Portable Solar Generator!

Click here to view the original post.

Portable Solar Generator Ray Becker “The Ray Becker Show” Audio player provided! On this episode of The Ray Becker Show we begin with economic news for the week and look at the Markets and other economic indicators. We discuss in detail, Portable Solar Generators. We also cover the basics of electrical PIE. Think about the … Continue reading Portable Solar Generator!

The post Portable Solar Generator! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Gardening for Preppers and Survivalist

Click here to view the original post.

Gardening for Preppers and Survivalist Forrest & Kyle “The Prepping Academy” Audio in player below! The “The Prepping Academy” and talking all things gardening. There’s not a single good reason anyone could give for not building a seed bank. In the eventuality of a grid down scenario, or even unemployment, a seed bank could be life saving. … Continue reading Gardening for Preppers and Survivalist

The post Gardening for Preppers and Survivalist appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Winter Clothing Guide: How to Dress Warm – For Cold Weather

Click here to view the original post.

WCK-cover-a

Well, I don’t know about you, but I hate freezing my butt off when it’s cold outside! Now add a worst-case scenario, and you could DIE out there, so it’s important to know how to dress for extended exposure to the frigid cold. Fortunately, it isn’t as hard as it might seem… especially with the addition of new clothing technology and a common sense approach.

Here’s How It Works..

Your body is a furnace that continuously generates surplus heat (when it is working properly), so all we need to do is use scaleable layers of the right clothing to PRESERVE the heat your body creates and maintain a comfortable micro-climate between your skin and outer layers of clothing- adding layers when you get cold and removing layers when you get too warm.

Layer #1: Sub Base Layer

Winter Clothing Kit

Sub-Base Layer Moves Moisture Away from Your Body

I’ve found that a snug pair of briefs and a long sleeve or sleeveless top made of nylon or polyester that is breathable, dries quick and pulls sweat away from your body works great. Short sleeve shirts tend to bunch up and be uncomfortable under thermals.

Under Armour and Exofficio brands are durable and have worked well for me and are great for year-round use, travel and bug-out bags because they wash out easily and dry quickly and can be reused without laundering.

Both brands make great sub-base layer products for the ladies,too.
Under Armour – Boxer Brief:
http://tinyurl.com/Boxer-Brief-WCK

Under Armour – Sleeveless Shirt:
http://tinyurl.com/UA-Shirt-WCK

Exofficio Briefs:
http://tinyurl.com/Exofficio-Brief-WCK

Winter Clothing Kit

Cotton Retains Moisture that Can Dangerously Lower Your Core Temperature

Cotton Clothing Warning

Cotton clothing is terrible for active extended exposure to the cold. Why? Because when you sweat or get wet from snow or rain, cotton absorbs moisture, loses its insulating properties and draws heat from your body instead of retaining it.

That’s bad news…
AND a sure fire recipe for hypothermia!

 Merino Wool is Best - It's NOT Scratchy and Keeps You Warm - Even When Wet

Merino Wool is Best – It’s NOT Scratchy and Keeps You Warm – Even When Wet

NEXT Up… We Need Socks… Wool Socks

AND not just any wool socks… I prefer Merino Wool Socks.

Merino wool is warm and softer than other wools so it’s NOT scratchy…. I hate scratchy wool!

Plus Merino wool is tough, wicks moisture, is breathable and naturally elastic, so my socks stay up in my boots.

 

Layer #2: Base Layer

We used to call these Long Johns or Thermals… NOT anymore.

Long sleeve top and bottoms made out of breathable yet insulating polyester like my PolarMax Base Layer are lightweight, roomy, warm and comfortable down to almost zero degrees Fahrenheit. But for extreme cold, I pull out my military issue polypropylene thermal top and bottoms.

Winter Clothing Kit

Your Base Layer is Essential to the Whole Equation of Staying Warm on the Coldest Days

Extreme Cold Base – Top:
http://tinyurl.com/Extreme-Base-Top-WCK

Extreme Cold Base – Bottom:
http://tinyurl.com/E-Base-Bottom-WCK

PolarMax – Double Base – Top:
http://tinyurl.com/PolarMax-Top-WCK

PolarMax – Double Base – Bottom:
http://tinyurl.com/PolarMax-Bottom-WCK

Heavyweight Merino Wool Base Layer:
http://tinyurl.com/Extreme-Base-CWC

Now We Need Some Pants…

Winter Clothing Kit

Wool or a 60%+ Polyester Blend Works Great – But I Prefer Wool

Durable, water and wind repelling pants made of wool or at least 60% polyester work great.

5.11 or Proper Tactical pants work really well over your base layer… but for extreme cold it’s hard to beat my military surplus winter wool trousers. Oh yeah!!!

And don’t forget your belt and multi-tool.

60% + Poly – Tactical Pants:
http://tinyurl.com/Tactical-Pants-WCK

Surplus Wool Pants:
http://tinyurl.com/Wool-Pants-WCV

Fleece Lined Pants:
http://tinyurl.com/Fleece-Lined-Pants

Paracord Belt:
http://tinyurl.com/Paracord-Belt-WCK

Multi-Tool:
http://tinyurl.com/Multi-Tool-WCK

Winter Clothing Kit

Layer #3: Core Layer

For tops, I layer two 100% poly fleece pullover shirts… a thinner one closer to my body and then a thicker one on top. And tops with 1/4 zippers on the front are helpful for regulating heat.

Fleece Pullover – Light:
http://tinyurl.com/Fleece-Shirt-WCK

Fleece Pullover – Heavy:
http://tinyurl.com/Fleece-Pullover-WCK

Keep ‘Em Loose
Make sure your core layers are NOT too tight because what really keeps you warm is having pockets of warm air between each clothing layer.

Layer #4: The Outer Shell

Winter Clothing Kit

A tough, insulated, water and wind repelling jacket is what you need.

For moderately cold temperatures, my tactical softshell jacket with hood works great and is very durable.

BUT when the temperature goes south of freezing I’m wearing a jacket with an outer shell that is highly water resistant and totally blocks the wind. Your coat must be well insulated to keep your core heat in and I think a hood is essential.

For extreme cold… nothing beats a down parka.

Tactical Jacket:
http://tinyurl.com/Tactical-Jacket-WCK

Free Country Insulated Jacket:
http://tinyurl.com/WP-Jacket-WCK

Extreme Cold Weather Clothing System – Coat
http://tinyurl.com/Mil-Tec-ECWCS-Jacket

Down Parka:
http://tinyurl.com/Parka-WCK

How About Ski Pants?
Although ski or 100% polyester pants may seem like a good idea, they can be pricey and also run the risk of melting when they come in contact with a spark or flame.

Winter Clothing KitBONUS Tip – How to Become Waterproof
To add a tough, scaleable, wind and waterproof outer shell for extreme weather protection… I recommend the Helly Hansen Impertech Jacket and Pants… just make sure you size them large enough to fit over all your winter clothing.

Helly Hansen Impertech – Rain Jacket:
http://tinyurl.com/HH-Jacket-WCK

Helly Hansen Impertech – Rain Pants:
http://tinyurl.com/HH-Pants-WCK

Boots
To keep your feet happy, I recommend comfortable, rugged, insulated, waterproof boots, that are not super bulky.

Winter Clothing KitThey need to keep your feet warm and dry and be able to stand up to hard extended wear if needed.

My current favorite all purpose winter boots are my Rocky Men’s Core Hunting Boots with 800 grams of Thinsulate… They are tough, warm, waterproof and SUPER comfortable to wear all day… but there’s a lot of choices out there… so you’ll have to try some boots on and find what works best for you.

NOW for your Feet Neck, Head and Hands…

Neckwear
Now around my neck I usually wear a polyester BUFF headwear scarf as a base layer to wick moisture and add a layer of cold resistance… Winter Clothing KitAnd then as an outer layer I add either a polyester neck warmer – like my vintage turtle fur… or a Shemagh Scarf Wrap.

Both are good options… but the Shemagh is my favorite due to the many ways it can be wrapped and used for neck, face and head protection… the downside is that the Shemagh is made of cotton… so it will be useless if it gets soaked.

BUFF Neck Wool Base Layer:
http://tinyurl.com/Buff-Neck-Base

Shemagh Scarf:
http://tinyurl.com/Shemagh-WCK

Neck Fleece:
http://tinyurl.com/Neck-Fleece

Winter Clothing Kit

Goofy Looking and Ridiculously Warm, this Natural Sheep Skin “Bomber” Hat is What Rides on My Head on the Coldest of Days. Nothing Else Even Comes Close

Headwear
Next… You gotta… Cover your head…

As a base layer for keeping the old NOGGIN’ warm, I recommend a simple fleece watch cap in addition to your insulated coat hood. Together they will offer scaleable protection from the cold and wind.

But for extreme cold… nothing beats my sheepskin bomber style hat.

Fleece – Cap:
http://tinyurl.com/Watch-Cap-WCK

Bomber / Trapper Hat
http://tinyurl.com/Bomber-Trapper-Hat

Winter Clothing KitGloves
Last, but not least, we need some tough and warm, water-resistant gloves. For maximum warmth, I can’t find anything better than a durable pair of insulated mittens, but for a versatile, glove made to work AND keep your hands warm, the Carharts Insulated Work Gloves are worth a look. I’ve been really pleased with them so far.

Carhartt Cold Snap Gloves:
http://tinyurl.com/Carhartt-Gloves

Leather Mittens:
http://tinyurl.com/Mittens-WCK

Winter Clothing Kit

Sun Glasses


One last final touch are sunglasses to protect your eyes from light reflecting off the snow and from bitter winds. I prefer tactical shooting glasses that provide maximum coverage.

So, there you have it… a simple, scaleable system that can keep you warm if you ever have to survival in the cold. Be Prepared and Stay Safe! ~David

Share

HERE’s a Bonus List of Arctic and EXTREME Cold Clothing Upgrades to ADD to Your Standard Cold Weather Clothing Kit:
http://tinyurl.com/Extreme-Base-Top-WCK

Extreme Cold Base – Bottom:
http://tinyurl.com/E-Base-Bottom-WCK

Bomber / Trapper Hat
http://tinyurl.com/Bomber-Trapper-Hat

Heavyweight Merino Wool Base Layer:
http://tinyurl.com/Extreme-Base-CWC

Muckluck Boots – Military Surplus (Don’t forget the liners):
http://tinyurl.com/Muckluck-Boots-WSC

Baffin Arctic Boots:
http://tinyurl.com/Baffin-Arctic-Boots

Balaclava – Extreme Face and Head Protection:
http://tinyurl.com/Extreme-Face-Prote…

Arctic Mittens:
http://tinyurl.com/Arctic-Mittens

Arctic Expedition Parka:
http://tinyurl.com/Expedition-Parka

Extreme Cold Weather Clothing System – Coat
http://tinyurl.com/Mil-Tec-ECWCS-Jacket

Arctic Expedition Pants
http://tinyurl.com/Expedition-Pants

Anti-Fog Snow Goggles:
http://tinyurl.com/Anti-Fog-Goggles

PREPPER BASICS Should I stay or should I go?

Click here to view the original post.

PREPPER BASICS: Should I stay or should I go? Bobby Akart “Prepping For Tomorrow” Audio in player below! On this week’s episode of the Prepping for Tomorrow program, Author Bobby Akart will continue his month long discussion of prepper basics. The Prepper’s Conundrum is Bug In or Bug Out—Should I stay or should I go? … Continue reading PREPPER BASICS Should I stay or should I go?

The post PREPPER BASICS Should I stay or should I go? appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Minimalist Prepping!

Click here to view the original post.

Minimalist Prepping! Tom Martin “Galt$trike” This show in player below! On the following episode of Galt Strike I have Bob Hawkins again to discuss minimalist prepping. Do we really need so much stuff? How about prepping with much less? I always get asked what is the best thing to invest in prepping. My answer is always skills. … Continue reading Minimalist Prepping!

The post Minimalist Prepping! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

How to “Eat Like a King” in the Wilderness – And NOT Die

Click here to view the original post.

UST-Wild Edibles-berries

Wild plants are a great, free source of nutrition and energy while camping, hiking, or “surviving” in the wilderness. But eat the wrong plant and you could be sick as a dog or worse – die.  However, abide by these 5 Rules of Wild Edibles and you’ll eat like a King (or Queen) and live…

Rule #1:
NEVER eat anything that you are not 100% certain what it is, what parts are edible and when you can eat it.
Some plants have only certain parts that are edible.  Some parts of plants are only edible at certain stages of growth.
Many edible plants have poisonous look-a-likes, so be 100% sure before you eat something. If in doubt, leave it out.

Rule #2:
If you haven’t eaten it before a survival situation – don’t eat it.
Remember, you must be able to positively ID a plant – smelling, touching and tasting helps you remember correctly.
This also makes sure you don’t have a negative reaction when your life may be on the line.

Mints are easily identifiable by their square stems, heavily scented leaves and characteristic flowerheads.

Mints are easily identifiable by their square stems, heavily scented leaves and characteristic flowerheads.

Rule #3:
Focus on learning and using wild edibles that are:
*Most plentiful, common and readily available
*Safest to eat
*Easiest to identify

wild strawberries

Wild strawberries are easy to identify because they are just smaller replicas of the larger variety.

Rule #4:
Never eat plants that may have been treated or sprayed with chemicals –
an issue mostly in urban environments.

Rule #5:
Get a good field guide for a reference (and carry it with you as you learn):
A Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants – Lee Allen Peterson
Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods from Dirt to Plate – John Kallas
Edible Wild Plants (Pocket Naturalist Guide)

Share

Wild Edibles: 5 Rules For Safely Selecting Wild Plants To Eat

Click here to view the original post.

UST-Wild Edibles-berriesWild plants are a great, free source of nutrition and energy while camping, hiking, or “surviving” in the wilderness. But eat the wrong plant and you could be sick as a dog or worse – die.  However, abide by these 5 Rules of Wild Edibles and you’ll eat like a King (or Queen) and live…

Rule #1:
NEVER eat anything that you are not 100% certain what it is, what parts are edible and when you can eat it.
Some plants have only certain parts that are edible.  Some parts of plants are only edible at certain stages of growth.
Many edible plants have poisonous look-a-likes, so be 100% sure before you eat something. If in doubt, leave it out.

Rule #2:
If you haven’t eaten it before a survival situation – don’t eat it.
Remember, you must be able to positively ID a plant – smelling, touching and tasting helps you remember correctly.
This also makes sure you don’t have a negative reaction when your life may be on the line.

Mints are easily identifiable by their square stems, heavily scented leaves and characteristic flowerheads.

Mints are easily identifiable by their square stems, heavily scented leaves and characteristic flowerheads.

Rule #3:
Focus on learning and using wild edibles that are:
*Most plentiful, common and readily available
*Safest to eat
*Easiest to identify

wild strawberries

Wild strawberries are easy to identify because they are just smaller replicas of the larger variety.

Rule #4:
Never eat plants that may have been treated or sprayed with chemicals –
an issue mostly in urban environments.

DSC03457edit2

Rule #5:
Get a good field guide for a reference (and carry it with you as you learn):
A Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants – Lee Allen Peterson
Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods from Dirt to Plate – John Kallas
Edible Wild Plants (Pocket Naturalist Guide)

Share

Herbal Formulas, The Basics!

Click here to view the original post.

The Basics of Making Herbal Formulas
Host: Cat Ellis “The Herbal Prepper Live

Herbal Formulas, The BasicsHerbal formulas are a severely underutilized resource by preppers. Plant-based remedies provide an easy, affordable, and renewable alternative for post-collapse medicines. Herbs, mushrooms, trees, and other natural items, like honey, provide a wealth of traditional remedies that you can make and grow at home with minimal and easy-to-obtain equipment.

Basics 20140227_162514Herbs also have a sort of stealth function built into them that many preppers can appreciate. You can stock up on lots of your own, custom-tailored herbal preparations and formulas without drawing the same kind of attention and compromising questions you might garner if you tried to stock up on pharmaceuticals. And, due to the fact that the average person is largely clueless when it comes to plant identification outside of a tomato and a cucumber, your Survival Herb Garden will not draw the kind of attention as, for example, your vegetable garden. Most will think your herbs are either a pile of weeds or that your medicinal flowers are purely ornamental.

Basics Anrica Infused Oil in CrockpotWMWhile the practice of working with herbs, known as herbalism, and the study of herbs, known as Herbalogy, might seem strange and esoteric to those unfamiliar with it, or perhaps associated with exotic, far away places and not really something that modern, western culture “does”, Western Herbalism is a viable and effective tradition of utilizing herbs to address both loss of health and encouraging health.

Herbalism is both an art and a skill, and both are easy to learn. Most people when first learning how to use herbs, are surprised at how simple much of it is. This episode will cover the basic methods of preparing herbal formulas, such as:
Basics Rose-Infused HoneyInfusions
Decoctions
Tinctures
Glycerites
Herbal Vinegars
Herbal Honeys
Elixirs
Syrups
Salves, lotions, and creams
Poultices
Powders

Many of these have very long shelf lives of at least one year, and some much longer. You can literally put years of remedies for a multitude of complaints away in a dark, cool spot, and they will still be as good in ten years as they were the day you made them. Be sure to tune in and listen to how easy it is to make your own herbal remedies. They are a prepper’s health’s best friend.
Herbal Prepper Live Website: http://www.herbalprepper.com/
Join us for Herbal Prepper Live “LIVE SHOW” every Sunday 9:00/Et 8:00Ct 6:00/Pt Go To Listen and Chat

Listen to this broadcast or download “Herbal Formulas, The Basics” in player below!

Get the 24/7 app for your smart phone HERE! 
Put the 24/7 player on your web site HERE! 
Listen to archived shows of all our hosts . Schedule tabs at top left of page!

The post Herbal Formulas, The Basics! appeared first on The Prepper Broadcasting Network.

My Favorite Hiking Apparel

Click here to view the original post.

I never imagined so many of you would be interested in my backpacking clothing choices. You asked, I listened. I’ve received lots of questions lately about apparel selection and articles of clothing that you’ve seen me wearing in photos throughout my blog. It’s great to hear you’re digging around through my older articles. So for those of you that asked, below is a collection of the items that I most commonly wear. These are my “go-to” pieces.

Find what works for you

The clothes that I wear are probably outdated compared to many of today’s more technical fabrics, but each and every item was selected through personal trial and error over the years and I’ve grown to trust them. Each piece has served me well through all manner of situations and weather conditions. I’m confident that any one of the items below will serve you well too, but I encourage you to follow your own path, test different types of apparel under varying conditions until you find what works for you. Don’t just take my word for it. Your mileage may vary as they say.

My basic clothing system

This is my starting point. I would only loosely call it a layering system. It’s really just a collection that I love and feel comfortable in. I can add or subtract from this configuration depending on the needs of my trip or weather. I can swap out my down jacket for my soft shell, or take both. I can add gloves, rain protection, or anything else – but I always start with these trusted favorites.

My Favorite Hiking Apparel - Backpacking Layering System

Items shown above

  1. North Face knitted beanie – I’ve worn this incredibly soft, fleece lined beanie for years. If I ever lose it I’d buy the same one again.
  2. Montbell ultralight down jacket – Ultralight 8oz down jacket. Packs smaller than a 32oz bottle, blocks a fair amount of wind, and is relatively water-repellant.
  3. GoLite Dakota wind shirt – This incredibly lightweight () shirt/smock
  4. EMS techwick 1/4 zip base layer – Midweight base layer with amazing sweat wicking ability to keep you dry and warm. The stretch spandex greatly enhances mobility.
  5. 5.11 Tactical Burner polarized sunglasses – I’m on my third pair of these sun glasses. I lost a pair, crushed a pair (ran over them with my car) and just bought another pair. Best sunglasses I’ve ever had for fit and function.
  6. Suunto Vector – Rugged, reliable, feature rich, and trail tested. More watch than you probably ever need. I wear one constantly. It could only be improved if it were solar powered like G-Shocks.
  7. EMS wool boxer briefs – Whether you hike, run, ruck, or climb — these boxers wick moisture to keep you dry and comfortable on the move.
  8. 5.11 Tactical TDU belt – Belts may not be sexy, but this one does what it needs to do with ease and reliability.
  9. Mountain Khakis Granite Creek convertible pants – Quick-dry, UV 50+ lightweight convertible pants. Perfect for PCT to AT or any hike. Relaxed fit and extremely comfortable.
  10. Salomon Speedcross 3 GTX trail running shoe – Everyone’s wearing them because they rock! Comfortable, high quality, reliable footwear ready for just about anything.
  11. EMS merino wool hiking socks – Happy feet = happy hiking. Get yourself some Merino hiking socks. Warmth, cushioning comfort, and moisture-wicking.

Items not shown

  • Montane Minimus Rain Jacket – Love this jacket. Packs extremely small which means I can always have it with me in my pack.
  • Mechanix Wear Fast-Fit gloves – Lightweight gloves for trail work. May not keep your hands warm in winter, but will protect them during camp tasks.
  • Fitbit Flex activity tracker – I’ve been tracking my daily activity for two years now with my Fitbit Flex. Waterproof when all others aren’t.

Shelter and Sleep System

I’ve had a lot of inquiries about the components of my sleep system and shelter configuration so I’ll start work on pulling that together soon.

The post My Favorite Hiking Apparel appeared first on Brian’s Backpacking Blog.