Horehound

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Horehound (Marrubium vulgare L. ),
commonly known as white horehound, is a European native of the Lamiaceae or mint family. Other names for this ancient remedy include hounds bane, marrubium, eye of the star, a seed of Horus, marvel, bulls’ blood, and hounds bane.

Horehound is a garden mint with green and white leaves and a distinctively bitter taste. It is native to Asia and Europe. Horehound is a hardy perennial that has naturalized in North America. Although the herb grows in a wide range of climates, the best quality is grown in desert heat, but it may be found in sunny, wayside places, thriving even in poor, dry soil.

The common name horehound comes from the Old English words har and hune, meaning downy plant. This descriptive name refers to the white hairs that give this herb its distinctive hoary appearance.

Another suggested derivation is the name of the Egyptian god of sky and light, Horus. Horehound is one of the oldest known cough remedies. It was one of the herbs in the medicine chests of the Egyptian pharaohs. In Roman times, Caesar’s antidote for poison included horehound. The generic name is believed to be derived from the Hebrew word marrob, meaning bitter juice. Horehound is one of the bitter herbs used in the Jewish Passover rites. Throughout its long history, white horehound has been valued not only as a folk remedy for coughs and congested lungs.

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Recorded mention of horehound began in the first century in ancient Rome. In his manual of medicine, Roman medical writer A. Cornelius Celsus, described antiseptic uses as well as treatments for respiratory ailments using horehound juice. In his book, “On Agriculture,” first-century agriculturist Lucius Columella detailed how to use of horehound for various farm animal ailments such as ulcers, worms, and scabs. In the second century, the noted physician Galen also recommended using horehound to relieve coughing and to support respiratory health.

In his 1597 book on the history of plants and their uses, the respected British herbalist John Gerard recommended horehound as an antidote to poison and a syrup of horehound for those with respiratory problems. English physician Nicholas Culpeper echoed Gerard’s promotion of horehound in his 1652 book for physicians, stating, “There is a syrup made of this plant which I would recommend as an excellent help to evacuate tough phlegm and cold rheum from the lungs of aged persons, especially those who are asthmatic and short-winded.”

USES:

White horehound is used for digestion problems including loss of appetite, indigestion, bloating, gas, diarrhea, constipation, and liver and gallbladder complaints. It is also used for lung and breathing problems including a cough, whooping cough, asthma, tuberculosis, bronchitis, and swollen breathing passages.

Women use white horehound for painful menstrual periods.
People also use it for yellowed skin (jaundice), to kill parasitic worms, to cause sweating, and to increase urine production.
White horehound is sometimes applied to the skin for skin damage, ulcers, and wounds.

In manufacturing, the extracts of white horehound are used as a flavoring in foods and beverages, and as expectorant in cough syrups and lozenges. Expectorants are ingredients that make it easier to cough up phlegm.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It’s LIKELY UNSAFE to take white horehound by mouth during pregnancy. It might start menstruation and could cause a miscarriage.

If you are breastfeeding stick to food amounts of white horehound. There isn’t enough information about the safety of medicinal amounts.

Don’t use white horehound on the skin if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Not enough is known about the safety of topical use.

Diabetes: White horehound might lower blood sugar. Taking white horehound along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely.

Heart conditions: There is some concern that white horehound might cause irregular heartbeat in people with heart problems. It’s best not to use it.

Low blood pressure: White horehound might lower blood pressure. This could cause blood pressure to go to low. White horehound should be used cautiously in people with low blood pressure or those taking medications that lower blood pressure.

Surgery: White horehound might lower blood sugar. This might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop taking white horehound at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

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Preparations:

Preparations of Horehound are still largely used as expectorant and tonics. It may, indeed, be considered one of the most popular pectoral remedies, being given with benefit for a chronic cough, asthma, and some cases of consumption.

Horehound is sometimes combined with Hyssop, Rue, Liquorice root and Marshmallow root, 1/2 oz. of each boiled in 2 pints of water, to 1 1/2 pint, strained and given in 1/2 teacupful doses, every two to three hours.

For children’s coughs and croup, it is given to advantage in the form of syrup and is a most useful medicine for children, not only for the complaints mentioned but as a tonic and a corrective of the stomach. It has quite a pleasant taste.

Taken in large doses, it acts as a gentle purgative.

The powdered leaves have also been employed as a vermifuge and the green leaves, bruised and boiled in lard, are made into an ointment which is good for wounds.

For ordinary cold, a simple infusion of Horehound (Horehound Tea) is generally sufficient in itself. The tea may be made by pouring boiling water on the fresh or dried leaves, 1 OZ. of the herb to the pint. A wineglassful may be taken three or four times a day.

Candied Horehound is best made from the fresh plant by boiling it down until the juice is extracted, then adding sugar before boiling this again, until it has become thick enough in consistency to pour into a paper case and be cut into squares when cool.
Two or three teaspoonful of the expressed juice of the herb may also be given as a dose in severe colds.

—Preparations and Dosages–fluid extract, 1/2 to 1 drachm. Syrup, 2 to 4 drachms. Solid extract, 5 to 15 grains.

Written by Rich, for AroundTheCabin.com
1/30/2017

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Back to Reality Prepping!

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So lately I see a lot of post on people talking about stopping prepping or doubling up on your preps. My question is why for either choice.

So let’s look at the word prepping. Prepping is nothing more than preparing for a bad time.
We as human beings have been preparing for problems, before recorded time. Putting back quantities of food and materials to either make tools, clothing or other useful items is ingrained in our very nature.

In modern day we have prepared for everything from earthquakes and floods, to super volcanoes and nuclear weapons. The host of problems that people prepare for could be anything from a simple loss of income, to the end of the world.

StorageBin2

In reality we prepare ourselves for things every day that we don’t even think about. We put gas in our vehicles today, so we don’t have to walk tomorrow. We buy groceries so we don’t have to go out and forage for food. We buy insurance just in case. Every day we do “prepping”, and don’t realize that we are doing so.

So why is it that some people think that you need to either stop altogether, or speed things up?

Doubling up on your preparations may not be advisable. You may not have the luxury of the finances needed to achieve the outlay at one time. You may not have the space to store double your quantity at this time. The items you are looking for may not be available all at one time.

Stopping your preparations doesn’t sound like a good idea either. Would you stop paying car insurance because you haven’t had an accident in the last five years? You would not put off buying groceries because you hope you can catch food tomorrow, would you?

Homesteading-Preparedness-1706

In reality, we are not in a race or in some sort of competition with each other. Preparing your self and your family for times of need is the responsibility of being an adult. What you prepare for is your choice. It is also up to your family how much of an investment you put into preparing, as well as the extent you’re going to go into preparations.

Preparing for your future, should be something you do while levelheaded, calm and with your immediate family. Preparations such as putting food, water and materials back is an investment. You need to have a plan and you need to think about what you’re going to be preparing for. Think of it as insurance, that you will have necessary items at times when you may not be able to gather them.

Keep your chin up!
The sky hasn’t fallen yet, the end has been near for a long time, and every generation feels like it will be the last on this planet.
So far everyone’s been wrong.

FoodPreps

Written by Rich, for AroundTheCabin.com
1/23/2017

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Sesame Seeds

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Sesame seeds are a high energy food that help to provide optimum health and wellness. They are an excellent source of high-quality protein which is most beneficial for growth, especially in children. Sesame seeds are also high in minerals such as calcium, iron, zinc, magnesium, selenium, and copper. In fact, did you know that just a 1/4 cup of sesame seeds provides MORE calcium than 1 cup of milk?

And calcium is not only vital to bone strength, it is also known to help ease the affects of migraines, aid in weight loss, and provide relief from PMS. The copper in sesame seeds offers anti-inflammatory benefits which can help to relieve swelling in auto-immune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia.

Sesame seeds are rich in Vitamin E, Folic acid and B-complex vitamins such as niacin which enhances GABA activity in the brain, reduces anxiety, and provides for a better night’s sleep. They also contain a special element called “sesame-lignin”, a potent antioxidant, which is an active free-radical scavenger that can also aid in lowering cholesterol and preventing high blood pressure.

Sesame seeds have the unique ability to nourish the nervous system, strengthen hormone production, support the cardiovascular system, benefit the digestive system, and reduce fatigue. The high Vitamin E content in sesame seeds has been highly prized as an ancient beauty treatment for healthy skin, hair, and nails.

Sesame seeds can be sprinkled on salads, vegetables or rice, mixed with dates or honey, or used as a delicious spread known as tahini. Tahini (sesame butter) is creamy, rich, and satisfying and can be used as a savory base to salad dressings, dips, sauces or hummus, or used as a sweet treat when mixed with honey and nuts.

http://www.medicalmedium.com/blog/sesame-seeds

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Breakfast In The 18th Century!

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Published on Dec 12, 2016

A simple, delicious recipe from The Art Of Cookery by Hannah Glasse

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The Crumpet Controversy

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Published on Nov 28, 2016

Sometimes while doing research for 18th Century Cooking we run into a recipe that is a little confusing and sometimes controversial. Kevin joins Jon in the kitchen today to make a Crumpet recipe from 1769. This recipe could easily be mistaken for other “biscuit” dishes, but we assure you, this is a Crumpet. A very delicious Crumpet!

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Cheesemaking In The Early 19th Century

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We have a very special episode today! Deanna Berkemeier, from Genesee Country Village & Museum in Mumford, NY, walks us through the process of making cheese from scratch. Deanna is a master at the art of Cheesemaking. We hope you enjoy this! If you’re ever in the Rochester, NY, area, be sure to put Genesee Country Village & Museum on your itinerary! You won’t regret it!

Genesee Country Village and Museum – https://www.gcv.org/

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For the love of Garlic

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Garlic contained many vital nutrients including vitamins, amino acids, and enzymes. On top of that garlic is also delicious and very healthy, for internal and external use.

Garlic contains the amino acid Allicin, that gives Garlic that potent smell from the sulfur compounds. Allicin is one of the primary components of garlic that gives it its healthy benefits.

Eating garlic raw is more beneficial than cooking garlic, if you can get past the taste. When garlic is cut or chewed and allowed exposure to the air for at least 5 to 10 minutes, the compound Allicin to fully activated. However when garlic is cooked the Allicin is inactivated and not able to produce.

Garlic contains high amounts of antioxidants
Garlic helps lower your cholesterol
Garlic is antibacterial
Garlic is antifungal
Garlic helps thin the blood
Garlic boost your immune system
Study suggests that garlic may help prevent blood clots
Garlic help lower your blood pressure
Garlic helps with joint pain, and osteoporosis
Garlic help prevents some cancer

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Garlic is both immune boosting and antimicrobial meaning it can fight viral and bacterial infections. The best way to use garlic is to put it into your diet either cooked or eaten raw, garlic benefits are numerous.

Garlic used for many conditions related to the heart and blood system. Garlic has also been used to prevent certain cancers: rectal, stomach, breast, prostate, and bladder.
Garlic has also used for earaches, menstrual disorders, hepatitis, shortness of breath, liver disease, fighting numerous infections, and many skin conditions (ringworm, jock itch, athlete’s foot)
Other uses for garlic include fighting fevers, coughs, headaches, stomachache, sinus congestion, gout, joint pain, hemorrhoids, asthma, bronchitis, and a host of other treatments.

          Word of warning on garlic

Check with your doctor to see if it affects any of your medications.
Do not take garlic if you have bleeding disorders, stomach or digestive problems, low blood pressure or getting ready for surgery.
Women who are breast-feeding may want to stay away from garlic as it may change the flavor of the milk they produce.
Possibly unsafe when applying garlic to your skin may cause skin irritation and some people.
Birth control pills, taking garlic along with birth-control pills may decrease the effectiveness.
Liver medications, check with your doctor.
Medications for blood clotting, check with your doctor
Heart medications, check with your doctor

Whether store-bought or harvested from the wild, garlic is a wonderful herb for us to explore and use. The culinary uses and the health benefits are astounding. I implore you to add garlic to your healthful herbs, and learn more on its benefits and uses, on your own.

And hey, it also fight against vampires!

Written by Rich, for aroundthecabin.com

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Herbs for Seasonal Cleanse

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A lot of people ask about removing toxins from their bodies or a body cleanse. One of the best things you can to to help your body out is to eat foods and herbs, that are in season.

Here in the United States, we are lucky enough to receive foods from all over the world. Food is shipped in from the southern hemisphere and Europe, from Asia and the Middle East. What I try to eat is food that has been grown local, raised local, or harvested locally.

So my suggestion is to eat local and eat what is in season.

Most people also need to concentrate on drinking more water. Drinking more water helps increase blood volume, and helps to get the lymphatic fluids throughout the body moving. This will help wash your cells and clean fluids, that have built up, and aid in the removal of waste from the body. Basically, a “super flush” going on through your body.

We also want to focus on the gallbladder and the liver cleansing both of them.

Herbs that we can use to clean up the gallbladder and liver are:
artichokes
burdock
dandelions
turmeric
yellow dock
peppermint
milk thistle

These herbs are common throughout most United States and available for most of the year. There are more out there but these are the basics.

Using these herbs in teas, and leave or roots in foods, will help your body to get your blood flowing and your digestive juices moving.

Here we should also mention that you need to have your bowels moving at least once a day. Also check with your doctor before taking any of these herbs if you’re not already taking them, to check that they do not cause problems with any of your medications. (safety first)

If after all this you are still having problems check with your local natural foods store, and/or Dr. They may have a mild laxative formula that will aid you.

Written by Rich, for aroundthecabin.com

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Ready Network Elite Pack -The Pack

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In this video, we talk about the pack.
The Elite Ready Pack is a high quality emergency pack equipped with all of the essential gear you will need to protect yourself and your family in a major disaster or survival situation. It’s also great for camping with friends and family.

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A Harvest Succotash

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A few months ago we prepared a summertime succotash using fresh corn and beans. Today’s recipe is for a harvest version that uses dried ingredients instead. It’s a much heartier dish than its sweet-corn cousin, but that heartiness is balanced well with the addition of squash. Corn, beans, and squash were often referred to as the “three sisters” by early Native American peoples, and were often cooked together in stews and soups. Historic journals tell us this dish was also popular among early settlers. The corn we’re using is a hominy corn made with Iroquois white corn, a special flint variety that can be traced back thousands of years. You can buy the quality product from the kind folks at Iroquois White Corn Project at the link below.

Iroquois White Corn Project – http://www.iroquoiswhitecorn.org/

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Paw Paw Pudding

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Ivy and Jon head to the kitchen with a basket of ripe paw paws! This exotic North American fruit is native to nearly every state east of the Mississippi, but we have yet to find them in any recipes from the 18th century. So what do they do with no recipe to follow? They improvise!

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1796 Pound Cakes!

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Today’s recipe is for a traditional “Pound Cake.” This comes from Amelia Simmons’s 1796 cookbook, “American Cookery.” While it’s called a cake, there are clues in the text that this was intended to be made into something more like a cookie or even a cupcake. This is a delicious dish — one we highly recommend it!

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Civil Unrest

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Are you Ready?
Be sure you have a supply of the following:

Water
Necessary prescription medications
Food and an off grid way to cook it
Or food that requires no cooking
First aid supplies
Lighting in the event of a power outage
Sanitation supplies (in the event that the municipal water system is unusuable, this would include cleaning supplies and toilet supplies)
A way to stay warm in harsh winter weather
Over-the-counter medications and/or herbal remedies to treat illnesses at home
Survival and first aid manuals (hard copies in case the internet and power grid are down)
Alternative communications devices (such as a hand-crank radio) so that you can get updates about the outside world
Off-grid entertainment: arts and craft supplies, puzzles, games, books, crossword or word search puzzles, needlework, ect.

Now, according to some, being in a large city might not be the best thing during a disaster scenario. So if something happens that requires evacuation, you’ll want to be the first out, which means you will want to have your emergency gear easy to pack and haul out to the car without wasting time.

We will go over more details in the next video coming on Civil Unrest ….. Stay tuned!

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Lemons

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Lemons are a powerful healing fruit that contain phenomenal antibiotic, antiseptic, and anti-cancer properties. Lemons are rich in vitamins C and B-complex and minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, silicon, copper, and potassium. They are considered to be a wonderful tonic and can help to cleanse and detoxify the entire body.

Although lemons have an acidic taste they actually have a very strong alkaline reaction on the body and can help to alkalize blood, cells, lymph, organs, and tissues. Lemons are known to help destroy putrefactive bacteria in the mouth and intestines which can help alleviate flatulence, indigestion, and constipation. Lemons contain a compound called limonene which is used to dissolve gallstones and kidney stones and can help to fight oral, lung, skin, breast, stomach, and colon cancer.

Lemons are also rich in bioflavonoids which can significantly boost the immune system and reduce inflammation in the body. Lemon juice is known to be particularly beneficial for colds, coughs, sore throats, hiccups, ear infections, fevers, arthritis, heart disease, COPD, atherosclerosis, diabetes, high cholesterol, autoimmune disorders, stroke, and cancer. Topically, lemon juice is a great remedy for wrinkles, warts, toothaches, corns, sunburns, poison ivy, acne, psoriasis, and as a hair rinse and facial astringent.

A tall glass of lemon water upon waking is an excellent way to hydrate and cleanse the body first thing in the morning. Fresh lemon in tea and green juice and added to salads, wraps, hummus, guacamole, and nori rolls is another great way to add this healing and nutritious fruit into your diet. Fresh lemons can be found at your local grocery and health food store.

Learn more about which foods can heal and restore your body in my new book Life-Changing Foods, click here for more info http://bit.ly/LCFBook

Thank you: Anthony William

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Goldenrod

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Goldenrod (the Solidago genus, Asteracea family) is a great plant to know.

Distinguishing Features: Long wood like stems with spiky tooth like parts which are widely-spaced, yellow flowers that grow in thick clusters.

Leaves: There can be wide variations in characteristics, but generally, goldenrod leaves are about 4 inches long and about ¾ of an inch wide, tapering to a point at the tip and narrowing at the base, with no leaf stem and small teeth around the edges. Three veins run parallel from near the base of the leaf.. The underside of the leaf is hairy, especially along the veins and the upper side has a rough texture.

Height: Most Goldenrod plants average 4 feet in height.

Habitat: There is no shortage of Goldenrod in September and October. This yellow plant can be found in moist locations, forests, fields, roadsides, compost piles, cultivated fields, and orchards throughout Canada, the U.S., and across the world.

Goldenrod is a perennial plant that is well-known for its healing properties.

The properties of goldenrod are similar to many other herbs: antifungal, diuretic, diaphoretic, anti-inflammatory, expectorant, astringent, antiseptic, and carminative. However, the actions of goldenrod to the kidneys, urinary track, skin, allergies, and cardiovascular system are impressive.

Goldenrod is often unfairly blamed for causing hay fever in humans. The pollen causing these allergy problems is mainly produced by Ragweed (Ambrosia sp.), blooming at the same time as the goldenrod but wind-pollinated. Goldenrod pollen is too heavy and sticky to be blown far from the flowers, and is thus mainly pollinated by insects. Frequent handling of goldenrod and other flowers, however, can cause allergic reactions.

Special Precautions & Warnings:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking goldenrod if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use..

Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Goldenrod may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking goldenrod.

Fluid retention (edema) due to heart or kidney conditions: “Irrigation therapy,” during which goldenrod is taken with large amounts of fluids to increase urine flow, should not be attempted in people with fluid retention due to heart or kidney disease.

High Blood Pressure: There is a concern that goldenrod might make the body accumulate more sodium, and this can make high blood pressure worse.

Urinary Tract Infection (UTIs): Herbal “irrigation therapy” may not work against infections and may require the addition of germ-killing medications. “Irrigation therapy” should be monitored closely. Don’t depend on it for clearing up an infection.

Water pills (Diuretic drugs) interacts with GOLDENROD
Goldenrod seems to work like “water pills” by causing the body to lose water. Taking goldenrod along with other “water pills” might cause the body to lose too much water. Losing too much water can cause you to be dizzy and your blood pressure to go too low.
Some “water pills” include chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Thalitone), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, Hydrodiuril, Microzide), and others.

Dosage: The appropriate dose of goldenrod depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for goldenrod. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician before using.

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Preparations: goldenrod include tea, tincture, infused oils, poultice, and powder.

Goldenrod tonics are easy to make. Harvest any goldenrod by cutting the top third of the plant in full flower on a sunny fall day. Or, respectfully pull the entire plant, roots and all, in the late autumn or early winter. Then follow the simple directions below. Note: You can use any size jar when making a vinegar or a tincture, so long as you fill it full.

To dry flowering goldenrod: Bundle 2-3 stalks together and hang upside down in a cool, shady room until thoroughly dry. When the stalks snap crisply, store the dried herb in brown paper bags. One or two large handfuls of crushed leaves and flowers, steeped in a quart of boiling water for thirty minutes makes a tea that can be used hot, with honey, to counter allergies (especially pollen allergies), fevers, sore throats, coughs, colds and the flu; or taken cold to relieve colic in babies, and gas in adults. Dried mint and/or yarrow are tasty, and useful, additions when making goldenrod flower tea.

To dry goldenrod roots: Rinse dirt off the roots, then cut away all the stalks, leaves and dead flowers. If possible, hang your roots over a wood stove to dry; if not, place them on racks and put them in a warm place to dry until brittle. Store in glass jars. Depending on the difficulty you are addressing, goldenrod root tea may be made with large or small amounts of the roots brewed or decocted in boiling water. Or the roots may be powdered, alone or mixed with flowers, and applied to hard-to-heal wounds and sore joints.

To make a goldenrod vinegar: Chop the goldenrod coarsely, filling a jar with chopped flowers, leaves, stalks (and roots if you have them); then fill the jar to the top with room-temperature, pasteurized, apple cider vinegar. Cap it tightly with a plastic lid. (Metal lids will be eroded by the action of the vinegar. If you must use one, protect it with several layers of plastic between it and the vinegar.) Be sure to label your vinegar with the date and contents. Your goldenrod vinegar will be ready to use in six weeks to improve mineral balance, help prevent kidney stones, eliminate flatulence, and improve immune functioning.

To make a goldenrod tincture: Chop the goldenrod coarsely, filling a jar with chopped flowers, leaves, stalks (and roots if you have them); then add 100 proof vodka, filling the jar to the very top. Cap tightly and label. Your goldenrod tincture will be ready to use in six weeks, by the dropper full, as an anti-inflammatory, a sweat-inducing cold cure, and an astringent digestive aid. Medical herbalists use large doses (up to 4 droppers full at a time) of goldenrod tincture several times daily to treat kidney problems — including nephritis, hemorrhage, kidney stones, and inability to void — and prostate problems, including frequent urination.

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10 essential herbs

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Here are 10 essential herbs, including some of their uses and guidelines to get started on your herbal apothecary. Health made simple and easy.
A few herbs that you can grow indoors or outside. Herbs you can use for preparing medicines with simple techniques as our ancestors did.

As far back as 5000 BCE, Sumerians used herbs in medicine. Ancient Egyptians used fennel, coriander and thyme around 1555 BCE. In ancient Greece, in 162 CE, a physician by the name of Galen was known for concocting complicated herbal remedies that contained up to 100 ingredients. Herbs have long been used as the basis of traditional Chinese herbal medicine, with usage dating as far back as the first century CE and far before.

Herbs have been used throughout the world, for a lot longer than we remember. Most believe from the dawn of mankind.

In general use, herbs are any plants used for food, flavoring, medicine, or perfume. Culinary use typically distinguishes herbs from spices. Herbs refer to the leafy green parts of a plant (either fresh or dried), while a “spice” is a product from another part of the plant (usually dried), including seeds, berries, bark, roots and fruits.

1: Aloe vera (Aloe vera): fresh leaves

Leaf juice is used topically to treat minor burns and wounds; it is antiseptic, digestive, insecticidal and emollient.

2: Chickweed (Stellaria media): fresh or dried leaves and flowers

Used internally to ease the pain of rheumatism and externally to soothe itching and other skin discomforts; it is an anti-inflammatory herb.

Caution: Pregnant women should not eat large quantities of chickweed.

3: Comfrey (Symphytum officinale): for external use—leaf and root

Contains allantoin, a substance that speeds the healing of tissue, and rosmarinic acid, which is an anti-inflammatory. It is an astringent herb used in the bath, poultices and fomentations to heal bruises, broken bones and torn ligaments.

Caution: Comfrey is not recommended for internal use because of the presence of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, which can cause liver damage and cancerous tumors in the liver. Comfrey products should not be used on broken skin or be used by pregnant women, nursing mothers or children.

4: Garlic (Allium sativum): fresh bulbs (cloves), aerial bulblets, flowers
Cloves are used as a medicinal and culinary herb. The cloves are antibiotic, antifungal, antiseptic and antiviral.

5: Ginger (Zingiber officinale): fresh rhizome

Ginger is warming, antiseptic, analgesic and antispasmodic. It is a traditional remedy for digestive complaints, bronchitis, muscle spasm and rheumatism.

Caution: Garlic should not be used by anyone suffering from digestive-tract ulcers, high fever or inflammatory skin conditions.

6: Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis): sustainably harvested fresh or dried rhizome

Rhizomes have been used to dye fibers and are still used medicinally. The yellow color of its rhizomes is attributed to berberine, a strongly antibacterial and bitter alkaloid.

Caution: Pregnant women and persons with high blood pressure should not use goldenseal. The herb should not be used for more than three months because the strong antibacterial action kills beneficial intestinal flora.

7: Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia): leaves and flowers

It is antibiotic, antispasmodic on smooth muscle tissue and a depressant to the central nervous system. We carry a small vial of the essential oil of lavender with us everywhere we go, to use as first aid for burns, wounds, headaches and nervous tension.

8: Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis): leaves and flowers

Antibacterial, antispasmodic and antiviral, and is used as an insect repellent and sedative. The leaf is used in tea, tincture and in the bath for its calming properties and pleasant lemon scent.

Caution: Pregnant or nursing women should consult a medical professional trained in the use of therapeutic herbs before taking lemon balm. Consult with your physician before taking lemon balm with other medications.

9: Mint (Mentha spp.): leaves and flowers

Leaves are used in tea and bath blends for their flavor, stimulating properties and fragrance. Mint leaves are also taken in tea to aid digestion, reduce gas and treat headache, colds and fevers.

10: Sage (Salvia officinalis): leaves and flowers

Garden sage contains the powerful compound thujone that controls profuse perspiration and dries up lactation. Sage tea is a traditional remedy for sore gums and throat, skin infections and insect stings, and for sharpening the memory. Currently, Salvia species are being researched for their antioxidant properties, specifically for the prevention or treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Caution: Pregnant or nursing women should not take sage internally. It should not be taken internally in large amounts or for extended periods because of the side effects of thujone.

Rich Beresford 2016 7 25
Written for AroundTheCabin.com

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A 200-Year Old Chicken Salad Recipe!

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Did you know they made chicken salad over 200 years ago? This recipe comes from Maria Rundell’s 1808 cookbook, “A New System of Domestic Cookery.” The parsley and a hint of lemon gives this dish a very refreshing taste, and surprisingly, the anchovies aren’t overwhelmingly strong, but rather they add the perfect balance. …Such a simple dish with a huge fresh summertime flavor!

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Burdock Root

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Burdock root is a medicinal herb and food that has powerful anti-tumor, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial properties. Burdock root is one of the top recommended herbal remedies for cancer due to the belief that it can stop cancer cells from metastasizing and it is one of the star ingredients of the famous natural cancer remedy known as Essiac tea.

It is also highly beneficial for colds, flu, sore throats, bronchial congestion, ulcers, gallstones, anemia, kidney stones, chicken pox, gout, measles, strep throat, urinary tract infections, bladder infections, hepatitis, and enlarged prostates. Burdock root is an essential blood purifier and detoxifying herb as it can neutralize and safely eliminate poisons and toxins from the body.

Burdock is one of the most important herbs for treating chronic skin problems such as acne, psoriasis, eczema, and shingles. It can also help to stimulate metabolism, re-grow hair, strengthen nails, and aid in edema and weight loss. Burdock root is an effective painkiller that can help alleviate symptoms of inflammation that affect auto-immune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, bursitis, lupus, and diabetes.

Fresh burdock can be juiced with celery, kale, and apple or used in recipes similarly to carrots. It is often steamed or added to soups and stews. It has a subtly sweet and earthy flavor that works well with potatoes, mushrooms, and onions. Dried burdock root is often used as a medicinal tea.

Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 1-2 teaspoons of dried burdock root and let steep for at least 10 minutes or more, sweeten with honey if desired. Burdock root can be readily found in a cream, salve, tincture, extract, and capsule form. It’s potent healing abilities has made it a vital herb for your natural medicine cabinet.

From our friend at: http://www.medicalmedium.com/blog/burdock-root

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Purslane Or Spurge?

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PURSLANE
• Excellent source of Omega-3 fatty acids (better than fish oil!)
• An excellent source of Vitamin A, one of the highest among green leafy vegetables
• A rich source of vitamin C, and some B-complex vitamins like riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine and carotenoids
• A rich source of dietary minerals, such as iron, magnesium, calcium, potassium, and manganese.
• Decreasing the risk of heart attack and stroke.
• Autoimmune diseases such as lupus.
• Maintaining heart health.
• Lowering cholesterol.
• Regulating blood pressure.
• Enriching brain health.
• As an anti-depressant.
• Boosting the immune system
• Inflammatory bowel disease.
• Rheumatoid arthritis.
___________________________________________

SPURGE

IF THERE IS A WHITE SAP, IT IS NOT PURSLANE!

  • Nothing eats it.
  • The sap is possibly toxic enough to cause blindness if it gets in the eyes.
  • It is an annual that doesn’t germinate readily until warmer weather, so pre-emergents are often applied too soon to stop it. (Most pre-emergents work only for 8-10 weeks and are spread in early spring.)
  • Each plant can produce a full crop of several thousand seeds in 5 weeks.
  • The flowers are so non-descript as to be thought absent, so it is easy to accidentally miss flowering and let it go to seed.
  • There are 12 weed species of spurge that are all very similar, varying as little as having a tiny spot on the leaves (Spotted spurge is what I found the most photos of, but was not what was in my yard.)

    The sap of this plant is a mild skin irritant and can cause a rash in some people. The sap is poisonous and considered carcinogenic.

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Mango

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Mangos are one of the most popular and nutritionally rich fruits in the world and are often referred to as “The King of the Fruits”. Mangos are an amazing source of vitamins A, C, E, and B-complex as well as health promoting flavonoids such as beta-carotene and alpha-carotene. Mangos are a powerful anti-cancer food and are specifically known to help prevent lung, breast, colon, prostate, blood, and oral cancers.

They are also highly beneficial in the prevention of strokes, heart disease, arthritis, cognitive disorders, respiratory diseases, and kidney disease. Mangos can help to alkalinize the whole body by helping to flush out toxic acids and rebuild the alkali reserves in the body. Mangos are packed with enzymes and are a prebiotic food, meaning they contain compounds that stimulate and feed the good bacteria in the intestines which greatly aids in digestion and assimilation.

Mangoes contain a significant amount of pyridoxine (B-6) which is vital for the synthesis of serotonin and dopamine in the brain. Pyridoxine is also essential in maintaining hormonal balance and proper immune function as well as for helping the body break down sugars, fats and proteins. Mangos are thought to help prevent insomnia and provide for a better nights sleep. In some countries mangos are eaten right before bed as a natural sleep aid.

Mangos are known to help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol due to its significant fiber, pectin, and vitamin C content. Mangos are also excellent for promoting good eyesight and helping to prevent night blindness and dry eyes. They are also wonderful for skin health and can be used both internally and externally to help clear clogged pores, eliminate pimples, and add a natural glow to the skin. Mangos are one of the worlds most versatile fruits and can be used in both sweet and savory recipes.

Consider using mango in your smoothie, salads, salsa, avocado, and vegetable dishes. Spices also pair well with mango and try experimenting with cinnamon, curry, cloves, and chili pepper to boost the flavor and nutrition of your meals. Start or end your day with a simple but delicious mango pudding. Blend 2-4 ripe mangos (peel and pit removed) in a blender or food processor until creamy and smooth.

Pour into a bowl and top with fresh berries. There are several varieties available in supermarkets throughout the year including Tommy Atkins, Kent, Yellow, Ataulfo, Keitt, and Champagne. Some are sweet and creamy while others are juicy and bright. Experiment with finding new ways to add mangos into your diet. Your body will love you for it.

Thanks to our friends at: http://www.medicalmedium.com/blog/mango

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Clover and Cyanide

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Question…Why don’t the bugs eat the clover in my yard?

Ok …here we go…

Under ordinary conditions, cyanide is safely bonded to sugar molecules that are sequestered in secure pockets inside each plant cell. The enzyme that separates the cyanide from its sugar lies outside that pocket. When an insect chews the clover leaves, the cyanide-sugars and enzymes mix—like bending and shaking a plastic glow stick—and this releases the poisonous cyanide concoction.

THAT is the answer..

I know, I know,(here it comes)… BUT WAIT, YOUR SAYING WE CAN EAT IT?… Yes, you can.

Cyanide is a naturally occurring chemical, generally considered to be poisonous if consumed in large enough amounts. According to the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry the following foods naturally contain cyanide:

almonds
millet sprouts
lima beans
soy
spinach
bamboo shoots
cassava
tapioca

Additionally cyanide is found in most any fruits that have a pit, or core, like cherries, apricots, and apples. The site reports that no foods are consumed in large enough quantities to be toxic. Cyanide can also be produced by certain bacteria, fungi, algae, and as a by-product of industrial manufacturing and waste. If industry is producing cyanide in your area it may enter local water supplies. If this water is used to grow plants in your area, those plants will also absorb the additional cyanide, so take note of the water and industry in your area. The same risk, thankfully, does not exist for fish in cyanide polluted waters as they do not absorb the cyanide. In general, it is import not to stress too much over cyanide in foods.

*** Small amounts of cyanide may even be good for you by helping to lower blood pressure.

In small doses, cyanide in the body can be changed into thiocyanate, which is less harmful and is excreted in urine. In the body, cyanide in small amounts can also combine with another chemical to form vitamin B12, which helps maintain healthy nerve and red blood cells.

In large doses, the body’s ability to change cyanide into thiocyanate is overwhelmed. Large doses of cyanide prevent cells from using oxygen and eventually these cells die. The heart, respiratory system and central nervous system are most susceptible to cyanide poisoning. (NOT good)

BACK to White Clover..
With all this in mind, clover can be good for you. It is high in protein, has beta carotene, vitamin C, most of the B vitamins, biotin, choline, inositol, and bioflavonoids.

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Plantain edible weed

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Plantain (Plantago major) is a weed commonly found in the wild and (much to suburbanites’ dismay) the lawns of almost everyone living in temperate climates. It is traditionally used to treat minor cuts and a wide range of skin disorders, including dandruff, eczema, sunburn, and bug bites.

This herb is also said to be good for soothing inflamed bronchial passages and sore throat. European research supports the use of plantain as a treatment for bronchitis, sore throat, and cold symptoms.

Studies have demonstrated that the juice of the plantain plant is both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory. Plantain contains allantoin, an anti-inflammatory phytochemical that kills germs, speeds wound healing, and stimulates the growth of new skin cells (many commercial cosmetic creams and lotions list allantoin as an active ingredient).

The best thing about the herb plantain is that it is easy to find and easy to use (there are over 200 species!). Unless you live in the desert or the tundra, there’s a good chance you have plantain growing right in your own backyard. It is readily identified by the green, nubby spikes, which stick up out of a cluster of round leaves.

To soothe bug bites, eczema, poison ivy, or other minor skin irritations, rub fresh plantain leaves on the affected area. You can also make a soothing poultice of fresh, mashed leaves and a little cool water (this one feels good on sunburns). Plantain is also available as a supplement in liquid extract and capsule form at most health food stores—the usual dosage is 1 teaspoon of liquid extract three times a day, or up to 6,000 milligrams in capsules per day for treatment of bronchial symptoms.

There have been no toxic reactions reported with the use of plantain. Be sure to follow the directions on commercial preparations—consuming extremely large amounts could cause diarrhea, skin rash, or other allergic reaction.

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Chives

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Chives contain nutritional compounds that are vital for bone and neurological health and can help to prevent osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease. They also have an exceptional amount of vitamin A and other antioxidants such as carotenes and lutein which help to protect the body from a variety of cancers. Chives contain a healing compound called allicin which has anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-fungal properties.

Allicin also has the ability to help reduce cholesterol, lower blood pressure, and help to decrease the risk of coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, and stroke. The sulfur containing oil in chives provides powerful antiseptic abilities without any of the digestion disturbing tendencies that the rest of the onion family can create. Chives are also known to help build the immune system, fight intestinal fermentation, and stimulate both stomach and liver function.

They are especially beneficial for those suffering from inflammation and autoimmune disorders such as fibromyalgia, bursitis, chronic fatigue, adrenal issues, shingles, epstein barr virus and vertigo. Chives are also an excellent source of folic acid which is essential for woman before and during pregnancy. Chives can be easily grown indoors or out and are a simple, flavorful, and healthy addition to any salad, guacamole, potato, rice, soup, or vegetable dish.

Learn more about which foods can heal and restore your body in my new book, click here http://bit.ly/MM-book

http://www.medicalmedium.com/blog/chives

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Why trapping is key to survival.

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Trapping is key to survival for several reasons. Many people do not have the knowledge

on how to set traps and where to set traps. Each and every trap you have set in a survival situation is like having another person out there 24 hours a day helping to get your next meal. There are several trap types we will discuss along with why targeting small game is more efficient than strictly going after large game such as deer and elk.

The first trap type we will discuss is snares. Whether its a hanging snare on a game trail or a spring snare using a tree for the spring. Snares are an effective method of trapping that has been around for years. In a survival situation snares are lightweight and easy to set up. I am a trapper and while I don’t use snares in running my trapline every year I do advocate them in a survival situation. Free hanging snares in a game trail or a fence crossing is very effective and generally catches the animal around the neck. A spring style snare can be just as effective and generally catches the animal around the leg. These are excellent methods in survival to gather food.
spring-snare-diagram

      Spring Snare
19-April--026Simple Snare

The next trap type we will discuss are called toe hold traps. They are commonly called leg hold or leg catchers. These are metal traps that use spring tension to hold the animal in place until you get there. These traps are heavy yet highly effective. I use this style of trap every year. There several different sets to use when setting toe hold traps. The first is whats called a cubby set. To make a cubby set you use small logs and tree limbs to build it. Basically you are building a box using a tree as the back of the box. The next type of set is called a dirt hole set. You dig a hole at an angle at about 18 inches deep and the off set the trap from the hole. Drowning sets are effective sets in areas with steep river banks and 2 to 4 foot deep rivers or creeks. To make a drowning set you take a big rock or cinder block and attached a wire to it then throw it in the river or creek and attach the other end to a tree after putting a slider attached to your trap on the wire.
Cubby sets are used primarily for raccoon, opossum, and other small game. Drowning sets are primarily used to target beaver. Dirt hole sets are primarily predator sets but do not discount predators as food. Bobcats taste great.

ocWQrTiwLuKwUhV-1600x900-noPad                                                                        Leg Hold or Toe Hold Trap

The next trap type is called a DP or dog proof trap. These are my favorite traps. They are easy to set and keep your neighbors from getting mad because you caught the dog in your traps. DP traps are a cylinder with a hoop of heavy wire under spring tension inside the cylinder. The coon stick his paw in to grab the bait and triggers the trap.
dp_duke_dog_proof
Dog proof trap

The next style of traps is actually 2 different traps yet they work on the same principal.
The neck breaker traps like deadfalls and connibear are the most humane and effective traps. When setting a deadfall remember that the weight of the deadfall should be 5 times the target animal. If you are targeting 30lb raccoon then your deadfall should weigh at least 150lbs. While deadfalls are effective I prefer the connibear traps. These almost guarantee a quick kill and come in several sizes. Most states require connibear to be set in water but in a survival situation that would go out the window. Box sets using a connibear are very effective. Set the connibear and put it at the front of the box with the bait in the back of the box.

figure 4 deadfall

Figure 4 dead fall

connibear box set

Modified Box Set using a 330 connibear

Animals such as opossum, raccoon, muskrat, squirrels, groundhog, and other small game will be your primary targets when trapping for a survival situation. The reason for this is these animals are plentiful and are very tasty. They will have enough nutrients to keep you going. I have heard people say well I will just eat rabbits. You will not survive by eating rabbit alone as your meat source due to the fact rabbits have an almost zero fat content. So you should be targeting other small game as well. Raccoon have lots of fat and taste great.

Large animals are not the easiest animals to trap due to size. If you get a shot on a deer during the winter then good but during the heat of the summer never kill more than you need in a survival situation. In the wintertime you preserve large animals better because of the colder weather.

Red Lewis

6/14/2016

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WHY GUN FREE ZONES ARE BAD

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As I sit here tonight in central Ky, I think about the horrible tragedy that happened in Orlando, 50 people killed and 53 more hurt. All I see is hatred and bigotry coming from a lot of people,
instead of us all pulling together, like we should to help the families that this tragedy has be fallen.

One news source has people that were happy about the tragedy. While other news sources call for more gun control. In my opinion gun free zones do nothing but create target rich environments for these lunatics.

Aurora, Co the the shooter passed 2 movie theaters that allowed concealed carry to get to the one that didn’t allow conceal carry. That is the one he shot up.
The guy from the Orlando shooting targeted a gun free zone only 2 people in the building had guns and one was shot first. Had other bar patrons been armed this would have gone down differently.

I am a firm believer that everyone should serve 2 years in one of the military branches and learn how properly use a firearm. All the mass shooting take place in gun free zones. You do not see these lunatics walking into places where people are armed and ready to shoot back. There have been a few that have tried that and it ended horribly.

My family and I avoid gun free zones because those places have more crime than areas that allow open or concealed carry. These type of attacks are carried out by lunatics that will stop at nothing to accomplish what they have set out to do regardless of the weapon they use to do it.
Timothy McVeigh used fertilizer and diesel fuel in Oklahoma city. The Boston city bombing was done by propane tanks with shrapnel attached to it. There have multiple stabbing by crazed knife wielding lunatics. Had someone been armed and ready to defend those that are around them then things might go differently.

The crime rates in areas that have gun free zones is higher than in areas that have people that conceal carry or open carry. The simple fact remains if you want to keep your family safe seek proper training on firearms and stay away from gun free zones.

STAY ARMED AND VIGILANT MY FRIENDS AND KEEP THE FAMILIES OF THE VICTIMS IN ORLANDO IN YOUR HEARTS AND PRAYERS.

Written by Red Lewis.
6/13/2016
DefenseFreeZone

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Basic Bannock Recipe

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Basic Bannock Recipe
courtesy Karen Hood

This recipe for bannock will come in handy during a day hike or an overnight camping trip. Mix the ingredients at home and then seal them in a zip-lock bag. The basic mix will stay fresh for up to a month if kept sealed, dry, and reasonably cool. The quantity given will yield four bannock cakes, each approximately 3-1/2 to 4″ in diameter.

Dry Ingredients

1 cup flour
1 tsp. baking powder
2 tbsp. sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
3 tbsp. margarine
2 tbsp. skim milk powder (optional)

Mix the flour, baking powder, salt, and milk powder. Cut in the margarine by hand or with a mixer on low, until the mixture resembles a coarse meal. Seal it in a zip-lock bag. Squeeze out excess air.

Bannock on the Trail

Grease and heat a fry pan or foil. Add enough COLD water to the prepackaged dry mix to make dough. Form the dough into cakes about 1/2″ thick. Lay the bannock cakes in the warm frying pan. Hold them over low heat, rotating the pan a little. Once a bottom crust has formed and the dough has hardened enough to hold together, turn the bannock cakes.

Cooking takes 12-15 minutes. Test readiness by inserting a clean toothpick or wood sliver into the loaf. If it comes out clean, the bannock is ready to eat.

If you don’t have a fry pan …

Roll the dough into a ribbon, no wider than an inch. Wind this around a preheated green hardwood stick and cook over a fire, turning occasionally, until the bannock is cooked.
Snapshot-1

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Dutch Oven Baking – Meat Pies

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Today we revisit the past and bring an episode all the way from Season One that ties into our Dutch Oven series. In this episode we bake two pies: a Cheshire pork pie in an earthen oven, as well as a mock passenger pigeon pie in a Dutch oven. These are some of our favorite recipes, you’re sure to enjoy it!

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Today we prepare an absolutely wonderful roast beef recipe from the “Domestic Economy” cookbook written in 1794 by Maximilian Hazelmore.

The Dutch oven was perfectly suited for use on the frontier. One can fry in it, make stews and soups with it, as well as bake in it. While the first two cooking methods are fairly easy, baking with a Dutch oven can be a little intimidating. With a few hints and a little experimentation and practice, baking in this 18th-century pot can be easy and rewarding.

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The Best Bread Pudding Yet? – Dutch Oven Baking

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In this third episode of our Dutch Oven series, we are baking a wonderful bread pudding! This recipe comes from the “Primitive Cookery” cookbook and is very delicious…especially with that amazing pudding sauce! Baking this recipe in a dutch oven is very easy if you use the techniques we have learned in previous episodes. Enjoy!

Oh, and please don’t mind Jon’s dog at 02:37!

The Dutch oven was perfectly suited for use on the frontier. One can fry in it, make stews and soups with it, as well as bake in it. While the first two cooking methods are fairly easy, baking with a Dutch oven can be a little intimidating. With a few hints and a little experimentation and practice, baking in this 18th-century pot can be easy and rewarding.

Primitive Cookery – http://jas-townsend.com/primitive-coo…

Dutch Oven Baking 101 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGBvq…

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More great information!
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The post The Best Bread Pudding Yet? – Dutch Oven Baking appeared first on WWW.AROUNDTHECABIN.COM.

Dutch Oven Baking: Getting To Know The Utensil

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This is the first video in a short series on baking in a “Bake Kettle” or Dutch Oven. Today we experiment with getting this utensil to the correct temperature for baking. We finish the video off by baking a loaf of bread. The Dutch oven was perfectly suited for use on the frontier. One can fry in it, make stews and soups with it, as well as bake in it. While the first two cooking methods are fairly easy, baking with a Dutch oven can be a little intimidating. With a few hints and a little experimentation and practice, baking in this 18th-century pot can be easy and rewarding.

*****************************
Sign up for our Youtube Newsletter! – http://jas-townsend.com/ytemail.php

To purchase any of the items featured in today’s video, click here – http://bit.ly/1OkGdT0

Click Here for the latest Cooking Episode – http://bit.ly/1W2MPNm

More great information!
*****************************
Our Retail Website – http://www.jas-townsend.com/
Request a Print Catalog – http://bit.ly/1N4fJTV
Facebook – http://on.fb.me/1jg6Wq1
Twitter – http://www.twitter.com/jas_townsend
Instagram – https://instagram.com/jastownsendandson

The post Dutch Oven Baking: Getting To Know The Utensil appeared first on WWW.AROUNDTHECABIN.COM.