Old Fashioned Biscuits and Gravy Recipe – Down Home Goodness

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This past weekend we decided to make one of our favorite breakfast meals – Old Fashioned Biscuits and Gravy. We usually save this recipe for special occasions or when we are feeding a large group for breakfast. However, the weather

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Our Favorite Easter Recipes – Recipes From Breakfast To Dessert

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Today we decided to dedicate our typical recipe of the week article to highlight our favorite Easter recipes. Each week we bring you a recipe that we have made in our OWG kitchen. Whether it be a recipe that comes

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5 Easy Christmas And New Years Day Breakfast Recipes

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I have 5 easy Christmas and New Years Day breakfast recipes for you today. I love when I can make my breakfast recipes ahead of time, don’t you? I can’t believe how fast this year has gone by for me. I’m now getting ready to make the grocery list for Christmas Eve and for breakfast the following morning. My daughters and I make one of these recipes every year the day before so all we have to do is bake one of them the next morning while presents are being opened. Each year we try to visit a different daughter and her family. Oh, how our family has grown from years ago, and oh how we love morning brunch with everyone enjoying time together.

We serve bacon with every breakfast and this is how we do it. We buy thickly sliced bacon at Costco and put it in a 9 by 13-inch pan. I used to use a cookie sheet to bake our bacon, I have now switched to a lasagna pan. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees and place the raw bacon strips in the pan, yes they will overlap, no worries. My Favorite 9 by 13-Pan

Be sure and keep checking on it because bacon can be sliced so many different ways so it may cook slower or faster. I bake mine about 30-45 minutes depending on how crispy the family wants it that day. Can you almost smell the bacon baking in the oven? When it’s cooked to your desired doneness, use tongs or forks to place the bacon on some paper towels to drain.

Would you love to learn how to make my No-Fail Cinnamon Rolls?

5 Breakfast Recipes

1. Our Favorite Omelet Casserole

Ingredients:

8 slices of bread, tear into bite-size pieces

2/3 pound of Velveeta cheese, cut into cubes

4 cups milk

8 eggs

pinch of salt

pinch of dry mustard

1-2 cups grated cheese to put on the top of the casserole when you bake it.

One package of Jimmy Dean sausage (small size) cooked and drained

6-8 slices of cooked bacon, crumbled

Instructions:

Butter a 9 by 13-inch pan and place the bread cubes in the bottom. Beat the 8 eggs, then add the milk, thoroughly mix together. Add the salt and dry mustard to the egg mixture. Now, pour this egg mixture over the bread cubes in the pan. Place the cubes of Velveeta cheese over this bread and egg mixture. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator overnight.

Cook the sausage and bacon separately and drain the grease. When cooled, place in the refrigerator until the next morning. Remove the plastic wrap the following morning. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Take the cooked sausage and bacon and press down into the casserole. Sprinkle the grated cheese on top. Bake uncovered for 1-1/2 hours or until eggs are set.

PRINTABLE recipe: Recipe by Food Storage Moms

2. Stacie’s Breakfast Casserole

Ingredients:

8 cups hash browns (2-inches deep in your pan)

1 package sausage, cooked, drained and crumbled or 1-1/2 cups cooked ham or 1-1/2 cups cooked bacon, crumbled

Egg mixture, combine the following and set aside:

10-12 eggs, beat until smooth

1/2 cup milk

2 cups grated cheese (set aside 1 cup for one of the layers)

Salt and pepper

Instructions:

Grease a 9 by 13-inch pan and place the hash browns into the pan. Sprinkle 2 tablespoons of oil over the hash browns. Bake at 425 degrees for 25 minutes. Remove from oven and pour 1/2 of the egg mixture over the hash browns. Put the meat of choice on top of this layer. Sprinkle the other cup of cheese on this layer. Pour the remaining egg mixture on top of this layer. Bake at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes uncovered, or until the eggs set.

PRINTABLE recipe: Recipe by Food Storage Moms

3. Veggie Brunch Egg Casserole

Ingredients:

3 cups shredded cheddar cheese

3 cups shredded Mozzarella cheese

4-1/2 ounces fresh or canned mushrooms (drained)

1/3 cup sliced green onions

1 medium chopped red bell pepper

1/2 cup butter

8 ounces chopped spinach leaves or cooked chopped ham

1/2 cup flour

1-3/4 cups milk

8 eggs, beaten

Instructions:

Mix cheeses together. Grease a 9 by 13-inch pan and place half of the cheese on the bottom of the ungreased pan. Melt the butter and saute the mushrooms, onions, and bell pepper and cook until tender. Put the sauteed vegetables over the cheese in the pan. Sprinkle the spinach or ham on this layer. Sprinkle the rest of the cheese on this layer. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator overnight.

In the morning, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Beat the eggs until smooth, add the flour and milk, continue beating. Pour this mixture over the casserole above after removing the plastic wrap. Bake uncovered for 45 minutes, until set and browned. Let it sit for ten minutes before serving.

PRINTABLE recipe: Recipe by Food Storage Moms

4. Linda’s Quick and Easy Quiche

Ingredients:

6 to 8 slices of bread (remove crusts if desired)

12 eggs, beaten

1 can (10-ounces) cream of mushroom soup

1 cup cream or whole milk

1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

1 teaspoon salt

pinch of cayenne pepper

1 pound of cooked ham, diced or cut into bite-size pieces (substitute with cooked bacon, or cooked sausage)

1/2 cup diced green onion

1/4 cup diced green bell pepper

1 pound Mozzarella or Swiss cheese, grated

Instructions:

Grease a 9 by 13-inch pan and place the pieces of bread tightly together on the bottom of the pan. Beat the eggs, add the soup, the milk, and seasonings. Sprinkle the diced ham, onion, and bell pepper over bread. Pour the egg mixture over this layer. Sprinkle the cheese over the top of this layer. Cover with foil and bake at 325 degrees for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and bake another 15 minutes uncovered.

PRINTABLE recipe: Recipe by Food Storage Moms

5. My Sister’s Overnight French Toast Casserole

Ingredients:

Peel and slice thin, 3 large apples

Cut 8 slices of French bread 3/4-inch thick (day old is best)

Grease a 9 by 13-inch pan.

Boil until clear:

1 cup packed brown sugar

1/2 cup butter

2 tablespoons Maple syrup

While boiling, heat:

3 eggs, slightly beaten

1-1/3 cups milk

1 teaspoon vanilla

Instructions:

Pour syrup mixture into the greased baking pan and place the apple slices on top of the syrup. Dip bread in egg mixture and place on top of apple slices. Pour remaining egg mixture on top of bread slices. Drizzle maple syrup over the bread slices. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Remove from the refrigerator 30 minutes before baking at 350 degrees for 30-35 minutes.

PRINTABLE recipe: Recipe by Food Storage Moms

As I typed my yummy breakfast recipes today, my mouth is watering just thinking about all of these! Do you have breakfast recipes you make every year? Happy Holidays, my friends, thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected.

The post 5 Easy Christmas And New Years Day Breakfast Recipes appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Gluten-Free Blackberry Biscuits {Made with Whey}

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blackberry

This sweet berry biscuit is the perfect addition to a Sunday brunch.

 

I had a plethora of whey left over from some homemade cheese that I made and wanted to incorporate this into my baking. With my whey in hand, I decided to surprise the family with fresh blackberry biscuits for breakfast in the morning. As soon as these biscuits were out of the oven and cooling, everyone flocked into the kitchen to see what had been made. I’m not going to lie, the biscuits didn’t make it through the night.

So, here’s the warning: If you make these biscuits don’t expect them to last long. If you make a berry compote to drizzle on it – look out!

I used whey in this recipe because I had an over abundance of it from a cheese making project and have been trying to use it up. Whey can be used in lieu of liquids in baking. Sweet whey comes from cheese making where bacterial cultures have been used and the whey has been drained at a pH of 5.2 or above. This type of whey is used most for baking and can benefit your goods in two ways: it adds additional nutrition and the natural acidity makes a perfect dough conditioner. It reacts with baking soda to produce all the leavening (carbon dioxide bubbles) you need. The flavor is similar to using buttermilk and I have found it keeps the baked goods more moist (I may be wrong, but this is from my experience using it).

This gluten-free version came out delicious and it’s more nutritious compared to using wheat flours.

Gluten-Free Blackberry Biscuits

  • 2 1/4 cups all-purpose gluten-free flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • ¼ cup unsalted butter, melted and slightly cooled
  • 1 1/4 cups whey (if you don’t have whey, use buttermilk)
  • 1 cup blackberries
  • Course sugar to sprinkle on top
  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees and spray baking pan.
  2. In a large mixing bowl combine the flour, baking powder, granulated sugar, cinnamon, salt and lemon zest.
  3. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in the whey (or buttermilk) and melted butter.
  4. Use the spatula to fold blackberries in with the ingredients together. Mix just until all flour is moistened. Mixture should be a cake batter consistency.
  5. Brush with any remaining butter and sprinkle with coarse sugar if desired.
  6. Bake in the preheated 425 degree oven for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown.
  7. Once cooled, use a pizza cutter to cut through biscuits and serve warm.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Classic Fall Recipes That Can Be Made Healthier

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favorite fall recipes made healthyThere’s something about the cooler fall weather that makes my family want to huddle up indoors and eat sweets. Humans are likely programmed to do just this, but let’s not let a change of seasons derail our healthy eating. Here are 5 modified classic fall recipes that will still make your house smell amazing and satisfy your sweet tooth—all without packing on the pounds.

5 Favorite Fall Recipes – the Healthy Way!

1. Pumpkin Pie

Pumpkin pie defines the Thanksgiving holiday in my household—we eat it as a dessert, but we also eat the leftovers for breakfast. This version adds in rolled oats for fiber and has healthy ground flax, but the full-fat coconut milk means a rich, creamy pie that satisfies.

Ingredients:

  • 1 can (15oz) pumpkin puree
  • 1 (13.5oz) can full-fat coconut milk
  • 1/4 cup gluten-free rolled oats
  • 2 tbsp ground flax
  • 1/4 cup coconut sugar
  • 2 tbsp molasses
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp pure vanilla extract

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Mix the above ingredients together, then pour into a prepared pie crust in a 10-inch round pan.
  3. Bake for 30 minutes (it might still appear undercooked—don’t worry!).
  4. Let your pie cool, then refrigerate for at least 5 hours.

2. Apple Cider

Ingredients:

  • 6 cups of organic apple juice
  • 1/4 cups of real maple syrup (you can use even less – let’s face it, apple juice is sweet on its own)
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 6 whole cloves
  • 6 whole allspice berries (optional)*
  • 1 orange peel, cut into strips (optional)*
  • 1 lemon peel, cut into strips (optional)*

*Remember, the richness of flavor makes up for a lack of sugar—I’d rather have a spicier cider than one that is too syrupy sweet…

Instructions:

  1. Pour the apple juice and maple syrup into a large stainless steel saucepan.
  2. Place the cinnamon sticks, cloves, allspice berries, orange peel and lemon peel in the center of a washed square of cheesecloth; fold up the sides of the cheesecloth to enclose the bundle, then tie it up with a length of kitchen string. Drop the spice bundle into the cider mixture. I’m not that concerned if it all sits in the broth loose – just be careful not to pour it into your mugs when you serve it.
  3. Place the saucepan over moderate heat for 5 to 10 minutes, or until the cider is very hot but not boiling. You can leave it on the lowest simmer during a party.
  4. Remove the cider from the heat. Discard the spice bundle. Ladle the cider into big cups or mugs, adding a fresh cinnamon stick to each serving if desired.

3. Slow Cooker Baked Apples

I love using my slow cooker, especially during autumn. It’s so nice to throw some ingredients in during the morning and then to come home to a house that smells amazing. This simple dessert makes use of the natural sweetness of apples and leaves out much of the sugar.

Ingredients:

  • 5 cups sliced peeled Granny Smith apples (4 medium)
  • 5 cups sliced peeled Braeburn apples (4 medium)
  • ¼ cup margarine (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • ¼ cup packed brown sugar (you can even use less or leave it out entirely—experiment to see what works the best for you)
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • ¼ cup apple cider

Instructions:

  1. Simply mix all ingredients and cook on low for 3-4 hours. If you’re going to be out all day make sure to set the timer on your slow cooker so the apples don’t get mushy.

4. Spiced Pear Cake

 This spiced pear cake is a crowd pleaser and a great way to use up your canned pears. We’re leaving off the icing in order to make this a healthier choice, but see this recipe for a richer, more decadent version.

 Ingredients

For cake:

  • 1 quart-size jar of canned spiced pears, drained (about 3 cups)
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups of maple syrup
  • 1 1⁄4 cups coconut oil
  • 3 cups gluten-free all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 cup walnuts or pecans, coarsely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, beat eggs, 2 cups sugar, and oil until blended.
  3. Combine flour, salt, and baking soda, and add to egg mixture, stir slowly until blended.
  4. Fold in pears, chopped nuts, and vanilla extract.
  5. Pour batter into a greased and floured 10-inch Bundt pan.
  6. Bake at 350° for 1 hour or until a wooden pick inserted in center of cake comes out clean.

5. Pumpkin Spice Waffles

Adding a little pumpkin spice is a surefire way to savor the fall weather (just ask Starbucks!). Working pumpkin into this traditional waffle recipe (and then tweaking to make it healthier) is a great way to make your breakfasts festive for the fall.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup maple syrup
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1-1/4 cup gluten-free all-purpose flour
  • 1-1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoon ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup 2% milk
  • 1 cup canned solid-pack pumpkin
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and warm

Instructions:

  1. Lightly oil and preheat waffle iron.
  2. In a large bowl, combine brown sugar and cornstarch in a large bowl. Whisk together to break apart the cornstarch and blend. Add the remaining dry ingredients, and whisk to blend.
  3. Separate eggs: yolks go in a medium sized bowl and whites get set aside in a smaller bowl.
  4. In a medium bowl, add pumpkin, milk and egg yolks. Whisk to blend.
  5. In a small bowl, whip egg whites with a hand mixer on high until stiff peaks form. Set aside.
  6. Pour melted butter into pumpkin mixture. As you pour, whisk to combine.
  7. Add the pumpkin mixture to the dry ingredients, and mix together until just combined.
  8. Slide the whipped egg whites out of the bowl and onto the mixture you just prepared. Gently fold them in until completely mixed.
  9. Once the waffle iron is heated, pour batter and press down until ready – about 3 minutes.

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Bacon Pancake Dippers – the Most Amazing Breakfast Food EVER!

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Bacon Pancake Dippers – the Most Amazing Breakfast Food EVER! I just love breakfast, it’s my favorite meal of the day. You just can’t beat waking up and having a cup of coffee and a great breakfast. If you are a breakfast foodie, then I think I may have found the ultimate breakfast food for …

Continue reading »

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Raspberry Vanilla Jam (Pectin-Free)

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 There is nothing like freshly picked sun-kissed berries. We have a plethora of wild growing berries where I live and I love to preserve them. I tend to draw on more natural based recipes that have been passed down from my pioneer ancestors, like the ones found in my prepper cookbook. After all, past generations didn’t have packets of pectin in their pantries and still their preserves always came out delicious; so this is me paying homage to my people.

This recipe for raspberry jam is delicious and has a touch of vanilla to intensify the flavors and doing have added ingredients like corn syrup that you find in store bought preserves. As I was making this recipe the other night, my daughters flocked into the kitchen to “taste test” the jam bubbling away on the stove. What I love most about this recipe is it is so easy and always cooks up with just the right thickness.

Raspberry Vanilla Jam

Makes 5 – 1 pint jars

  1. Wash and sterilize canning jars. Boil the flat parts of the lids in a small pot and keep at a low simmer.
  2. In a large pot over medium-high heat, add fruit, sugar, and lemon juice. Allow mixture to come to a boil. Mash the fruit with a potato masher and skim off any foam that may form and discard.
  3. When mixture has come to a boil, lower the heat to medium and allow the mixture to continue to softly boil for 5 minutes. Tip: Stir regularly to prevent scorching. You will know that the jam is done with a gel forms on a spoon.
  4. Remove jam from heat and let sit for a couple of minutes, stirring occasionally. It will thicken slightly.
  5. Ladle jam into hot jars, clean rims, then place flat lid on jars, and add screw bands.
  6. Immerse jars in hot water bath, and boil rapidly for 15 minutes (check your elevation areas and adjust the cooking time accordingly).
  7. Remove from bath and place on a towel on the counter to cool. If jars aren’t sealed within 12 hours then move them to the fridge and eat within 2 weeks.

Happy Jammin’!

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Spice Up the Holidays With Pomegranate Jelly

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pomegranate jelly
Who doesn’t love homemade gifts?  I decided to make some homemade jellies, but wanted to do something a little different. Rather than giving them the regular jams that I make in the summer, I wanted to bring a little winter variety into the mix and try my hand at making pomegranate jelly.

Everyone I know loves pomegranates and the color is so gorgeous. So, why not make this into a jelly?

The results were great! It was tangy, sweet and has a variety of purposes.  It can replace cranberry jelly with turkey for the holidays or to top hors d’ oeuvres (my favorite is topped over baked brie). As well, it is a lovely accompaniment to breakfast toast, scones, and biscuits.

There is still time to make this delicious jelly as gifts for friends and family.

Pomegranate Jelly

  • 5 cups pomegranate juice (10 pomegranates) or 5 cups bottled pure pomegranate juice
  • 6 cups sugar
  • 2 lemons, juiced
  • 1 (1.75 ounce) powdered pectin
  1. Wash and sterilize canning jars. Boil the flat parts of the lids in a small pot and keep at a low simmer.
  2. If you are using fresh pomegranates, peel pomegranates and extract juice. Strain juice through cheesecloth. Tip: If you juice your own pomegranates be sure to let the juice rest for 12 to 24 hours so the sediment will go to the bottom. Only use the clear liquid if you want your jelly crystal clear.
  3. In a large pot over medium-high heat, add juice, lemon juice and pectin. Bring mixture to a full rolling boil over high heat, stirring constantly.
  4. Stir in sugar to mixture and stir regularly to prevent scorching. Bring to a rolling boil  and boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.
  5. Remove jam from heat and let sit for a couple of minutes, stirring occasionally. It will thicken slightly. Remove any foam that has occurred.
  6. Ladle jam into hot jars leaving 1/4 inch space at top of jars. Clean rims, then place flat lid on jars, and add screw bands.
  7. Immerse jars in hot water bath, and boil rapidly for 15 minutes (check your elevation areas and adjust the cooking time accordingly).
  8. Remove from bath and place on a towel on the counter to cool. If jars aren’t sealed within 12 hours then move them to the fridge and eat within 2 weeks.

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Five Healthy Alternatives to Bisquick Pancakes

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pancakesPancakes have always been one of my favorites breakfast treats, and I’m willing to bet that many of you reading this feel the same way. It hits the spot in all the right ways, yet somehow leaves you asking for more. It’s not unlike eating dessert for breakfast (hell, it even has “cake” right in the name).

But that’s also kind of the problem. Pancakes are undoubtedly one of the least healthy ways to start your day, especially if you make them with Bisquick. If you haven’t already, read the ingredients list sometime. Every Bisquick pancake comes saddled up with a hefty serving of unpronounceable garbage.

However, there are plenty of healthy and tasty alternatives that will make you wonder why you ever used Bisquick in the first place. Below, are a few of my favorites.

Banana Pancakes

Let me start by saying that you will find a ton of different pancake recipes on the internet, but since we’re looking for alternatives to Bisquick, I’m just going to share the simplest version of each recipe, and link to more detailed versions for those of you with tastes that are more refined than mine. With that said though, banana pancakes are probably the easiest meal to make on this list.

Honestly, they don’t taste like a traditional pancake. In fact, they taste way better. It has the texture of cream filling or custard, but with a lightly crisped coating. I usually mash up or blend a large ripe banana with one egg, but other recipes will call for a ratio 2 eggs for every 1 1/2 bananas. A pinch of baking powder will also help fluff them up a little. Once you put your batter together, add your favorite spices and fry them in butter. Keep the cakes small though, since it’s impossible to flip a large banana cake without it breaking.

Coconut Flour Pancakes

Coconut flour has become a really popular alternative for dishes that are traditionally wheat based, and understandably so. Each serving comes with a modest dose of protein, easily digestible fats, and fibers. That’s a nice step up from white flour, which tends to be lacking in nutrients. Fortunately, coconut flour also makes a pretty mean pancake.

For one person, I’d suggest mixing a single egg with a splash of milk, and anywhere between two tablespoons and a quarter cup of coconut flour (as you can see, I’m not a big fan of following recipes to the letter). Most recipes call for a pinch of baking powder as well as sea salt, but I’d skip the salt if you’re sensitive to that taste. Cook on medium heat with butter, or perhaps coconut oil if you’re just crazy about the stuff.

Almond Flour Pancakes

While almonds usually make a fine addition to many meals, in this case they rock as the main course. I usually mix a half cup of almond flour with a single egg, and add two tablespoons of water with a touch of salt to the mix. Cinnamon and Nutmeg also go well with the batter. Though I haven’t tried it yet, I hear that mixing this with some variation of the coconut recipe is to die for.

Quinoa Flour Pancakes

I have to admit, there are other items on this list that most people will probably find tastier, but quinoa pancakes make up for it by being super nutritious. Not only is quinoa loaded with vitamins and minerals, but these nutrients are very well balanced together. It also doesn’t hurt that each serving of quinoa comes with a few grams of high quality protein.

Most recipes will call for baking soda or baking powder, or they’ll have you mix the quinoa with wheat flour, but I honestly think that the batter is perfect with only three ingredients. Mix one egg with a half cup of quinoa flour, and slowly add milk until you have a gooey consistency. They cook a little faster than regular pancakes so keep a close eye on them. You’ll find that flipping them is really easy since quinoa holds itself together. I’ve never had one of these cakes break on the spatula. After it’s done, you’ll find that it’s a little heavier than a regular pancake, but with a nutty flavor. Instead of syrup, I usually mash up a banana and use it as a spread.

Sweet Potato Pancakes

I once tried cooking up pancakes that were made from sweet potato flour. It was super easy to make, but unfortunately it tasted pretty awful. It was way too starchy and I didn’t feel very well after eating it. If you want to make these pancakes, you’ve got to start with a fresh sweet potato. It’ll take a little more effort, but it’s worth the wait.

Like the quinoa cakes, most recipes call for wheat flour and baking powder, but there’s a two ingredient recipe that really hits the spot. Keep this one in mind if you ever have leftover sweet potatoes, since the process is a little time-consuming. You start by roasting a sweet potato in the oven, and then you gather the flesh into a bowl. Mix in two eggs with whatever spices you prefer, and thoroughly whisk it all together. Cook on medium high heat for about 5-7 minutes, flip them, and cook the other side for 3-5 minutes. Since these won’t bubble like normal pancakes it’s hard to tell when they’re done, so use a timer (FYI, quinoa cakes don’t really bubble either). Serve with butter, honey, or maybe even a little cream cheese.

On a final note, if you’re trying to find a healthy alternative to pancakes, you should also be looking to replace your store brand syrup. Throw out the Aunt Jemima and buy real maple syrup. It’s usually in a little glass jar, and it tastes way better. Other than that, my favorite alternatives are honey and molasses. Most people don’t think of molasses as a condiment, but it’s worth trying out on a few of these recipes. You haven’t lived until you’ve had honey, butter, and molasses on a sweet potato.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition