6 Things To Remember Before You Get Into Adventure Sports

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By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

Getting into adventure sports could be a great idea for people who already love fitness and
pushing themselves but want to take it to the next level. If you’ve been thinking about trying
adventure sports for a while, you’re in the right place. Read on for 7 things you need to
remember if you’re going to start an exciting new adventure sports hobby:

1. Get Mentally Prepared And Excited

One of the most important things you’ll do is make sure you’re mentally prepared and excited for
the sport you’re attempting. You should only do it if this is something you feel confident that you
really want to do. Not because of peer pressure!

2. Know Your Health

If you suffer from health conditions, then there are probably some adventure sports that you
shouldn’t try. Things like vertigo, acrophobia, asthma or any heart disease mean you should
avoid pushing your body to the extreme. If you’re unsure you should speak to your doctor before
going ahead, and always take his advice.

3. Don’t Take Pictures

Taking pictures while you’re supposed to be focusing on the adventure sport at hand can be
very dangerous. Make sure you just focus on the task you came to do and have a good time.
You don’t need photographic evidence!

4. Trying It With Somebody Else Can Be Useful

It’s usually better if you can take someone along with you, especially the first time you try
something like this. You will have more confidence as you attempt your chosen sport, and you
have somebody to count on if you need them, too.

5. Research The Company

You’ll usually take part in a sport with a company, so make sure you research them before you
risk your life. Ask questions and find out how safe they are, along with their risk management
procedures. Make sure you choose a company that has experience and has a good reputation.
Companies like Vault cargo create equipment that can be used for adventure sports, so make
sure you do your research on what you need to get started and buy that from somewhere
reputable too. Don’t take any chances.

6. Have The Right Gear

Having the right gear is essential, too. You could easily injure knees, elbows, or another body
part if you’re not kitted out with the right safety gear. Knee pads, elbow pads, and wrist pads can
all help you to stop from hurting yourself.

7. Warm Up

A warm up will help you to keep your muscles and joints flexible, as well as get you ready for
what is to come. Dynamic warm ups can be best, rather than stretching. Stretching cold muscles
can actually cause more problems. Stretching them once your sport is over will help, however. A
dynamic warm up could mean jogging, bodyweight exercises, and similar movements to get the
blood pumping and body ready.

Are you ready to try an adventure sport, and which will you try? Leave your thoughts below

The post 6 Things To Remember Before You Get Into Adventure Sports appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

Camping Trips Go Wrong, Could You Survive In The Wild?

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By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

Camping trips, fishing breaks, and adventure holidays can all provide amazing memories.
On the other hand, any leisure activity in the wild has the potential to serve up some very
difficult moments. As a responsible traveler, being ready for all eventualities is essential.
After all, it’s not only your safety that could be at risk. Friends and family could be in danger
too.

To stay in control of those situations, just remember to stay S.A.F.E!

Shelter

Even if you’re lost without any power resources, you’ll have time to find help during the
daytime. Unfortunately, the nighttime is where real danger starts. While you may think that
this is due to animals and critters, it isn’t. The cold is the far bigger danger.The right products are key. However, you also need to know how and where to put the tentup. Making a poor decision here could open the door to a host of problems. Meanwhile,
sleeping bags will be crucial as you try to stay warm during the early hours.

Once again, as long as you’re safe at night, you have the day to find a solution.

Attitude

A positive mindset can enhance your life in a whole host of ways. This is especially true in
life’s most challenging moments. Being stuck in the wild certainly falls into this category.
Whether you’re alone or in a group, your attitude will influence everything.

If you aren’t prepared to attack those problems, you may land yourself in serious danger.
Conversely, when you keep a clear mind and believe that a solution can be found, those
hopes will look brighter. Smart decisions made with clarity will always bring better outcomes.

If nothing else, it should prevent disagreements and fighting with your companions.

Tent, Camp, Night, Star, Camping, Expedition, Dome Tent

Image Source: Pixabay

Food

Depending on the nature of the problems, it could be several days before you’re rescued or
find a way out of the predicament. Desperation can soon sink in if you don’t have the energy
levels required to stay positive. Nutrition is key.

Food and drink are two crucial aspects of a 72-hour emergency kit. These are primarily
thought of as home emergency resources. In reality, though, taking this package on your
next wild adventure could prove to be a life-saving decision.

First and foremost, it’s a matter of survival. The fact it will boost your comfort is a bonus.

Equipment

If you’ve become lost, trapped, or in an unenviable situation, the right tools are key. A Swiss
Army knife should be kept on your possession at all times. In truth, though, this basic facility
is just one of several items that need to be mastered.

Do you know what is static rope? Are you able to tie various types of knots? Can you use a
compass and navigate yourself without Google Maps? All of those questions are crucial, and
the answers will guide you to the right resources and knowledge.

When combined with the other three points above, your survival hopes will look better than
ever.

 

The post Camping Trips Go Wrong, Could You Survive In The Wild? appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

Father’s Day Camping Trip Essentials

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Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

Father’s Day (17 June), is just around the corner, so why not take your old man on a
weekend camping adventure and enjoy spending some quality time together.

June is the perfect time to go camping, with temperature milder than earlier in the year so
you can have a wonderful time in the great outdoors.

Plan the perfect Father’s Day camping trip with these top tips.

Choosing the right location

Location is everything when it comes to planning the perfect camping trip, so you’d be wise
to do your research first. Some tips for choosing a campsite include looking for flat, dry land,
somewhere that offers shelter and avoiding being too near the water. It’s better to choose a
location you’re familiar with or ask friends and family for recommendations to ensure you
choose somewhere suitable.

Bring the essentials

Camping requires a lot of gear, so if you’re going to do things right, make sure you take all of
the essentials with you. At the very least, you’re going to need a weatherproof tent, sleeping
bags, and pitching supplies, as well as something to eat/cook with. If you’re going
somewhere particularly off the beaten track and a bit wild, then make sure you’ve got some
survival gear packed. Take sturdy walking shoes and plenty of weatherproof clothing to help
you battle any weather or dips in temperature that come your way.

Plan some activities

What will you do on your camping trip? While it’s nice to spend time together, you could both
find yourselves a bit bored after a few hours. Does your father have an interest in hunting or
fishing? That can be a great way to spend the weekend. Activities like hunting will require
some extra equipment, so why not surprise him with binoculars or other gifts as a precursor
to your trip? A good hike is another way to enjoy being outdoors together, and make sure
you take your camera to capture those great views.

Eating and drinking

You’re going to need to eat and drink during your trip, so it’s worth thinking in advance about
what you’re going to need to take with you. If you’re willing to carry a cool box, you can enjoy
a barbecue on your first day as well as some chilled beers, while cans are also good for
taking with you. You’ll be surprised at the different things you can cook on a camping trip, so
take a look and pack some easy-to-cook items. It’s better to take too much food than not
enough, as being hungry will only make you irritable!

Enjoy quality time together

If you live away from home or you don’t get the chance to spend much quality time with your
father, this can be a great way for you to both reconnect. Now will be the perfect opportunity
to get advice on everything from work to relationships as well as to find out more about
what’s going on in your father’s life. It’s easy to forget that our parents don’t always have the
answers, and might need some advice from time to time too. Use the time you have together
to bond and develop some great memories, you’ll be glad you did when camping becomes
more difficult.

Room for a four-legged friend?

Dogs make great companions for camping trips, so why not bring yours along for the ride?
They’ll keep you company and can be good to have around for hunting or fishing, while also
giving them some beneficial outdoor exercise. This is an idea that’s best kept for trained
dogs, so if yours is a bit on the wild side, they might have to sit this one out.

Let people know where you are

Heading out into the wilderness for the weekend is a fun way to spend time together, but you
have to remember to put safety first. Make sure you let people back home know where you
are and check in regularly with them. Cell service can be patchy in the mountains, to say the
least, so take a GPS system with you in case you get lost or there’s an emergency.

Father’s Day is a fantastic day for celebrating your dad and thanking him for everything he’s
done. Now that you’re older, and even maybe a parent yourself, you can appreciate him a lot
more and enjoy doing more together. Plan a great camping trip to trip for your father and
enjoy spending quality time together this Father’s Day.

The post Father’s Day Camping Trip Essentials appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

What To Do When Your Loved Ones Don’t Think You Should Prep

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Guest post from our friends at – Prep Survival Guide

The time has come: you have decided to become prepared for any situation that life may throw at you. You have decided to prep. And our of all the challenges facing you, one of them is greater than any other: your family.

Out of all the challenges we preppers face, none may quite be so close to home as our loved ones. When it comes to the preparedness lifestyle, even a longtime supportive and loving spouse may suddenly be found hostile to your mindset.

Out of all the challenges we preppers face, none may quite be so painful and detrimental to our prepping as our loved ones.

For almost every story of a man or woman who had a life changing event that turned them into prepping, there is a story of a spouse who didn’t understand or refused to accept this new way of life.

I found myself in this situation once.

So the question arises: what do I do when my family doesn’t support my prepping.

The answer is a fairly simple one. Talk to them.

Today I want to tell you how slowly, over time, I fixed the painful situation that I was in by simply having a serious of honest conversations about prepping with my wife and kids.

So this post is neatly divided into two parts.

First, I answer the question “How do I talk to my loved ones about prepping?” literally.

Second, I discuss how we can answer objections that family members may raise.

Let’s get started.

How Do I Talk To My Loved Ones About Prepping?

The moment has arrived.

You have been convinced that you must prepare for hard times.

This means storing food, learning skillsets. It means changing how you behave financially. It means doing whatever it takes to separate yourself from the herd.

Now you have to tell your family. And not only must you tell your family about your (and their) new lifestyle, you must convince them that it is the way to life.

Here is how I did it.

#1: Prepare A Presentation: If you get up there and start winging it, you are doing your family and your beliefs a disservice. Make no mistake: you are preaching a life-giving sermon. If you are wrong, there are few if any downsides but if you are correct, you will be a savior to many lives.

Prepare a presentation. I don’t recommend it, but take notes if you need to. Have facts and figures. Know what you believe is the biggest threat and tell them why you believe so. Your feelings are rarely enough to convince people that they must change their way of living, so be ready with facts.

Plan what you’re going to say and stick to the plan come what may.

#2: Speak To Their Fears: Not everyone is scared of the same things you are. My wife is terrified of a home invader even though I am not (that’s because I’ve got 4 members of the family, we’ve all got guns, and we can all use them. I pity the fool coming in my home uninvited) so in my presentation, I spoke to her fear.

I told her that if life got bad enough, lone wolves and mobs would probably come looting, robbing, raping, and killing in local neighborhoods.

This is not manipulative! It’s the truth. I simply revealed to her a possible consequence of not being prepared.

You owe it to your loved ones to share with them the full impact of what may come to pass if things get bad enough. If they’re afraid of being alone, speak to that! If they’re afraid of financial hardship, speak to that!

Show them, in a way they understand, what may happen if no preparation takes place. Speak to their fears.

#3: Watch Your Tone: Of all these tips, this one is both the most important and the most difficult to get right.

Remember that you are helping the people you are discussing this issue with.

You are not forcing it. You are not forcing them.

You are offering to help them.

If you approach it in any other way, you will receive hostile feedback because people don’t like to be commanded. Not even your spouse, not even your kids, and not even your friends.

If this conversation about prepping is taking place, remember: you are asking them to prepare for disaster with you. You are willing to do it alone because you think it is right, but you want to do it by their side and with their support.

Be gentle. Be loving. Be kind.

Let your tone reflect these things.

How To Deal With Objections

You gave the presentation like a master orator and were met with silence. Blank stares. Grimaces.

They looked at their feet a lot.

And then one lone voice raised an objection, soon echoed by another. Before you know what to do, those you love have revolted against your measly presentation and your desired preparation.

Your loved ones do not like the idea of you prepping. Here’s what to do.

Listen: You have done your talking. So shut up, sit down, and let them speak.

They will never trust you with their lives if they cannot trust you in a conversation.

Take a moment and read that last sentence again.

Your loved ones probably love you back. And that means that they trust you to listen to their words. So do it.

The listening phase has two goals.

  • Gather information
  • Use their information as fuel for the next phase

When they discuss why you shouldn’t prep, listen to them. Hear them out. They will probably have valid reasons. Maybe they think your fear is unfounded. Maybe they will say that they don’t want to change what is working financially.

Maybe they just think you’re crazy.

But hear them out, learn their objections, and then…

Speak To Their Fear Again: If they bring up objections, then you didn’t speak to their fears enough the first time. Do it again after listening. They will probably bring up points that you didn’t expect or weren’t prepared for.

That is okay.

If you have to, tell them that you don’t know how to respond to their objection. Look up some facts and get back to them. There is no shame in not having all of the information on command.

Do remember two things: first, you are not speaking to your fear. You are speaking to theirs. Second, use facts and figures. Your emotion is probably not enough to win the day.

Hear their objections, speak to their objections.

Be Ready For Feedback: When dealing with their objections, be ready for some stinging remarks. Someone, whether they mean to or not, will undoubtedly say something that hurts your feelings and feels like they are attacking your character.

It’s just the name of the game.

Be ready for your loved ones to say hurtful things. Be ready to be hurt by their lack of support. It isn’t that they don’t love you or don’t support you. It is that they think this is a fad at best and ridiculous at worst.

Be prepared for them to say hurtful things. You owe it to them, to yourself, and to your beliefs to not give up.

Be Gentle: Remember that you aren’t commanding them. You are asking their permission to prep with them. Show your love for them by listening to them, by not interrupting, and by taking on an air of humility.

You don’t know everything, you don’t have all the answers, and you can’t make all the problems go away.

They will appreciate you in the long run if you don’t act like you can do any of those things.

What Do I Do If They Still Don’t Support Me? Be Patient: Rome wasn’t built in a day. If you walk away from the conversation and they still aren’t on the same wavelength, that’s okay.

You did your best. Nothing more can be expected of you. Be patient.

At this point, it’s best to begin to show instead of tell.

Here’s an example I found true one time:

My family wasn’t unsupportive, but they definitely weren’t really feeling the preparedness thing. They were kindly skeptical about it.

One time on a road trip, we had been on the road for hours and I insisted that we were not stopping until we got to our destination. Pee in bottles, starve, I don’t care. We’re making it.

After a few hours, my family was pretty hungry but we were so close (kinda) and I didn’t want to stop. Then my oldest boy remembered something.

“Hey Dad, don’t you keep food around here somewhere?”

I told him where to find my bug out bag that I keep in my car. It’s stashed with granola, some canned foods, and other items that are useful in bugging out. You know the kind.

After my two boys, wife, and I had all gotten something, my wife put her hand on my leg, turned towards me, and said “Well, I guess being prepared does come in handy.”

No one ever gave me another moment of grief about prepping.

 

The post What To Do When Your Loved Ones Don’t Think You Should Prep appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

72 Hour Emergency Kit: The Essentials To Pack

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By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

All homes need to be equipped with an emergency bag. We never know when we might
need one or when we might need to leave our homes quickly, so it is important to be
prepared and ready for anything. Getting an emergency kit together can be pretty
straightforward, you just need to know what to pack and the best places to get the items. The
good news is that they are pretty inexpensive and easy to find. So there really are no
excuses for not getting your kit together.

Three days, or 72 hours is usually the best time-frame to aim for. So here are a few of items
that you might need, if you’re not sure where to start.

Water

It makes complete sense to have water in the kit. It is what you will need to survive, so as
much as you can fit in. Not only can you drink it, but you can use it to clean yourselves with,
as well as cleaning things like food or cuts. The goal is to aim to pack a gallon of water per
day, per person.

number sign red color metal box street sign signage brand sheet font emergency tin can traffic sign first aid vehicle registration plate metal cans medicine chest

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First Aid Kit

A first aid kit is really important when it comes to an emergency kit. You might not know
where you’ll end up, especially if there is something like a natural disaster. So it makes
sense to have some supplies to help you care for yourself and for others, until you can get
medical attention, if needed.
Flashlight and Batteries
Being able to see in the dark is important for an emergency kit. Candles and matches can be
a good idea, but generally, for safety, a flashlight is going to be a better option. If you can’t
find a flashlight that is powered by winding it up, then make sure that you have plenty of
batteries spare in your emergency kit too.

Clothing

Often you’ll only have time to leave in the clothes that you are in. So having a few pieces
stored away in the emergency kit will help, especially if you’re wet and have only left your
house because of a flood, for example. Having some practical and sturdy clothing, much like
the things that froutlet.com sells, can be a good idea. You don’t know how long you’ll be
away from home, so you’ll want clothing that is practical, warm, and comfortable.

Food

While you can go longer without food than you can do without water, to be as comfortable as
you can, some food packed away is a must. Think about some foods that are
non-perishable, and will actually be something that you and your family will eat. Plan for a
few days, and try to get things that won’t need too much preparation or could be eaten cold
(things like tins of beans could work well, for example. Plenty of protein and fiber in them).
This is just a start of the list that you would need. But having a few items packed and ready
to grab is going to be better than nothing.

Original content from: The Survival Place Blog

The post 72 Hour Emergency Kit: The Essentials To Pack appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

72 Hour Emergency Kit: The Essentials To Pack

Can, Kitchen, Product, Wooden, Canned, Container, Metal

Pixabay.com

By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

All homes need to be equipped with an emergency bag. We never know when we might
need one or when we might need to leave our homes quickly, so it is important to be
prepared and ready for anything. Getting an emergency kit together can be pretty
straightforward, you just need to know what to pack and the best places to get the items. The
good news is that they are pretty inexpensive and easy to find. So there really are no
excuses for not getting your kit together.

Three days, or 72 hours is usually the best time-frame to aim for. So here are a few of items
that you might need, if you’re not sure where to start.

Water

It makes complete sense to have water in the kit. It is what you will need to survive, so as
much as you can fit in. Not only can you drink it, but you can use it to clean yourselves with,
as well as cleaning things like food or cuts. The goal is to aim to pack a gallon of water per
day, per person.

number sign red color metal box street sign signage brand sheet font emergency tin can traffic sign first aid vehicle registration plate metal cans medicine chest

pxhere.com

First Aid Kit

A first aid kit is really important when it comes to an emergency kit. You might not know
where you’ll end up, especially if there is something like a natural disaster. So it makes
sense to have some supplies to help you care for yourself and for others, until you can get
medical attention, if needed.
Flashlight and Batteries
Being able to see in the dark is important for an emergency kit. Candles and matches can be
a good idea, but generally, for safety, a flashlight is going to be a better option. If you can’t
find a flashlight that is powered by winding it up, then make sure that you have plenty of
batteries spare in your emergency kit too.

Clothing

Often you’ll only have time to leave in the clothes that you are in. So having a few pieces
stored away in the emergency kit will help, especially if you’re wet and have only left your
house because of a flood, for example. Having some practical and sturdy clothing, much like
the things that froutlet.com sells, can be a good idea. You don’t know how long you’ll be
away from home, so you’ll want clothing that is practical, warm, and comfortable.

Food

While you can go longer without food than you can do without water, to be as comfortable as
you can, some food packed away is a must. Think about some foods that are
non-perishable, and will actually be something that you and your family will eat. Plan for a
few days, and try to get things that won’t need too much preparation or could be eaten cold
(things like tins of beans could work well, for example. Plenty of protein and fiber in them).
This is just a start of the list that you would need. But having a few items packed and ready
to grab is going to be better than nothing.

Original content from: The Survival Place Blog

The post 72 Hour Emergency Kit: The Essentials To Pack appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

What To Do With $1000 Right Now

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By Rourke – Modern Survival Online

A little while back I read a post over at IfItHitstheFan.com concerning a recommendation on where to spend $900 on survival & preparedness preps.

I love thinking about stuff like this. It is sorta like “What would I do if I won the lottery?”

Back to reality.

There are many people across this great country that are just now seeing the light and beginning there preps. For many of these newcomers the question of where to begin is ever present. Some people are taking things serious and are willing to sink some serious change into their preparations – so I figured I would throw my 2 cents in.

For someone relatively new to the prepping scene and having no purposely stocked supplies – a $1000 can go a long way.

Here are my recommendations:

  • Food ($350) – this has to be the priority.
    • Purchase in quantity what you normally eat. A good idea would be to sit down with a notepad and pen and meal plan for 2 weeks.
    • Remember that there may be no electricity so all food items in the meal plan have to come from the pantry.
    • Next – take that 2 week meal plan and make a list of all items and use that as your shopping list. If you are able to buy 2 of everything listed – that would be a one month supply.
    • Take into consideration any supplies such as cooking oil that you may need to complete the meal. Don’t forget about spices and other condiments.
    • Lastly – do consider shelf life (often on the package) as well as buying store brands and buying on sale to maximize your available funds.

Continue reading at Modern Survival Online: What To Do With $1000 Right Now

The post What To Do With $1000 Right Now appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

How To Kickstart Your Training When You’ve Gone Off Track

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Photo by Wesley Quinnon on Unsplash

By Staff writer – The Survival Place Blog

Training your body is hard work and it takes a lot of dedication, patience, blood, sweat and tears
to be successful. It’s all too easy to turn down the idea of working out or to pick up that packet of
biscuits, because the body will always favour the most comfortable option that you have in mind.
However, it’s important to keep yourself fit and healthy so that you can continue with your
training. It’s true when they say that only the fittest survive, so if you’ve gone off track a little with
your training, here’s a few tips on how to kickstart yourself again and get back where you want
to be!

Pack with protein

The whole idea of training is to bulk out and become the fittest, and in this case protein is your
best friend. Make meal plans and premake your food so that when it comes to meal time you
can cook it without being tempted to go for an easier option. Food that’s packed with protein will
help you build up the muscles that you want and also help your endurance levels too. Here are
some great ideas for meal plans that are packed with protein. Take a look and see if there’s
anything you could be doing differently.

Work out military style

It’s no secret that people in the military are among the fittest people in the world. The training
that they have to go through is intense and regular too. There is an exercise plan called Goruck
that can give you the secrets into training like the military, so why not take a look and take
advantage of these Goruck military discount codes that SGPT have to offer for their readers. It
will give you the chance to train like the professionals and also achieve your target so much
faster.

Challenge yourself to push even further

Normally in an exercise plan you give yourself a target to reach and have set days in which you
do this. Instead of making certain days where you’re training, why not force yourself to do it
more often so that you can reap the results even faster? Getting into the right mindset about
training is important too, so why not take advantage of social media groups that are made to
give people tips and tricks about how to stay on plan. You never know, you might make a friend
that will stay with you!

Do it with a buddy

Talking of friends, training is so much easier to endure if you’re doing it with someone face to
face. This works well because you can spur each other on and also pick eachother up when
either of you feels like quitting. Plus, it’s a great way to fit in time with friends at the same time
as training!

Try these four ideas to help kick start your training. Remember that results take hard work and
dedication, and that you can do this!

Originally published at The Survival Place Blog: How To Kickstart Your Training When You’ve Gone Off Track

The post How To Kickstart Your Training When You’ve Gone Off Track appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

4 Dangerous Wildfire Myths You Shouldn’t Ignore

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By Bill Heid – Off The Grid News

The lives and property of many Americas are in grave peril from new threats of historic fire danger this summer. In fact, drought is turning large areas of the country into a tinderbox.

The historic fire danger led to blazes that consumed more than 120,000 acres and forced hundreds of people to evacuate in Northwestern Oklahoma on Friday, April 13, CBS News reported.

Colorado might see one of the worst fire seasons on record this summer because of low snowpack the U.S. Forest Service warned. Low snowpack leads to dry conditions that create lots of fuel for fires.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: 4 Dangerous Wildfire Myths You Shouldn’t Ignore

The post 4 Dangerous Wildfire Myths You Shouldn’t Ignore appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

Finding Your Own Food As A Vital Survival Skill

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By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

If you ever stop to think about how prepared you are for a sudden survival situation, do you feel
a little worried? There are so many things that we could all be doing to try and prepare better for
those situations – and the more likely they become, the more important this is. There is plenty of
debate surrounding what is and is not essential as a survival skill, but one that nobody can
argue with is having the ability to find food – for yourself, for your family, or anyone you care for.
In this article, we are going to look at some of the major things you can do now to improve your
ability to find food, no matter what the situation brings.

Foraging

Despite what else might or might not happen, foraging is always going to be a hugely important
skill to have. Even if you find yourself without tools and stuck in the middle of nowhere, being
able to forage at least a little could mean the difference between life and death. What’s more,
foraging successfully might not even be as hard as you might think. In general, it can easily be
done just by following some basic rules of thumb. Let’s have a look at some of those now, to
give you a better idea of how to forage properly.

First of all, it is important to make sure that you never just jump right into eating something that
you have not absolutely, one hundred percent positively identified. This could lead to poison,
possibly death. Instead, you should carry out a series of checks to ensure that whatever you
have found is safe to eat. First rub a small part of it on the skin somewhere, ideally the back of
the hand. Then wait a few hours and see if it causes any problems such as itching or swelling. If
it does not, try rubbing a small part against the lips and again waiting to see if anything happens.
If you are still fine, you can try eating a small part and waiting a day to see if it does anything.
This, however, is all a last resort attempt – in general ou sound only eat something when you
know what it is. If in doubt, leave it out.

That being said, most habitats are full of vegetation which you can readily eat, so long as you
know how to identify it. This kind of information varies hugely depending on where you might
end up, but there are certain things which you can almost always find to eat in the wild. It is
worth researching this stuff early on, and possibly treating yourself to a good handbook or two
as well. You should also be sure to pick your food from the right locations – in other words, not a
polluted stream or a nuclear landfill. Learn the seasonal changes and what you should and
should not eat. If you are clever about it, one day you could use your foraging skills to literally
keep your family alive – so it is worth learning the essentials now while you can.

Fishing boats berthed in the marina of Old Town of Nessebar, Bulgaria

Image Source: Kaboompics.com

Fishing

Hopefully, if anything happens you will still be able to find the opportunity to go fishing, as this
can be a great way to get food in when you are trying to survive in the wild. If you were to only
forage, it would be hard to get all the nutrients and minerals you need. But if you can
successfully catch fish too, then you will be able to get your protein and irons as well.
Fortunately, it is relatively easy to learn how to fish, and you don’t even need much to do it. In
most cases, you could cast a crude rod out in the wild – but if you have the chance, it will
definitely be preferable to try and get together a fishing kit now which you can try to hold on to in
the future if possible. Let’s take a look at some of the things that you might want to aim to have
in such a fishing kit.

For a start, you will obviously want some kind of a rod or spear in order to be able to catch fish.
But you might also want to take this opportunity to treat yourself to some more high-tech fishing
equipment, to make it as easy as possible for yourself in the future. It might be worth looking at
some HawkEye Boating & Fishing Electronics to see if you could benefit from fish finding
technology, for instance, as it is always a good idea to try and make things as easy for yourself
as possible. With the ability to fish, you will be able to find food much more easily in a survival
situation, and that will mean that you won’t have to worry quite so much about surviving.

Image Source: Pexels.com

Hunting

As well as fishing, there might be times when you actually need to hunt land animals too. There
is of course plenty of debate about whether human beings actually need to eat meat at all. But if
you are in a survival situation you will probably find that being able to find meat will provide you
with plenty of sustenance in a short space of time, and as such it can be particularly good to be
able to hunt for meat when necessary. If you are not sure where to get started on this, the first
thing to bear in mind is that when it comes to it, you will instinctively find that you are able to do
it – as long as you are hungry enough, of course. But it is a good idea to make sure that you are
prepared in some way for what hunting entails. You should spend some time practising with
basic tools in places where it is safe to do so, and prepare yourself mentally if possible as well.
As long as you know how to hunt, you will always be able to find food when you really need to.

Original content from The Survival Place Blog: Finding Your Own Food As A Vital Survival Skill

The post Finding Your Own Food As A Vital Survival Skill appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

How I’m Going To Build A Simple Tall Raised Garden Bed

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Tall raised garden bed

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

First of all, why would one build a raised garden bed at all?

The most likely answer is for the sake of bending over and your back.

Other reasons include the comparative ease to amend and control the garden soil, and the potential to construct / attach a sort of green house cover in order to start the growing season earlier in the Spring.

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: How I’m Going To Build A Simple Tall Raised Garden Bed

The post How I’m Going To Build A Simple Tall Raised Garden Bed appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

Winter Survival: How to Navigate in the Snow

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By Jeremiah Johnson – Ready Nutrition

[Editor’s Note: As winter rages on, it brings to mind the importance of knowing how to navigate in snow and extreme winter weather. The worst-case scenario in this winter emergency is not knowing the terrain and getting so lost you succumb succumbing to exposure and possibly starvation because you don’t have the equipment necessary for survival. Author, Jeremiah Johnson has outlined the essentials on how to navigate in the snow and what equipment you will need to protect yourself from exposure.]

ReadyNutrition Readers, I have written several articles in the past on land navigation fundamentals and the importance of those basics.  Most of those basics still hold true in the “Winter Wonderland” of the snow and ice: those basics merely need to be modified for the changes of the season.  Once again, as with all things I recommend to you to practice these techniques and familiarize yourself with them prior to something coming up…a significant event where you must do it.  Practice does make perfect, and repetition promotes a good follow-through.

That being said, how hard is it to navigate during the winter?  Well, it is tougher in several perspectives.  First, with snow blanketing the landscape, the appearance of the terrain is changed.  Secondly, the landscape is also physically altered: it is a different thing to walk across six inches to several feet of snow.  Right now, where I live, I have almost three feet of snow on the ground.  The winter weather conditions are another item: it’s a far cry from a summer stroll when you walk into a cold wind that is throwing sleet right into your face in the middle of February.

Know Your Terrain

First, let’s address the appearance of the terrain.  This holds true, especially in wilderness or rural areas.  You can’t always discern natural landmarks, such as a creek or stream that may very well be on your map.  It may be frozen and covered over with snow.  The same for a lake or pond.  One of your keys to success in this area is to thoroughly know the area you will be in prior to these winter conditions existing.  Another is to pick out landmarks that do not change with the weather and that are clearly visible.  A mountain or high hilltop would be a good example, or a river that does not freeze over, or one with a bridge marked on the map that traverses it.

Know Your Pace-Count

You can find your position by relating it to a known and recognizable point.  Next, let’s address the physical alteration of the terrain.  I have recommended that you purchase snowshoes for yourself in the past.  Remember some of the land nav. articles I wrote before?  I told you to measure a 100-meter pace-count by marking your starting point and your finish point with a couple of “flags” or pieces of colored, coated, copper wire.  If you did that (and elevated it above the ground) on a couple of trees…you can use it in the wintertime.

Now you’ll need to find out two things: your pace count with snowshoes on, and the same while wearing a backpack or rucksack.  There’s also a “backup” to help you, and that is to estimate that distance by sight and correlate both your estimated distance and your pace count.  As you’re traversing the wilderness, it would be wise to have a good walking stickwith you…something about as long as your height.  This will help you to test the ground for “soft” spots and help to steady you as you make your way across the snow and ice.

Winter conditions are also a lot of fun – Not! The sun isn’t shining, the wind isn’t calm, and a cup of hot chocolate is not in your free hand when your car breaks down in the middle of the winter.  Usually, it is horrible, to add to the physical and situational stress.  Once again, I exhort you to pick up a good pair of goggles that do not fog up, and appropriate shielding for the face…because the sun won’t be shining, the wind will be in your face, and that mirage of the “Swiss Miss” holding out a hot chocolate for you thirty meters to your front, sitting on the boulder?  That’s a mountain lion.

Make sure you’re dressed in all-weather to combat the weather.  I recommend Gore-Tex from head to toe.  A GPS compass will help, but here it is important to rely on the basics, because batteries do die, electronics can be fouled up by extremes in weather and temperature, and it’s always best to rely on the “primitive” and skills, rather than just try to “game” it with your Android compass app, or some other “toy” that can play a dirge for you if you depend on it and it fails.

Practice stepping out with those snowshoes and learning your pace count with them to traverse the drifts.  It is also a physical challenge regarding water and other supplies, such as food and first aid equipment.  Remember: your other challenges and obstacles do not cease just because you are in the process of finding your way across a valley in the wintertime.  Practicing good techniques with your map, your compass, a proper pace count, and terrain association (matching what you see on the ground with your maps and charts) are the keys to winning in the wintertime, along with perseverance.  A good cup of coffee also helps!  Happy trails!  JJ out!

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: Winter Survival: How to Navigate in the Snow
About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

 

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