Blog-Food Storage Moms appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Gentle Reminder To Be Prepared To Survive Disasters

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This is my gentle reminder to be prepared to survive disasters. Now, this could be two feet of snow in your yard that doesn’t melt for two months, like a reader, Kathy, told me about where she lives. She said they hadn’t had snow like that in 20 years. What’s really scary is the thought of no garbage pickup or mail delivery for those two months. Luckily, Kathy was prepared with food and water, except for the cat she has who wouldn’t drink the powdered milk! I loved that comment! It’s a good reminder to store extra pet food for our dogs, cats, etc. I’m not sure what the farmers would do for outside animals. I now have a dog again, a male black and white ShihTzu, so I grabbed one extra bag of food when I went to the store the other day. Remember, we also need to store water for our pets, just a quick tip to think about.

Now, two months with that much snow means the roads were probably not driveable or they would have had garbage pickup and mail delivery. Is that a major disaster? Well, if you don’t have direct deposit for your monthly paychecks, retirement checks, or whatever, you may not be able to pay your bills. If you pay your bills online, if available, it wouldn’t be as major a disaster. Of course, if there is no mail delivery you may want to setup paperless statements. I prefer paperless statements on everything because they are never in the mailbox. If the power is down, that’s okay, I have direct deposit and my payments are ACH (automatic clearing house) which means my bills will automatically be paid whether or not I have the Internet. UNLESS we have a grid down we could get things done, with a grid down then payments will not exist. Paychecks will not exist, at least, until power is back up and running. Banks will be closed and your money unavailable. If you haven’t read the book called, “Lights Out” by Ted Koppel, you need to ASAP. Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath

If you haven’t purchased the paperback copy of my book, you may want to in order to be prepared for the unexpected: Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation If you already have it, I thank you from the bottom of my heart for buying it.

Gentle Reminder:

  1. Store food, even if it’s one can a week, just make sure it’s something you will enjoy eating.
  2. Store water, please store at least one gallon per person per day. I prefer four gallons per person per day, but that’s how I roll. Don’t forget to store water for your pet as well.
  3. Store your basic first aid supplies at the very minimum. If the stores are closed you may not have fever reducing medicine at your home if you use it. Yes, I love essential oils, but I need aspirin for my arthritis, it’s the only thing that works for me. Another gentle reminder to check your cabinets for your favorite ones.
  4. Store the product My Doctor Suggests Silver Solution if it’s right for you. I use it whenever I am exposed to sick people. I still wish churches had those hand sanitizer deals hooked to the walls. Oh my, the hand shaking and germs, just thinking out loud. Sorry, I use hand wipes on the grocery carts, I’m not proud, if the stores don’t supply them, I bring my own. Wow, I’m starting to sound like a germaphobic….okay, I own it. I recommend this one: 30ppm, Triple Strength pH Balanced Colloidal Solution – Daily Colloidal Silver Supplement for Immune Health – 16oz Bottle of Silver Water This silver will not turn you blue or gray, I use it all the time and have for years.
  5. These may be considered a first aid kit item, but I highly recommend this cough drop: Original All Natural Silver Lozenges – Soothing Honey with Lemon: The Perfect Cough Drop for Cough, Throat & Mouth Health and Immune Support – Contains 30ppm Silver Solution in Each Drop
  6. Keep your gas tank at least 3/4 full because, as you may know, the tanks’ pumps don’t work without electricity. Now, if you live out in the country where an older gas station still exists and works with a hand crank you are lucky!
  7. Please check on your neighbors if you have a power outage. If you have older people living near you, see if they need help, I’m sure they would love a hug or two, I promise. Before you have a disaster, whether small or big, deliver a case or two of water to an elderly couple on your street. Trust me, if they were your parents you would love to have someone deliver some water in case of emergency. Also, consider giving WaterBricks for Christmas or birthdays to your family members. You can sleep at night knowing your loved ones have water when needed. Please help the elderly fill some containers, they may need that kind of help too.
  8. Flashlights are critical, so be sure to know where they are and have some extra batteries available. I gave a solar one to one of my granddaughters who went to college. She is serving a mission right now for her church, proud grandma here, she took it with her! I love it!

Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected and heeding my gentle reminder tips, I thank you and you neighborhood thanks you! May God bless our world.

My favorite things:

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

WaterBrick WB-0001 Ventless Spigot Assembly, Fits Both WaterBrick Water Container Sizes, Blue/White/Red

WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue

55 Gallon Water Preserver Concentrate 5 Year Emergency Disaster Preparedness, Survival Kits, Emergency Water Storage, Earthquake, Hurricane, Safety  I use 1/2 teaspoon per 3.5-gallon WaterBrick of this product. You only need to rotate every five years.

A New Fighting Chance: Silver Solution: A Quantum Leap In Silver Technology: How molecular structuring safely destroys bacteria, viruses and yeast.

The post Gentle Reminder To Be Prepared To Survive Disasters appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Three Easy Cakes To Make From Scratch

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Can you use three easy cakes to make from scratch? I know summer is coming and we are starting to hear about family reunions. I love taking cakes to family reunions. I can still remember a very yummy cake that Mark’s aunt brought to the Loosli family reunion every year. I swear we all fought to get in line to get a piece of her cake. It was a white sheet cake, topped with real whipping cream and topped with homegrown elderberries or loganberries in a rich gooey sauce. Oh my goodness, I can almost taste it, right now!

Have you heard about the famous chocolate Texas sheet cake? I’m not sure if it was REALLY a Texas cake or not. Maybe it started in Texas, I don’t know. In Utah, we tend to take this cake to every funeral or family reunion because it’s easy to make and serves a lot of people. I think anything with chocolate is always my favorite. So let’s get started with three of my favorite easy cakes to make from scratch.

Easy Cakes:

Texas Chocolate Sheet Cake

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup butter or one cube
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1/4 cup cocoa-dry
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon real salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
 Instructions:
  1. Put the butter, water, and oil in a medium size pan. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat and add flour, sugar, cocoa, soda, salt, and vanilla. Blend in the slightly beaten eggs and buttermilk. Pour into a greased cookie sheet 12″ by 17″ or a 9″ by 13″ cake pan. Bake the cakes @ 350 degrees. Bake the cookie sheet cake approx. 20 minutes. Bake the 9″ by 13″ cake pan for approx. 37 minutes.
  2. Frosting: melt one cube butter in a saucepan, add 4 tablespoons cocoa and 5 tablespoons milk. Bring to a boil. Mix in 4 cups powdered sugar and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Pour over cake while it’s still warm. This cake is very moist and never has any leftovers.

PRINTABLE recipe: Texas Chocolate Sheet Cake by Food Storage Moms

Carrot Cake

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 tsp. soda
  • 2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 cup oil
  • 4 eggs
  • 3 cups shredded/grated carrots
  • 1 tsp. vanilla

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Combine the flour, sugar, soda, seasonings, and oil. Add the rest of the ingredients and thoroughly mix together. Grease a bundt cake pan or two 9-inch cake pans. You can also make 24 cupcakes.

Baking times:

Bundt cake: bake 45 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean

Two-9-inch cake pans: 30 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean

Cupcakes: bake approximately 20-30 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean

PRINTABLE Recipe: Carrot Cake by Food Storage Moms

PRINTABLE recipe: Cream Cheese Frosting by Food Storage Moms

Oatmeal Cake with Brown Sugar Glaze

1-1/4 cup boiling water

1 cup regular uncooked oatmeal (not instant)

1/2 cup softened butter

1 cup sugar

1 cup brown sugar

1 tsp vanilla

2 eggs

1-1/2 cups flour

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1 teaspoon cinnamon

Instructions:

Pour the boiling water over the oatmeal and let it set for 20 minutes. Grab a bowl, use a mixer to beat the butter until creamy, add the sugars and beat until fluffy. Blend in the vanilla and eggs and thoroughly blend until smooth. Add the remaining ingredients and mix them together. Pour into greased pan and bake for 30-40 minutes at 350 degrees, depending on altitude. While the cake is baking mix the frosting recipe below and spread carefully on the cake after it is done. Put the cake back in the oven and broil until the glaze bubbles.

Frosting, combine the following ingredients and spread on the hot baked cake:

1/4 cup butter, melted

1/2 cup brown sugar

3 tablespoons cream

1/3 cup chopped nuts

3/4 cup shredded coconut

PRINTABLE recipe: Oatmeal Cake with Brown Sugar Glaze by Food Storage Moms

Sometimes we just need to make some easy cakes and enjoy a treat with family, friends, and neighbors. Who wouldn’t love a piece of cake from a friend? Thanks again for following my blog and giving me input so we can learn together.

My favorite things:

KitchenAid KHM512ER 5-Speed Ultra Power Hand Mixer, Empire Red

Danish Dough Hand Whisk / Mixer 11″

Top Rated Bellemain Stainless Steel Non-Slip Mixing Bowls with Lids, 4 Piece Set Includes 1 Qt., 1.5 Qt., 3 Qt. & 5 Qt.

The post Three Easy Cakes To Make From Scratch appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Are You Tired Of Being A Crazy Prepper?

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Are you tired of being a crazy prepper? Some people give me a blank stare if I mention “prepper”. I don’t want to be a “crazy prepper”. If you don’t know what I am talking about when I say prepper, let me explain. When I used to hear the word prepper, I assumed it was someone like me who is preparing for the unexpected. I’m a grandma, mother, sister, and an aunt who loves to store food for a rainy day., disaster or unforeseen emergency. Of course, I want to store water as well in order to survive if water lines are disconnected or the water is contaminated in some way. Just a note here, I will not use any tap water anywhere, nope, I will not. There are too many bacteria elements/spores in the water that I don’t want to drink or cook with. I use reverse osmosis in my home to purify it to 99.99% bacteria free. I try never to buy bottled water because I really don’t know where the different companies get their water. But, hey if I’m on the road, I may have to buy a bottle or two.

Let me explain why I am writing today’s post about being a crazy prepper. I started teaching classes on food storage and emergency preparedness in stores and in my home, years and years ago. I couldn’t get enough people in my neighborhood to come on board with me, so to speak, so I started my blog, Food Storage Moms in 2012. I wanted to teach the world about how important it is to be prepared for the unexpected.

Crazy Prepper

Here’s the deal, I feel like there are NOW what I would consider being crazy preppers out there doing things they consider important and reasonable. Please tell me what you think, I will add your comments to my post. It seems like many people are becoming survivalists, that’s not me. I’m just a chick in Southern Utah who wants to know how to survive a disaster or unforeseen emergency. I am not purchasing gas masks, I do store N95 masks because I learned we needed those when Mark and I took our C.E.R.T. classes. I do recommend buying N95 masks in case of a pandemic or if you may be in charge of helping others after a disaster. 3M 1860 Medical Mask N95, 20 Count I also store these in case of a blood or human saliva splash: Dynarex Face Mask with Shield, Tie on Surgical, 50 Count It would be nice to have child size ones as well: Cotton PM2.5 Anti-smog + N95 Activated Carbon Mask Children Masks Bear Green

Is it just me or are some of these preppers or preparedness people becoming a military type operation? This might include storing hundreds of weapons/ammunition, living in a bunker or metal Quonset hut, storing food and other items in metal storage containers located on property in the mountains, not being neighborly since they don’t want others to know what they are doing or storing. One family, I know about has built a 20,000 square foot home with four-foot concrete walls with a 12-foot solar run fence to ward off any scary people/offenders. The house has its own “grocery store” for their family. To you, these efforts may make total sense, but it seems a little over the top for me.

Others have built “bunkers” under the floor in their garages during initial home construction. We have one community not far from here where families are digging enclosures on the side of hills where they plan to live or at least secretly store items to be used in case of disaster. What are your thoughts? I’ve really struggled lately with what I am seeing on blogs, FaceBook, Twitter, and Instagram as some preppers try to justify what they are doing, maybe in hopes of convincing others to do the same. I’ve actually had to take a step back from FaceBook for a few months. Yes, I still look at FaceBook, but I’m quickly scrolling through some of the garbage people are spitting out. I think, really people do you REALLY want to say that in public via social media? Yikes, I feel like I’m on a soapbox. Yes, I love learning from people I respect, but wow, some of the stuff on FaceBook is not acceptable to me. You may say, just get off FaceBook. That’s not going to happen. I have expenses to run my website, I must keep my business FaceBook page. I hope you as readers can understand where I am coming from today.

I started this blog to teach people about food storage and to learn the skills to survive a disaster and not have to depend on the government. Because, as you know, the government cannot take care of everyone. They can’t. Period. This is why I recommend buying an extra can of food each week and storing water as your budget allows you to purchase the necessary containers. I write sometimes to remind myself, oh yeah, Linda get a couple of one dollar bills this week and stash them for emergencies. I remind my readers to keep their gas tank 3/4 full now over the 1/2 full I suggested a  few years ago. The reason being when we lose power we may not have access to get gas for our cars to get out of the city if our community is evacuated. The gas pumps do not work without electricity. If you live out in the country where the gas pumps are hand powered you are the lucky ones.

Prepper Doctor

I have a really awesome prepper doctor. I love him, so let me tell you that upfront. He is a bit over the top to me, but I do respect him for being prepared. He has 5th wheel totally filled with emergency preparedness stuff, a trailer is attached to the 5th wheel ready to take water, and food up into the mountains. I have been to his a house a few times and I LOVE seeing what he has planned. It’s a bit too much for me, but at least he is prepared. He has a double cab truck and is ready to flee when the time comes. I would not say he is a survivalist with military type actions intended. He is teaching people in his church to be prepared for the unexpected. I wish I lived in his neighborhood. The sad thing is, he said he teaches a preparedness class monthly and only 3 or 4 people show up. It’s frustrating to him because he believes as I do that we must all be prepared for the unexpected. This is so frustrating to him.

This is why I will occasionally write a post about getting to know your neighbors. Hopefully, you live by like-minded prepared people. Where I live, I am extremely worried for some of my neighbors. I can count on one hand how many people realize how critical it is to be prepared within a three-mile radius. I’m not saying I want some crazy prepper living on my street, but a few prepared people would be awesome.

Thanks for following me and giving me your input. I want to teach the world to be prepared and learn tips from my readers. I thank you from the bottom of my heart.

My favorite things:

ZYLISS Lock N’ Lift Can Opener with Lid Lifter Magnet, White

Norpro Egg Beater Classic Hand Crank Style 18/10 Stainless Steel Mixer 12 Inches

The post Are You Tired Of Being A Crazy Prepper? appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

12 Reasons Why You Need Family-Friends

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I’m sure there are more than 12 reasons why you need family-friends, but I will start with this number today. I have had a lot of time lately to think back over my life and think about my family and friends. I’ve had a very good life, compared to some people I know. My husband, Mark loves me more than I can even describe. I have been very, very blessed with his compassion and love for me. I grew up in a negative family situation. My mom was a single mom and later married a wonderful man. But life was still very hard for me growing up. I would have to say I have PTSD from my childhood. You don’t need to know the details, but Mark has made me the woman I am today. I do need to say my mom taught me to work hard and be strong, and I’m thankful for that.

I’m sure the people that really know me, like Elaine, Sarah, and Heather would never guess I had a bad childhood. I have never dwelled on it or blamed my parents or grandparents for how I was treated. They have known me as a happy go lucky person who smiles all the time. We can laugh, giggle and cry together. There is something very important about having friends and family you can rely on. So let’s get started with a few of my ideas. I would love to add your ideas as well.

12 Reasons Why You Need Family-Friends:

1. Meals: We can laugh, and giggle while we enjoy time together with family and friends. We can fix meals in the kitchen at someone’s house and burn the bacon and still eat it. Just a note, this happened over Easter weekend. We still ate the bacon, it was just a little more crunchy than usually. The Easter egg hunt took longer than expected, life is good when you can laugh about burnt bacon.

2. Phone calls: I know that social media is very popular and serves a purpose. BUT, there is something really awesome about talking to someone over texting someone. Yes, of course, I text all the time, but I love hearing my friends voices. My adopted granddaughter, Jenna sent me a text last night to let me know her mom was going to the hospital on Monday. I called her mom within 15 minutes of the text. I HAD to talk to her mom, I HAD to hear her voice. I had to laugh with her because that’s what we do. Life is good when you have awesome friends you can call anytime and catch up on life.

3. Holidays: Nothing is better than inviting friends and family over to celebrate holidays, and I mean any holiday. I love excuses to get together with each other. I love hearing different family traditions from new friends as well as old friends. Don’t you love hearing what food each family specializes in for certain holidays? I love tasting new side dishes and sharing the recipes. As you may know already, I LOVE appetizers, they are my favorite food items! I wish I lived closer to my kids and grandkids so I could go to all their birthdays, but that isn’t always possible.

4. Funerals: I must tell you funerals can be happy or sad. I had to stop going to funerals after I went to a celebration for our best friends son, Aaron after he died. His non-funeral was a celebration of life. I will never go to another funeral again, sorry, I can’t. Aaron’s was joyful and we all shared memories of his life. Our best friends had the celebration with his wife and three young kids at a park and lunch was catered. As I remember well over 400 people attended. His life was cut way too short, but his life lives on through his wife, kids, parents, and siblings. I want my non-funeral to duplicate his. He was a hockey player and coach and the youth and their families came out in droves. I can still remember watching him as a kid water ski behind a boat! What an amazing dad he was! Great memories of a great family and friends.

5. Lunches After Funerals: Now, I do not like going to funerals, I will sometimes go to viewings. Please don’t judge me, I tell people I love them before they die. I do, however, LOVE going to the lunches AFTER the burials. Here’s the deal, you talk, laugh and giggle with friends and family you haven’t seen in years. Facebook is fine, and I love seeing what some of my friends and extended family are doing. BUT talking and giggling face to face rocks! I mean it rocks with love!

6. Family loves you no matter what: You can always count on family to love you no matter what. Of course, life isn’t always perfect, but family is family. We accept each other for who we are, and here again, we can laugh and giggle together.

7. Reminisce about old stories: Don’t you just love old family-friend stories we all lived to tell about? I start getting the giggles inside thinking about one story when Mark and I lived in Farmington, Utah. Why dwell on negative stories when you can tell really good stories that maybe the younger kids haven’t heard yet. You know the stories sometimes change a little over the years and some of us can’t remember this or that, but we still laugh and giggle. It’s called history. Mark’s mother wrote a journal her whole married life, maybe even when she was younger I don’t know. It would be nice to keep a journal, but nowadays people take pictures and make photo books with pictures. Pictures tell a thousand words, right? Add a story along with the pictures and you have a true treasure.

8. Being a friend: When you are a friend you help your friends be better people. They help us be better people. We tend to choose those friends that are happy, optimistic and love life. Who needs a Debbie downer around, right? I must admit I’ve been called a Pollyanna, and that’s okay, I own it. I have been called a cheerleader by my life coach, Lyn. Life is good when you have good friends.

9. You’re less lonely when you have friends: My biggest regret in life is how lonely my mom was after my dad died. Unfortunately, because she was lonely in her later years she became somewhat of an unhappy recluse. She became angry, although I didn’t understand it at the time. Now that I am older and a bit wiser, I think I understand her moods. If does make me sad because I didn’t visit her when I had my career life. I lived about 400 miles away, but that is no excuse. I see that now. She just needed someone to take her to lunch, to visit her and pamper her. I didn’t do that. That is something I regret BIG time. If you have an older neighbor or relative you live close to, please visit them often. They need it and you will grow from it. I know, because I try to visit my lonely neighbors now. People need friends, no doubt about it.

10. Friends and family can make you miserable sometimes: We all know the ones at family reunions we all want to sit by, and the ones at neighborhood lunches we love sitting by. We also know the friends and family members that can make us miserable and they probably don’t even know it. They whine and complain and are sometimes just plain hard to be around. But it’s life, what can we say. They are family and friends.

11. Friends support us through thick and thin: I remember calling the friends above after I learned one of my daughters had just been diagnosed with a disease. I could hardly say the words through the tears. I felt guilty because I thought maybe I had eaten something when I was pregnant with her that caused this awful disease, or what I fed her or whatever. I knew I had to call my friends. I called Elaine first and we cried together, then Heather, then Sarah. I knew they would understand how I felt. I get emotional just thinking about when I made those phone calls. Thank goodness for friends, awesome friends.

12. Gender doesn’t matter with friends: I have female friends and male friends. I know I can call anyone of them and they will listen and console me if needed. I’m making it sound like I call my friends all the time to be consoled. I don’t. But I have called them for advice because they wouldn’t judge me. They would listen. Listening is being a really good friend and sharing advice when needed. One of my really good male friends is more like a brother to me. We would call each other about every six months or so until he started getting Dementia or Alzheimer’s. I cry when I think about the 25+ years we have been friends. He has gone down hill faster than I would have expected. Age is not always good to us. May God bless all those who care for family members with Dementia or Alzheimers in their homes. I see it here where I live, it’s a 24/7 hour job for those neighbors.

Please hug your family members every time you see them and tell them you love them. Please do the same with your friends, I promise they would love to hear how much you care about them. Mark has three best friends, and they tell each other often how much they truly value their friendships. They express their love to each other as well. Life is good with friends that love you, May God bless you to express your love to family and friends today, not tomorrow. Tomorrow may not come. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected.

My favorite things:

WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

Norpro Egg Beater Classic Hand Crank Style 18/10 Stainless Steel Mixer 12 Inches

Top Rated Bellemain Stainless Steel Non-Slip Mixing Bowls with Lids, 4 Piece Set Includes 1 Qt., 1.5 Qt., 3 Qt. & 5 Qt.

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Why You Need To Meet Your Neighbors

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My post today is explaining why you need to meet your neighbors. Of course, if you have lived in the same house for 30 years, you probably know almost everyone on the street. Where I live is mostly renters, so the people move in and out all the time. It’s a bit more difficult to get to know the ones that rent only 60 days, or even six months. I do have about 30% of the people on my street that actually own their homes. I live in a neighborhood where about 50% of the people are under 60 years old and about 50% are over the age of 60. It’s quite common to hear at least one or two ambulances every other month in my subdivision.

This is the reason why I feel very strongly about writing this post today. This last weekend was spring break and Easter. Well, Mark and I had company here and we heard the sirens very close to our home. Mark walked down the street to see if he could help in any way. He saw an ambulance drive away from a friend’s home. I’m sure because of “privacy issues” the fireman standing next to the firetruck would not confirm Mark’s question as to who was in the ambulance. The front door was open at the home and Mark rang the doorbell to see if her daughter was still there. The daughter is older and has some very critical medical issues so Mark asked her “was that your mom in the ambulance?” She nodded and said, “just call her”. Well, our friend in the ambulance did not answer her phone. Mark started trying to call people in the neighborhood who knew her extended family members’ phone numbers.

Keep in mind it’s the day before Easter and most people were out of town. All we needed was a phone number to contact her relatives to help with her daughter and let them know the ambulance left with our friend. It took Mark about an hour to get a relative’s phone number. Mark called a few people who then headed to the main hospital we have here in town. Luckily, she was okay, but was in really bad pain and the emergency room took very good care of her. The people who went to the hospital were able to bring her home after she was treated.

Meet Your Neighbors:

Here’s the deal why you need to meet your neighbors, we need contact information. Now, some people are very private and would never give you any information. I remember one day I looked in my mailbox and there was an envelope with a different address, that obviously had some credit cards enclosed. I walked down about four houses and knocked on the door. Well, I’ve never met these people and they must not want to meet anyone on the street. They had a huge sign on the door that says something like “We have our own religion, We don’t need anything, We don’t want to buy anything, and We love Jesus”. Well, I was hoping to give the credit cards to them personally but I put them in their mailbox. I get it.  I won’t be asking them to come to my “Contact Information” party, complete with bagels and cream cheese.

I am going to go knock on a few front doors and see if I can get a few to come to my party to share names and phone numbers in case of an emergency. Mark has two great friends, Craig and Craig in the neighborhood and I’m filling out a form for them to have in case of an emergency. I’m filling out a form for our best friends, Brent and Kathleen to have in case they need to get in touch with family members for any reason, emergency or whatever. I hope I can get a few people to come to my “Contact Information” party and this way we can all help each other when needed.

This picture below is a partial copy of the document, and here is the PRINTABLE: FSM Emergency Contact Info

meet your neighbors

I also have a shortened version I call my Emergency Contact Information PRINTABLE: Emergency Contact Information

Emergency Contact Information

Name:

  1. Email:
  2. Home phone number:
  3. Cell phone number:
  4. People to contact with information indicated above

Name:

  1. Email:
  2. Home phone number:
  3. Cell phone number:
  4. People to contact with information indicated above

 

Just think how much easier it would be for everyone if we could contact family members or friends of our neighbors after a disaster, or an unforeseen emergency if we had emails, phone numbers, etc. Of course, I’m hoping we have electricity or the internet in order to do this, I understand we may not at some time or another. Block parties would be awesome as well. This is why you need to meet your neighbors. I need to meet all of my neighbors. May God bless you and your neighbors to get together and share emergency contact information.

My favorite things:

Neenah Exact Index Card Stock, 8.5 x 11 Inch, 90 lb, White, 250 Sheets (40311)

Avery 74102 Top loading non-glare poly sheet protectors, heavy, 100 per box

Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

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Can We Ever Be a Minimalist Person?

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First of all, can we be a minimalist person these days? I’ve really been trying to declutter my kitchen, my bedroom closets, the bathroom cupboards, the dresser drawers in every room, the hall closet, and the garage. I want less stuff on the horizontal spaces in my house. First of all, I do not like to dust. Thankfully Mark dusts the house. I can’t say he loves dusting, but he is quick to grab the dusting can and the rags to get the job done. I never judge how he dusts, if he doesn’t dust NO ONE WILL. So there you have it. I detest dusting. It’s so crazy because I love cleaning bathrooms and all the tile floors in the house. Remember, we only have a 1900 square foot home so it’s pretty easy and fast to clean. My entire house has tile, no carpet. I have a rug in the living room and two small rugs by the front and back door. A mop works great.

In 2009 we moved from northern Utah where we had a 4800 square foot home with two kitchens, two living rooms, six bedrooms and four bathrooms. It was great to have the grandkids over and they had a playroom with dress-ups and toys galore. It was the gathering home. Well, one day my doctor told me I needed to get rid of the stress in my life at the time for the sake of my health. I owned my own mortgage company and I worked 60-80 hours a week. Lunches at my desk. No sick leave, no vacation. If I left my staff would not get a paycheck. I did this for 15 years. Enough is enough. We gave all of our furniture to our kids and friends when we decided the time was right to make the move. I hate selling stuff. It’s me, if someone needs it they can have it.

So we loaded up and moved to Southern Utah. I thought this will be nice, a smaller home that we had purchased for the “downsizing time” called semi-retirement. Mark and I are both type “A” and will never entirely retire because we love helping out with our neighbors and the community.

Here’s the deal, I thought I could never be a minimalist person. Now I want a tiny home with my food storage and emergency preparedness items pulled behind the tiny house in a trailer. Mark won’t go for the tiny house, but that’s my goal if I still have my health to do it.

Minimalist Person Ideas

You may ask what the in the world is a minimalist person? Here are my thoughts. Just because I want this doesn’t mean it’s right for you, or anyone else.

  1. Less consumerism….I never NEED the newest and greatest electronic gadget.
  2. Clutter free life, this has taken me several years, it’s still a work in progress.
  3. I want fewer clothes…..I want 5 shirts, 5 pants, 1 sweater and one skirt.
  4. I want fewer pairs of shoes, I used to buy ten pairs of shoes at once. That was downright dumb. I had zero time to shop when I worked. I’m down to three to five pairs and that is changing this weekend when I purge again.
  5. I want less furniture, I’m still giving away furniture to this day. I want less….more empty space.
  6. Simplify my life……I want FREE time.
  7. Simple environment…..I want to SMELL the roses, literally.
  8. Quiet surroundings….I want five or maybe ten acres with trees and no sounds except my dog.
  9. Less cleaning…..tile rocks in a desert home and is so clean.
  10. Less stuff…this is still a work in progress. I take stuff to the thrift store weekly.
  11. No valuables to hang onto…I have no valuables.
  12. Less material things, we bought the cheapest large TV we could find because Mark loves sports. It works, that’s our entertainment.
  13. NO deadlines or schedules…..I want to be able to get up in the morning and say…I’m walking five miles today..in another town.
  14. Continue living a frugal life….this is easy for me.
  15. I gave up my second car to see if we could live with one car, we have had one car for 7-1/2 years now (I do not carpool kids).
  16. I rarely eat out because the food is expensive and the food is way too salty or greasy.
  17. I want to eat healthier and eat less meat, yep I said it. Actually no meat or liquid meat like milk, or any dairy. Mark still eats milk and cold cereal. He takes zero prescriptions, and all his blood work is excellent. Not sure how he does it!
  18. Donate stuff while people will still wear it or use it. YES, clothes go out of style.
  19. Buy right the first time, it will save you money in the long run. Don’t step over dimes to save pennies, or whatever the statement may be. I know some people who made big mistakes spending less on something of less quality only to end up buying the better item within months. In other words, it cost them more the second time because now they have two saws (one that works and one that is not workable). We have had ours for 35 years and finished more than a dozen houses or home remodels with that DeWalt!
  20. Live like today is your last day on earth.
  21. Make a bucket list or imagination board and DO IT!
  22. Think of all the money you will save…..
  23. Grow a garden and put your hands in the earth…it feels wonderful.
  24. Check on your older neighbors on your street….it costs nothing to make them smile, I promise.
  25. Check in with friends and family and talk to them about THEM, not about you, just listen, it’s free and so rewarding.

I have to finish this post with a story about some close friends of ours. Brent and Kathleen were out of town a few years ago and a friend of theirs died up north where they were visiting. Brent called me and asked to go to their house here and get his jacket, a shirt, and a tie to overnight them to him. He was speaking at a funeral. I know the garage code, and as I’m going into their house I said “Brent, which jacket, shirt, and tie do want me to ship? He said, “what do you mean, I only have one jacket, one shirt, and one tie”. My life changed that day about “stuff”. Brent said “I can’t wear more than one jacket, shirt or tie at once. Just go and get the ones in the closet.” Sure enough, there was ONE jacket, ONE shirt, and ONE tie. He is my hero and so is his wife. She is exactly like him.

Let me know if you have the feeling of wanting to be a minimalist person, one step at a time. I would love to hear. Kathleen, my friend above, and I have helped at least 50-60 people move out of their homes over the last 7-8 years. Trust me, start decluttering NOW. I promise you’ll be a lot happier, and so will the movers helping you move. Your kids will be glad after you die. I promise, they don’t want all those trinkets or some of the “valuables” you have. SELL them NOW. Remember, you can’t take it with you, and the kids probably don’t want it. Let’s all try to simplify!

My Favorite Things:

8 Quart Stainless Steel Mixing Bowl by The Cook’s Connection

Norpro Egg Beater Classic Hand Crank Style 18/10 Stainless Steel Mixer 12 Inches

Danish Dough Hand Whisk / Mixer 11″

Bellemain Stainless Steel Measuring Cup Set, 6 Piece

Measuring Cups and Spoons 13 Piece Complete Set of Quality Professional Grade 18:8 Stainless Steel – 7 Stackable Cups and 6 Nesting Spoons Perfect for Dry and Liquid Ingredients

The post Can We Ever Be a Minimalist Person? appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Survival Books You Will Need In Hard Copies

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I recommend these survival books you will need in hard copies, not the e-book versions. If we lose power, and we will, we want a hard copy of certain books. I had a reader ask me to remind all of us to get hard copies of survival books. Now, as I’ve mentioned before I will not be hiking up into the mountains to flee my neighborhood. There again, if my house is flattened from an earthquake or flood, I will have to evacuate. I only buy hard copies of books that I need today, or possibly next year for knowledge to help me and my neighborhood get through just about any disaster, including an EMP. If you haven’t read Ted Koppel’s book as outlined below, I highly recommend it. I was actually interviewed and recorded for my thoughts about living without electricity. Although my thoughts were not included in the book it was a compliment to me to be asked for my ideas.

So let’s get started with some of the survival books I suggest you get. The word survival may sound a little strong, but let’s just say we may need some tools to get us all through rough times, and we will have rough times at some point in our lives if we haven’t already. My attitude has always been “buy right the first time”. Please keep in mind that some of these books are a bit pricey, but you get what you pay for in knowledge that is so beneficial.

Survival Books:

  1. I was honored to be asked to write this book by Page Street Publishing, it is family friendly and you can have your children and grandchildren read it. When I was asked to write the book, I mentioned I did not want to talk about weapons in my book. Period. If you are wondering if I have a weapon, yes I do. Mark and I both have our concealed weapons permits, and we both know how to shoot. Mark more than me. Weapons are a personal topic. I will leave it at that.Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation
  2. I have very little skills in the medical field, so I use this book all the time. Remember, if we lose power you will not be able to “Google” a question you are wondering about, just giving you the heads-up here. This book is user-friendly and has just about everything I have ever needed to look up as far as medical information. The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way
  3. I wish I could get more people to read this book. I bought the hard copy and I could only get one friend to read it. If you want to know the truth about our country’s power grid and how sadly it is unprotected against terrorist attacks and how it would be virtually impossible to repair, let alone replace, you need to read this book. Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath We will need far more than candles, my friends.
  4. This is my bible for essential oils. The FDA will not let us say much about essential oils because they have shut down websites for saying too much. First of all, I do not believe they cure anything, but they rock for other things. You can buy a pocket size book, or the larger one with tons of information, which is what I did. I actually purchased both. I have one in the car, one in my first aid kits, and one in the living room. Essential Oils Pocket Reference WOW, the larger one is so expensive now. When I bought it I choked over the $90.00 price. This book is packed with knowledge but is extremely costly. Essential Oils Desk Reference 6th Edition (6th Edition) (1905-07-21) [Spiral-bound] I have seen the prices of food storage and emergency preparedness items skyrocket over the last few years. Check out thrift stores whenever possible for books and equipment.
  5. Lisa Bedford from The Survival Mom is a friend of mine and she was actually one of the first preppers to write a book, as far I know. Survival Mom: How to Prepare Your Family for Everyday Disasters and Worst-Case Scenarios
  6. Bernie Carr is a friend of mine and I have all of her books, this one is great for kids: Jake and Miller’s Big Adventure: A Prepper’s Book for Kids and this is great one: The Prepper’s Pocket Guide: 101 Easy Things You Can Do to Ready Your Home for a Disaster
  7. I read this book and I was emotional the entire time reading about the truth of what happened at Memorial Hospital after Hurricane Katrina. Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital I REALLY want to put this book on my list because this book tells what happened at one of the main hospitals AFTER Hurricane Katrina. Please read and be prepared to take care of yourself and your family. These poor nurses and doctors, what they had to go through…………..and the patients. God bless all the families involved in that tragedy.

I’m sure there are other survival books, but these are my favorite ones and aren’t necessarily Doomsday type books. We need the knowledge before a disaster or unforeseen emergency hits our neighborhood. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. May God bless all of us.

American Red Cross

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15 Reasons Why You Do Not Want To Bug Out

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I’m sharing 15 reasons why you do not want to bug out. First of all, I have never liked the word bug out. For years we have heard we need a 72-hour kit either from your local church, county or state agencies. Frankly, they are useless. Yes, they will be fine for a day or two if you haul water with them. I’m coming on pretty strong today because I am actually sick and tired of seeing negative comments on Facebook that have to do with our government. I’m pretty opinionated on my views, but you will NEVER see them on Facebook. I have better things to do with my time. Okay, I better step down off my soapbox and explain why I will not bug out or leave my home after a disaster. If my house caves in after an earthquake, yes I will have to leave, that’s another story. If and when we go to war things will change, we need to be ready for war within our own country. Possibly even our own neighborhoods. Maybe “war” is a bit strong, but oh my gosh, I would hate to live by some of the people who are making negative statements on Facebook or on blogs and websites.

I have lived through a tornado in Illinois, an ice storm in Illinois, major flooding in Utah and horrendous winds in Utah. I’ve bailed water from flooded homes and sandbagged many houses over the years. I’m very concerned where I live today because I live fairly close to a major freeway. I can bet you right now we will have riots on that freeway when the SHTF! The county where I live has warned us about this. It’s the main thoroughfare for California and Nevada heading to northern Utah. The county is expecting 400,000 to 500,000 people to head to Utah if the west coast has issues, and it will. There is no other place to go, they will head this way.

I have told you before about the first 72 hours after a disaster. The first 24 hours the lights will go out because we will have no power. We may look across the street to see if the neighbors have power, nope, it’s dark there too. Don’t flush those toilets it may back up into your house. Just giving you the heads-up here. If you don’t have an emergency toilet, you better get one NOW, and a shovel to bury the refuse away from any water source.

The next 24 hours, we will be checking with our neighbors to see what’s going on. We may get an alert IF the disaster is only our neighborhood. If you haven’t registered your cell phone with your city or county please do it today. Just Google Reverse 911 and your city or county. You will then follow the instructions to add your phone number to the emergency database. Hopefully, your neighbors have stored some food and water because the local grocery stores will be empty with 48 hours or less. I can picture checking on a few of my neighbors, unless of course it’s a pandemic. Then I will not leave my home. In my neighborhood, I could only get two other families to get good walkie talkies so we could communicate if we had to stay in our homes. I taught a class once and this is the set the search and rescue team suggested we all get. Motorola MR350R 35-Mile Range 22-Channel FRS/GMRS Two-Way Radio (Pair) I’ve seen these at Costco sometimes as well.

The next 24 hours people are going to start getting agitated if they haven’t already. Here’s the deal, some people are prepared, but most are not prepared for any disaster or unforeseen emergency. I have had people say, I’m going to Linda’s if the SHTF or after a disaster. Really? You may want to think again. I cannot feed the neighborhood or supply enough water for everyone. It’s not going to happen. I have asked many neighbors to get prepared for the unexpected. Some have followed my advice and many, many have not. Do I get discouraged, sure I do! Some people think the government will take care of them. Some people believe that faith in their church will carry them through anything. When people get hungry, they get mean. I mean really mean. They will do anything to feed and hydrate their family.

Today, I am begging you to see if you can get your neighborhood to be prepared. I feel like screaming from my rooftop and no one is listening. I know a lot of my readers leave me comments they are prepared, or at least working on it. I thank you from the bottom of my heart. You rock, but I have probably told you that before! Now, I do not have a tent, bunker or a house in the woods away from civilization. So, here are my thoughts today why you do not want to bug out unless you have the means to do it.

15 Reasons Why You Do Not Want To Bug Out

  1. Your house would be your safest bet to keep you from the weather, hot or cold. I may have told you about my friend that purchased a tent that would fit 8-10 people. I couldn’t even get that box in my only car, a Honda CRV. Nope, it would not fit. I am not buying a tent. Period.
  2. Our homes hopefully have the food we have stored for emergencies.
  3. Our homes should have water stored to go with that food and to keep our family hydrated.
  4. I have a comfortable bed in my home and will sleep better than a cot or in a sleeping bag in a tent.
  5. I have my cooking devices I will need to prepare meals or boil water.
  6. I have an emergency toilet complete with bags, kitty litter and lots of toilet paper. I made family cloths that are ready to use once the toilet paper runs out. I cut flannel into 9-inch squares.
  7. I have two different ways in my home beside the washing machine to wash and rinse my clothes. Yep, I even have a clothesline.
  8. I have fuel stored in my garage that is not flammable, and propane in my yard that is flammable.
  9. I have all my kitchen supplies with pans, Dutch ovens, my Sun Oven, etc. right here at home.
  10. I have all the first aid supplies at my fingertips. I could suture a bad cut if I need to do that.
  11. I have the tools, shovels, etc. right here ready to use.
  12. I have solar power ready to power up my Bosch bread maker or my wheat grinder. Of course, if I have no power I have a hand crank wheat grinder ready to start cranking to grind my hard white wheat I have stored. I still have my large stainless steel bowl to make bread by hand. I love that bowl, by the way, my mom used to have one to make her bread. If you don’t have one, get one. Update International (MB-1600) 16 qt Stainless Steel Mixing Bowl
  13. It’s safer being at home unless of course, we have an earthquake and our home is flattened. If you think going up to the mountains to survive is going to be safer, think again. We don’t know what’s in the mountains, are there crazy people up there looking for food or water? You may run into strangers who are not friendly. You may become a target, think about that.
  14. The roads may not be safe if you can get gas for your car. You may remember I use to say keep your gas tank half full. Now, I recommend no less than 3/4 full. Those fuel pumps at the gas stations don’t work without electricity.
  15. Please get together with your neighbors and see if you can put a plan together to help each other. People will get mean when they have no food or water after a disaster. You will be safer at home with all the preps you have been gathering over the years. Your neighborhood is YOUR community, we must work together.

May God bless this world, we have major issues coming. If we are prepared we will not be afraid. I am prepared for anything that comes my way. I hope our neighbors do not depend on us. We must all bring something to the table. The government will not be able to help everyone right away. There are not enough medical personnel to take care of our entire community. Trust, me on that one. I took a C.E.R.T. class and the county gave us the statistics, our city had like 180 beds in the hospital. Yes, the medical personnel will make do in schools and churches, but we must be able to take care of our own medical needs until help arrives. Please take some classes and buy this book. I call it my medical bible. If we don’t have power a Kindle version will not work. The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way

Please buy my book before you need it: Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation My book is available worldwide online and in every bookstore. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for trying to be prepared for the unexpected.

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How To Use Canned Ground Beef

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I’m so excited to share with you how to use canned ground beef! You may remember I took classes to receive my Master Preserver Canning Certificate from USU (Utah State University) extension service using the USDA canning guidelines. I have canned everything possible now after taking that class. Well, I better clarify that I have not pressure canned any wild meat. By the way, I talked Mark into taking the class with me and we both passed the test with flying colors, thank goodness! We pressure canned cooked ground beef and cooked ground beef patties. We also pressure canned raw chicken. Here’s the deal, it was great pressure canning meat in the class. I must admit I will not do it at home. Mark and I eat very little meat, but I loved the experience and it’s really easy to do.

BUT, after Pleasant Hill Grain sent me some cans of cooked ground beef so I could sample it and write a review, I was literally in awe. Why would I do this myself when I can buy two cases of it from a commercial company I trust? After I fixed the chili with the first can of cooked ground beef, I went online and ordered two cases. Oh, my goodness, you can make so many things with just one can! I remember growing up and we had hamburger meat several times a week. I grew up with a single mom so money was tight, but I didn’t know how tight at the time. Then my mom remarried and things were a little better, but we still didn’t have a lot of fluff, so speak. My mom taught me to make bread, and after having kids of my own, I taught them how to make bread for their family too.

What I love about opening a can of cooked ground beef is the meat is ready to add to most every recipe we want to make that calls for meat. It won’t make meatloaf because it’s cooked crumbled beef, but that’s okay. I love having something in my pantry that I can add to a meal at the last minute, or, to prepare a meal in the slow cooker. Here are a few meals I started thinking about that we can all make. Please send me your ideas and I will add them to my list. Who wouldn’t love having 13 ounces of ground cooked ground beef in a can and ready to go? I’m going to tell everyone I know about this meat! We can all get canned tuna, roast beef or chicken at Costco, but not cooked ground beef! Woohoo!

I used to buy the frozen meatballs so Mark could have some meat in his spaghetti, not anymore, I’ll grab a can of this yummy ground beef!

How To Use Canned Ground Beef:

  1. Soups
  2. Chili
  3. Stroganoff
  4. Casseroles
  5. Creamed ground beef over biscuits
  6. Spaghetti
  7. Tacos
  8. Snack ramen, beef, and peas
  9. Lasagna
  10. Sloppy joes
  11. Burritos
  12. Beans, rice, and beef
  13. Stuffed bell peppers
  14. Manicotti
  15. Tamale pie
  16. Shepherds pie
  17. Asian wraps
  18. Taco soup
  19. Mexican pie
  20. Mexican pizza
  21. Goulash
  22. Tator Tot casserole
  23. Beef nacho casserole
  24. Italian wedding soup
  25. Seven layers Mexican dip

If you have a farm or mini farm and raise your own beef, that’s awesome! This works for me and I don’t use any freezer space to store my cooked ground beef! Here’s yet another way to be prepared for the unexpected. If we lose power, we still have some meat on our pantry shelves. Agaiin, if you have ideas of how to use this kind of meat product please let me know.  I love sharing my reader’s ideas so the world can learn and be better prepared.  Thanks for your loyalty and for visiting my site.

My favorite things:

Lodge L12CO3 Cast Iron Camp Dutch Oven, 6 quart

Lodge L10SK3ASHH41B Cast Iron Skillet, Pre-Seasoned, 12-inch

Kelly Kettle Large Stainless Steel Base Camp Basic Kit

WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

WaterBrick – 4 Pack Blue with Spigot

The post How To Use Canned Ground Beef appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

My Favorite Kind Of Food Storage

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This is my favorite kind of food storage, when you can stretch a meal from one can of meat, for instance, for an entire family. When my girls were growing up we always had taco Fridays. I bet you can picture what I’m about to say, I would add rice to stretch the cooked 1/2 pound hamburger for six people. Sometimes, I would add leftover hash browns. Right? Well, Pleasant Hill Grain asked me if I would do a review on some of the new food storage items they carry. You may remember that company because I mention them when I’m doing a post on my colored 5-gallon buckets with matching Gamma lids. Yep, that’s the company. These opinions today are my own, I will never agree to do a review on items I will not use or eat myself, so let’s get started. P.S. I can tell you I love everything they sell on their website. I’ve been using them to purchase so many products over the years.

These are the items I received, as shown above, for two reasons I will show you a few cans that are open. I wanted to see what was in some of the cans and I’m sure you do too! I have recommended the “Red Feather” butter in a can for years, its butter and It’s yummy! I have heard about the “Bega Cheese” from Australia, but had never tried it. It tastes a little like Velveeta cheese, but a little milder. It would be a great treat on crackers after a disaster! Trust me on that one, we will soon get tired of peanut butter and jelly on crackers. Although, that sounds pretty good right now! LOL! If you can’t or have no desire to make bread, store a few boxes of crackers that we’ll need to fill our bellies with some food. Add some of this meat with some mayo on the crackers, or add it to a casserole and we have a meal.

My Favorite Kind of Food Storage

The box came with a note and I quote part of it, “The largest consumption region for canned cheese is the Middle East, but Bega isn’t a Middle-Eastern company, it’s an Australian company and their cheese is produced in Austrailia. Bega uses the same packaging for cheese that’s shipped worldwide, so the labeling and certification is designed to best suit the areas where their products are most popular.” I’m using the cooked ground beef shown above in some chili tonight, add some beans, diced tomatoes, and spices and I’m good to go. I have grated cheese and chopped onion with crackers on the side. I love it!

I’ve seen this cheese available at so many emergency preparedness stores and wondered what it looked like. I was always hoping they had testers of the cheese like at Costco. I would buy it for sure now to add to my food storage stash. Add some salsa with it and bring on the tortilla chips, yummy!

Here’s a picture of the bacon right out of the “Yoder’s” bacon can. I did a post on Yoder’s bacon and compared it to a package of the slightly thin cooked bacon from Costco in the refrigerator section a few years ago. It’s the same thing, or seems like the same thing to me. It had the exact same number of slices, yes it did! Awesome, huh? Yet, the can takes up so little space on the pantry shelf (no refrigerations required). You will love some bacon in your food storage for a special treat when the freezers do not work because of a power outage. It makes me want a BLT as in bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich right now. Everything is better with bacon on it, don’t you think so?

My Favorite Kind of Food Storage

I was really glad Pleasant Hill Grain sent me a can of Ghee-Clarified butter. Here’s the deal, I took the classes last year from the USU via the USDA and passed the test to receive my Master Preserver Canning Certificate. I learned how to preserve (pressure can, water bath, dehydrate, etc.) many things. I did learn we cannot can the following items:

  1. Butter or Ghee (clarified butter, because it still has too much fat). Let me explain how you can use this can of Ghee. You can use it to barbecue your meat, saute and fry egg dishes, veggies, and dipping sauces. Use it for baking healthier cakes, pies, pastries, and candy. It has a great flavor on popped popcorn. you can use it in place of 1/2 to 2/3 as much of your regular cooking oils. It’s lactose-free and has no trans fat. The ingredients are fresh pasteurized cream.
  2. Bacon, it’s not safe, it has too much fat
  3. Eggs
  4. Milk, because of too much fat

I know I have received several emails saying people have links where you can follow on how to safely “can them”, sorry, I follow the USDA guidelines. They suggest we do not. I have been canning food for over 50 years and I follow the USDA rules. It’s how I roll. I love that commercial companies make it available in a safe way for us to store for future use on our pantry shelves.

The canned turkey and chicken have no water added, only salt and pepper. They would be great in casseroles, or add some mayo for sandwiches. The pork and beef chunks also have no water added, just salt and pepper. I grew up on roast beef leftover meat with mayo and relish, so that can is ready to open for me any day now! I like the size of the cans because I can make the following items and more with any of the canned meats:

  1. tacos
  2. enchiladas
  3. pork carnitas
  4. soups
  5. stews
  6. casseroles
  7. beef stroganoff
  8. pork burritos
  9. chicken burritos
  10. beef burritos
  11. creamed turkey over crepes
  12. chili

You get what I’m saying, the menus are not limited at all. The meats are all cooked, we just add them to any meal, easy peasy. Thank you, Pleasant Hill Grain for giving me the chance to share my favorite kind of food storage with my readers. May God bless you for your effort to fill your shelves with food your family will enjoy eating.

Pleasant Hill Grain meats

Pleasant Hill Grain dairy

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How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

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Today, I’m following up with my ideas on how to store emergency preparedness items. I have a small home, as I have mentioned before. It’s 1900 square feet, and you may remember, I have a three car garage. The third stall, which could hardly fit any size car, is where Mark and I organized all our emergency preparedness items. All my food storage remains inside the house. I only store emergency preparedness stuff that can withstand the heat here in Southern Utah in the summer. Outside temperatures have gotten as high as 120 degrees, making the temperature in the garage, even with all the insulation we have added, higher than food storage items can stand for any length of time. Yep, it’s hot here in the summer! We have a lot of dust here, so you see that I all of my stuff has been put in protective plastic zippered bags.

I hope this post shows the world several different options to store emergency preparedness items. I apologize for the different size pictures, but I wanted you to see as much as possible on each rack.

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

I have hanging shelves from my garage ceilings (I have seen the shelves at Costco). They are 4 feet by 8 feet and about 18-24 inches hanging from the ceiling. The portable washing machines are two 6-gallon buckets (one has drilled holes in it), a green Gamma lid and a mobile washer like this one: Breathing Mobile Washer Classic – Portable Clothes Washing Machine – Handheld – Manual – Mobile Hand Powered Laundry Solution – Superior Materials and Construction The large wash buckets can be found at most stores, these are made by Behrens. Behrens 2, 15-Gallon Round Steel Tub I went to an antique store to get a washboard. Bwbg7 Galvanized Washboard (Wbg7)

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

I bought some heavy duty racks from Costco online and they deliver them to your house. They are 72 inches tall by 48 inches wide and 18 inches deep. They have some heavy duty rolling wheels which are nice when I need to move them.

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

I label everything with cardstock and place the 1/2 sheets in the buckets so I know what I have in each one. My 72-hour kits below are in plastic bags with a list of items that are in each one.

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

I have a very small kitchen, so I store my pressure canner and water bath canner outside in those bags as well. These are the bags that I buy, depending on the size of the item I’m storing: Richards Homewares – Set of 4 Md Chests 12 Guage Vinyl 12x16x8 each, Kitchen You can buy these at Bed Bath and Beyond as well. All of my Lodge Dutch ovens and cast iron pieces have Lodge bags, if available, and then they are stored in the appropriate size bags to keep them dust free. Set of 2 Clear Zippered Sweater Storage Bags

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

The buckets below are color coded for a reason. I can see at a glance how much FUEL I have. I have the regular propane tanks out on the back patio stored away from the house. I buy these colored buckets and Gamma lids from Pleasant Hill Grain: Gamma Lids (all different colors) and the 5-gallon colored buckets. Any bucket with a lid will work, I’m just an organized chick, it’s who I am.

  1. Green-clean scrap wood
  2. Red-oak lump charcoal
  3. Black-clean pine cones
  4. Blue-Kingsford’s charcoal briquettes without the starter fluid

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

Now, that I have shared some of my ideas on how to store emergency preparedness items, please share yours with me. I will add them to my post. May God bless us all when an unforeseen disaster strikes our community. We will be ready, that’s for sure.

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How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Today it’s all about how to store as much water as possible for any disaster or unforeseen emergency. This post follows yesterday’s “how to store food storage” in a small home. Today, I’m going to show you how I store water several different ways. I love getting emails asking how do I store water, food storage and just about everything else. So, I decided to invite you into my home and show you how I store my emergency preparedness items. There are so many ways to store water, some are expensive, some are fairly cheap. Keep in mind, I didn’t buy all of these items in a day. Please note when filling any water container be sure to use a lead-free hose like this one: NeverKink 8612-50 Boat and Camper Hose, Drinking Water Safe, 5/8-Inch-by-50-Foot

I live in a fairly small home that’s 1900 square feet. I mentioned yesterday, I have a three car garage. Here’s the deal, there is no way you could get two normal size cars in the double garage. The third stall we store our emergency prep items. I live in Southern Utah where the temperatures get up to 120 degrees sometimes in the summer. All my food storage is stored inside my house.

Let’s get started with how to store as much water as possible! This is a queen size bed in my guest room. The room is very small. I have 16 WaterBricks (the 3.5-gallon ones) under the bed filled water and Water Preserver. 55 Gallon Water Preserver Concentrate 5 Year Emergency Disaster Preparedness, Survival Kits, Emergency Water Storage, Earthquake, Hurricane, Safety The reason I use Water Preserver for water preservation is because I only have to rotate the water every five years. If you decide to use bleach in your water containers, you will need to rotate the water every six months.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Now, this picture is in my master bedroom where I have a dresser shown kitty-corner. It’s not flat against the wall and looks awesome in the bedroom without anyone knowing I have 12 cases of Blue Cans stacked neatly behind the dresser. Please brace yourself for the cost of these. This stack of water is one of the things I have been saving money to buy. They last 50 years and taste better than any water I have tasted. I have reverse osmosis in my kitchen, so I’m pretty fussy as to the taste of water. These can be stored up to 145 degrees, awesome, huh? If you look at the website they are cheaper, if you can pick them up. I ordered mine off of Amazon. Blue Can – Premium Emergency Drinking Water Please check this website if they have a distributor near you: Blue Can Water I bought these Blue Cans to store and not have to worry about rotating due to age, or fret due to the temperature in my home. I can sleep at night, yes I would call it a luxury, that’s how I roll with water.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

This tank below holds 160 gallons and has two spigots. You can find these at most emergency preparedness stores. I like the fact that I can fill it on the top and fill a bucket with one of the spigots, or drain the entire tank from the lower spigot. I used three containers of the Water Preserver when I filled this tank. We put it on 2 by 4’s on the garage floor to keep it off the concrete.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Now, this picture I had a hard time taking because it’s HUGE, it holds 250 gallons and has two spigots as well. When Mark and I saw it at the store we didn’t realize how big the tank was. The store delivered it to our home and we started to laugh, how in the world are we going to get this in our garage. After laughing, we rinsed it out (that was a little challenging) then we put it on 2 by 4’s on the garage floor to keep it off the concrete. Then we filled it. We did strap it to the wall, but if we have an earthquake I’m not sure how well it would hold it in place. I do feel more secure having it strapped. You can buy large tanks like this at most emergency preparedness stores. This tank is about 84 inches tall and 32 inches in diameter. In this tank, I actually used a 16-ounce bottle of Nano Silver (63 ppm) that came with the purchase to keep this water purified.  I will trade out the water in five years and refill it with fresh water and a new bottle of Nano Silver.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

These are the usual 55-gallon water barrels with a UV/sun protection cover that will reflect the sun and help keep them from getting as much damage. I didn’t want to buy tarps because we have critters here that would have loved making a nest under the tarps. Remember, I live where the heat can get up to 120 degrees in the summer. Because I stored these outside, the likelihood that they may freeze is always a possibility, so I filled them using one bottle Water Preserver and left a four-inch space for the water to expand. The Barrel Bag WB-381 ”The Barrel Bag” 55-Gallon Drum Cover Grey Here’s the deal on these bags, I never used them when I lived where it was colder. These bags do keep the barrels from discoloring and cracking in the heat where I live, but they are expensive. I only bought them for their UV/sun protection. I have seen these barrels at Walmart, Costco and some grocery stores. Remember to get a pump to pump the water out when needed. They usually have the pumps sitting next to the barrels at most stores. I used one bottle of Water Preserver in each barrel. I will rotate these after five years with fresh water and preserver. You also need a bung with these to tighten the cap on top. BUNG: Duda Energy dwrench Aluminum Drum Wrench for Opening 10 gal, 15 gal, 20 gal, 30 gal and 55 gal Barrels Standard, 2″ Bung Racing Fuel Methanol, 2″ PUMP: Blue Drum Water Pump

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Please store as much water as possible, you don’t want to be the family standing in line at the grocery store waiting to see if there is any bottled water left on the shelves after a disaster. Trust me on that one! May God bless you for being prepared for the unexpected.  You may have some other ideas for effective water storage.  I’d love to hear what you’ve done so I can share it with my other readers. Thanks so much for your loyalty and for staying on top of issues relating to emergency preparedness.  You are the best!

The post How To Store As Much Water As Possible appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

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Today it’s all about how to store as much water as possible for any disaster or unforeseen emergency. This post follows yesterday’s “how to store food storage” in a small home. Today, I’m going to show you how I store water several different ways. I love getting emails asking how do I store water, food storage and just about everything else. So, I decided to invite you into my home and show you how I store my emergency preparedness items. There are so many ways to store water, some are expensive, some are fairly cheap. Keep in mind, I didn’t buy all of these items in a day. Please note when filling any water container be sure to use a lead-free hose like this one: NeverKink 8612-50 Boat and Camper Hose, Drinking Water Safe, 5/8-Inch-by-50-Foot

I live in a fairly small home that’s 1900 square feet. I mentioned yesterday, I have a three car garage. Here’s the deal, there is no way you could get two normal size cars in the double garage. The third stall we store our emergency prep items. I live in Southern Utah where the temperatures get up to 120 degrees sometimes in the summer. All my food storage is stored inside my house.

Let’s get started with how to store as much water as possible! This is a queen size bed in my guest room. The room is very small. I have 16 WaterBricks (the 3.5-gallon ones) under the bed filled water and Water Preserver. 55 Gallon Water Preserver Concentrate 5 Year Emergency Disaster Preparedness, Survival Kits, Emergency Water Storage, Earthquake, Hurricane, Safety The reason I use Water Preserver for water preservation is because I only have to rotate the water every five years. If you decide to use bleach in your water containers, you will need to rotate the water every six months.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Now, this picture is in my master bedroom where I have a dresser shown kitty-corner. It’s not flat against the wall and looks awesome in the bedroom without anyone knowing I have 12 cases of Blue Cans stacked neatly behind the dresser. Please brace yourself for the cost of these. This stack of water is one of the things I have been saving money to buy. They last 50 years and taste better than any water I have tasted. I have reverse osmosis in my kitchen, so I’m pretty fussy as to the taste of water. These can be stored up to 145 degrees, awesome, huh? If you look at the website they are cheaper, if you can pick them up. I ordered mine off of Amazon. Blue Can – Premium Emergency Drinking Water Please check this website if they have a distributor near you: Blue Can Water I bought these Blue Cans to store and not have to worry about rotating due to age, or fret due to the temperature in my home. I can sleep at night, yes I would call it a luxury, that’s how I roll with water.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

This tank below holds 160 gallons and has two spigots. You can find these at most emergency preparedness stores. I like the fact that I can fill it on the top and fill a bucket with one of the spigots, or drain the entire tank from the lower spigot. I used three containers of the Water Preserver when I filled this tank. We put it on 2 by 4’s on the garage floor to keep it off the concrete.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Now, this picture I had a hard time taking because it’s HUGE, it holds 250 gallons and has two spigots as well. When Mark and I saw it at the store we didn’t realize how big the tank was. The store delivered it to our home and we started to laugh, how in the world are we going to get this in our garage. After laughing, we rinsed it out (that was a little challenging) then we put it on 2 by 4’s on the garage floor to keep it off the concrete. Then we filled it. We did strap it to the wall, but if we have an earthquake I’m not sure how well it would hold it in place. I do feel more secure having it strapped. You can buy large tanks like this at most emergency preparedness stores. This tank is about 84 inches tall and 32 inches in diameter. In this tank, I actually used a 16-ounce bottle of Nano Silver (63 ppm) that came with the purchase to keep this water purified.  I will trade out the water in five years and refill it with fresh water and a new bottle of Nano Silver.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

These are the usual 55-gallon water barrels with a UV/sun protection cover that will reflect the sun and help keep them from getting as much damage. I didn’t want to buy tarps because we have critters here that would have loved making a nest under the tarps. Remember, I live where the heat can get up to 120 degrees in the summer. Because I stored these outside, the likelihood that they may freeze is always a possibility, so I filled them using one bottle Water Preserver and left a four-inch space for the water to expand. The Barrel Bag WB-381 ”The Barrel Bag” 55-Gallon Drum Cover Grey Here’s the deal on these bags, I never used them when I lived where it was colder. These bags do keep the barrels from discoloring and cracking in the heat where I live, but they are expensive. I only bought them for their UV/sun protection. I have seen these barrels at Walmart, Costco and some grocery stores. Remember to get a pump to pump the water out when needed. They usually have the pumps sitting next to the barrels at most stores. I used one bottle of Water Preserver in each barrel. I will rotate these after five years with fresh water and preserver. You also need a bung with these to tighten the cap on top. BUNG: Duda Energy dwrench Aluminum Drum Wrench for Opening 10 gal, 15 gal, 20 gal, 30 gal and 55 gal Barrels Standard, 2″ Bung Racing Fuel Methanol, 2″ PUMP: Blue Drum Water Pump

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Please store as much water as possible, you don’t want to be the family standing in line at the grocery store waiting to see if there is any bottled water left on the shelves after a disaster. Trust me on that one! May God bless you for being prepared for the unexpected.  You may have some other ideas for effective water storage.  I’d love to hear what you’ve done so I can share it with my other readers. Thanks so much for your loyalty and for staying on top of issues relating to emergency preparedness.  You are the best!

The post How To Store As Much Water As Possible appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How Can I Store Food Storage In A Small Home?

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Have you sometimes wondered “how can I store food storage in a small home?” Well, I have a fairly small home, it’s only 1900 square feet. I am going to show you my home in small doses because otherwise, the post would take too long to load. I have a three car garage, if you can call it a three car garage with the narrow one car section. You can barely fit two very small cars in the double garage and one car in the third stall. Mark and I use the third garage section for our emergency preparedness items that can withstand the heat in the summer. Everything else is stored inside my home. The temperatures here in Southern Utah can get up to 120 degrees in the summer, so all food items we keep inside where the temperature is controlled. The ideal temperature for food storage would be 50-70 degrees. I can’t afford to keep the temperatures this low, so my food storage will not last the full 25 years (per some cans), just giving you the heads-up here.

I love watching the TV shows that talk about “Tiny Houses”.  If I didn’t have food storage or emergency preparedness items I could easily live in one of those. My husband, Mark, not so much, so here we stay because my passion is being prepared for the unexpected. I started taking pictures of some of my preparedness items and realized I will have to write two or three posts to show you how you can store food storage and emergency preparedness items.

I have received several emails asking me “where do you store your food storage, Linda?” I’ve been asked to speak to a few groups in September, which is National Emergency Preparedness Month, so I decided to hire a professional photographer to take pictures of all my stuff as I pulled them out of the plastic protector bags. I can no longer haul all of my emergency preps or food storage to classes where I teach, so now I will bring pictures and make a slide show.

I’m going to start with my basic food storage items that I must have in order to make freshly ground whole wheat bread for Mark and I every two weeks or so. So my first must have items are my wheat grinders. The one on the far left is by far the best electric wheat grinder I have ever used. This one is available at one of my favorite stores: Pleasant Hill Grain. The middle one I have used for years and is available at most stores. NutriMill Classic 760200 High Speed Grain Mill, 1200 Watt, 5 Cups Per Minute. The Red hand wheat grinder I purchased from a company in Montana. They are handmade and you can grind hard white wheat from coarse to fine whole wheat flour. It does many things with a lot of hand power. The Grain Maker-made in the USA

store food storage

Next, I’m sharing a picture of my Bosch bread mixer, I can’t keep my grocery bill down without making bread. Sometimes, Costco has them on display for a great price. Bosch MUM6N10UC Universal Plus Stand Mixer, 800 Watt, 6.5-Quarts with Dough Hook, Scraper and Double Beater  If you can learn to make bread, you can survive most any disaster. I used to make bread by hand with a huge silver bowl, I love making bread and teaching others how to make it.

store food storage

Now, this is my hard white wheat that I store in my guest room next to the bedroom wall. Now, if I had children living at home, this wouldn’t work. The kids need room to play. But at least you can see how I store my wheat. It’s too hot to store wheat in my garage.

store food storage

I traded out my old Shelf Reliance rolling racks because I couldn’t see exactly what I had. It was driving me crazy. So I bought these shelves online at Costco. They are 72 inches tall by 18 inches deep and 48 inches wide. I bought the heavy duty wheels that go with them and I use bungee’s to keep the canned goods secured to the shelves. I will show the old shelves I used to have below. They took up way too much room, and I like to see at a glance what I need to grab. If I had a basement with built in shelves I would love it. But this house does not have a basement. So there you have it.

store food storage

The picture below is my grand children’s guest bedroom lined with two sets of bunk beds. Under each bunk bed I have several cases of food storage stashed, neat and tidy!

store food storage

These were my old shelves, which worked fine, but they took up too much room in the grandkids’ guest bedroom. We used to roll them out into our bedroom when we had guests, but that was getting tiresome so we switched them out. I like the new ones much better.

store food storage

Take a walk around your house and see if you can stash some extra cans above the refrigerator, you know the cabinets we can’t reach. Do you have any shelves in your closets that could be used for some cases of food? What about the coffee table? Do you have side tables that are empty, fill them with a few cans of beans. If you have a hall closet with a shelf above it, add some cases there. What about under your beds? As I’m writing this, I’m starting to feel like a hoarder. I’m not a hoarder, just a chick that’s not going to stand in line at a grocery store for food or water after a disaster.

Would I love a basement or one whole room for food storage, I sure would. But, I have a small home and we are making it work to store food storage, one can at a time. May God bless you for your efforts to prepared for the unexpected. We are going to need to be prepared, I promise.

 

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Easy One-Month Food Storage Supply

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It’s really very easy to get started with my easy one-month food storage supply for your pantry. I have this nifty food storage chart. If you haven’t seen it before, here it is again. Where Do I Start by Food Storage Moms  You basically print the sheet out and start filling in the blanks on the page(s). All you have to do is just start thinking of what you would like to eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. I would have to add some snacks because I’m a snacker. While you look at the sheet, gather your family around and write down some items you have in the pantry NOW, or could slowly add to your food storage stash for emergencies. The list is for seven days, Sunday through Monday. One section is for breakfasts, one for lunches, and one section for dinners. It would be great to make a trip to the local grocery store and have each family member choose the items they would like to eat. Remember, if your family won’t eat, don’t buy it.

Of course, fresh fruit and vegetables from the garden, your local farmer’s market or grocery store are always the best, but they may not be available in an emergency situation. The facilities may all be closed. If we are quarantined, for instance, say for 30 days, what do you have in your house this very minute you can eat, and for how long? What about water? I know the American Red Cross states one gallon of water per person per day, I disagree. It’s better than nothing, but I get thirsty thinking I could only have one gallon per day. I live in the desert where it can get up to 115-120 degrees in the summer. I highly recommend a minimum of 2-gallons per person per day, but preferably 4-gallons. Now, some of the cans or jars of fruit and vegetables have liquid in them that would help with the liquid we need to hydrate ourselves. But, I am a water drinker, big time. Just giving you the heads up, be prepared with water.

We are all aware of the different disasters like ice storms, snow storms, flooding, hurricanes, and tornadoes, to name just a few that we see going on all around the country. We could also have a pandemic, and be quarantined to our homes. I hope this never happens, but it could. I don’t know if you remember me talking about the POD (Point of Distribution) that’s been started all over the US via church facilities and controlled by your local health department. Here’s a link if you missed it: http://www.foodstoragemoms.com/2015/11/point-of-distribution-by-fema/

A local church leader in the neighborhood asked me if I would participate in the distribution of antibiotics in case of a pandemic as shown above. Several churches and organizations were asked to go to a local center and be trained on how to do this. I dragged Mark to the training. I don’t agree with the location since it wasn’t the most central location for our area, but I’m not in charge so I will duct tape my mouth shut on that one. Our neighborhood location will cover a ten-mile radius of people and there is no way people would walk that far, well I guess I better say I can’t, and I won’t. Can you imagine the traffic to get there in a car? We could drive there if our roads are even driveable. I’m a preparedness chick, so that’s how I think. Anyway, the US is expecting a pandemic or emergency of some sort so if we have to be in our homes for an extended period of time, we better get our homes prepared with food, water, and first aid items at the very least.

Keep in mind Mark and I don’t eat processed food every day, but I picked up a few items because I teach classes and I hired a professional photographer to take pictures of my stuff to show people in the class what I have available. I’m too tired to haul Sun Ovens, butane stoves, WaterBricks, etc. to each class. Please note, I took this picture above. I am not a professional photographer. If you purchase some canned goods and you don’t use them by the end of the year, please donate them to your local food bank unless they have an extended expiration date.

Easy One-Month Food Storage Supply

I picture having turkey and mayo on crackers like at Costco when they have samples. We all love those samples, or at least most of the stuff they give away to taste. All we need to do is plan 30 meals for breakfast, 30 meals for lunch and 30 meals for dinner. We can do it, one meal at a time, I promise.

Breakfast: Pancakes, syrup, and applesauce or muffin mixes (if you have a way to bake them). Open the cans of fruit cocktail and see who gets the red cherry in the can. I can still remember those days with my daughters.

Lunch: Crackers, turkey, and mayo or crackers with peanut butter and jam. If you have bread in the freezer, that works. If not, store some crackers. Green beans taste great right out of the can at room temperature. Peaches or applesauce tastes great at room temperature.

Dinner: Chili, crackers, green beans, and peaches. You can buy soup, stews or just canned beans. If you can make tortillas, you rock!

Now, after you fill out the sheet for one week, print off three more sheets and fill them in as well. You now have one month of food storage ideas to start your easy one-month food storage supply! Please fill your shopping baskets as soon as your budget allows. You do not have to buy #10 cans

Keep in mind if it’s easier for you, buy a bucket of food storage the next time you go to Costco’s, or Sam’s Club, check it out and read the labels. They also sell them on Amazon like this one: Augason Farms 30-Day Emergency Food Storage Supply Pail Keep in mind when you buy the buckets of food, the serving sizes are extremely small. Just giving you the heads-up here. I know because I have tried 99.9% of every food storage item on the market. Just start with a few cans at a time, every time you go to the store. We must be prepared. May God bless our families.

My favorite things:

Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case
12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves
WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue
Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue
55 Gallon Water Preserver Concentrate 5 Year Emergency Disaster Preparedness, Survival Kits, Emergency Water Storage, Earthquake, Hurricane, Safety (I use this over bleach because I only have to rotate the stored water every five years compared to 6-months with bleach)
CRITICAL ITEM: ZYLISS Lock N’ Lift Can Opener with Lid Lifter Magnet, White

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DIY Dollar Store First Aid Kit Buckets

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You can make several DIY (Do It Yourself) dollar store first aid kit buckets on the cheap, one item at a time. I have written a lot of articles about first aid kits over the past few years. Here’s the deal, you can buy almost everything at your local dollar store, except for certain bandages, to fill a 5-gallon bucket for supplies. I would highly recommend buying GOOD name brand “BandAids” because at the dollar store we don’t know how old they may be and they may not stick as needed on a cut or deep wound. Of course, some things will typically not go bad to the point we can’t use them, like gauze, scissors, etc. I’m going to show you a few first aid kits I have designed over the years and hopefully, they will fit almost every budget.

I actually got this idea from a reader, it was one of those cartwheel moments when I told her, “Oh my gosh, AWESOME idea!” She had been given some 3-gallon buckets and started slowly filling them with first aid supplies. I told her I could see a post coming using her idea! Thank you, Janet, for the 3-gallon bucket idea! I decided to get 5-gallon buckets because I have a perfect spot to store them. I’m so color coded, as you probably know by now. I decided on white buckets with red Gamma lids and I bought lettering for the American Red Cross similar symbol in red with black lettering to indicate a few items in the buckets. Gamma Seal Lid, Red, 3 Pack – New! – Boxed! – 5 Gallon Bucket Lids (Fits 3.5, 5, 6, & 7 Gal.) Storage Container Lid and 5-gallon food grade buckets can be found pretty inexpensive in your local grocery stores.

I started writing what I would put in each bucket and it got out of control, so I narrowed the selection to the statements above on the white buckets. You could easily use a permanent magic marker in red and black and do the same thing. I speak at several classes throughout Utah so I needed to have them look a bit more professional, so I purchased vinyl lettering at a local store in town.

DIY Dollar Store First Aid Kit Buckets:

DIY Dollar Store First Aid Kit Buckets

Here are few items you may want to add to your containers. I have a PRINTABLE: First Aid Kit by Food Storage Moms

First aid supplies:

Remember, just pick up a few items every time you visit a dollar store in your neighborhood. Pick up good BandAids at your local pharmacy or grocery store.

  1.  B-12 Vitamins
  2. Ziplock Bags
  3. Zantac (Acid Reducer)
  4. Vicks VapoRub
  5. Tylenol
  6. Tweezers
  7. Tucks Pads-Which Hazel
  8. Toothbrushes/Toothpaste
  9. Tick Remover
  10. Surgical Face Masks (N-95), all sizes
  11. Sunscreen
  12. Stethoscope-I would buy a good one at your local medical supply store.
  13. Soap
  14. Splints
  15. Splinter Removal Kit
  16. Sleep-Aid Medicine
  17. Silver Cough Lozenges-my favorite ones: Original All Natural Silver Lozenges – Soothing Honey with Lemon: The Perfect Cough Drop for Cough, Throat & Mouth Health and Immune Support – Contains 30ppm Silver Solution in Each Drop
  18. Silver Liquid-I recommend this one: 30ppm, Triple Strength pH Balanced Colloidal Solution – Daily Colloidal Silver Supplement for Immune Health – 16oz Bottle of Silver Water
  19. Silver Gel-I use this one: Extra Strength Silver Gel – 35ppm Silver Gel Activated for Maximum Strength: Great for First Aid/Emergency Gel, Skin Irritations, Wounds, Facial Cleanser, Immune Protection. Therapeutic Grade. (1)
  20. Scissors
  21. Rolled Gauze
  22. Quickclot
  23. Pregnancy Test
  24. Peroxide
  25. Pepto-Bismol Chewables
  26. Petroleum Jelly
  27. Orajel
  28. Neosporin
  29. Nail Clippers
  30. Nystatin and Triamcinolone Acetonide
  31. Non-stick Sterile Pads
  32. New Skin Liquid Bandage
  33. Nasal Spray (Afrin)
  34. Nasal Decongestant PE
  35. Multi-Task Knife
  36. Molefoam/Moleskin
  37. Mouthwash
  38. Monistat (Yeast Infections)
  39. Motrin
  40. Mucinex Dm
  41. Mucinex
  42. Menstrual Pads and Tampons
  43. Lotion or Body Cream
  44. Lip balm/ ChapStick
  45. Hydrocortisone
  46. Mylar Blankets
  47. Ibuprofen
  48. Hemorrhoid Ointment/Suppositories
  49. Heat packs-Heating pads
  50. Hand sanitizer
  51. Gauze Pads (sterile and non-sterile)
  52. Gloves (non-latex)
  53. Floss
  54. Flashlights w/batteries
  55. First-Aid Shears
  56. First-Aid Book
  57. Eye Patches
  58. Essential Oils Book
  59. Epsom Salt
  60. Elastic Gauze Bandage Rolls
  61. Ear Plugs
  62. Ear-Loop Masks (N-95), all sizes-I get these on Amazon 3M 1860 N95 RESPIRATOR AND SURGICAL MASK Box of 20
  63. Duct Tape
  64. Dressings for open wounds
  65. Dramamine (motion sickness)
  66. Cotton Swabs
  67. Cotton Balls
  68. Condoms
  69. Contacts/Contact Cases/ Extra Glasses/Saline
  70. Cold Medicine/Cough Syrup
  71. Castor Oil
  72. Calamine Lotion
  73. Burn Gel
  74. Bug Spray 100% Deet
  75. Boudreaux’s Butt Paste
  76. Birth Control
  77. Betadine/iodine swabs
  78. Benadryl, Liquid, and Chewable
  79. Bee Sting Kit
  80. Band-Aids/Butterfly, Several Sizes
  81. Bandage Scissors
  82. Aspirin/Advil
  83. Apple Cider
  84. Alcohol: 90-100% proof
  85. Aleve (Naproxen)
  86. Anti-Itch Cream
  87. Anti-Diarrhea
  88. Antifungal Ointment
  89. Anti-Bacterial Wipes
  90. Allergy Medicine
  91. Ace Wraps : 3 inch & 4 inch

Vitamins:

  1. B-complex vitamins
  2. Calcium
  3. D-3 Vitamins
  4. Magnesium
  5. Mature Complete Multivitamin
  6. Omega 3 Fish Oil
  7. Vitamin C
  8. Essential Oils

Plano fishing tackle box that works great:

I filled this Plano fishing tackle box Plano Large 6-Tray Tackle Box with as many products as possible as listed in the PRINTABLE list above.

DIY Dollar Store First Aid Kit Buckets

My Large First Aid Kit:

I filled this awesome Stanley 020800R FatMax 4-in1 Mobile Work Station for Tools and Parts with as many of the items as I could from the PRINTABLE list shown above.

DIY Dollar Store First Aid Kit Buckets

Please get a good emergency medical handbook:

The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way

Essential Oils Pocket Reference

May God bless you to be diligent in being prepared for the unexpected. Please make some DIY dollar store first aid kit buckets with friends and family. You’ll be glad you did, I promise.

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The Best Marinated Carrot Salad Recipe In The World

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This is the best marinated carrot salad recipe in the world! Oh, my gosh, Mark and I were invited for dinner the other night to some friends house and Mark mentioned to them that I am trying to stay clear of meat and dairy products. First of all, I try not to tell anyone about the healthy way of life I am working on. So this darling couple had every vegetable you can imagine on beautiful dishes to munch on and chitty chat around the table, oh how I loved this! They fixed the best salmon on the barbecue for the three of them and I was loving the rice, salads and all the fresh vegetables. Well, I asked if I could share this marinated carrot salad recipe on my blog. She quickly gave me the recipe and then I passed it on to my daughters because I knew this was one they would all love!

Here’s the deal, you can use sliced carrots or baby carrots for this recipe. My mouth is watering just thinking about eating this for lunch. I used my pressure cooker to cook the carrots last night and chilled them to make the salad today. I used my Fagor pressure cooker on high with one cup water and set it for three minutes. I used the quick release and carefully removed the lid and drained the carrots. Any pressure cooker or pan can steam carrots, but I love my Fagor pressure cooker since it saves me precious time. Mark and I eat a lot of carrots so this recipe is a hit at our house! I doubled the dressing ingredients because I knew I would be adding more carrots over the next few days. You can also use this dressing on other vegetables, it’s so yummy! You can use sliced carrots, grated carrots or baby carrots.

You may be asking yourself “why is she using her pressure cooker to cook the carrots?” Well, I always have 10 things going on at once and all I have to do is put the carrots in the pan, add one cup of water, lock the lid and set it for 3 minutes on high. That’s it, set and go do the laundry or whatever. Yes, I could have boiled/steamed them but then I would have had to watch the pot on the stove. Please remember when using a pressure cooker to be sure and check your manual because my two different pressure cookers state “do not fill more than 2/3 full” to allow for the pressure to build up.

Suzie’s Marinated Carrot Salad

Ingredients:

5 cups steamed carrots, drained (I used a pressure cooker, 3 minutes on high with one cup of water)

1 medium white onion, thinly sliced

1 small green, yellow, or red pepper chopped into bite size pieces

Dressing:

2 cans cream of tomato soup

1 cup vegetable oil

1 cup sugar, or less as desired

1-1/2 cups cider vinegar

2 teaspoons prepared mustard

2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce

2 teaspoons salt

2 teaspoons pepper

Instructions:

Steam the carrots and chill overnight. Add the remaining vegetables with the carrots in a large bowl. Combine the dressing ingredients in a separate bowl and pour over the vegetables. Chill in a covered container. Enjoy!

PRINTABLE recipe: Suzie’s Marinated Carrot Salad shared by Food Storage Moms

My favorite things:

Fagor 670040230 Stainless-Steel 3-in-1 6-Quart Multi-Cooker

Presto 02970 Professional SaladShooter Electric Slicer/Shredder, White

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What Happens 72 Hours After Disasters

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Today I want you to think about what may happen the first 72 hours after disasters or unforeseen emergencies happen where you live. Here’s the deal, I want you to picture life in 24-hour increments. I have broken the three 24-hours in sections below so you can picture what will most likely happen within 72 hours after any disaster in any city, county, state or country. It’s plain and simple, let’s get started.

If possible get together with your neighbors to purchase walkie-talkies and set them on the same channel and test them monthly. The old kind we used at Disneyland years ago no longer cut it. They may not be useable because they will not go through blocks of houses. This is the brand an emergency search and rescue guy recommended to a class I taught a few years ago. Motorola MR350R 35-Mile Range 22-Channel FRS/GMRS Two-Way Radio (Pair)

1. The first 24 hours we will check with neighbors to see who is okay or hurt. If the disaster is big enough we will have limited county or city officials to help the entire area in the short term. It’s not going to happen. Period. We need to be ready to take care of ourselves in many areas. I am talking about water, food, shelter, first aid supplies, tools, cooking devices, etc. We most likely situation is that we will lose electricity. If we use gas to heat our homes that will probably not be available. If you think you will be able to turn on the water faucet, think again, the water supply may have been cut off or contaminated.

The sewer lines most likely will not work either. If you don’t have a portable toilet you better get one this week. Not next week. I will not share my portable toilet with anyone. I know it sounds selfish, but I want my neighbors to know that right now. I hope they have a good shovel to dig a hole for their own toilet, just saying. Here is a post I wrote regarding this issue and how to deal with it: Emergency Toilet For After A Disaster by Food Storage Moms. These are cheap and everyone should have their own emergency toilet or some black garbage bags, kitty litter, and duct tape to use inside their home toilets.

2. The second 24 hours, some people have gone through their bottles of water, emptied their food pantry, or freezer to eat whatever they have available. Remember, every family member needs at least one gallon of water per person per day according to the American Red Cross. I disagree, but I’m sure you know by now that I recommend four gallons of water per person per day. One gallon will not be enough for cooking, washing clothes, or bathing. You will want some baby wipes for what I call spit baths. This is the day you hope you were caught up on the laundry. If not, you will at least want clean underwear. Here is my post about an emergency washing machine: Emergency Washing Machine by Food Storage Moms. Of course, you can use a sink or washtub as well. You shouldn’t just plan on using the bathtub because first of all the water lines might be cut. Second, the sewer lines might backup into your house if you try to drain the water.

3. The third 24 hours will not be fun. You know those BLACK FRIDAY sales that happen after Thanksgiving? Well, after a disaster if the roads are driveable the grocery stores will have lines out the door due to rationing of water and food. Trust me, I will NOT be in any grocery store after a disaster, I do not do Black Friday sales either. I don’t like the pushing and shoving at the stores. Man, just think how the crowds will be looking for water and food. YIKES! Utah, where I live, is ranked #4 for states with personal gun ownership. People get mean when they are really hungry or thirsty and they need to feed their families. Just something to think about. The grocery store shelves will be empty or a bottle of water could cost $20.00 and the store may not have change. Exact dollar amounts will be needed.

Before A Disaster Some People May Think:

1. Why do I keep hearing the phrases get prepared, be prepared and are you prepared?

2. Sometimes people may think nothing will happen to me.

3. The government will have to step in and help us.

4. God or whoever you pray to will take care of me.

5. I can’t afford to buy extra water or food.

6. I can’t afford preparedness items.

7. I don’t have time to learn skills.

8. My neighbor is prepared, I will just go over there.

9. My house is too small to store anything extra.

My Favorite Bartering Items For After Disasters:

1. Ammunition

2. Hard liquor

3. Cigars (do not store cigarettes-they go bad)

4. After a disaster coffee drinkers will barter for instant coffee (Starbuck’s might not be open)

5. Food you grow in your garden (get heirloom seeds you can keep planting year after year if you save the seeds)

6. Basic staples you have stored like flour, sugar, honey, oil, baking powder, baking soda, and spices

7. Skills like bread making, learn to make biscuits and crackers

8. Skills-handyman stuff

9. Skills-quilting and sewing will mend clothes or make clothes for us

10. First aid supplies

11. Chickens and eggs (as long as you have the food to feed them)

12. Meat (grass-fed animals will be a premium)

13. Skill of hunting for animals to eat (learn how to preserve them)

14. Trading your canned food items (you need to know how to can and preserve your garden)

15. Water and food (be sure and have a way to purify your water) Turn off the water to your water heater before the water becomes contaminated if you hear about a water problem.

16. Fuel for car and cooking

17. Learn to make soap and laundry detergent

18. Lemonade mix, hot chocolate mix or good old sugary Tang, if they still sell it (these will make water taste better)

19. Cooking oil, any kind will be sought after

20. Cooking devices for outside cooking with fuel

I am not saying run out and buy everything on this list. We will all need the skills to help each other. We must all be able to bring something to the table in order to help one another. We are responsible for ourselves, no one else is going to take care of us.

If and when our economy crashes you may not have that Social Security check, retirement check, paycheck or pension check in the mail or deposited, think again. People keep telling us to pay off our houses, pay cash for cars, stay out of debt and be prepared for the unexpected. Have cash, precious metals and things to barter. It’s human nature to think that disasters only happen to other people living elsewhere.  If that is the approach you’ve taken up to this point in your life, think again.  Disasters can come our way in many forms, like getting sick and unable to work, losing your job due to layoffs or company closures, accidents happen, whether in your car or at home doing projects.

You may have the best plans to make your home safe and secure, but your neighbor may have a fire disaster just waiting to happen by storing dangerous fuels in the garage or on the side of the house. If their home goes up in smoke yours may be next based on wind and ashes. I read an article this week about a drunk driver that drove through the front of a home, nearly killing the occupants. They were lucky the car didn’t burst into flame. You may think that disasters only come in the form of flood, tornado, hurricane, earthquake and other causes we call Mother Nature. Sure, we need to think of these and be prepared, but more often than not it’s the surprise events outlined above that bring the most heartache and challenges to families. Do your homework and be as prepared as your time and finances can allow.  You’ll be glad you did, and so will those living with and near you.

May God bless you and your family to have the means to be prepared for the unexpected one step at a time.

My favorite things:

My Book (available in every bookstore online or in the world): Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

Berkey GSPRT Generic 22-Ounce Water Filter Sports Bottle, 3-Pack

Big Berkey BK4X2 Countertop Water Filter System with 2 Black Berkey Elements and 2 Fluoride Filters

Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case

12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves

Lodge L12CO3 Cast Iron Camp Dutch Oven, 6 quart

Kingsford Products 31212 Natural Organic King Charcoal (2 Pack), 16.7 lb

The post What Happens 72 Hours After Disasters appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Quick And Easy French Bread You Can Make

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This is my quick and easy French bread you can make at the last minute for any meal. It’s very simple to make, it’s moist in the center and a little crispy on the outside. This recipe is an old family recipe, and my four daughters would sell the bread door to door to make a little spending money when they were younger. We sold it at church bazaars and at school functions. We got orders ahead of time when people were having spaghetti and meatballs for dinner. It’s a favorite bread when taking dinner to neighbors with a pot of chicken noodle soup.

The original recipe from almost 40+ years ago calls for shortening. I use butter these days, but most any oil could be substituted. Here’s the deal with this recipe, it says it makes three loaves. You could make two larger loaves or make the three skinny loaves I made with a pan I have had for years. You can make this bread dough in a large bowl or use a Bosch bread mixer like I did. As you know, I love pictures to visualize what I am going to make, so today here are my pictures for this bread. I have a PRINTABLE recipe available at the bottom. The thing I like about this recipe is that it doesn’t need eggs. If you have chickens that produce eggs that is great, but I rarely buy eggs these days because I am trying to eat less dairy. So let’s get started with this easy French bread recipe.

Just so you know, I dump everything in my Bosch and start mixing. Yep, I start it on low and work up to high, it’s an easy to make this recipe, I promise. It’s actually a no-fail recipe that anyone can make. You can actually make French bread rolls with the same recipe. Just mold them differently and cut the cooking time according to how big you make the rolls. You can make these loaves on a greased cookie sheet as well. You may remember, I worked at a fabulous Kitchen store and I loved to buy the fancy kitchen tools because I enjoy cooking and baking almost everything.

Easy French Bread

Ingredients:

2-1/2 cups hot water

4 teaspoons SAF instant yeast

3 tablespoons sugar

1 tablespoon salt

1 tablespoon shortening (I used melted butter)

6 cups white bread flour

Step One-Instructions:

I dump everything in a bowl or my Bosch bread mixer and mix the dough about 6-8 minutes.

easy french bread

Step Two:

I then cut the dough with a dough cutter into three sections. OXO Good Grips Multi-purpose Stainless Steel Scraper & Chopper

easy french bread

Step Three:

I roll out the three pieces of dough into a rectangle shape and roll up into a tube shape and place on a greased cookie sheet or French bread/baguette pan as shown: Chicago Metallic Commercial II Non-Stick Perforated Baguette Pan

easy french bread

Grease some plastic wrap and cover the dough and let rise until double in size. Just before placing the loaves in the oven to bake, use a sharp knife to slice a few shallow cuts on the diagonal on the top of the dough. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees and bake for 25-35 minutes or until golden brown. Lightly brush the baked loaves with butter on the tops and serve while warm.

PRINTABLE recipe: Easy French Bread by Food Storage Moms

My favorite things:

Bosch MUM6N10UC Universal Plus Stand Mixer, 800 Watt, 6.5-Quarts with Dough hook, scraper and double beater.

Kelly Kettle Ultimate Stainless Steel Small Trekker Camp Stove Kit. Boil Water, Cook Fast, Survive.

Nordic Ware Natural Aluminum Commercial Baker’s Half Sheet

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Why You Need To Have A First Aid Kit For Kids

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Today it’s all about why you need to have a first aid kit for kids, grandkids, etc. I don’t know about you, but it seems whenever I have my kids or grandkids here someone gets hurt. It might be a scratch, a bee sting or a cut. Sometimes the kids have a fever or a cough. We are pretty lucky they do not get sick often but it’s nice to know I have “stuff” in the cupboard to soothe or comfort them. I also use essential oils big time and Silver Solution from My Doctor Suggests. I realize every family is different and may or may not use certain products, I get that. I just want you to rotate what you do have in your cupboards for cold or flu symptoms and have them available if all your local stores and pharmacies are closed. Or if you have to be evacuated, put this item on your “to grab list” for such emergencies should they arise.

I remember talking to a family who was evacuated a few years from their city and their baby had a fever and the power was out in the town. They drove to a nearby town to stay in a motel to keep their baby safe from the cold. They needed some fever reducing medicine and luckily the mother had some items in her “diaper bag” to soothe the baby.

I decided to put together a Children’s Medical Kit with a two layer plastic container I purchased at JoAnn’s Craft Store. Of course, I used my 40% off coupon so the kit was very affordable. My daughter does vinyl lettering so I asked her to make me the set you see on the container. A Magic Marker would work too!

First Aid Kit For Kids:

How To Make A Children's Medical Kit | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

Kids First Aid Contents:

How To Make A Children's Medical Kit | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

This one I will keep in the hall closet so it is ready to grab and let the kids choose their favorite band-aids when needed. I tried to gather the most important things we might need if we are unable to go to the store. I am adding a thermometer to the kit as well. I want to be prepared for the unexpected if the pharmacies are closed or the weather closes the roads from extreme weather conditions. I guess you can call me Nervous Nellie. Please let me know what items you would add to your children’s first aid kit I would love to hear. May God bless you and your family.

My Favorite things:

Snapware Snap ‘N Stack 6-Inch by 9-Inch Plastic Container

American Red Cross Website.

The post Why You Need To Have A First Aid Kit For Kids appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

What Are You Waiting For To Be Prepared

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What are you waiting for to be prepared? Maybe you are prepared with water, food, cooking devices and fuel. Maybe you are prepared with 72-hour kits. Here’s the deal, whatever you have done to be prepared for the unexpected you need to pat yourself on the back. I’m now getting requests to speak at preparedness groups for the month of September. You may or may not realize that September is designated as National Preparedness Month. I think people are starting to realize that it doesn’t have to be a major disaster for you to consider being better prepared. Being prepared is having the tools you need when you need them. Those tools could be water, food, skills, a garden, or at least know how to garden. Please get prepared with the necessities your family needs today, not tomorrow.

If we have a major disruption in our communities our grocery stores will become empty very quickly. Trust me, I have seen empty store shelves. Now I drive to local stores to take pictures of the empty shelves after a minor disruption here so I can share that information with my readers in hopes they get the vision of why being prepared is important. I don’t need anything, I just want to be aware of what the stores will look like when we have floods, damaged roads that are closed from too much rain, fires or other disruptive events.

What are you waiting for:

If you can take one night a month, or one night every quarter at the very minimum, and make a plan with your family for evacuations, I would love it. You don’t have to make it a scary experience, just explain where you can meet, what to do and where to go if you are separated. Can you imagine your child walking home from school and an earthquake starts rumbling? If you have a plan they will know what to do and where to go. Will they be scared, probably, but not as scared if you had never talked about a plan after the disaster hits your community. If the family is home, hurray, but that isn’t always the case, and you may still need to evacuate the whole family. This past week over 200,000 people we forced to evacuate an area down river from an overfilled dam that was showing damage from recent storms. That was in California, north of Sacramento. Those people couldn’t return home for at least two days. I’m sure most of those people never thought they’d have to leave the safety of their own homes. I wonder how many had their 72-hour kits with them as they drove out of the driveway?

Sometimes people have to hear it over and over again to prepare for the unexpected. Maybe they read about the floods in other areas of the country and it hits them they better get their act together to be prepared to evacuate. Or at least have some water stored and food with a can opener. I can eat food out of a can if I have a can opener. My suggestion is to get at least two can openers. If one breaks you have a spare. I have to laugh, I was teaching a food storage class and one lady said I don’t own a can opener. I was shocked, who doesn’t own a can opener? I asked her how she was going to open the #10 can food items she has stored. She mainly buys fresh meat and vegetables for her meals. I bet she has a can opener now. Life is good if we have a can opener and a plan. KitchenAid Can Opener, Red

Here are a few items that would help you get through a short-term disaster:

  1. Water, we can’t survive without water and I will not be standing in lines to get a case of water at the city or county buildings after our water lines are broken or our local water supplies become contaminated. Please store water.
  2. Food, I don’t care if it’s a few extra cans of beans, green beans or diced tomatoes in a can. Chili in cans would work, pancake mix, etc.
  3. Cooking devices, this is one of my favorites: Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and fuel: 12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves
  4. Storing a few extra paper plates, cups and plastic silverware would be awesome so we don’t have to use our water to wash dishes.
  5. Learn to make crackers, tortillas or bread because if you have a jar of peanut butter, canned beans, canned veggies, and fruits you have a meal or two sitting in your pantry.
  6. Learn to cook from scratch, you can survive any disaster with those skills and a full pantry with baking items needed.

Please be prepared for the unexpected, you must take care of yourself and your family. The government can’t take care of everyone. Please be self-reliant, you can sleep at night if you are prepared. May God bless you and yours.

My favorite things:

My book is available worldwide in every bookstore and online everywhere.

Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

 

The post What Are You Waiting For To Be Prepared appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

What Are You Waiting For To Be Prepared

What are you waiting for to be prepared? Maybe you are prepared with water, food, cooking devices and fuel. Maybe you are prepared with 72-hour kits. Here’s the deal, whatever you have done to be prepared for the unexpected you need to pat yourself on the back. I’m now getting requests to speak at preparedness groups for the month of September. You may or may not realize that September is designated as National Preparedness Month. I think people are starting to realize that it doesn’t have to be a major disaster for you to consider being better prepared. Being prepared is having the tools you need when you need them. Those tools could be water, food, skills, a garden, or at least know how to garden. Please get prepared with the necessities your family needs today, not tomorrow.

If we have a major disruption in our communities our grocery stores will become empty very quickly. Trust me, I have seen empty store shelves. Now I drive to local stores to take pictures of the empty shelves after a minor disruption here so I can share that information with my readers in hopes they get the vision of why being prepared is important. I don’t need anything, I just want to be aware of what the stores will look like when we have floods, damaged roads that are closed from too much rain, fires or other disruptive events.

What are you waiting for:

If you can take one night a month, or one night every quarter at the very minimum, and make a plan with your family for evacuations, I would love it. You don’t have to make it a scary experience, just explain where you can meet, what to do and where to go if you are separated. Can you imagine your child walking home from school and an earthquake starts rumbling? If you have a plan they will know what to do and where to go. Will they be scared, probably, but not as scared if you had never talked about a plan after the disaster hits your community. If the family is home, hurray, but that isn’t always the case, and you may still need to evacuate the whole family. This past week over 200,000 people we forced to evacuate an area down river from an overfilled dam that was showing damage from recent storms. That was in California, north of Sacramento. Those people couldn’t return home for at least two days. I’m sure most of those people never thought they’d have to leave the safety of their own homes. I wonder how many had their 72-hour kits with them as they drove out of the driveway?

Sometimes people have to hear it over and over again to prepare for the unexpected. Maybe they read about the floods in other areas of the country and it hits them they better get their act together to be prepared to evacuate. Or at least have some water stored and food with a can opener. I can eat food out of a can if I have a can opener. My suggestion is to get at least two can openers. If one breaks you have a spare. I have to laugh, I was teaching a food storage class and one lady said I don’t own a can opener. I was shocked, who doesn’t own a can opener? I asked her how she was going to open the #10 can food items she has stored. She mainly buys fresh meat and vegetables for her meals. I bet she has a can opener now. Life is good if we have a can opener and a plan. KitchenAid Can Opener, Red

Here are a few items that would help you get through a short-term disaster:

  1. Water, we can’t survive without water and I will not be standing in lines to get a case of water at the city or county buildings after our water lines are broken or our local water supplies become contaminated. Please store water.
  2. Food, I don’t care if it’s a few extra cans of beans, green beans or diced tomatoes in a can. Chili in cans would work, pancake mix, etc.
  3. Cooking devices, this is one of my favorites: Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and fuel: 12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves
  4. Storing a few extra paper plates, cups and plastic silverware would be awesome so we don’t have to use our water to wash dishes.
  5. Learn to make crackers, tortillas or bread because if you have a jar of peanut butter, canned beans, canned veggies, and fruits you have a meal or two sitting in your pantry.
  6. Learn to cook from scratch, you can survive any disaster with those skills and a full pantry with baking items needed.

Please be prepared for the unexpected, you must take care of yourself and your family. The government can’t take care of everyone. Please be self-reliant, you can sleep at night if you are prepared. May God bless you and yours.

My favorite things:

My book is available worldwide in every bookstore and online everywhere.

Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

 

The post What Are You Waiting For To Be Prepared appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Four Things That Are Not Safe To Can At Home

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There are four things that are not safe to can at home. Period. Lately, I have been concerned with articles on Facebook or blogs with posts stating you can preserve certain foods at home that I knew were not safe to can. Then I started getting emails and Facebook PM’s asking me if this post or that post was accurate. In my gut, I knew some of the foods weren’t safe to can. So I went to the experts to confirm my thoughts. I am not a newbie to canning. I have been safely canning my foods per Utah State Extension service guidelines for over 50 years. I also have my Master Preserver Canning Certificate via the USU through the USDA training courses. This is an updated article whereas I added milk to my list. I am seeing a lot of people canning milk and cream. These are unsafe to can at home because of the fat in them.

Now, you might say, “I learned how to can them from my friend (or whoever) and my jars look great”. They may even taste okay. But here’s the clincher, you don’t know what bacteria is lurking inside those jars. Please, please, please do not risk the health of your family by canning these higher risk food items. Carolyn mentioned the reason certain foods are not listed on your local state canning extension lists is because they have not been proven safe to preserve via our home canning process.

Four Foods Not Safe To Can At Home:

1. Never Can Eggs

I want to bring this issue to everyone’s attention because eggs are not safe to can at home. Bacteria will grow and you may not even see it in the jars when eggs are canned at home. Now, I am not talking about pickled eggs (which are safe for the refrigerator for a short period of time only).  Please do not can eggs. Call your local extension service if you still think you can can your own eggs. If the food item you have a question about canning yourself isn’t listed on your local extension service it is more than likely unsafe to process at home.

Yes, you can freeze eggs but personally, I don’t want to fill my freezer with eggs. The texture will not be the same with frozen eggs but they would work for baking. I get nervous about the electricity going out. I can only imagine trying to get rid of those thawed eggs in a power outage.

I love reading about people having chickens and gathering eggs from their chicken coops. I have heard good stories from people who are learning to raise chickens who have the land and families working together as a team. I have also heard they have excess eggs and want to know what to do with all those eggs.

Let’s get real here, please save money and buy some professionally processed eggs in #10 cans for longer term storage needs. Or in packages from a reputable company. I only buy Ova Easy Eggs. They are real eggs, you can scramble them, make a frittata, quiche or bake with them. I have a few #10 cans of powdered eggs, but I must say, they do not taste like eggs when cooked in a frying pan, even with butter. They will be fine for baking muffins, cakes, pancakes or bread. These are the only ones I like to buy because they taste just like eggs out of a carton: OvaEasy Powdered Whole Eggs – Case (12 x 4.5 oz Bags)

2. Never Can Bacon

There is too much fat in bacon to make it safe for canning at home. I am not a scientist or microbiologist to be able to explain correctly the significance of the bacteria that grows in bacon if you try canning it at home. I realize some people have canned bacon for years and swear by its safety. Here again, we don’t know what’s lurking in our home canned bacon. I highly recommend you do not can bacon at home. Here’s the deal, I love bacon. Doesn’t everything taste better with bacon in it? My husband and I have been eating BLT’s for weeks now with the tomatoes out of our garden.

The only bacon that’s on my food storage shelves is four cans of professionally processed cooked Yoder’s Bacon. They will be used for a treat if we are without power for weeks. It’s way too expensive per pound to store much more. I bought six cans of the canned bacon from Yoder’s. I taught a class with one can and did a post with the other can. I compared the price of precooked bacon from Costco and one can of Yoder’s: Yoder’s Bacon & Ova Easy Eggs by Food Storage Moms.

Yes, I freeze a few packages of bacon when it goes on sale. I thaw it in the refrigerator and bake it in the oven the next day. I line a cookie sheet with foil and spread the bacon out in single layers as well as I can. I bake the bacon at 400 degrees for 45-60 minutes depending on how crispy it gets in that time period. I love that my stovetop stays clean by baking the bacon in the oven. I learned this from my daughter and her husband. It’s so much easier.Please note *I buy very thick bacon from a meat butcher so if your bacon is thinner, cut the time in half.  Yoder’s bacon: Yoders Canned Fully Cooked Bacon

3. Never Can Butter

Now let’s talk about butter. It is not safe to can at home either. Maybe you had a friend show you how to can it. Like bacon, butter has way too much fat in it to safely can it at home. Here again, we don’t know what bacteria may be growing in those jars.

I watch for butter to go on sale and fill my freezer with as many as my budget will allow. I also bought some powdered butter that tastes awful. I get the dry heaves just thinking about the smell of it. One website states their powdered butter “tastes like Land O’Lakes butter.” No, it doesn’t, I have tried them all. They are fine for baking.

This is a statement I was given from the USU Extension Service on a sheet of paper listing food to NOT store:

“Home Canned Butter, especially unsalted butter has NO protection from botulism, salted home canned butter has no science-based process to can safely. Heating the jars does sterilize it, but it will NOT kill any botulism spores. When you remove the oxygen from the jar, it allows for the potential growth of botulism spores”.

I highly recommend this brand of canned butter for your food storage: Red Feather PURE CANNED BUTTER – 6 cans of 12oz each – great for survival earthquake kit

4. Never Can Milk or Cream:

Here’s the deal with canning milk or cream, it is unsafe to preserve by water bath or pressure canning. The milk and cream have too much fat in them. This is what I found on the USDA website: “Caution: Do not add noodles or other pasta, rice, flour, cream, milk or other thickening agents to home canned soups. If dried beans or peas are used, they must be fully rehydrated first”. End of quote. In the classes, I took to pass my Master Preserver Canning Certificate we were reminded of these four products I have listed above that they are unsafe to can because we cannot get our pressure canner up to the temperature required to kill off the bacteria. This is why I buy these products from commercial companies that have the equipment to can them safely.

Comments from Readers:

Thanks to Lauralee H. explains how butter was stored in pioneer days:

The pioneers only made small batches of butter at a time from milking their cow. Then they stored it at room temperature in a butter bell. A ceramic type of dish where they spooned the butter into the top bell part and over the butter poured a small amount of boiled salted water that was cooled over the butter. Then a plate type bottom was placed on it, and it was turned over quickly and sat down on the counter. That way the salted water was on the bottom of the butter sealing out the air. Each time they needed the butter they poured the water off and used the butter. Most of them did salt their butter back then when churning it. They tried not to make too much butter at a time, only what they could use up in maybe three days. If they made big batches they were going to do baking that would use it up. I think you can still purchase butter bells.

Thanks to Shelley for this great comment:

The National Center for Home Food Preservation is the go-to resource for safe. approved methods and recipes. If I ever have a question this is where I go. I am also a Master Food Preserver through Washington State University and I also rely on the Extension Services to provide information. Please don’t trust the online resources you see as safe. Research first!

http://nchfp.uga.edu/index.html

Another Linda telling me what her mom did years ago: hello, great post. My mom was born in 1910. She told me stories of how things were done in Ky for generations. They had cold dairies (called various things) but what it came down to was watch where the river level was at the highest point in the year and go a few feet above this. You dig out the river bank, shore it up, just like they do in the mines, caves, etc. Milk, eggs, butter was stored. mom said it was very cold even in the summer. Winter temps allowed longer storage thus greater amounts stored. For pitted fruits, a fruit cellar dug into a mountain or wood building covered to be a small hill, etc.

JoEllen: Actually you might have included anything “dairy” as something unsafe to can as well. There’s a crowd out there who advocate water bath canning of extra milk. Hopefully, they will survive their ICU stay…

Please be careful when canning ANY foods at home, but these three we should never can at home. Here’s to safe canning.

Utah State Extension Service: Utah State Extension Service.

My favorite things:

Ball Mason Wide Mouth Quart Jars with Lids and Bands, Set of 12

All American 921 21 Quart Pressure Cooker Canner

Norpro Canning Essentials Boxed Set, 6 Piece Set

Ball Enamel Water Bath Canner, Including Chrome-Plated Rack and 4-Piece Utensil Set

Ball FreshTech Electric Water Bath Canner, Silver

The post Four Things That Are Not Safe To Can At Home appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Quick And Easy Chicken Soup Recipe For Colds-Flu

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This is my quick and easy chicken soup recipe for colds and flu that anyone can make easily. My neighborhood is experiencing a cold or some kind of virus that is lasting 3-6 weeks. Some of the people have bronchitis, coughs, sinus infections and they are feeling drained of energy. I have talked to two neighbors who have been sick since Christmas and they just can’t seem to kick the cold symptoms. One mentioned her husband thought he was on the mend and then BAM he was flat in bed. This must be a bad virus, flu, cold or whatever is going around. My husband and I have been taking meals to families and today I’m going to make the biggest pot of my chicken soup recipe and put it in quart jars to deliver to more people. If you have neighbors that are ill this recipe can be taken to them in quart jars or disposable containers. All they have to do is heat it up and enjoy this chicken soup recipe that is homemade.

Here’s the deal with chicken soup when people have a cold or influenza without complications, of course, it soothes the throat and helps clear the nasal passages. I would call it a comfort food we all grew up on that Grandma made for anyone who was sick. We rarely went to the doctor and somehow the soup made us feel better. This is truly the best homemade chicken noodle soup in the world. I have made this for years and now my grandkids ask me for the recipe. The reason I think this is the best chicken soup recipe is the fact that 99.9% of the ingredients are right there in your pantry, freezer, refrigerator or food storage pantry. You can interchange chicken in cans or use frozen chicken or leftover chicken.

You can make your own noodles, or use my secret ingredient noodles: Grandma’s Frozen Egg Noodles. Of course, you can boil your packaged noodles/pasta of choice and add them later when the soup is almost finished cooking. I use my electric slow cooker so I can do other things because I usually have ten things going on at once. So I set the slow cooker on low and go about my day doing stuff we all do each day. I call it my set and forget dinner. It really is a very yummy smooth soup with just the right amount of spices. It practically fills my 3-1/2 quart crock pot. Cuisinart 3.5-Quart Programmable Slow Cooker

Secret Ingredient

Best Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

My favorite noodles

Best Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

Here is a picture of my favorite frozen Grandma’s Egg Noodles (as close to homemade as I have ever tasted).

Chicken Soup Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 2 cans of chicken (12.5 ounces each) drained or substitute 2 cups of cooked chicken
  • 6 cups water
  • 1/4 cup Better Than Bouillon Chicken Base or substitute equal amounts of water with chicken broth
  • 3/4 cup freeze-dried onions or 1 fresh onion chopped in bite size pieces
  • 3/4 cup dry dehydrated carrots or 1-1/2 cups diced fresh carrots
  • 3/4 cup dry freeze dried celery or 1-1/2 cups diced fresh celery
  • 1 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 1 teaspoon dried sweet basil
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • salt to taste
  • 1 package Grandma’s frozen egg noodles (11 ounces) cooked and separated as directed or boil your pasta of choice
  • 2 cans cream of chicken soup undiluted (optional)

Instructions:

Combine all ingredients in a slow cooker, BUT add the Grandma’s Noodle the last two hours or they will be mushy. Enjoy!

PRINTABLE recipe: Chicken Noodle Soup by Food Storage Moms

If you have some neighbors who are ill this week, they will love this chicken soup recipe, I promise! Keep up the good work by storing water and adding one can at a time to your pantry.

The post Quick And Easy Chicken Soup Recipe For Colds-Flu appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Quick And Easy Chicken Soup Recipe For Colds-Flu

This is my quick and easy chicken soup recipe for colds and flu that anyone can make easily. My neighborhood is experiencing a cold or some kind of virus that is lasting 3-6 weeks. Some of the people have bronchitis, coughs, sinus infections and they are feeling drained of energy. I have talked to two neighbors who have been sick since Christmas and they just can’t seem to kick the cold symptoms. One mentioned her husband thought he was on the mend and then BAM he was flat in bed. This must be a bad virus, flu, cold or whatever is going around. My husband and I have been taking meals to families and today I’m going to make the biggest pot of my chicken soup recipe and put it in quart jars to deliver to more people. If you have neighbors that are ill this recipe can be taken to them in quart jars or disposable containers. All they have to do is heat it up and enjoy this chicken soup recipe that is homemade.

Here’s the deal with chicken soup when people have a cold or influenza without complications, of course, it soothes the throat and helps clear the nasal passages. I would call it a comfort food we all grew up on that Grandma made for anyone who was sick. We rarely went to the doctor and somehow the soup made us feel better. This is truly the best homemade chicken noodle soup in the world. I have made this for years and now my grandkids ask me for the recipe. The reason I think this is the best chicken soup recipe is the fact that 99.9% of the ingredients are right there in your pantry, freezer, refrigerator or food storage pantry. You can interchange chicken in cans or use frozen chicken or leftover chicken.

You can make your own noodles, or use my secret ingredient noodles: Grandma’s Frozen Egg Noodles. Of course, you can boil your packaged noodles/pasta of choice and add them later when the soup is almost finished cooking. I use my electric slow cooker so I can do other things because I usually have ten things going on at once. So I set the slow cooker on low and go about my day doing stuff we all do each day. I call it my set and forget dinner. It really is a very yummy smooth soup with just the right amount of spices. It practically fills my 3-1/2 quart crock pot. Cuisinart 3.5-Quart Programmable Slow Cooker

Secret Ingredient

Best Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

My favorite noodles

Best Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

Here is a picture of my favorite frozen Grandma’s Egg Noodles (as close to homemade as I have ever tasted).

Chicken Soup Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 2 cans of chicken (12.5 ounces each) drained or substitute 2 cups of cooked chicken
  • 6 cups water
  • 1/4 cup Better Than Bouillon Chicken Base or substitute equal amounts of water with chicken broth
  • 3/4 cup freeze-dried onions or 1 fresh onion chopped in bite size pieces
  • 3/4 cup dry dehydrated carrots or 1-1/2 cups diced fresh carrots
  • 3/4 cup dry freeze dried celery or 1-1/2 cups diced fresh celery
  • 1 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 1 teaspoon dried sweet basil
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • salt to taste
  • 1 package Grandma’s frozen egg noodles (11 ounces) cooked and separated as directed or boil your pasta of choice
  • 2 cans cream of chicken soup undiluted (optional)

Instructions:

Combine all ingredients in a slow cooker, BUT add the Grandma’s Noodle the last two hours or they will be mushy. Enjoy!

PRINTABLE recipe: Chicken Noodle Soup by Food Storage Moms

If you have some neighbors who are ill this week, they will love this chicken soup recipe, I promise! Keep up the good work by storing water and adding one can at a time to your pantry.

The post Quick And Easy Chicken Soup Recipe For Colds-Flu appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Why I Love Cleaning Bathrooms Every Week

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I’m sharing why I love cleaning bathrooms every week with you today. It may seem odd, but I really love to clean bathrooms. I feel like it cuts down on bacteria, obviously, the bathrooms have who knows what in the toilets, the bathtubs, the counter tops, and don’t forget the light switches. I have a definite routine for my bathrooms. My house is very small and only has 2 bathrooms. When I worked I had someone clean my house every week for almost 20 years, it was awesome. Yes, I am a perfectionist and I had to give instructions to the gal that worked for me. I had the same housekeeper for all those years and I loved her like a sister.

I had a large home with five bedrooms, four bathrooms, a dining room, a living room, a family room, and two kitchens. It was a great family home, but a few years ago, Mark and I decided to downsize. It’s been very hard for me to live in this tiny home because I love to entertain and I have had to adjust to a very SMALL home. But I am grateful I have a home, regardless of what size it is. Since I semi-retired my routine for cleaning bathrooms is every Sunday. Yes, it’s the Sabbath, but that day is my day to clean my bathrooms. What can I say, it works for me.

Cleaning Bathrooms:

The first thing I do is wash the toilets, I love clean toilets. I literally can clean my bathrooms in five minutes. Yep, five minutes. Here is the tool I use for the toilets: Don Aslett’s Complete Toilet Set with Pumice Stone and these are the brush replacements: Don Aslett’s Johnny Mop-Set of 3 and I buy this product when my bottles of cleaner get low: Safety Foam Toilet Bowl Cleaner 2 Pack

Next, I clean the bathtubs with this gadget as I no longer kneel on my knees: Hurricane Spin Scrubber Cleaning Brush Keep in mind if you can kneel just use a good brush and keep up on the scrubbing because I only use this baby once a month. I use Spic N Span or whatever other cleaner I have in the house. I have tried homemade cleaners and they don’t measure up to my scrub test. If you have a great recipe for one, let me know. Then I clean the counter tops with Clorox wipes and clean the windows with a good window cleaner like this one: Sprayway, Sprayway Glass Cleaner, 19 oz Cans, Pack of 4 I think you can buy this brand at Costco as well. If you want clean mirrors and clean windows don’t buy the old standby window cleaner brand. It leaves streaks and the windows look worse after you smear the dirt around. Just giving you the heads-up here. I kind of work my way out of the bathroom by cleaning the floors with my Clorox wipes. Yep, I have small bathrooms, this wouldn’t work if you have large bathrooms. I clean mine every week and therefore I can clean them in 5 minutes, literally.

The reason I’m talking about cleaning bathrooms today is because I have several, and I mean several, sick people in the neighborhood. No, it’s not from bathrooms that need to be cleaned, but I think clean bathrooms help us stay healthy. Of course, we need to eat fruits and vegetables to keep our immune system healthy as well. This post is a friendly reminder to use a cleaner (I use Clorox or Lysol wipes) on door knobs, light switches, TV remotes and counter tops. And don’t forget to empty the bathroom garbage cans as needed. I use the small 4-gallon garbage bags in my bathroom. I replace them as needed, but at least once a week. You can buy them at your local supermarket or Amazon: Glad Garbage Small, White, 30 ct, 4 gallons, 2pk

I hope you are well and working slowly on being prepared, you will be glad you are! May God bless your family.

My favorite things:

WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

WaterBrick WB-0001 Ventless Spigot Assembly, Fits Both WaterBrick Water Container Sizes, Blue/White/Red

The post Why I Love Cleaning Bathrooms Every Week appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Disasters Are More Than Just Your Ordinary Day

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Obviously, disasters are more than just your ordinary day, but they typically start as one. I have been through more than my share of disasters in my lifetime. Some have been major and some not so devastating. Here’s the deal, we need to be prepared every day for whatever comes our way. The first disaster I was involved in was years ago when I was about 16 years old. I lived where snow was falling so beautifully all over the lawns, the sidewalks, and the streets. The trees and bushes in the yard looked just like a Christmas card. But then the temperatures dropped, and they dropped quickly. I had never seen an ice storm, literally, roads had become like ice skating rinks. Not really safe to ice skate in the extreme cold weather. The roads were closed for days, then two weeks.

My cousin and I had to walk to the store to get milk, and whatever else we needed at the grocery store. Keep in mind I was 16 and I had a pocket of cash walking in a snow covered sidewalk to the store. I had never lived where it snowed. It was cold, but it was fun because my cousin and I were together and laughing as we walked there. We laughed until we got to the store. There were lines and the food was rationed for families. WHAT? What is rationed? I soon learned we were allowed one gallon or one quart of milk a week, if they had it. I was back east helping my aunt for a few months who had a new baby.

Please keep in mind my mom always had a pantry filled with canned goods and bottled fruits. She made bread and taught her daughters to make bread and to be self-reliant without really knowing it at the time. Oh, how I wish my mom knew she inspired me to be prepared. She died before I was asked to write a book on food storage and emergency preparedness. If you haven’t purchased it, I highly recommend my book: Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation It’s a family friendly book where no weapons are discussed. I wanted the book to be a teaching tool for classes and family meetings. It’s available in stores online or in most every bookstore. I was honored to be asked to write it for people to be prepared for the unexpected.

Just An Ordinary Day:

Typically disasters start out as an ordinary day and can have some warning, or no warning at all. You would think where we live we all would have some way to be alerted as quickly as possible about the minor or major disasters listed below. Yes, we do hear in some cases beforehand, but other times we will not hear for several different reasons.

If you only have cell phones remember that these are not automatically on a Reverse 911 Emergency Notification System. If you are at work, at the park, the gym, driving somewhere and you have your cell phone AND we have a disaster or emergency, your CELL phone will alert you if you have registered your cell phone. You must register your cell phone with your local Reverse 911 Notification System if you want to be notified. You can “Google” Reverse 911 Emergency Notification in your city or county and you should be able to find it. Please do it today!

  • Floods
  • Overfilled rivers, canals and drain pipes gushing with water from excessive rain or snow melting
  • Fires
  • Ice Storms
  • Hurricanes
  • Tornadoes
  • Tsunamis
  • Riots
  • Mass evacuations
  • War
  • Pandemics
  • Railroad derailments
  • Transport accidents
  • Earthquakes
  • Sewer backups
  • Waterlines broken
  • Water contaminated in local water systems

Please be prepared for the unexpected, a disaster or unforeseen emergency could strike your neighborhood at any time. Are you prepared with water, food, cooking devices and fuel? Please start with one thing at a time. You do not need to go into debt to be prepared. We can’t think that the government will have supplies for our cities, nope it’s not going to happen for days, weeks or possibly months. Just picture grocery stores empty after a disaster because they will be empty in 24-48 hours at the most. Please remember to store bleach for cleaning up sewage, or whatever, and rotate it every 6-9 months. Trust me, we will need it. Please keep your gas tank 3/4 full and have cash on hand like fives and ones. If we lose power the ATM’s, the gas stations, the pharmacy and some stores will not be able to process your debit or credit card. Hard cash will work if you need it on any not so ordinary day.

My favorite things:

WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

WaterBrick WB-0001 Ventless Spigot Assembly, Fits Both WaterBrick Water Container Sizes, Blue/White/Red

3M 1860 N95 RESPIRATOR AND SURGICAL MASK Box of 20

The post Disasters Are More Than Just Your Ordinary Day appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How I Started A Whole Food Plant-Based Diet

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Today I’m going to tell you how I started a whole food plant-based diet. I have struggled with my weight for the last 20 years. I have tried every diet known to man. Years ago, I was a manager of a bank, then a private banker for two bank branches, and then I started my own mortgage company. I rarely had time to eat healthy meals. I was grabbing fast food from one place for lunch and then standing in line for take-out for dinner. The pressure of my jobs forced me to eat at my desk in between clients. I did this routine for over 20 years. My doctor told me to quit my job or my arthritis would literally cripple me. I’m a type A person and nothing stops me. The pounds come on slowly and they are even harder to take off. I have high cholesterol. I had been told I was a walking heart attack at the peak of my career. I take the highest statin dose available for heart patients. I am not proud of this fact, by any means.

Here’s the deal, I had a doctor tell me back in 2006 when I was looking at getting two knee replacements to read a book called “The China Study”. The China Study: The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition Ever Conducted and the Startling Implications for Diet, Weight Loss and Long-Term Health Well, I bought the book and kept working. Have you purchased books, and thought to yourself I have got to read that book? This was one I wanted to read for years. I finally bought the audible and have listened to it almost 5 times. I love the book, but you need to decide what is right for you and your family. After reading the book, I started exercising and eating a plant based diet. I must tell you I was almost a vegetarian before I read the book because I really do not care for meat, except maybe filet mignon once every couple years. Please check with your medical doctors before you change your diet or lifestyle. This book has saved my life. I have now lost 40 pounds in six months. I lost the first 22 pounds while listening to the audible book with speakers turned on while I went swimming three times a day for an hour each time. I started slowly and worked up to three hours.

After the initial 22 pounds, I started making a smoothie every morning with a protein powder filled with lots of spinach and frozen bananas made with water only. No juice, no sweetener. I also make smoothies with different fruits, but I always add spinach.

After I semi-retired I decided I would never stand in line for food again, and almost wanted to boycott eating out. Not really, but I love eating at home with Mark. You probably know that typically restaurants over salt the food, add too much yummy butter and add lots of sugar because it makes the meal taste better. AND you keep coming back for more unhealthy food because life is hectic and you may rationalize that you don’t feel like cooking tonight. Big mistake, I know because I was standing in those lines and driving to the restaurants that had curb pick up.

The “diet”, or in my words, my new way of life is wonderful and I’m getting Mark on board who loves meat, but now realizes at our age health is the most important thing we need to consider when evaluating our lives. This may not work for you. I am not selling anything, I am just sharing my thoughts on eating a plant based diet. If you have a garden you will love this way to eat. I read the book and have now watched about 12 documentaries on Netflix, such as Food, Inc., Conspiracy, Fork Over Knives, Plant Pure Nation, Sugar Coated, Engine 2 Rescue, Fat, Sick, and Nearly Dead, Food Choices, Fed Up, and Food Matters, to name a few. I have watched each one of these at least 3-4 times. I learn something new with each one each time I watch them.

The diet is basically vegan, meaning you eat grains, legumes, beans, nuts, fruits, and vegetables with zero processed fat and oils. You eat no meat, sugar or dairy. To some people, this may seem extreme. To is is my way to show I am trying to make my heart healthy and reduce my pain from arthritis. I am only sharing this information to give you an option if you have pain all the time as I do and want to improve your health. Check with your doctor, remember I am not in the medical field and have no training in nutrition. I did not start this way of life on a whim, believe me, I wanted to strengthen my body, improve my health and hopefully become pain-free. I also wanted to rid myself from continual sinus infections, which I have done, so far, yay!

People have said to me, “how are you getting protein?” I thought to myself how am I getting protein? I never thought about protein amounts before I started eating like this. I eat everything and anything now in the fruits and vegetables food groups and I’m never hungry. Fiber fills your belly and it’s healthy, and I actually save money on my groceries, that’s one of the best parts!

Plant-Based Diet:

Here are some stats I gathered from different sources:

Fruits:

Please note the calories will vary based on the size of the fruits and vegetables you choose to eat. Note that g = gram(s) below.

Apples:    80 calories   5 grams fiber   0 g protein

Apricots:   17 calories  1 gram fiber  1 g protein

Avocadoes:  320 calories   14 grams fiber   4 g protein

Bananas:   105 calories   3 grams fiber  1 g protein

Blackberries:  1 cup=62 calories   7 grams fiber   2 g protein

Blueberries:    1 cup=84 calories   4 grams fiber  1 g protein

Boysenberries:   1 cup=62 calories  7 grams fiber  2 g protein

Cantaloupe:    1 cup=54 calories  1 gram fiber  1 g protein

Cherries (sweet):  12 cherries=51 calories   2 grams fiber 1 g protein

Dates:   1/4 cup dried=126 calories   4 grams fiber  1 g protein

Grapefruit:   1 cup=74 calories  3  grams fiber   1 g protein

Grapes:    15 grapes=52 calories   1 gram fiber   1 g protein

Kiwi:   1 fruit=46 calories  3 grams fiber   1 g protein

Lemons:   1/2 lemon=8 calories  1  gram fiber   0 g protein

Limes:   1/2 lime=10 calories  1  gram fiber    0 g protein

Mandarin Oranges:   1/2 cup=46 calories  1 gram fiber   1 g protein

Mangoes:  1/2 mango=67 calories   2 grams fiber   1 g protein

Nectarines:  1 nectarine=63 calories   2 grams fiber   2 g protein

Oranges:  1 orange=62 calories  3 grams fiber  1 g protein

Peaches:   1 peach=39 calories    2 fiber grams 1 g protein

Pears:   1 pear=96 calories   5 grams fiber  1 g protein

Pineapple:   1 cup=74 calories   2  grams fiber   1 g protein

Plums:  1 plum=30 calories  1  gram fiber  1 g protein

Raspberries:   1 cup=64 calories    8 grams fiber  2 g protein

Strawberries:   1 cup=53 calories    3 grams fiber   1 g protein

Vegetables:

Cucumbers:  1/2 large=23 calories   1 gram fiber   1 g protein

Green beans:  1/2 cup snap=22 calories   2 grams fiber   1 g protein

Kale: 1/2 cup cooked=18calories   1 gram fiber  0 g protein

Leeks: raw 1/2 cup=14calories  0-gram fiber   0 g protein

Lettuce:  raw 1 cup=8 calories   1 gram fiber  1 g protein

Mushrooms: raw 1/2=11 calories  1 gram fiber   2 g  protein

Onions: raw chopped 1/2 cup=32 calories  1 gram fiber  1 protein

Peas: green cooked: 1/2 cup=67 calories   4 grams fiber    4 g protein

Peppers: red/green/yellow raw 1/2=15 calories  1 gram fiber  1 g protein

Potatoes: 1 baked with skin 106=calories   3 grams fiber  3 g protein

Radishes: raw 10 medium=7 calories  1 gram fiber  0 g protein

Spinach: raw 1 cup=7 calories  1 gram fiber  1 g protein

Tomatoes: 1 medium raw=27 calories  2 grams fiber  1 g protein

Beans:

Black beans: canned 1/2 cup=110 calories  7 grams fiber  7 g protein

Cannellini beans: canned 1/2 cup=100 calories 5 grams fiber  5 g protein

Chickpeas: garbanzo beans canned 1/2 cup=100 calories  5 grams fiber 5g  protein

Navy beans:  canned 1/2 cup=148 calories  7 grams fiber 10 g protein

Pinto beans: canned 1/2 cup=103 calories  6 grams fiber  6 g protein

Refried beans: 1/2 cup no fat=100 calories  6 grams fiber   6 g protein

I hope this gives you an idea why some of us are a work in progress by becoming vegan. It may or may not be right for you. Mark and I are learning about becoming healthier one day at a time. I will have a bagel with cream cheese, just in case you are wondering! Life is good when I’m trying to free my body from pain and becoming stronger every day. May God bless you in your endeavors to become prepared for the unexpected!

My favorite things:

Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

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Emergency Supply Checklist We All Need

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Sometimes an emergency supply checklist is a way to help us be prepared for the unexpected. If it seems overwhelming to know where to start, I get it. It’s almost like a house that needs to be cleaned and we don’t know which room to start on. Maybe we’re moving and we have a ton of boxes and packing paper staring us in the face. It’s okay, we clean one room, pack one or two boxes and keep going. You do the same thing with food storage and emergency supplies. You start with a few things you use every day and expand the amount. You write down what you eat every day and then buy a few extra things. I designed a food storage checklist a few years ago. If you missed it here it is: Where-Do-I-Start

I used to teach classes, and I still do sometimes, but my schedule is too busy to do much traveling to teach people, so I direct them to my website to learn what they need to do. I have a lot of printables that people can use to get them started. Here is what the document looks like:

Emergency Supply Checklist

I know for years the state, the federal government, the American Red Cross, and many churches suggested a 72-hour kit. I soon learned we need a whole lot more than any 72-hour kit could hold. Yes, I have a list for them too, but with all the chaos that’s going on in our country and around the world, we need more than what’s in that bag. I know, at least we can take it to the schools and churches after a disaster to help get us through the first few days. I’m not, and I repeat, not going to the hills like some preppers suggest with shotguns, etc. At my age, I couldn’t haul the stuff I need to feed my family of two and be able to carry the water too! Here’s the deal, if my house collapses from an earthquake, yep, I will evacuate. I’m not buying a second home up in the hills with a barricade built around it, nope it’s not going to happen. I’m prepared to stay where I am and I can survive most anything. Now, I didn’t get to this point overnight, it’s taken years of preparation, one step at a time. One #10 can, one case of this or that and one bucket of my hard white wheat at a time. You can do this too! One step at a time. Just start with a plan.

  1. Water, one gallon per person per day is suggested by most agencies. I suggest four gallons per person per day. I live in the desert and I will need lots of water.
  2. Food, fill in the blanks on my list above, you can start with one week, then two weeks, then three months. Buy at case lot sales and rotate the food. I always buy instant milk, ingredients that I can use to make pancake, bread, biscuits or crackers. I buy cases of vegetarian refried beans because I love them and I can make tortillas to help consume the beans. I buy rice, cans of cream of chicken soup, canned green chilies, canned diced tomatoes, and beans like kidney, pinto, navy, etc. I buy cases of canned fruits and vegetables. I used to “can” them myself, but now I just buy them.
  3. PRINTABLE first aid supplies: First Aid Kit Checklist by Food Storage Moms
  4. PRINTABLE 72-hour kits: FSM 72-Hour Kits For Adults and FSM 72-Hour Kits For Children and FSM 72-Hour Kits For Pets
  5. Be sure and get a stove that will boil water and cook a few meals when needed. This is the one I bought for all four of my daughters: Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and 12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves
  6. Get a few good can openers.

Please start today with one can, one case or whatever your budget allows. Remember the government and your neighbors can’t take care of you. You must take care of yourself. PERIOD. It may take days or weeks for anyone else to have food and water available for you. Remember, please be cautious around our truckers on the highway, without them, we cannot survive. Please pray for our truckers who are the only ones that can deliver the food and water to our grocery stores. If you have a mini-farm that’s awesome, but most of us do not. May God bless our truckers.

Thanks for being prepared for the unexpected.

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Emergency Preparedness-How Prepared Are You

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If I talk about emergency preparedness-how prepared are you is the logical question? I have asked a few people how they feel about preparedness. Some of my questions to friends were like “do you store water?” Other questions have been “how do you feel about food storage” or “how long could your family survive on the food you have stored?” Well, as you may imagine, the answers were all over the board. Here’s the deal, I really try not to be on a soapbox screaming from the rooftops to tell everyone to get prepared. We have to be realistic and recognize the government can’t take care of all of us after a minor or major disaster, at least right away. The local American Red Cross may help in a week or two, possibly a month. We must be self-reliant, that’s it. Period.

I’m not a doomsday prepper and I don’t believe in zombies. I know a lot of people do, I don’t. My life has always been prepared for whatever comes my way. I have been lucky, my husband has never lost his job. We have never had to live on government help. Mark worked three jobs so we didn’t have to take out student loans to get him through college. I ironed clothes (I doubt my daughters even own an iron) I’m thinking this as I write this statement. I babysat kids and cleaned homes to help with income with four daughters under tow. Mark and I never thought anything about it. We just worked hard, and we still do to this day. It’s a way of life for us. I understand people need occasional help from the government. I get it. As long as it’s short term and doesn’t become a way of life or lifestyle, as I call it, I understand. It’s when I hear about families who have been living off the government for ten or more years when they could have tried to do it on their own that I get ticked off.

As you know Facebook sometimes tells us more than we want to hear. Some people almost boast about the fact they are living off the government going on 10-12 years now. Wow, my mom could have used some help as a young single mom with three daughters. She was too proud, she worked and we worked to help her. This is why it’s so critical to have food storage stored. If you or someone in your family loses a job or becomes ill such that they can’t work, are you prepared to feed your family?

Being prepared is a way of life for me and for my daughters. I can boast about my daughters because they are all hard workers and survivors. They are also self-reliant. Of course, all families have a few hiccups, and I have had a few as well. I love the saying from Texas, “I put my boots on and got back in the saddle.” I don’t know where I heard that quote, I believe it was a movie. I use it all the time because I know I have had to put my boots on and get back in the saddle a few times. It’s life, but I know I can survive anything. My daughters can survive anything because they are strong women.

I swear, it was from other’s example to us, but also we grew a garden and we “canned” every food we could get our hands on that was free or cheap. I know work teaches kids how to be self-reliant. Please note this past year I “pressure canned” chicken for the first time while earning my Master Preserver Canning Certificate. It was a really fun class!!

If you have a disaster or unforeseen emergency in your neighborhood is anyone prepared with water, food, gardens, first aid kits, cooking devices, fuel or general preparedness skills? I am extremely worried where I live. I can’t take care of everyone, it’s not going to happen. I will be willing to cook meals with help and shared food and water. My fear is the lack of both on my street. I know possibly seven families out of 1200 families that are prepared for a disaster in my subdivision. I would love to move where there are like-minded people, but economically it’s not going to happen.

I’m concerned for the truckers and their safety if the roads are shut down and the people are trying to loot the trucks because the grocery store shelves are empty. People get mean and crazy when they are hungry and their kids are crying for a drink and something to eat. For the survival of your family, please get prepared for the unexpected.

Preparedness:

I quote from the Merriam-Webster Dictionary: Preparedness is “A state of adequate preparation.” The key word here is “adequate,” meaning enough supplies stored to keep your family hydrated with water, fed with food, blankets and fuel sources to keep them warm, and having first aid supplies at the very minimum so your family can be prepared for the unexpected.

Please start today if you haven’t already:

  1. Water, one to four gallons per person per day minimum WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue with water preserver: 55 Gallon Water Preserver Concentrate 5 Year Emergency Disaster Preparedness, Survival Kits, Emergency Water Storage, Earthquake, Hurricane, Safety
  2. Food
  3. First Aid supplies
  4. Blankets
  5. Cooking devices with fuel stored
  6. Emergency binder holding your important documents
  7. 72 hour-kits, at the very least
  8. Pictures of family members so you can post pictures if you get separated after a disaster
  9. Make a plan with your family today so all members know where to meet if you are not home when a disaster hits
  10. Buy 90-day prescriptions, if possible (they are usually cheaper if you pay cash, ask your doctors for refills)
  11. Communication, talk with your neighbors to have a walkie talkie on the same channel. I only have three families linked with my channel. No one else sees the need or has the desire to get walkie talkies (think Pandemic, I will not leave my house) Motorola MR350R 35-Mile Range 22-Channel FRS/GMRS Two-Way Radio (Pair)
  12. Flashlights, please get one for every family member. Trust me, you will need them. These are my favorite because they don’t need batteries: Goal Zero 90109 Solo V2 Solar Flashlight

Sometimes you have to see, read or hear articles before it really hits you that these needs are real and may save lives. This is the article I hope helps just one family do what they should be doing. Make a preparedness plan, today, not tomorrow and make sure all your family knows and understands what needs to be done, don’t take it all on yourself. May God bless those who have prepared for the unexpected. If you can move where there are like minded people, seriously consider it. Do it now!

 

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11 Things Every Pantry Needs To Cook From Scratch

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Here is my list of 11 things every pantry needs to cook from scratch. If you start with this list, the sky is the limit to help us make just about every baked item we would like to bake. Now we can add more foods to our pantry to make even more meals. But today I am going to just talk about what you can make anytime with these baking items shown above. Yep, you can do it! You do not even need an electric mixer. If you have a large bowl that would really help, depending on what you decide to make.

These items are in the pantry, not the freezer. I want everyone to know what they can make in any emergency when the power is out. Okay, let’s get started.

What Every Pantry Needs:

1. Honey

The great thing about honey is that it lasts forever. It might crystallize but it is still great. You might need a chisel, but it tastes great soft or hard. One thing about honey, you can drizzle it on homemade biscuits, bread or pancakes. Yummy! My baking items have to include honey! Cox’s Honey: Cox’s Honey Website. Be careful with honey and babies. Please do your research. I cringe when I have people tell me they just bought several 5-gallon buckets of honey to store. Please put the honey in quart jars or you may be sorry, just so you know. It will last forever but you will need a way to get it to soften in order to use it. I know because I have had to put my half-gallons of honey outside in the heat of the summer and keep my fingers crossed it would go back to its original consistency.

2. Real Salt

Everyone usually has some salt in the cupboard. Here’s the deal with salt, our bodies need salt to survive. I am not talking excessive, but salt makes some foods taste better as well. Plus I need to bake certain items as listed below. This is my favorite: Redmond Real Salt, Fine Ground, 26 Ounce Pouch

3. Olive Oil

We can use olive oil for so many baking items, which I will list below. Remember olive oil does not have a long shelf life. I never store mine for more than 1 year. Six months is even better. But I have eaten at homes and the olive oil on side dishes or salads tastes rancid. Some people have it for years. Oh, man is it bad, in my opinion. When in doubt…throw it out.

4. SAF Yeast

I realize you can make a lot of things without this commercial yeast. My very good friend, Melissa Richardson who wrote the book “The Art Of Baking With Natural Yeast” never uses commercial yeast. I am like an old dog and still love my no fail freshly ground whole wheat bread. Saf Instant Yeast, 1-Pound Pouches (Pack of 4)

5. Baking Soda

This is a “must have” for some homemade food items. This is a very important baking item for the pantry.

6. Baking Powder

This is also a “must have” for some homemade items.

7.  Coconut Oil

Let me count the ways we can use coconut oil! Not just for the pantry…..plus this has a longer shelf life than most oils. The temperature where it is stored is critical. Not in a hot garage.

8. Powdered Butter

Well, we do need some powdered butter in the pantry. Do you remember me telling you I opened a can of powdered butter and I mixed the portions on the can and started stirring? I start gagging just thinking of the smell. The website said it tasted just like “Land O’Lakes” butter. NO WAY! I still laugh about that. Powdered butter for baking is a great emergency food storage item. Red Feather Butter is yummy that you san store for emergencies. It’s a little pricey but it tastes good. Please do not “can” butter it is not safe to eat, trust me on this one.

9. Instant or Powdered Milk

This one is a “must have” baking item, but is also perfect for those days when you are out of milk and the roads are iced over. You can make milk to drink, cook with, on cereal, etc.! Love it!

10. Powdered Eggs (OvaEasy are my favorite)

These are my favorite #10 can eggs (they have packages inside the can). They are 100% eggs. Of course, if you have chickens or quail you are set for any meal.

11. Wheat (I prefer Hard White), White Bread Flour or Your Choice of Gluten-Free Flour

If you have wheat you will need a wheat grinder. You can sprout wheat as well. Be sure and check the shelf life for white flour (6-12 months at the most). Please do not go out and store large bags of flour that will go rancid in a year or two. When in doubt throw it out. I believe in waste not want not too…but I do not want to get the “flu” as in food poisoning.

Meals You Can Make With 11 Basic Baking Items:

Bread, pancakes, muffins, pasta, cracked wheat, sprouted wheat, tortillas. You can also make crackers, mayonnaise, English muffins, Swedish Hotcakes, Popeye Pancakes, cookies, and crepes. You can also make custards, puddings, cakes, waffles and biscuits. Is your mouth watering now? I want to make some crepes right now! Here’s the deal, look at all these items you can make in a disaster if you have just these 11 items. Now if you have some fruit, vegetables, and cheese……you will rock with meals!

Let’s be ready for those winter storms. Please fill your pantry with these basic baking items. Remember if you can afford to get that $20.00-30.00 butane stove you can cook inside (just crack a window)! Stock up on a few cans of butane…be ready when the power goes out. Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and the fuel: 12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves

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Easy Frugal Sauces You Can Make Yourself

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I’m sharing some of my easy frugal sauces you can make yourself today. For some reason, if a dish of food has a sweet spicy sauce, I’m all over it. If the dish has a sauce that is creamy or accents the food, it seems more satisfying for some reason to me. I like meat with gravy, potatoes with gravy, stuffing with gravy. Gravy and sauces are similar to me, just different ingredients. What can I say, I love sauces and gravies. I love dips, but today it’s all about frugal sauces.

I hope you enjoy these different sauces as much as my family does. The thing about some of the recipes below, you can make a white sauce and add Parmesan cheese and you have a “light” Alfredo sauce instead of using cream. You add some sausage crumbles to the white sauce and you can make sausage and biscuits! I realize some of these have a lot of butter or sugar, that’s how my mom made them and I carry on the tradition. Now, you can cut down the butter and sugar, depending on your taste buds.

Frugal Sauces

White Sauce:

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup butter
  • 1-1/2 cups flour
  • 1/2-gallon milk (more or less depending on the consistency you like)

Instructions:

Melt: 1 cup butter (I am cringing that I am really admitting I use 2 cubes of butter)

Add: 1-1/2 cups flour, stir constantly to make a roux (a mixture of fat and flour).

Add: 1/2-gallon milk, stir constantly, I really do mean constantly. LOL, or you will have lumps!

You can make creamed chipped beef on toast or biscuits with this sauce by adding chopped beef. You can also make macaroni and cheese by adding cheese to this sauce and pouring over cooked macaroni. Creamed tuna on toast was a meal we had almost every week when I was growing up.

Egg Foo Young Gravy/Sauce:

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups water
  • 2 bouillon cubes or 1 tablespoon Better Than Bouillon
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce or Bragg’s sauce
  • 4 tablespoons cornstarch

Instructions:

Place these ingredients in a medium saucepan and whisk until smooth. Bring to a boil while stirring constantly. Serve warm over egg foo young.

Jalapeno Pepper Jelly Sauce:

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup chopped red bell peppers
  • 1 cup chopped green bell peppers
  • 1/3  cup diced and seeded jalapenos (use gloves to chop them)
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • 6 tablespoons liquid pectin

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in a large saucepan over medium heat and stir constantly until sugar dissolves. Let it cool before placing the ingredients into your blender and blend for 5-6 seconds. Now, return the mixture to the same pan and bring it to a boil. Skim the foam off the top of the mixture. Now turn the heat to simmer for 5 minutes. Add the pectin and bring the mixture back up to a boil again.  Let it slightly cool before serving over your favorite Mexican dishes or meats.

Sweet Meat Glaze/Sauce:

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup brown sugar (packed)
  • 2 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 cup cold water
  • 4 tablespoons soy sauce or Bragg’s sauce

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in a pan, stir constantly like a white sauce until it thickens. This sauce is almost like a barbecue sauce that you pour over a pork roast, pork chops or a pork tenderloin that’s been cooked. Broil the meat with half of this sauce poured over it in a 9-inch by 13-inch pan. Please watch this constantly as it will burn very quickly. Remove from the oven when it starts to caramelize.

PRINTABLE recipe: Sauces by Food Storage Moms

My favorite things:

OXO SteeL 9-Inch Whisk

Danish Dough Hand Whisk / Mixer 11″

OXO Good Grips Egg Beater

Farberware Classic Stainless Steel 4-Quart Covered Saucepot

Cuisinart 77-412 Chef’s Classic Stainless 4-Piece 12-Quart Pasta/Steamer Set

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Quick-Easy Appetizers For Every Party

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I know we are all wanting to get to know our neighbors, so I have to share my quick-easy appetizers my family makes for every holiday. Not all of them are used every time, we switch our favorites for different holidays. I love to have people over to my house and one of my favorite ways to entertain is to have a HUGE array of appetizers so friends can grab a plate and eat appetizers as we laugh and have a good time together.

If you have a slow cooker or two you can make these a few hours before the party and just relax right before the get-together. These recipes are great for holidays like I said, but awesome to take to parks for family reunions. I think every family has made at least one or two of these over the years because we keep passing our favorite recipes on to friends and new family members. I have to tell you, I could have appetizers every day of the week and skip dinner. Well, maybe not every night, but several nights each month. Some of these recipes are even better the next day, if there is any left that is! Enjoy! I have the PRINTABLE recipes below.

Quick-Easy Appetizers:

1. Spicy Buffalo Meatball Appetizer

Ingredients:
Instructions:
  1. Combine the Franks Hot Sauce, brown sugar and water in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Stir until the brown sugar dissolves. Place the precooked meatballs in a slow cooker and cover with the sauce. Cook for about 2-3 hours on low, or until warmed through. Serve with toothpicks, buttermilk dressing, and celery sticks if desired.

2. Stacie’s Green Chilies Bean Dip

Ingredients:

  • 1 can bean dip
  • 1-4-ounce can of chopped green chilies
  • 1-16-ounce can refried beans
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/2 cup grated cheese

Instructions:

Layer the ingredients above in the slow cooker and cover. Cook on low for about 2-4 hours or until warmed through. Serve with tortilla chips.

3. Little Smokies (hot dogs) Sweet & Sassy Appetizer

Ingredients:

  • 12 or 18-ounce jar of grape jelly
  • 12-ounce jar of chili sauce
  • Three pounds of Little Smokies

Instructions:

Combine the ingredients in the slow cooker and set on low for 2-4 hours, or until warmed through. Serve with toothpicks.

4. My Favorite Chile Con Queso Dip

Instructions:

  • 40-ounce can chili without beans
  • 2-pounds Velveeta Cheese (cubed)
  • 16-ounce jar Picante sauce (I use mild)

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in the slow cooker and cook on low for 2-4 hours, or until melted and warm. Serve with tortilla chips.

5. Linda’s Cream Cheese Dip

Ingredients:

  • 2-8-ounce packages of cream cheese softened (cubed)
  • 3-16-ounce cans of chili without beans
  • 2 cups grated or shredded mozzarella cheese

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in the slow cooker and cook on low for 2-4 hours, or until melted or warmed through. Serve with tortilla chips.

6. Cream Chipped Beef Dip

Ingredients:

  • 8-ounce package of cream cheese softened (cubed)
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 cup chip beef cut into small pieces
  • 2 tablespoons fresh green onions chopped or 1 tablespoon air-dried green onions
  • 2 tablespoons milk of choice
Instructions:
Combine all of the ingredients in the slow cooker and stir occasionally to combine the softened cream cheese, sour cream, beef, onions and milk until warmed through. Serve with Fritos.

7. My Favorite Nacho Dip

Ingredients:

  • 3 pounds Velveeta cheese
  • 1-10-3/4 ounce can cream of chicken soup
  • 2-4-ounce cans chopped green chilies

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in the slow cooker and cook on low for about 2-4 hours, or until heated through. Serve with tortilla chips.

8. Hot & Spicy Dip

Ingredients:

  • 1-pound cooked ground beef, drained
  • 1-pound Mexican Velveeta cheese (cubed)
  • 8-ounce jar salsa (I use mild)

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in the slow cooker until melted and heated through. Serve with tortilla chips.

9. Hot Spinach & Artichoke Dip

Ingredients:

  • 1-9-ounce frozen spinach, thaw it and squeeze the liquid out of it
  • 1-8-ounce package cream cheese (cubed & softened)
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons dry parsley
  • 1-15-ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts, chopped fine and drained
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • 1 cup Parmesan cheese

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in the slow cooker and cook on low for 2-4 hours, or until heated through. Serve with baguette sliced bread.

PRINTABLE recipes: Quick-Easy Appetizers by Food Storage Moms

Let me know if you have love appetizers as much as I do! Anyone having a party this weekend or a family get-together?

My favorite things:

 

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How To Cook Dried Beans Four Different Ways

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I’ve been wanting to talk about how to cook dried beans four different ways for some time now. There is something awesome about a pot of beans simmering on the stove. You can flavor so many kinds of beans with different seasonings, and the magic of several new meals begin. I grew up eating beans and made pinto beans into mashed beans to fill burritos to freeze in bulk with my daughters. I must admit right here that ONCE I missed a chunk of dirt, it must have been very small but big enough that it took one of my daughters years before she would eat refried beans again. Yep, she bit into a burrito with a chunk of dirt. I know we need to open the bag and spread the beans out and check for rocks, debris and small chunks of dirt. Dang, I missed a chunk! Anyway, just giving you the heads-up to look through the bags of beans you decide to soak or not soak before cooking them. Today, when I made these beans I found a 1/4 inch rock, this is why I use a mesh strainer to inspect my beans before I soak or cook them.

I love storing beans in my pantry and food storage because they are nutritious, hearty, versatile and inexpensive. When fall comes, I immediately think of chili served with cornbread. I make chili with white beans, red chili beans, or a combination. Man, my mouth is watering just thinking about a pot of chili. Here’s the deal about beans, if they are really old, as in 25 years old, that were stored in big cans (mine were green) then they may not have the food value we would all like after that many years. BUT, they would fill the belly, and if you have a pressure cooker you may be able to cook those old hard, and I mean really hard beans. I was in a pressure cooker class a few years ago and the instructor showed us how beans will soften if cooked in a pressure cooker. If you added some cooked quinoa and some vegetables along with the cooked beans you would at least feel full after an emergency in your neighborhood. I have friends that eat old beans almost every day of the week and they are healthy, so life is good if you store lots of beans.

I like to rinse my beans before I pre-soak them or cook them. You don’t have to pre-soak the beans, but just giving you the heads-up here, it takes longer to cook the beans when you don’t. I didn’t pre-soak the beans for my pressure cookers. I used two different electric pressure cookers below so I could compare them side by side. I purchased both of them just so you know I am not getting paid to review these pressure cookers.

Cooking Dried Beans:

Please note, I cooked the dried pinto beans four different ways using only the following:

  1. 1 cup dried beans (sort for rocks/debris, wash and drain)
  2. 3 cups water
  3. No salt, seasonings or oil/fat added
  4. I didn’t pre-soak any of them before cooking. PLEASE NOTE, I would for sure pre-soak the beans for cooking beans on the stovetop, in the oven, and the slow cooker. Just giving you the heads-up here. Pre-soak is always the best way to cook beans. Nothing has changed except maybe the pressure cooker cooks them a little faster. BUT, I will pre-soak all my beans going forward. I’ve pre-soaked them for years, but I wanted to see if I could cook them without doing pre-soaking. Nope, it helps cook them faster.

Four Ways to Cook:

Stovetop:

I would for sure pre-soak the beans at least 6-12 hours minimum covered with water in the refrigerator. After pre-soaking them, drain the water from the pan and cover with at least one inch of fresh water. Cook without a lid on medium heat until the water comes to a boil, simmer until tender, this time period will depend on how old the beans are. I had some beans that were about two years old and they took 8 hours to cook. I didn’t pre-soak them, big mistake. You can add your favorite seasonings, garlic, jalapenos, green chilies, onions, etc. There is something awesome about making your own homemade pinto beans, or whatever beans you have in your pantry. I added my favorite seasonings like chili powder, cumin and garlic halfway through the cooking. I didn’t add oil or fat of any kind.

Slow Cooker:

I would for sure pre-soak the beans at least 6-12 hours minimum covered with water in the refrigerator. After pre-soaking them, drain the water from the pan and cover with at least two inches of fresh water in your slow cooker. I would start by setting the slow cooker on high and then lower it to low maybe halfway through the day, depending on the temperature of your slow cooker. I realize different brands cook at different temperatures. Cook at least 6-10 hours or until tender. I added my favorite seasonings like chili powder, cumin, and garlic halfway through the cooking. I didn’t add oil or fat of any kind.

Oven Cooking:

I have to tell you this was the easiest way to cook them! I grabbed one of my Dutch ovens, but any deep oven-safe pan would work. I would for sure pre-soak the beans at least 6-12 hours minimum covered with water in the refrigerator. After pre-soaking them, drain the water from the pan and cover with at least one to two inches of water in the Dutch oven or pot. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and bake without a lid for 90-120 minutes. Longer if your beans are older. Cook until tender to your taste. I added my favorite seasonings like chili powder, cumin, and garlic halfway through the cooking. I didn’t add oil or fat of any kind.

Electric Pressure Cookers:

dried beans

I have purchased both the Fagor 3-in-1 pressure cooker and the 7-in-1 Instant Pot so I wanted to compare the two side by side. I am partial to the Fagor because I have taken several classes from Chef Brad who teaches so many wonderful classes everywhere. He suggested at the time we buy a Fagor, so I did. Then the Instant Pot became popular on Facebook and on blogs recently. I decided to buy an Instant Pot before I did a giveaway with one last year. They are both great machines.

You can see the mesh strainer above, I use it to rinse my beans before I soak or cook them. As you know, I will go back to soaking my beans overnight once again after today’s experiment. NOTE: you must be careful with beans in a pressure cooker because of the foam they create. Read the instructions about cooking beans in your pressure cooker’s owner’s manual. Most say to keep the pot fully cooked below 2/3 or 1/2 full. Please check your book because beans will expand and fill the pot, possibly too full.

Fagor:

The ratio for cooking beans is 1 part beans to 3 parts water. You lock the lid in place and turn it to “pressure”, HIGH 50-60 minutes and push start. I used the natural release to release the pressure after cooking.

Instant Pot:

The ratio for cooking beans is 1 part beans to 3 parts water. You lock the lid in place and turn it to “Beans/Chili”, then push the high pressure. The time comes up as 30 minutes, but my beans didn’t get cooked in the 30 minutes, but my beans are two years old. They may cook in 30 minutes if you have a fresh bag of beans, but these two year old beans were not cooked. Next time I will push 50-60 minutes. I used the natural release to release the pressure after cooking.

Release on pressure cookers:

Here are two ways to release the pressure, be sure and use a hot pad or washcloth or you will get burned from the steam:

1. Natural Method: after cooking you will press the START/STOP button to stop the cooking process. Unplug the unit and wait for the pressure to naturally release….approximately 20-30 minutes. After this time move the pressure regulator to vent to make sure all the pressure has been released.

2. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from the escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

Please store some beans, they are inexpensive and you can cook them outside with charcoal and a Dutch oven or a Sun Oven if you have a lot of sunshine where you live. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. May God bless you and your family for being prepared.

My favorite things:

Fagor 670040230 Stainless-Steel 3-in-1 6-Quart Multi-Cooker

Instant Pot IP-LUX60 V3 Programmable Electric Pressure Cooker, 6Qt, 1000W (updated model)

Cuisinart Set of 3 Fine Mesh Stainless Steel Strainers

Augason Farms Pinto Beans Emergency Food Storage 41 Pound Pail

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How Prepared Is Your Family To Survive Disasters

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How prepared is your family to survive disasters? It may be a minor disaster or an unforeseen emergency in your neighborhood. You may have to be evacuated. Are you prepared to leave your home and go to a shelter if you get a knock on your door from local authorities telling you that you MUST leave your home? We really need to think about what we may want to grab and take with us. My top priority would be my important documents I have stored in a binder in a very secure place. You may know, I designed a binder with FREE printable pages. I have included instructions detailing what you may want to add to your binder, as well. One would be pictures of our family members to be enclosed in the binder in case we get separated from our loved ones. We will keep one picture and post the other picture on a wall so we can hopefully be reunited ASAP.  Here is the download: Food Storage Moms FREE Printable Emergency Binder Download

Please be patient for it to load, and the PDF document should show up on your computer on the bottom left-side of your laptop or computer monitor. Once the document finishes loading it will be ready to click and print. I prefer printing it on cardstock, and it’s actually in color if you want to print with a color printer.

Here’s the deal, I have heard that only 10% of the people in Utah are prepared for a disaster or unforeseen emergency. This really bothers me because I can’t provide for my entire street or neighborhood.  I have this percentage based on real numbers from churches, emergency preparedness centers, and neighborhoods where I have taught classes about this very topic in Utah. I’ll bet the percentage of unprepared families is even higher in many other locations, particularly the highly concentrated urban centers. I hear comments like, I don’t know where to start, I don’t have the money to buy groceries, let alone emergency food and supplies. I have also heard people ask what’s the big deal, we have heard we need to be prepared for the last thirty plus years and nothing has happened. Well, this may be true in some areas of the country, but I get emails all the time asking me what to do, and they include comments such as this one “Our neighborhood has been without power for five days now, what would you suggest for cooking, etc?”

These are real people and the emails show me the fear in the families concerned. My heart aches for them because maybe they have never had a minor or major power outage EVER. But they do now. My point is this, we need to be prepared before we need to be prepared. It’s a fact if you turn on the TV and listen to the news, hear it on the radio, or look on Facebook there are emergency issues in numerous places in the USA and throughout the world.

I’m sure you have seen my articles on many emergency preparedness topics. I believe sometimes we have to see the comments about the stuff I have listed below again and again before it sinks in enough to take some action. If even one family gets prepared in the next week, I have accomplished what I have tried to do, inform the world one family at a time. Let’s hope at least 15% of your neighborhood is prepared, that would beat the number of 10% in Utah being prepared for disasters, whatever they may be.

Tips To Survive Disasters:

Talk with your family and make a plan for meeting up after an evacuation or disaster if that should occur. Please make more than one or two choices to meet in case roads are damaged and you are driving carpool or kids to dance lessons.

Store water and food for at least two to three weeks minimum in case you will be homebound because of a major epidemic.

Decide on one or two choices of cooking devices that you could use to boil water or cook a hot meal. Be sure and have the appropriate fuel stored that is required to go with the stoves you plan to use.

Order some N-95 masks to add to your first aid kit. If you don’t have a first aid kit, just think about what will happen if the pharmacies are closed due to power outages. Do you have cough syrups, Tylenol or whatever OTC products you would like if you were unable to get them anywhere due to all stores being closed? It will happen, trust me. It has happened in many cities and states. Here’s my first aid kit that I recommend at the very least to have on hand: First Aid Kit For Survival

Keep up on your laundry and store extra laundry detergent should you need to wash your clothes by hand. You’ve probably seen my emergency washing machine with 6 -gallon buckets and a Gamma lid as a mobile washer: Breathing Mobile Washer – Handheld, portable, non-electric, mobile, manual clothes washing machine. Handle Included.

I would make sure you have a portable toilet because if the power goes out the sewer lines may not work. Tote-able Toilet Seat and Lid. I prefer six-gallon buckets so you don’t have to squat down as far: 6 Gallon Bucket with White Gamma Seal Lid Save the Gamma Lid for another bucket you can use to store food.

Please get some good flashlights and store extra batteries, unless you plan to use solar flashlights. I prefer this one: Goal Zero 90109 Solo V2 Solar Flashlight or this one: Goal Zero Torch 250 Flashlight with Integrated Solar Panel

Keep in mind this list has just the bare necessities we need should a disaster hit. But we need to encourage our neighbors to prepare for the unexpected too. If your neighbors are approachable have some get-togethers and talk about what you would do as a team of neighbors to work together and what each could bring to the table if it takes the government or other emergency agencies a week or a month to arrive with help. We must take care of ourselves because we are responsible for OUR family to survive disasters.

My favorite things:

WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

WaterBrick WB-0001 Ventless Spigot Assembly, Fits Both WaterBrick Water Container Sizes, Blue/White/Red

FEMA Website

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I Recommend These Cooking Stoves For Survival

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I recommend these cooking stoves for survival, and I’ll tell you why. If and when we lose power I want you to think about how you would cook some meals, or boil some water for that matter. If you have a generator you will be set, until the fuel runs out if it’s gas powered. If you have a woodburning stove that’s awesome if it’s cold in your home, but not in the summer if it’s 100 degrees outside. I think most of us have a gas (propane) barbecue, or maybe one that uses charcoal briquettes. Those are great for short-term cooking only because they would use way too much fuel to boil a gallon or two of water.

We need to have a plan for cooking and boiling water for survival from a major disaster or even a minor power outage. Yes, we can go a few days without a hot meal, I get it. But, if we need to boil our water when the local water supply is contaminated we should be ready to boil water with a cooking device. Hopefully, every family has at least two to three days worth of water stored at their homes, but I’m afraid there a lot of people that don’t. It could be zero storage space, lack of money to buy the containers, etc. So, this is why I’m talking about cooking stoves today. If you have at least one of these you can cook a meal or boil water. There a few more ways to cook, but I’m just talking about these stoves today. Please remember to procure the fuel required for the stove you decide to purchase.

Cooking Stoves:

Here’s the deal, if you have very little sunshine in your community, a Sun Oven would be useless. I hate to use the word useless, but if you have overcast days 300 days of the year, you will not be able to count on the sunshine to bake meals or boil water. If you have several days of sunshine, like I do in Southern Utah, this is a perfect oven for you.

                                                                                                    SUN OVEN/SOLAR COOKING:

I just purchased a second Sun Oven because I LOVE them! All American Sun Oven- The Ultimate Solar Appliance It is approximately 19 inches square and about 11 inches high. It has a handle so you can carry it. It opens up with these sides to reflect the Sun!!! You can buy a Sun Oven with or without bread pans, cake pans, two cooking pots that stack and a set of three dehydrating racks, along with some parchment paper, and NOW a turkey roaster pan! You can “dehydrate” anything from fruits, veggies, and jerky. The instructions are quite simple. Please be sure and read ALL the instructions before use.  This is the condensed version of instructions:

1. Placement–place in a sunny location unobstructed by trees, etc.

2. Setup–lift and unfold the reflectors. Slide the slot in the bottom section of the reflectors over the thumbscrew, etc.

3. Focusing–aim the front of the Sun Oven towards the sun. You need to tilt the oven to eliminate the shadows. You will occasionally need to adjust the position.

4. Preheat–The Sun Oven should be preheated before cooking. It is recommended that you place the oven with the glass door closed and latched down in the sun to preheat. In the strong sun, the Sun Oven will reach 300 degrees F in about twenty minutes. This is awesome!

5. Cooking–Place food in the cooking pot or pan on the tray inside the oven. Close the door quickly, and latch it down, using both latches. Use potholders when removing the HOT cooked food after its finished cooking. Always cover the food being cooked, except bakery goods. Cut down a third of the liquid normally used for rice, stew or sauces. This does not apply to bakery products. You can use glass casserole dishes with a cover. It says do not use foil because the shiny foil would reflect the heat away from the food being cooked. Two pots can be stacked and cooked at the same time.

Since foods do not burn in the Sun Oven, it is not necessary to stir the foods after they are placed in the oven. Use a meat thermometer –place this in the meat BEFORE you put the meat in the oven. I highly recommend this solar oven. The All American Solar Sun Oven is the one I recommend!

VOLCANO II STOVE:

The Volcano II stove/oven is a really great stove to use in an emergency, at the park or when camping. I like this particular stove because you can use propane with an attachment (one for small bottles and a different one for large containers of propane). The Volcano II stove uses wood, propane or charcoal. I demonstrate this stove/oven at food storage/emergency preparedness classes I teach.  I recommend this stove because it can be used year round. Volcano Grills 3-Fuel Portable Camping Stove

                                                                                                     CAMP CHEF STOVE/OVEN:

The Camp Chef Stove/Oven show above is one I demonstrate at the same classes. I make homemade bread and bake two loaves in the oven after removing one of the oven racks. I bake the bread at 350 degrees for 27-30 minutes. I purchased a griddle to go with my Camp Chef Oven for pancakes, etc. I would highly recommend one of these. Camp Chef Camping Outdoor Oven with 2 Burner Camping Stove

                                                                                                            BUTANE STOVE/FUEL:

I have purchased both a Butane Stove and butane fuel. What I like about this little stove is you can use it year round. It’s great for camping, teaching classes, and of course to use in an emergency or natural disaster. It is also pretty inexpensive for approximately $25.00, give or take. Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and fuel: 12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves

I have purchased a butane stove for all four daughters of mine, I want to know they are prepared for the unexpected. Please let me know what cooking device you have now, or one you think would be perfect for your home, apartment or use after a disaster. May God bless you for being prepared.

 

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The Food Is Free What Is The Problem

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If the food is free what is the problem, my friends? I recently read a comment from a reader and I loved it. I really did enjoy the message she sent. I must quote her because she experienced a major disaster back in 2004 called Hurricane Ivan. I quote, Angelcrest “As a suggestion to readers with special dietary needs…. stock up now on your preferred foods! After Hurricane Ivan hit our area dead center back in 2004, it was 2-3 weeks minimum before stores opened, and power was restored. It took longer for outlying areas & those closest to the bays & Gulf. We did go a couple of times to get ice, bottled water & MRE’s that were being handed out & coordinated with folks in our Sunday school class to get the water & MRE’S to their respective neighbors who were elderly or otherwise unable to get to the distribution sites on their own. Most of these people had not prepared even though there was at least a week’s warning of the hurricane. And our classmates reported back that their neighbors refused the MRE’S because of too spicy or salty & the food not being what they wanted.” Thank you, Angelcrest. Man, if this doesn’t smack you in the face I don’t know what would. Please store food your family will eat along with lots of water. The food was FREE and so was the water.

Please note Hurricane Ivan occurred in 2004 and roared through the Caribbeans and the Southeastern United States for over 10 days and seemed to not want to die down. It affected several areas, and several times it was labeled a category 5 then a 4 then a 5. Wow, the people were given one week notice that this major hurricane was headed their way, at least where Angelcrest lives. I do not know where she lives, but my point is this, some people have zero notice of an impending disaster or unforeseen emergency. Her neighborhood had a week to look over their pantry, cupboards, water storage, flashlights, first aid supplies, emergency cooking devices and whatever they felt was needed from the local stores to hunker down for this impending disaster. If seems as though some did nothing.

The Food Is Free:

They got MRE’s and didn’t care for the FREE food. I have seen counties hand out cases of water. I will never be in those lines for food or water unless my house crumbles in a very major disaster.

Here’s the deal, can you imagine standing in line to get cases of water, food, diapers, milk, or whatever? Well, I’m picturing empty store shelves. We had a 9 hour blocked highway between St. George, Utah, and Mesquite, Nevada a few years ago. Nine hours people were stuck in their cars, no way to turn the cars around, no way to exit. We had so much rain the roads washed away. This was not a hurricane, ice storm or earthquake. I quickly ran to every local store and took pictures of the empty water and food shelves. I didn’t need anything, I just wanted to see the people scrambling because they were not prepared and record my observations and feelings at the scene unfolded. The shelves of water were nearly empty.

Did you read the sentence above about the MRE’s? The people in need felt the food was too spicy or too salty. Well, guess what my friends, we need to get food for our family, water for our family and everything else so you do not have to eat salty or spicy MRE’s that the government will hand out in a week or two, maybe even three weeks after a disaster. I tried calling our emergency preparedness county offices today and have left several emails asking what food our small town has planned to hand out if any. I still haven’t heard back from them. I wanted to know what plans they have in place. You may want to check with your city and county, hopefully, they will pick up the phone or return emails. It would be nice to know, for those who are not prepared in any way. Do your part for yourself and your family, you’ll be very glad you did!

My favorite things:

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue

Mountain House Just In Case…Essential Bucket

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How To Take Care Of Yourself When No One Comes

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Today I’m going to discuss how to take care of yourself when no one comes, as in the government. It may be your church, your neighbors, or your friends that cannot help. The roads may be impassable, either from earthquakes, ice storms, snow storms, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, fires or other disasters. You may be evacuated or you may be home-bound. The truckers may not be able to deliver food to the grocery stores, and the shelves will become empty very quickly, as in 24 hours or less. Let’s pretend today you have snow falling more than you have seen in years. Schools are closed because the roads are too treacherous to travel. Emergency messages are coming through our landlines or cell phone or maybe on the television, that’s if we still have power. Today, I want to talk about being ready to take care of yourself BEFORE you need help. I hope you never need help, my goal is to get every family self-reliant, one family at a time.

Here’s the deal, if we are prepared for a disaster and have water, food, emergency cooking devices with adequate fuel, a first aid kit and other important items we need then we can sleep at night. I have some really awesome readers who make comments telling me they were home-bound for a month, and some for several weeks. They were prepared, I tip my hat to them. They were unable to leave their homes for longer than they ever expected. They were prepared with water, food, cooking devices, heat, and electricity. Some areas get hit harder with more snow than others. Some areas never get snow, but they get treacherous ice storms. My point today is to be prepared before you need to be. In other words, please get some good hard copy books to read with your family to discuss options and make a plan together using different scenarios, like if you are home or if you are not home, where will your family members meet? The books are great, if you read them and apply the principles outlined for you. Be proactive and get to it, now!

The four books above are what I call my bibles for preparedness. I actually have the larger Essential Oil Book because I am sure I will need to help a lot of people, and I study it religiously. This is the one I have: Essential Oils Desk Reference 6th Edition You can see the smaller version which is awesome to help you understand essential oils. I’m going to put a disclaimer here because the FDA has shut down some bloggers because they claimed some essential oils “CURE” people of certain diseases. I don’t believe they cure diseases. I do believe they soothe some illnesses and/or their symptoms. I’m not advocating you NOT go to the doctor, that is your choice and you know what your family needs. I do believe they help keep me from needing to go to the doctor as often because I know how to use them. I also eat a lot of fresh fruit and vegetables to keep my immune system strong. I do not smoke or drink. I’m learning to eat healthier and rarely get sick, if ever.

Take Care of Yourself With These Books:

(When no one is available to help you, use these books to guide your family to be self-reliant.)

My book is the yellow and black one above and is available in major bookstores everywhere. In my book, I teach the world to be prepared in every way from food, water, cooking devices, food charts, how to store your water safely, and so much more. As an example, you need a first aid kit in your home and car right now because if the truckers are stopped due to inclement weather, you may not be able to go out and buy one if needed. You need a plan. Today, not tomorrow. It’s a family friendly book, I highly recommend the hard copies of these books because, without power, you will need a reference source that doesn’t rely on power, trust me. Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

This is a pocket size essential oils book: Essential Oils Pocket Reference This book explains the different oils and how to use them. I will not go into depth about essential oils today, but I’m working on an article so I can share my ideas with all my readers.

I love the book by Dr. Joseph Alton and his wife: The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way The thing I like about this book over any other medical book is how the doctor explains in layman terms how to take care of our bodies if we are cut, burned, or have a broken arm, to name a few things. It’s a must have book for every home. It’s the perfect first aid book like no other in the world.

My other must have book is my Silver Solution Book by Gordon Pedersen: A New Fighting Chance: Silver Solution: A Quantum Leap In Silver Technology: How molecular structuring safely destroys bacteria, viruses, and yeast.

I highly recommend all of these books for families to read as soon as possible in order to be prepared for the unexpected. If you purchase these books one at a time, you can learn to be self-reliant and take care of yourself. Why is that necessary, because the government can’t take care of everyone.

I’m never without these products from “My Doctor Suggests”, a company I rely on for a number of things:

***(these do not make you blue, I know because I have used them for years)

Organic Silver Lozenges – Soothing Honey with Lemon: The Perfect Cough Drop for Cough, Throat & Mouth Health and Immune Support – Contains 30ppm Silver Solution in Each Drop – My Doctor Suggests Brand

30ppm, Triple Strength pH Balanced Colloidal Solution – Daily Colloidal Silver Supplement for Immune Health – 16oz Bottle of Silver Water

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My Huge Shout Out To Truckers On The Road

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This is my huge shout out to truckers on the road today! I wrote a post a few days ago about how we should all be prepared for a disaster or an unforeseen emergency in our neighborhoods. I was so glad I received a heart-warming comment from a reader by the name of JoEllen and I quote: What you say is very accurate. Just within the last week, there was a snow/ice storm in the Portland, OR area. While in Utah they are worse, here we aren’t really prepared for such weather events. I-84 was closed eastbound from Troutdale, OR to Hood River, OR and a few miles east it was closed again for “blizzard conditions.” The trucks were parked in Troutdale waiting to be able to continue. I can only imagine what the grocery store shelves looked like with their bare-bones inventory system! Whether your goal is to prepare for a winter weather event or the end of the world as we know it, PREPARE! My husband and I were homebound for 3 weeks due to snow. We were warm, had power and ate just as nothing was amiss. That is a major stress reliever!” End of quote. Thank you JoEllen, for this awesome comment.

I’m going to compare this story to a conversation I had with one of my daughters a few years ago. She mentioned how much she loves being a mother, but how hard it is some days. I told her I wish every mother could have a “nanny” to carpool kids, a housekeeper, a cook and someone to do the laundry. Of course, that’s not going to happen, in most families. I told her to smile every time she folds the laundry. I mentioned that kids are not usually going to say “hey mom, thanks for doing the laundry” or “wow that’s awesome you made my dentist appointment” or “thanks for planning our meals and cooking breakfast, lunch and dinner every day.” Of course, the kids will say “please” and “thank-you” for other things that happen during the day. My point is this, sometimes we take things for granted. Our kids or significant other may occasionally take us for granted. Sometimes, I want a wife…….yes I do.

Shout Out To Truckers:

I have a blogger friend named Wanda Ann over at Memories By The Mile, she and her husband are both truck drivers. We used to go to lunch at least once a month, but then our lives got busy writing and she was trucking with her husband all over the states. I sometimes would call her to see if she was driving where the weather was bad. She would call me back when she stopped at a truck stop or she would pick up if she was parked. I still think of she and her husband driving in bad weather. I think of them when I see a driver in a car on the highway not let a trucker change lanes. I get nervous when I see a car cut off a truck, you know a HUGE semi-truck. No one can be in that big of a hurry that they can’t have some manners or be courteous to our truckers.

I’m getting ready to drive up north to see my kids and I’m watching the weather to see which day would be good for me to make the trip. Our truckers drive in rain, snow, sleet, windstorms and icy roads. Yes, they stop and park when the weather is unsafe, but they have deadlines to get the animals, supplies, milk, groceries, gasoline or whatever to their destination. I am so thankful for the truckers who really need a shout out for doing their job. Without them our grocery stores would be empty, we would not have gasoline for our cars, we depend on those awesome drivers who never get a day off. Well, maybe Christmas. Wanda Ann told me she was having Thanksgiving at a truck stop last year.

So, the next time you see one of those huge semi-trucks go driving down the highway, I hope you have a smile on your face knowing they are the ones helping us every day of the year, come rain or come shine. Literally. Let’s show other drivers how WE can be courteous to the truckers driving by slowing down and letting them in a lane that they need to switch over to. When following or passing a semi- truck give enough space so the trucker can stop if he had to stop. Can you imagine trying to stop one of those babies with all the weight they carry?

Please stay clear of the tires as well, I have seen them shred all over the highway. Stay far enough back, that you or the truckers can stop or safely move out of the way to safety. I just had to post this picture below because I know we have truckers driving in these bad weather conditions and sometimes even worse weather. May God bless our truckers who we all depend on to survive, one way or another.

truckers

May God bless our truckers who we all depend on to survive one way or another. We sometimes take you for granted, thank you for all you do for our country!

My favorite things:

Kelly Kettle Large Stainless Steel Base Camp Basic Kit

AAA (4388AAA) 76-Piece Excursion Road Kit

Small First Aid Kit 100 Piece: Car, Home, Survival

The post My Huge Shout Out To Truckers On The Road appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Get Your Family Prepared For Disasters

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If you are still wondering how to get your family prepared for disasters, let’s get on it today, not tomorrow. If you want to know where to start, or you are halfway there, or your family is totally prepared, that’s awesome. I think in Utah, the statistics for families being prepared are about 10% of the people living here. I interview people all the time, I talk with church leaders of all denominations. I’m really scared, not for me, but for those who should know better. We have been told for years by various churches, state leaders, and other government agency leaders to get our families prepared for an earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, fires, or famine. Not days people, years. We need to be prepared for a loss of income, power outages, ice storms, snowstorms, and so much more. I tip my hat to all those truck drivers that drive HUGE semi-trucks so we can have water, food, gasoline and all the necessities of life we may take for granted every day. They are subject to ice storms, snow storms, hail, extreme weather conditions and other challenges to bring every family what we need on a daily basis. If you see a semi-truck on the highway,  give them the courtesy they deserve on the road, and maybe a friendly wave too.

If we have a major disaster or an unforeseen emergency, these awesome trucks may be parked and unable to deliver the items we need. Therefore, I am begging you to get prepared for a disaster or an unforeseen emergency. If you could not leave your home for three days, three weeks or maybe even three months, how would you fare? Do you have water, food, cooking devices with fuel stored? What about first aid supplies? These are the bare minimum items we may need if the roads are shut down and the stores are empty. If we have a power outage you will not be able to fill your car to go to another town to get water if your town’s supplies are depleted.

These are real situations that have happened all over the world, not just our country. The government will not, and cannot help, possibly for days, weeks or months in some drastic situations. I think sometimes people are complacent thinking nothing ever happens where they live. Well, we better think again, because things are happening when and where people least expect it.

If you haven’t read my book, please consider ordering the hard copy so you can teach your family how to be prepared. It’s a family friendly book with ideas we all need, I promise. Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation I was asked to write a book to teach the world. I’m honored that I was asked to write a book to teach the world to be prepared. My book is available in most every major bookstore and online.

If you haven’t read Ted Koppel’s book, I highly recommend it as well. He talks about how our country is not prepared in any way for an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse). If we have a grid down, our country is very vulnerable and this makes me realize why we all need to be prepared. Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath I bought the hard copy as well as the Audible version.

Another book I think is very important to have for every day us, and to have a hardcopy available after a disaster is this one I highly recommend: The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way Please get hard copies of these books because if the power is gone you will have nothing to rely on when it comes to electronic devices. Yes, solar works, and I have several sources of solar power, but after a disaster, you will want my book and a medical book. The doctors will not be available, the pharmacies will not be able to fill prescriptions without power or access to your medical needs.

Get Your Family Prepared:

Water:

We can’t survive without water, we need the following at the very least:

  • 1 gallon per day per person to stay hydrated. If you live in a HOT area you might need more.
  • 4 gallons per day, per person, allows for personal hygiene, washing of dishes, etc.
  • 5  to 12 gallons per day would be needed for a conventional toilet.
  • 1/2 to two gallons for a pour flush latrine.

Food:

I would plan on at least three days of food, at the very minimum. One month’s worth of food is even better if it’s in cans. It would make you sleep at night knowing you could boil water, make mac and cheese, rice or beans and have other options too. If you can open a can of chili, that’s awesome. If you can afford some #10 cans of freeze-dried food that would be great. Take your family to the grocery store and have each one of them choose some canned or boxed items they would eat for breakfast, lunch or dinner meals. Remember you need water and a can opener to open some of those cans. Muffin mixes, pancake mixes, crackers and canned meats are fabulous. You can feel better knowing you can feed your family if the shelves in the store are empty. If you cook from scratch, get the basics like flour, salt, honey, sugar, oil, spices, baking powder, and baking soda, to name a few. You can make bread, crackers or so much more. If I have some cans of Campbell’s cream of chicken I can make so many casseroles with the food I have stashed in my pantry. Sorry, I have not found a cream of chicken soup to make from scratch that my taste buds can tolerate. That’s how I roll here.

Here’s the deal, just pick up a few items every time you go to the store that you know the family will eat if we can’t go to the store when problems confront us.

The government can’t come immediately to your home to deliver water or food, it’s not going to happen after a disaster. We all need to take care of ourselves, it’s called being self-reliant. Period. Remember, you can always donate those foods to the homeless before they expire if you don’t eat them.

Cooking Devices/Fuel:

If you can afford even just this butane stove with some fuel, you can get by for weeks. You can eat meals out of cans, but you need to be able to boil water. If you can make some hot chocolate, it will calm the nerves of many. Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and some fuel: 12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves Be careful using any cooking device because of carbon monoxide fumes. These are recommended to use outdoors. I have used them when I taught cooking classes in stores that were not equipped with full-size kitchens. I also used mine when I was waiting for a gas line to be installed for a gas stove I purchased. I gave a set of these, the stove and fuel to all four of my daughters, so I know they can boil water and cook a few meals. It’s a mom thing.

Medications:

If you can purchase with cash, buy as much as you can of all your critical medications. The pharmacies may be closed for days, weeks or months. If you have insurance see if you can purchase at least a 90-day supply.

Emergency Binder:

Gather your important documents and put them securely in a safe location. Have them ready to grab and go if needed. If you need some ideas you can download my FREE printable emergency contact binder contents:

Food Storage Moms FREE Printable Emergency Binder Download  Please be patient for it to load and the PDF document should show up on your computer on the bottom left-side of your laptop or computer monitor. Once the document finishes loading it will be ready to click and print. I prefer printing it on cardstock, and it’s actually in color if you want to print with a color printer.

First Aid Supplies:

Here’s the deal, if the grocery stores and the pharmacies are closed due to extreme weather conditions or a disaster, please check your stockpile and discard expired OTC (over the counter) items and replace them ASAP. Here is my PRINTABLE first aid kit that may help you get started, a little at a time. First Aid Kit For Survival Here’s  picture of one of my first aid kits:

family prepared

I used a Plano fishing tackle box for this one: Plano Large 6-Tray Tackle Box Please note, I use essential oils for soothing illnesses only. I love them and use them every day.

Blankets:

Just a note here, never giveaway quilts, they are awesome to keep us warm if the furnace does not work. You can pick them up from thrift stores and occasionally at garage sales.

Flashlights:

As you know, I love Goal Zero products and they have given me several products to review and I’m extremely grateful for the items. I have purchased many and I appreciate the Goal Zero products because you can’t beat the quality. They are hands down my favorite sponsor. If you ever see a Goal Zero “roadshow” at Costco, load up with as many products as you can afford to buy. This is one of many flashlights I highly recommend; Goal Zero 90109 Solo V2 Solar Flashlight No batteries required. The sun charges it, LOVE it! I also have this lantern: Goal Zero 32004 Lighthouse 400 Portable Battery Charger USB Power Hub & Lantern I don’t like the dark, so if the lights go out I’m ready to turn on the lantern.

Cash:

Just a reminder, if we do lose power the gas station pumps will not work, and the cash registers at the store may not work either. Some grocery stores have generator backups for a short period of time. If the grocery store shelves are empty you won’t need cash. You may not be able to buy anything, so it’s critical to be prepared to barter, trade or share your goods. It’s not IF but WHEN we need to be prepared for the unexpected, we must be ready.

May God bless all of us to be prepared and be self-reliant.

FEMA Website

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Instructions On How To Use An Instant Pot

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Can you use some instructions on how to use an Instant Pot? I have you covered today with pictures because I’m a visual person. If I can SEE it, I can do it. I have used a Fagor electric pressure for a few years, maybe five years. I took several pressure cooker classes from Chef Brad and he recommended a Fagor and that’s what the store was selling where I taught some classes. My friend, Tiffany suggested I try an Instant Pot.  She has been using her’s a lot and loves it! She and I did a joint Instant Pot giveaway right before Christmas. It was an extremely popular giveaway. The woman who won so excited when she received the email that she had won the Instant Pot because she had heard so many people rave about it.
I really wanted to try one BEFORE the giveaway in December. Well, I got it just in time to try making some chicken tenderloins in it. They were perfect in every way! I wish every family could have a pressure cooker in their homes to make healthier meals fast! I decided to do some potatoes today in a pressure cooker because a reader asked me how to do them. You basically need to look at the charts I made for pressure cookers, or use the book that came with the one you purchased. My PRINTABLE charts are posted below. I washed the potatoes and started the process.

How To Use An Instant Pot:

I need to explain two things before I go any further. There are two ways to release pressure after cooking:

  1. Quick release means releasing pressure instantly after the food is cooked. When the meal is finished you push “cancel” and turn the valve to “venting” and cover the valve with a washcloth (be careful with the hot steam) so the steam doesn’t burn you after you switch the valve from sealing to venting. I wear hot pads as well.
  2. Natural release means the food continues to cook after you press “cancel,” but the residual heat and steam wait for the pressure to come down on its own naturally. This will take about 20 minutes or more depending on how full the pot is filled. Then it’s ready to unlock the lid and serve. There is still steam, so please be careful when you turn it to “venting”.

Instant Pot

I checked my vegetable chart and decided to cut my Russet potatoes into chunks and I left the peelings on. Easy, right? I added one cup of water to the potatoes in the pot.

Instant Pot

Next, I placed the lid on top of the base and turned it until it locked in place, and I turned the pressure valve to “sealing” and pushed the “manual” button, then the + symbol until it showed eight minutes.

I made sure the pressure button was on high. You can adjust the time for a longer time period if needed. It takes a few minutes before you will hear it beeping, that means it’s starting to build up pressure. You will see a little bit of steam come out of the valve. No worries, it’s just getting ready to pressure cook your food.

Instant Pot

You can see the “manual” button below and the “High Pressure” light is on and it shows 8:00 for eight minutes.

Instant Pot

You will see the time 8:00 or whatever the time you need and then the flasher will show ON.

Instant Pot

When you hear the beeping after it’s cooked, you place a washcloth over the regulator vent and turn it to “venting” to carefully release the VERY HOT STEAM. You can get burned, it’s very hot, so be careful. You can then remove the lid if you want “quick release”, which is what I wanted to do with these potatoes. These potatoes can be fried, mashed or eaten as is. I love how easy it is to set and forget this pressure cooker.

Instant Pot

Let me know if you have a pressure cooker and tell me what foods you like to cook in yours! Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. It’s critical we know how to cook from scratch…..May God bless you for your efforts.

Pressure Cooker Temperatures-Vegetables

Pressure Cooker Temperatures-Meat

Pressure Cooker Temperatures-Rice, grains, beans

My favorite things:

Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way

WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

The post Instructions On How To Use An Instant Pot appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Use Quick And Easy Pressure Cookers

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I’ve been getting a lot of emails asking about how to use quick and easy pressure cookers. I hope my pressure cooker pictures help you today. I am a visual person so pictures help me grasp things a little easier. I have canned green beans, tomatoes, salsa, spaghetti sauce, etc. in a Pressure Canner. Today I want to give you instructions on how to use an everyday cooking Pressure Cooker. We have all heard the horror stories that our Grandma, Aunt, Mom or Cousin had an explosion with food everywhere in the kitchen using a pressure cooker. Okay, here’s the deal. Pressure cookers need not be feared. Of course, we need to be cautious and make sure we secure the lid with a good gasket. I wouldn’t leave it and go run errands but it is quite simple to use.


Every pressure cooker has a rubber gasket inside the lid. The gasket creates an airtight seal necessary for pressure cooking. This is one of the parts we need to make sure is still pliable or replace if it is damaged in any way. You can see where I labeled the Regulator Knob. This gem we turn on the top of the lid to seal (for pressurized cooking)  or vent (to release the pressure or cooking without pressure) the food we are cooking. This means you can use this “pressure cooker” for cooking foods different ways. You don’t have to only pressure cook with this cooker. The filter protects the pressure regulator and is removable for cleaning.

easy pressure cookers

Here is a pressure cooker reminder to us that we must use a minimum of 1 cup of liquid when we pressure cook any food. This pressure cooker has a removable pot that is really easy to wash (it has a non-stick finish). I also purchased the optional stainless steel pot. Fagor 6Qt. Stainless Steel Removable Cooking Pot You can actually do the following with this pressure cooker:

1. Warm: reheats the food or keeps it warm until serving time

2. Brown: You can brown your meat before you pressure cook it

3. Steam: quickly boils water to steam veggies or rice

4. Slow Cook: cooks recipes slowly (9-1/2 hour timer)-this means it can be a slow cooker

5. Delay Time: allows you to delay the cooking up to 8 hours-I wouldn’t want to leave it more than maybe an hour just to be safe (perishable).

I picked up some stew meat that’s typically pretty tough meat but it was on clearance and I knew I could tenderize it in my pressure cooker. If you want you can add some barbecue sauce you but will still need one cup of water. But before I show you how to lock the lid, I want to show you how to “brown” any meat, chunks, or roasts, etc. If you brown your meat in a little oil, it seals in some really awesome flavor. Plus, you can make gravy with the liquid after you cook the meat.

easy pressure cookers

Can you see the “BROWN” button below? All you do is push that button and then the “START” button. You will soon hear the oil spattering a little, continue searing the meat to brown it to your liking.

easy pressure cooker

I added some chopped onions, I love onions in everything. This is where you will add the one cup of water, broth or liquid before putting the lid on to pressure cook it.

easy pressure cookers

Next, you put on the lid and turn it counter-clockwise until it locks into position. Turn the regulator knob to “SEAL” or “PRESSURE” depending on your pressure cooker regulator as shown at the top of this post.

easy pressure cookers

Next, choose either the HIGH or LOW-pressure button on the control panel. Check your pressure cooker for suggested settings. I set my beef chunks at 50 minutes on HIGH. Next, you push the indicator light to set the required minutes, in my case 50 times for 50 minutes. Next, press the START/STOP button to begin cooking. The indicator light will stop flashing. The cooker will count down after the pressure is reached. The floating valve will rise once the appropriate pressure has been reached, safely making it so the lid cannot be removed. The pressure cooker has two different ways to release pressure once the cooking is done. TIP: please be patient, because at first you may think is this darn thing even working? If the lid is locked it will work and you will soon see the numbers start going down, 50, 49, 48, etc. It takes a little time for the pressure to build up.

easy pressure cookers

Here are two ways to release the pressure, be sure and use a hot pad or washcloth or you will get burned from the steam:

easy pressure cookers

1. Natural Method-after cooking you will press the START/STOP button. Unplug the unit and wait for the pressure to naturally release….approximately 20-30 minutes. After this time move the pressure regulator to vent to make sure all the pressure has been released.

2. Quick Release Method: after cooking press the START/STOP button to make sure the unit is completely turned off. Turn the pressure regulator to vent and allow the pressure to release. Caution! Keep hands and face away from escaping steam as it is extremely hot and can cause injury. I use a washcloth to cover the release vent when turning it to help from getting burned by the very hot steam.

I highly recommend one of these or another similar brand because of the time issue in preparing meals and saving money on utility bills.

Here is the finished product, so tender and moist it’s unbelievable:

easy pressure cookers

Printables for Easy Pressure Cookers:

You will need to adjust the times as needed to go with YOUR pressure cooker.

Pressure Cooker Temperatures-Meat

Pressure Cooker Temperatures-Vegetables

Pressure Cooker Temperatures-Rice, grains, beans

My step by step instructions for you:

Be sure and check your manual but these are some pretty basic instructions for most pressure cookers:

Step #1 In this pressure cooker whatever you make MUST have a minimum of one cup of liquid to build up the steam every time you use it. My Fagor requires one cup of liquid. I never could find the requirement for liquids in the Instant Pot manual. Be sure and check your pressure cooker manual for the minimum liquid required.

Step #2 Place the lid on after you have placed the food you want to cook (with one cup of water minimum) and turn it until it clicks into place. It will lock when you turn the pressure regulator button to “pressure” on the top.

Step #3 Touch the HIGH or LOW button, I typically always use the HIGH button. Check out my printable charts above to help you choose the time required to pressure cook the food item you are cooking. If your food is frozen it will take longer, (about twice as long).The cooking times in my charts are for unfrozen food. It’s so easy you will cook every meal in one of these babies! You just keep clicking the high button until it shows 6 minutes for rice. Make sure the button on top is set on pressure or seal depending on what kind of pressure cooker you are using. Then you push the start button. Then you let it do its thing. Dinner is ready in no time.

My favorite things:

Fagor 670040230 Stainless-Steel 3-in-1 6-Quart Multi-Cooker

Fagor 6Qt. Stainless Steel Removable Cooking Pot

Instant Pot IP-LUX60 V3 Programmable Electric Pressure Cooker, 6Qt, 1000W (updated model)

The post How To Use Quick And Easy Pressure Cookers appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Bake Bread And Survive Any Disaster

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I will show you how to bake bread and survive any disaster today. Yes, you can make bread with my no-fail recipe. I promise. A few years ago I wrote a post showing how you can make bread three different ways. Well, since then I have learned to make bread in a Dutch oven so now I can show you how to make bread four ways. Now, not everyone has a wheat grinder so today it’s all about making white bread. After a disaster, white bread will fill the belly and you can serve it with soup. I hope people in your community are teaching each other how to make bread with or without a bread mixing machine. If it’s a freshly ground whole wheat bread class, you rock. I grew up making bread so it’s just a way of life for me and saves me lots of $$$ on my food budget.

I have taught several classes on how to make bread, in my home, in specialty kitchen stores, and in large groups in church kitchens. If you have fresh ingredients, you can make bread. I have a no-fail recipe anyone can succeed at making bread. When I say fresh ingredients, here’s the deal on this statement. I only buy this yeast: Saf Instant Yeast, 1-Pound Pouches (Pack of 4) if you don’t bake a lot just buy one: Saf Instant Yeast, 1 Pound Pouch. I store ONLY the amount of SAF Yeast in my refrigerator that I will use in a month. The open pouch that won’t fit in my refrigerator jars goes in an air-tight container in a quart mason jar in the freezer. The other unopened SAF yeast pouches go directly into my freezer. I always buy 4-6 pouches at a time. I cannot ever run out of yeast. Yes, I could make unleavened bread but I don’t want to for my weekly bread making. I shouldn’t say weekly, it’s actually about every two weeks because I only make eight loaves and freeze seven.

Which reminds me, these are the bags I use to freeze my bread: 100 Count Clear Bread Bags / Includes 100 Cable TiesThese are fairly cheap and include the ties. I never reuse the bags, but I do use these bags for other things besides bread. It’s just the shape of the bags are what I need to store and freeze my bread.

I also only recommend bread flour, I grew up using all-purpose white flour but it’s not the same, trust me on this one. I try always to buy unbleached bread flour, just giving you the heads up here. The flour must be less than 12 months old because it has bread spores leaching in the bucket after a year. I store my flour in 5-gallon buckets with Gamma lids. Gamma lids make the container air-tight and are easier to open and close the buckets: Gamma Seal Lid – Red – For 3.5 to 7 Gallon Buckets or Pails Gamma2

Bake Bread and Survive:

First of all here is my recipe for two loaves of bread: White-Bread-For-Two Recipe or Whole-Wheat-Bread-For-Two Recipe I have to laugh every time I share my two-loaf recipe. When I was asked to write my book “Prepare Your Family For Survival” my publisher said I had to cut my recipe down to two loaves. The editors mentioned no one makes more than one loaf at a time where we live. Well, in Utah most people make 4-8 loaves at a time, right? So, yes, I cut my recipe down and actually it’s been a favorite download for college students, two member families, etc.

Lodge Dutch oven:

If you have a 6-quart Dutch oven you can make bread perfectly by only using charcoal briquettes and a match. I just the rocks out in my front yard to start the small fire away from trees and of course, my house. Here’s a picture of my first loaf I made:

bake bread and survive

Here is my PRINTABLE Dutch oven chart: Dutch Oven Chart I called Lodge Manufacturing to see if I could make my own printable chart using their numbers and they gave me permission to do so. I love their products.

Here’s the picture of the first three loaves of bread using three different ovens a few years ago:

bake bread and survive

Sun Oven:

The one loaf on the left was baked in a Sun Oven using a non-reflective or non-shiny pan. If you use a stainless steel pan the sun will reflect the heat away from the items you are cooking. All American Sun Oven- The Ultimate Solar Appliance

bake bread and survive

Conventional Oven:

The two middle loaves were baked in my home in my own conventional oven.

Camp Chef Stove/Oven Combination:

The loaf of bread on the far right is was baked in my Camp Chef: Camp Chef Camping Outdoor Oven with 2 Burner Camping Stove

bake bread and survive

Thanks for being prepared for the unexpected, May God bless you for your efforts.

 

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How To Cook After Disasters Hit

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Today it’s all about how to cook after disasters hit. And disasters will hit our neighborhood or community at least once in our lifetime. Sometimes they will hit more than once. If we are prepared we will not fear, I promise. Here’s the deal, you do not have to spend a lot of money on emergency cooking devices. I’m going to talk about all the ones I have used and recommend. Keep in mind some of my sponsors have given them to me to do a review. Let’s be real here, I will only write about the ones I love. The others I have refused to try because I saw how flimsy they were at the store. Some I have shipped back to the company and could not do a review for them. I’m here to teach the world what does work. Period. I’m always on the look out for new products, but the old standbys still work the best.

I have tried almost every emergency stove that’s available on the market. I use them often so my skills are current and I’m prepared right now to cook outside. I used to camp, but now that my girls have grown up and started their own families I have given up camping. I used to love to go camping with a trailer, and who doesn’t love the smell of bacon and eggs cooking outside in the fresh crisp air in the morning? I know I love it! So, now I cook outside in my yard and try to share the fruits of my labors, so to speak, with my neighbors. So, let’s get started with the items I use and highly recommend.

Cooking After Disasters:

Butane stoves:

I have used these to teach classes at stores, and I have one in my home that I have used many times. This is also the stove I gave all four of my daughters for Christmas one year. If you have some pans, you can boil water, cook some soup, fry eggs, and many more foods. You can’t do any canning like water bath canning or pressure canning on one of these. It would not be safe. Yes, I have my Master Preserver Canning Certificate from the state of Utah.

They use butane fuel like Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and: 12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves

Pros: very inexpensive

Cons: Once you run out of fuel you can no longer cook with it.

Lodge Dutch Oven:

If you have a 6-quart Dutch oven (the larger ones are too heavy for me to carry), you can boil water and cook just about every food you can fit in those babies with the lid on the top. You will need firewood, charcoal, or lump charcoal to cook with one of these. I am going to build a small fire-pit which I hope to show you next week. Please buy the non-starter fluid charcoal product to use because if you store those briquettes in an airtight container they will last indefinitely. Please make sure you buy this style Dutch Oven because you can stack cook with these lids. Plus, the charcoal doesn’t slide off the lid. Lodge L12CO3 Cast Iron Camp Dutch Oven, 6- quart and don’t forget to buy charcoal… I cook with my Dutch ovens on rocks in the front yard. I’m sure my HOA hates it. I’ll probably get a letter.

Pros: inexpensive if you get them on sale, well actually they are a bargain since they last a lifetime if you keep them seasoned and dry.

Cons: You must maintain them by seasoning them, which to me isn’t that big a deal. You need to store enough charcoal to use one of these. Once the charcoal or wood, lump charcoal is gone, you may have to look for alternative wood sources and hope you have enough to keep the temperature where you need them to properly cook the food. Here’s my PRINTABLE Dutch oven chart: Dutch Oven Chart I got permission from Lodge to incorporate a printable for you.

Volcano Stove:

Pros: What I like about the Volcano stove is the fact that you can use three fuels to start with: wood, charcoal, and propane. Just make sure before an unforeseen emergency you have the correct adaptors for the propane. Some Volcano stoves come with small adaptors for the tiny propane tanks and sometimes you have to purchase the large tank adaptors. Be sure and check the Volcano stove you purchased to see what kind of adaptor it has. I gave three of my daughters one of these. They are awesome. Watch for a sale at Costco. When they have them they are sold at a very good price. Volcano Grills 3-Fuel Portable Camping Stove and a griddle (Volcano sent me one of these): Volcano Grills Reversible Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Griddle/Skillet The griddle works great for pancakes, grilled cheese sandwiches, etc. You can flip it over and cook meats. It’s awesome! Thanks Volcano for letting me try one! I love it.

Cons: The baking tent makes my bread smell like smoke. That’s the only con I have.

Camp Chef Stove/Oven Combo:

Pros: I like this one because I can make pancakes on the griddle (purchased separately) and bake casserole and bread on the racks inside the oven. I do have to remove one rack. That’s easy to do. I can bake two loaves that use one-pound pans for each one. Please make sure you have two adaptors, one for the small propane tanks and one for the larger propane tanks. Here’s the one I purchased and I love it: Volcano Grills Reversible Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Griddle/Skillet

Cons: They only use propane

Barbeques:

Pros: Most everyone has one. Just keep lots of propane stored. Lots, yes lots.

Cons: They waste fuel, in other words, you will go through too much fuel just to boil water, or to cook a heavy duty pan with a casserole inside. I wouldn’t take my nice pans I use inside and use outside on the barbecue. They may never look the same. Picture BLACK pans, sometimes. Cast iron pans work well outside.

Kelly Kettle:

This is the one I was given by Kelly Kettle: Kelly Kettle Ultimate Stainless Steel Large Base Camp Kit

Here’s the deal on the Kelly Stove, I had been wanting one for about two years. I was so excited when the company contacted me to do a review on one. It was truly a cartwheel moment. I love, love, love it! You can see the post on how to use it here: Kelly Kettle Demonstration by Food Storage Moms

Pros: you can boil water, cook soup and make hot chocolate using only twigs, leaves, or pinecones. AWESOME!

Cons: I have no cons for it as long as you have pinecones stored in airtight containers or leaves and twigs in abundance around your home.

Camp Chef Two-Burner Stove:

Camp Chef was gracious enough to send me this beautiful stove to teach classes for emergency preparedness. It is awesome, and I thank them for it. Explorer 2-Burner Stove

Pros: It has two burners, you can cook two different pans of food and use a griddle on it as well. It requires propane (which lasts indefinitely-my favorite fuel), and you can cook for your entire street if you had to make some meals to sustain life.

Cons: It’s a little more expensive, but not enough to keep me from purchasing another one.

Sun Oven:

I am grateful that Paul Munsen sent me a Sun Oven 5 years ago so I could do a review. I thank him from the bottom of my heart. I promote these like crazy because IF you have sunshine, you will love one. Plus, save on utility bills! All American Sun Oven- The Ultimate Solar Appliance

Pros: Uses zero fuel, only the sun. For the price, it’s a bargain. You never need fuel to use it. If your food can fit inside the Sun Oven you can bake it.

Cons: If you have limited sunshine I would not recommend one of these. Here’s the deal, people use these all over the world. They are a blessing to everyone everywhere if they have sunshine.

Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. You can sleep at night knowing your family will be safe, well fed and more comfortable.

The post How To Cook After Disasters Hit appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How Prepared Are You For An Emergency

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My heart is urging me to ask my readers, how prepared are you for an emergency? I’m sure there a few that will say, “I’m almost there.” Some people will say, “I’m just starting with food storage and emergency preparedness items.” Many will say, “Where do I start, I am overwhelmed with the thought of an emergency?” I am occasionally stopped at the grocery store and asked questions like, “Why are you buying so many cans of beets and green beans?” In Utah, it’s pretty common for people to purchase cases of food once a year when stores have their case lot sales in the fall. There is nothing quite as comforting as a small room packed with canned or bottled food items lined up in a row. I think the people that ask me must be on vacation and traveling through Utah because it’s normal to buy cases of the foods you eat just about every day.

I receive about 300-400 emails per day asking about food storage and emergency preparedness. Some I can answer rather quickly, and others I redirect to my website to get the answer(s) they need. I know that more people are watching the news and maybe are starting to “get it”, that we must have some stored water and food. The government can’t take care of us immediately after an unforeseen disaster or emergency. It may take them weeks to get food or water if our supplies are shut off. It may happen today, tomorrow or next year. We need to be prepared, I can’t emphasize this enough. Here’s the deal, you don’t have to have pallets of food delivered to your home. If you can afford to spend thousands, that’s awesome. I can’t. I grew up with food storage, grinding wheat, making bread and cooking from scratch. I didn’t know anything else. I applaud my mother for teaching me the skills of being self-reliant.

Tips For An Emergency:

Water is critical:

My favorite water preserver: Water Preserver Concentrate I use this one so I only have to rotate my water every five years. If you use bleach you need to rotate your water every six months.

  • 1 gallon per day per person to stay hydrated. If you live in a HOT area you might need more.
  • 4 gallons per day, per person, allows for personal hygiene, washing of dishes, etc. I highly recommend this amount.
  • 5 to12 gallons per day would be needed for a conventional toilet.
  • 1/2 to two gallons for a pour flush latrine.

Where do I start with food storage:

I put together a sheet that will help you get started. All you need to do is write down the food you and your family eat each day for seven days. Please only store what you will actually want to eat after an emergency. You can buy cans, purchase the staples to cook from scratch, and also pre-made packages of food storage where you just add boiling water. You can buy #10 cans where some will last 20-25 years if they are freeze-dried and in optimal weather conditions. Please do not store food storage in a hot garage, it will shorten the shelf-life significantly. Here is a PRINTABLE I designed: Where-Do-I-Start

Bread Making:

If you know someone in your neighborhood that can teach the youth how to make bread, do it as soon as possible. I promise it is a skill they will find very useful over the coming years. I mean they will really need to know how to make bread. It takes practice. If you are intimidated about making bread, then learn to make biscuits or crackers. You will need that skill! I’m coming on pretty strong today because I truly believe we have got to bring back our ancestor’s skills. Bread making is one of the most important skills you will want to learn. If you have fresh ingredients and a large bowl anyone can make bread. Whole-Wheat-Bread-For-Two Recipe or White-Bread-For-Two Recipe

Sewing:

If you have a neighbor who knows how to sew, ask her to teach you. I’m thrilled when people email me and ask me what sewing machine to buy. I cherish those emails because I know there are people wanting to learn skills that we all need. I have a Bernina, but there are some really great brands out there. Just giving you the heads-up here, you don’t need the most expensive machine. But I would not buy the cheapest one either. You get what you pay for. My daughter bought a Janome for her daughter to learn to sew and she actually took sewing lessons. Proud grandma, here. I have had two granddaughters take sewing lessons. I even had a grandson learn to sew in high school and he is sewing on my old Baby Lock machine. Yay, this grandma loves this stuff!

Emergency Toilet:

I prefer a six-gallon bucket over the five-gallon bucket unless you are really short. These are the toilet lids I purchased: Tote-able Toilet Seat and Lid and this is where you can get the six-gallon buckets: (save the Gamma lid for something else) 6 Gallon Bucket with White Gamma Seal Lid

1. Box of 10-gallon size bags (500-count), I bought these at Costco. You can buy the green ones, but they are so expensive Kirkland Signature 10 Gallon Clear Wastebasket Liner 500 Count

2. Toilet paper – at least 3-4 rolls

3. Hand Sanitizer

4. Baby Wipes

5. A collapsible shovel

6. Kitty litter or sawdust to help reduce the odor

7. Duct tape to attach the bags to the bucket to prevent slippage

Emergency Stoves I Recommend:

Here’s the deal with an emergency stove, you have a lot of options. I would suggest a butane stove, and you may want to start with: Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and some fuel: 12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves

This is just one stove I recommend. I will talk tomorrow about other choices of cooking devices I have used. May God bless you for being self-reliant. The government will not be able to take care of everyone. We are responsible for ourselves and our family.

My favorite things:

Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

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What Can We Do When Panic Sets In

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I decided I must talk today about what we can do when panic sets in. A few days ago we had another “shooting” in our country. This time it happened in a Ft. Lauderdale, Florida airport. I was running errands with my sister, Carol and I saw the news clip on my phone. I have a daughter that works at an airport and I quickly sent her a text to hear if she had heard about the shooting. I knew she didn’t work at the affected airport, but I knew it could impact the clients traveling to and from the airport where she works. I told her 13 people were shot and 5 of those had died. I’m sick for the families of these people and all others involved in this tragedy, the employees of the airport, and the law enforcement personnel who had to bring this terrible situation to an end. When I got home I quickly turned on the television to CNN and FOX News to see what was happening.

The pictures were horrific and I thought to myself, how are these people handling this stress. I could see some families, or groups of people anyway, with children. I can’t imagine the fear and panic those people must have felt as the events unfolded in front of them. In an instant, everything changed. The television reporters were interviewing the police, and a few of the people who were just innocent bystanders with plans for vacations, cruises, business trips or whatever, and their lives are now changed forever.

I remember when I was in high school in Las Vegas, Nevada and the school had the National Guard, Army Reserves and Police rotating to stop the riots that were happening due to poor race relations between the students. I graduated from high school in 1968 and the images are still vivid in my mind. I can remember one race walked on the left down the halls of the school and the other races walked down the right side. Yes, right here in America. We could not use the bathroom without going with a friend and police stood outside the bathroom, and the various races sat in different sections of the cafeteria apart from each other. My best friend was lucky because her parents had money to pull her out of this high school and send her to a private Catholic High School in town. I now lost association with my best friend who I had felt safer with as I walked down the hallways at school.

I wonder how those people at the airport felt hearing gunshots and having to drop to the floor of the luggage area. There is no way I can compare what they went through to what I went through as a 16-year-old student in high school. But, I can tell you, I was afraid every single day for a year. Some students were caught with knives, so then the bathrooms were off limits during school hours. I was in panic-mode every minute of the day. The school was totally segregated.

Panic Mode Tips:

I’m going to suggest some things you may want to consider if you are caught in a situation at school, an airport or movie theater. Now, I don’t want everyone to be afraid of going to the movies or of flying. Here’s the deal, more people are killed on the highways each year than in shootings throughout the country. We must be strong and not let these crazy nuts stop us from living how WE want to live. We still need to play, travel or go to our work environments each day. If we don’t continue to live we only hurt ourselves, our family and friends by giving up on those daily activities that bring happiness, contentment, and financial support by staying home.

  1. If you are in a movie theater, before taking your seat, look for the EXIT signs. If an emergency arises, you should try to find your way to the leave the theater through that door as soon as possible. Carry a small flashlight in your pocket or purse. Goal Zero 90109 Solo V2 Solar Flashlight
  2. When you visit a restaurant, before you take a seat, look for the areas that you can evacuate the eating area, if needed. Here again, have a flashlight in your possession, never leave home without one. A small one with a great light like above is perfect because it is solar and never needs batteries. I have four of these flashlights.
  3. Have you heard of an EDC (every day carry) bag? I wrote a post about one of these bags. I have some things listed below you may want, besides some of your own special needs and desires.
  4. When you are filling your gas tank, look around before you get out of the car, lock the doors with the keys in your hand. I use this stretchy key wrist- band with my keys attached with a silver sturdy ring. 5 Pack – Ultimate Wrist Coil Camper Keychains for Work and Play – Premium Elastic Bungee Badge Holder & Key Chain Ring (One Size Fits All) by Specialist ID (Assorted Colors) Watch who is standing or walking around the area where you are standing. If you feel threatened don’t fill your tank there, look for a more safe facility, or come back the next day if you think it will be safer.
  5. Grocery stores are another place we must be aware of our surroundings. Please put your phones down and look around the aisles where you are shopping. I worry when I see small children at the grocery store running around unattended, and sometimes the mothers are oblivious as to what or where their children are.
  6. Parking lots are not all safe, I don’t care where we live, we must be aware of our surroundings. This could be a church parking lot, school parking lot, shopping malls, etc. Please keep your phones in your purse or pocket and be prepared whenever possible to protect yourself. Consider carrying some mace or pepper spray to use if necessary. Be sure to check out your key to see if there is a “panic” button that can be activated as needed.
  7. If you feel a panic mode coming on, take a deep breath and exhale. Do this again. It will help relieve anxiety if you are in a situation that makes you uncomfortable.
  8. I’m not talking about fear today, I’m hoping this is coming across as being prepared before panic hits you. You will relax if you are aware of the area you walking around, etc. It will become a natural thing to do in your life to be aware of your surroundings at all times.

Items I carry in my Every Day Carry Bag:

  • Multi-tool knife, you can use these for so many things.
  • Hand sanitizer-keep my hands clean from bacteria.
  • Mirror-if stranded I can flash this to let people find me
  • Compass-if stranded I can at least know the direction I am heading.
  • Whistle-I prefer the ones that are extremely loud to alert people.
  • Small bills and coin for emergency cash if the power goes down.
  • Water bottle (with a filter).
  • Lip gloss.
  • Small first aid kit.
  • Duct tape (small rolls now available).
  • Seatbelt cutter.
  • Flashlight.
  • Pen and small paper tablet.
  • Folding knife for protection or other uses.
  • USB charger for phones and tablets.
  • Aspirin and Benadryl.
  • Pepper spray.
  • Black sharpie.

Other EDC Items To Consider:

  • Names and phone numbers of who to contact in an emergency.
  • Battery/crank powered portable radio/extra batteries.
  • Flashlight/preferably one with solar/crank/LED.
  • Compass and maps; not everyone has GPS in their car and on phones.
  • Can of motor oil.
  • Fire Extinguisher(5 pound ABC type).
  • Flares and/or orange cones.
  • Jumper cables.
  • Rags/paper towels.
  • Shovel/axe.
  • Pocketknife.
  • Tire gauge.
  • Toolbox.
  • Window scraper for ice.

Necessities for survival:

  • Water/Granola bars/Jerky
  • Blankets
  • Jackets/sweaters
  • Emergency cash: approximately $50.00 in small bills
  • First Aid Kit
  • Baby Wipes
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • Scissors/pens/pencils (not crayons-they melt)
  • Emergency snack food and/or MRE meals (items may need to be replaced more frequently if stored in extreme heat conditions)
  • Whistles
  • Umbrella
  • Hand warmers
  • Extra blankets

PRINTABLE: Items I carry in my Every Day Carry Bag by Food Storage Moms

This is the bag I carry sometimes instead of a purse, and I don’t panic because I have things in my EDC bag I can use for most emergencies. Take a deep breath and pray before you panic. May God bless you and your family. Maxpedition Jumbo Versipack, Khaki

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