Pressure Canning Asparagus at Home

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Pressure Canning Asparagus at Home Asparagus is one of the those amazing gifts of spring. I put it on par with the English pea and arugula as those first blessings from the garden. If asparagus is cooked too long it can become terrible. In fact, for many years I thought asparagus was what came out …

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Dancing Goat Farm – Labor for Lessons

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Dancing Goat Farm Labor for Lessons

Rockingham County, NC. Looking for people who live close to me who would like to learn about sustainable living, organic gardening, building a cob oven and rocket stove, canning, making cheese, goats, chickens, ducks and how to transform a 1/2 acre into a permaculture paradise, while they are waiting to make their move off grid. There is a learning curve to all of these skills. It’s always better to have some of them before you make your jump.

 

I’m not fully off grid yet. I heat with wood and the new 30′ x 32′ greenhouse will be heated with a rocket stove come winter. I’m still lusting after my solar set up. Reclaiming the old farmhouse well is still a work in progress at Dancing Goat Farm. One of the former owners thought filling it in with dirt and booze bottles was a good idea.

 

Oak pallets are much heavier at 62 than they were at 55. Some things I can’t pick up by myself like the chicken house. (It’s tipping over because the bunnies thought underneath it was a good place to dig tunnels.) I need help! If you want to learn, get your hands dirty, plant a row of your own vegetables this year give me a shout. I planted 8 fruit trees this month. 4 more are on their way. The concord grapes are in but not the white and champagne. The avocados, pomegranates, figs and olive trees have to be planted in the greenhouse. In May the lemon, lime, orange, grapefruit, coffee, cinnamon and banana trees have to be moved to the greenhouse. The two clawfoot tubs have to be moved to the greenhouse because after a long day on the farm nothing is sweeter than enjoying a glass of wine while soaking under the stars.

 

 

 

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Announcement: The Prepper’s Canning Guide Is Now Available

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I’m excited to announce that my new book is out. The Prepper’s Canning Guide: Affordably Stockpile a Lifesaving Supply of Nutritious, Delicious, Shelf-Stable Foods is now available on Amazon.

Here’s

Read the rest

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4 Key Tips To Create A Garden For Canning And Preserving – Grow Your Food This Year!

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More and more people are planting backyard gardens every year for canning and preserving! Beyond the simple joy of getting to play in the dirt and experience the great outdoors – gardening has become more popular than ever as people

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Home Canning – Pressure Canning Method

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Home Canning – Pressure Canning Method

This articles first appeared on toriavey.com

According to a document supplied by the USDA to the National Center for Home Food Preservation, “Empty jars used for vegetables, meats, and fruits to be processed in a pressure canner need not be presterilized.” This means that while your jars should be clean, you can skip sterilizing them in boiling water before you fill them with your product. However, if you’re feeling super thorough and want to do the pre-sterilization, I’ve provided a link to my Boiling Water Method, which will walk you through the process step-by-step. Always use new canning lids, which should only be used one time.

Before you start, you will need to purchase or borrow a pressure canning pot. Do not use a regular pressure cooker; pressure canners are built larger with special inserts for canning. I have to admit, I was a little nervous about trying out a pressure canner for the first time. It’s intimidating and can be very dangerous if not done correctly. Putting this tutorial together was somewhat tricky due to differences between pressure canner models and brands. I wanted to guide you clearly through the steps, but it’s difficult because each pressure canner is uniquely constructed. I decided the best way to illustrate the process was to use my own Presto 16 quart Aluminum Pressure Canner and Cooker. Your model may vary in terms of process. While I have tried to keep the instructions general and somewhat broad, it is very important that you refer to your pressure canner’s specific instruction manual due to differences between brands and models. Pressure canning can be dangerous if you don’t follow your manufacturer’s instructions carefully; pressure cookers and canners can explode if not used properly. Please use caution and proceed at your own risk. Even if you’re using the Presto Canner that I use, please read the instruction manual in addition to using my tutorial here. Always better to be safe than sorry.

Okay, enough caution statements. I don’t mean to scare you off of pressure canning; I just want to make it clear that it needs to be done carefully. Once you understand the process, pressure canning isn’t all that different from regular canning. It’s actually a terrific skill to have, particularly when your garden is overflowing and you want to save your veggies for the coming year. I’ve worked hard to put together a comprehensive tutorial here. I hope you find it useful!

Recommended Products:

Pressure Canner

Canning Jars – Quart, Pint

Ball Canning Lids – Regular and Wide Mouth

Canning Books

You will need

  • Pressure canner
  • 3-piece canning jars
  • Wide mouth funnel
  • Jar lifter
  • 2 tbsp white vinegar (optional, recommended)

 

  • Before you start, you will need to purchase or borrow a pressure canning pot. I do not recommend using a regular pressure cooker; pressure canners are built larger with special inserts for canning. Note that this tutorial was written and photographed using a Presto 16 quart Aluminum Pressure Canner and Cooker. While I have tried to keep the instructions somewhat general and broad to suit a variety of canners, it is very important that you refer to your pressure canner’s specific instruction manual due to differences between brands and models. Pressure canning can be dangerous if you don’t follow your manufacturer’s instructions carefully; pressure cookers and canners can explode if not used properly. Electric pressure canning pots will have a different process than the one that appears here. Please use extreme caution.
  • Before you start, make sure your hands and all of the tools you’ll be using are very clean. According to FDA guidelines, while the jars should be clean before starting, they do not need to be boiled to sterilize before pressure canning due to the high temperature levels in the pressure canner. If you would prefer to boil and sterilize the jars prior to pressure canning, please refer to my previous post: Home Canning – Boiling Water Method.
  • Remove the lids and rings from your canning jars. If you are re-using jars, be sure that you aren’t using any with cracks or chips. Keep in mind that canning lids can only be used once, so don’t reuse old ones– buy fresh lids before you begin.
  • Place the canning lids and rings into a small saucepan. Cover with water and bring to a low simmer for a few minutes. This will soften the sealing strips around the edges of the lids.
  • Meanwhile, using a wide mouth funnel, carefully fill the jars with your product. Depending on what you will be canning, you will need to leave 1/2 – 1/4 inch of space at the top of the jar. Most recipes will specify what is necessary, but as a general guideline, most jams or jellies will need 1/4 inch, while pickles and thicker products will need 1/2 inch.

With tongs or a magnetic lid lifter, remove the lids from the simmering water and place on a clean towel.

Place the lids with warm seals directly onto the jars and seal with the circular bands using just your fingertips so that they are secure, but not too tight. Wipe any spills or excess product from the lid and sides of your jars using a damp cloth.

 

  • Before you start canning, be sure your pressure canner has been thoroughly cleaned. Also check that the sealing ring, the black overpressure plug on the cover and the white compression gasket are not cracked or deformed.
  • Prepare your pressure canner pot lid based on your manufacturer’s instructions. Ours has a rubber sealing ring that fits into the edge of the pressure canner lid. This rubber seal usually comes pre-lubricated, but if it feels a bit dry you can apply a light coating of cooking oil around the ring (I usually do this step just to be safe).

Fit the lubricated rubber sealing ring into the edge of the lid.

Check the vent pipe for any food or debris that may be clogging the opening. If something is blocking the opening you can clear the vent pipe with a toothpick or a pipe cleaner.

Attach the dial gauge to the canner based on your manufacturer’s instructions. On our model, we first place the white compression gasket onto the end of the dial gauge.

Then we insert the dial gauge and the compression gasket into the hole at the center of the cover. The compression gasket should sit within the cover hole.

Turn the cover upside down and place the metal washer onto the dial gauge.

Place the nut onto the end of the dial gage and tighten very tightly with your fingers. You can use a wrench if necessary.

Place the canning rack into the bottom of your pressure canner along with 3 quarts of hot water (the amount of water may vary based on the size of your canner– refer to manufacturers instructions for your specific amount). To prevent water stains on your jars, you can add 2 tbsp of white vinegar to the water.

Place your filled jars with secured lids on top of the canning rack. You must always use a canning rack to keep the jars away from the direct heat of the burner, which can lead to breaking or cracking.

 

  • Place the lid on the pressure canner and secure the lid tightly based on your manufacturer’s instructions. On our model, we apply pressure to the handles to compress the sealing ring and turn clockwise until the lid handles are directly above the pot handles. Your model may have a different method for securing the lid.
  • Heat the pressure canner over medium high until a steady flow of steam can be seen or heard coming from the vent pipe. Allow the steam to flow from the vent pipe for 10 minutes. If necessary, reduce the heat to maintain a steady, moderate flow of steam with minimal sputtering. It’s kind of difficult to capture that flow of steam on camera, but it’s there– trust me.

Once the 10 minutes have passed, place the pressure regulator (a cap-like piece) on top of the vent pipe. Adjust stove heat to a relatively high setting to heat the water within.

On our canner, as the heat rises and pressure develops inside, the air vent/cover lock (a small metal knob) will lift and lock the cover on the canner. Your model may have a different “signal” to let you know there is pressure in the canner. Once that cover is locked, DO NOT open the canner until the vent/cover lock lowers again, or until your canner signals that there is no longer any pressure inside the canner (more details below). Likewise, do not remove the pressure regulator cap from the top of the vent pipe.

As the heat rises inside and pressure builds, the pointer of the gauge will move up. Your goal is to build to the amount of pressure specified in your canning recipe (each recipe is different, so refer to your specific canning recipe for the correct poundage). Continue heating until the pressure on the dial gauge reads the desired poundage. You may want to reduce the heat a bit when you are 1-2 pounds away from the desired pressure weight, so that the heat does not rise too high too quickly and surpass the desired poundage by a large amount.

 

  • When the pressure gauge reads the desired poundage, start your timer. Adjust heat to maintain correct pressure on the dial gauge. Going slightly above the recommended poundage is ok, though you should try to keep it as close to level as possible. If at any time the pressure drops below the desired poundage, you must return pressure to the correct setting and start the timer over. The cans need to cook at the recommended poundage for the full recommended time period as stated in your pressure canning recipe, or you risk spoilage.
  • When the timer goes off, turn off the heat and leave the canner to cool. DO NOT open the canner.
  • Allow the pressure to drop on its own; this will take some time. On our model, we know that the pressure has reduced once the air vent/cover lock has dropped. Your model may have a different “signal.” Do not use the dial gauge as an indicator that the pressure has reduced, since the gauge can read zero while there is still an amount of pressure in the pot.

When pressure has completely reduced and the air vent/cover lock has dropped, remove the pressure regulator from the vent pipe and allow the canner to cool for another 10 minutes before attempting to open.

 

  • Remove the cover of your pressure canner. On our model, we turn the lid counter-clockwise until it cannot go any farther and lift towards us so that the steam is released in the opposite direction. If for some reason the cover sticks, do not force it open. Allow the canner to cool for 10 minutes more and try again. Repeat as necessary.
  • With a jar lifter, remove the jars from the canner.

Allow your jars to cool for 24 hours. Remove the round outer bands from your lids and test your seals by lifting the jar by the flat lid a few inches from the counter top. The jar should lift without any separation. Jars with good seals can be kept in a cool dark place for up to a year.

A broken seal doesn’t mean that your product has gone bad, it just has a shorter shelf life. Those jars should be placed directly into the refrigerator and used within two weeks or until the product has spoilage, whichever occurs first.

Saving our forefathers ways starts with people like you and me actually relearning these skills and putting them to use to live better lives through good times and bad. Our answers on these lost skills comes straight from the source, from old forgotten classic books written by past generations, and from first hand witness accounts from the past few hundred years. Aside from a precious few who have gone out of their way to learn basic survival skills, most of us today would be utterly hopeless if we were plopped in the middle of a forest or jungle and suddenly forced to fend for ourselves using only the resources around us. To our ancient ancestors, we’d appear as helpless as babies. In short, our forefathers lived more simply than most people today are willing to live and that is why they survived with no grocery store, no cheap oil, no cars, no electricity, and no running water. Just like our forefathers used to do, The Lost Ways Book teaches you how you can survive in the worst-case scenario with the minimum resources available. It comes as a step-by-step guide accompanied by pictures and teaches you how to use basic ingredients to make super-food for your loved ones. Watch the video below:

 

Source : toriavey.com

 

 

                           RELATED ARTICLES : 

 

 

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A True Homesteader!

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A True Homesteader! Host: Bobby “MHP Gardner There is a lot of interest in being self-sufficient these days. People are looking for information on how to grow and store their own food, provide their own meats, go off-grid with solar setups… get out of the system so to speak. We see a lot of these … Continue reading A True Homesteader!

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Food Storage: Oven Canning

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You will never find this Oven Canning technique in a USDA or National Center for Home Preservation website; there are just too many variables to say that the process works 100% every time with every food type. However, if you reread the section on food safety and see that for botulism to grow it needs […]

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Be Our Guest: Food Preservation Part I

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Canning, off-grid, cooking, food preservation, water bath, pressure canner

With the “know-how,” food preservation isn’t so daunting

Charcutier Sean Cannon is opening his first restaurant, Nape, in London this month. Born and bred in Norfolk, Sean told the Guardian how growing up in a self-sustaining community influenced his cooking. His best kept secret – preserving.

“Whether it’s killing an animal and having lots of fresh meat, or early summer and everything is ripe, knowing what to do with a glut is key.” Cannon said.

If you live off-grid you’ll know that preserving food for future use is essential. Not only does it provide food security, but also allows you to taste sweet summer berries in the winter. By doing this age old tradition, it also stops more modern thoughts and concerns of “what is actually in my food?” If you do the preparing and the preservation, you know exactly what has gone into the food you will be eating.

There are many ways to preserve food including canning, freezing, dehydrating and smoking.

Canning is a valuable and low-tech way to preserve food. There are two main methods for this, either water bath canning or pressure canning. It is worth noting that water bath canning should only be done for acidic fruits, such as berries and apples. If canning other produce such as meats and vegetables, pressure canning should be used; otherwise there is a high risk of food poisoning.

The basic process is to heat water in your canner (or large pan if water bath canning). This should not be filled to the top; 3-5 inches should be left for your jars of food. Jars should have lids secured and be placed carefully into the canner, being careful not to knock other jars, as they could crack or break under the high temperatures. The jars should be immersed in the canner with the water just covering the lids. The canner lid should be locked in place if pressure canning and the jars left for as long as needed according to the recipe. After the required time, the canner should be allowed to depressurise if using a pressure canner, before the jars are removed. Heat protection and necessary precautions should be taken to ensure you do not burn yourself. The jars should then be left to cool and seal for a minimum of 12 but ideally 24 hours. The sound of popping and pinging will mark your canning success!

Canning is so popular because of the wide variety of foods that can be preserved this way and the length of time they will remain edible for. Plus there’s no worry of keeping food frozen or cool!

Canning does however come with an initial start-up cost. If you’re only looking to preserve fruits and jams, then water bath canning in a large pan is of course an economical way to go. However, if you’re looking to preserve a wider variety of foods which includes meat and vegetables, then it would be wise to invest in a pressure canner.

The Presto 23 Quart Pressure Canner and Cooker comes in at a reasonable $86.44 on Amazon. This can double as a water bath canner and a pressure cooker. Made out of aluminium, the canner allows for fast and even heating and with a liquid capacity of just under 22 litres, seven quart jars fit comfortably inside. The lid has a strong lock and an over-pressure plug can relieve any build-up of steam. With a 12 year warranty and excellent reviews, this canner will certainly suit the needs of most canners.

Canning, food preservation, jars, canning, water canning, pressure canning, off-grid, storage

Good jars & lids are a must – there’s nothing like hearing the “pop” of sealing success!

The Presto’s rival is the All American Canner. This is a pricier option at $225.37 on Amazon and has many similar features, being made of aluminium and also holding 7 quart (or 19 pint) jars. This is a heavier unit though, coming in at 20lbs to the Presto’s 12lbs. A reviewer having access to both canner makes did however point out another comparison between the two. She noted that the All American Canner has a weighted gauge which needs less “babysitting” than the Presto with its dial gauge, which required her to keep adjusting the heat of her stove. However, she pointed out that when compared side by side, both the Presto and All American took the same amount of time to get to pressure, to can the produce and to bring back down ready to remove the jars.

Once the initial canner investment is made, there are a couple of other bits and pieces which you will need. Jars are a must and are reusable. However, if using second hand jars to try and save on cost, it is important not to have any that are cracked or damaged in any way – this could lead to some nasty accidents later on!

In terms of lids, these can either be replaced for around $3 per pack or you could spend a little extra and invest in some reusable Tattler lids. These are marketed at $8.88 on Amazon for a pack of 12 and are “indefinitely reusable”.

Other kit you might want to buy (and are recommended to prevent nasty burns) are a jar lifter and canning funnel. These can be bought separately or in a set with other equipment such as kitchen tongs, a jar wrench and magnetic lid lifter advertised on Amazon at $8.79.

For more detailed information on canning basics for beginners, check out Starry Hilder’s video on YouTube!

Another popular preservation method, especially for meat and fish is smoking.
Smokin' Hot! Only if you want to eat your meat straight away. If you want to preserve your meat, cold smoking is the way to go!

Smokin’ Hot! But only if you want to eat your meat straight away. If you want to preserve your meat, cold smoking is the way to go!

This involves long exposure to wood smoke at low temperatures, which is different to grilling over an open fire. Smoking preserves meat and fish by drying the produce and the smoke creates an acidic coating on the meat surface, preventing bacterial growth. The addition of a rich mouth-watering smoky flavour only adds to the appeal of this preservation method.

 

There are two types of smoking method. The first is called hot smoking and cooks the meat so it can be eaten straight away. This involves getting the temperature above 150 degrees Fahrenheit. The meat will still need to be cooked over a long time, leaving it very tender.

The second is cold smoking which doesn’t cook the meat for consumption straight away. Instead temperatures between 75 and 100 degree Fahrenheit are used to seal the meat and flavour it. The time meat or fish is left to smoke depends on the cuts and type of produce. Adding salt to the meat can help to speed up the process as it is a natural preservative. After drying the meat should be placed in an air tight container and stored at a cool temperature until consumed.

There is a wide range of smokers from electric or gas to charcoal and wood. This propane smoker from Amazon comes with a built in temperature gauge and retails at $211.40. Alternatively, instead of trying to find a smoker that suits your needs, why not build your own? That’s what this family has done!

 

Part II of “Be Our Guest – Food Preservation” will cover refrigeration and dehydrating.

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Top 10 Food Storage Myths

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food storage myths

The internet is full of websites that give information on survival topics, including food storage. There are dozens and dozens of books that will teach you “the right way” to store food and YouTube videos galore. Most contain valid, trustworthy information, but mixed in with that are a number of food storage myths that many people accept without question.

Here are 10 that I take issue with, and I explain why.

By the way, following Myth #10 are 2 short videos that review these myths.

Myth #1:  You should stock up on lots of wheat.

When I was researching foods typically eaten during the Great Depression, I noticed that many of them included sandwiches of every variety. So it makes sense to stock up on wheat, which, when ground, becomes flour, the main ingredient to every bread recipe.

There are a couple of problems with the focus on wheat in virtually all food storage plans, however. First, since the time of the Great Depression millions of people now have various health issues when they consume wheat. From causing gluten intolerance to celiac disease our hybridized wheat is a whole ‘nother animal that our great-grandparents never consumed.

The second issue is that wheat isn’t the simplest food to prepare, unless you simply cook the wheat berries in water and eat them as a hot cereal or add them to other dishes. In order to make a loaf of bread, you have to grind the wheat, which requires the purchase of at least one grain mill. Electric mills are much easier to use and, within just seconds, you have freshly ground flour. However, you’ll probably want to add a hand-crank mill to have on hand for power outages. All together, 2 mills will end up costing a pretty penny, depending on the brands you purchase.

Then there’s the process of making the bread itself, which is time consuming.

I’m not saying you shouldn’t store wheat, and, in fact, I have several hundred pounds of it myself. The emphasis on wheat as a major component in food storage is what I have a problem with. In retrospect, I wish I had purchased far more rice and less wheat. Rice is incredibly simple to prepare and is very versatile. It, too, has a very long shelf life.

Myth #2: Beans last forever.

While it’s true that beans have a long shelf life, they have been known to become virtually inedible over time. Old-timers have reported using every cooking method imaginable in order to soften the beans. A pressure cooker is one option but, again, some have told me that doesn’t even work!

Another option is to grind the beans and add the powdered beans to various recipes. They will still contain some nutrients and fiber.

Over the years, I’ve stocked up on cans of beans — beans of all kinds. They retain their nutrients in the canning process and are already cooked, so there’s no need to soak, boil, pressure cook, etc. You can always home can dried beans, and if you have beans that have been around for more than 10 years or so, canning them is a super simple process and insures they won’t become inedible.

Myth #3: If they’re hungry enough, they’ll eat it!

Have you ever fallen in love with a recipe that was easy to make, inexpensive, and your family loved it? You probably thought you’d finally found The Dream Recipe. And then you made it a second time, then a third, then a fourth. About the 8th or 9th time, however, you may have discovered that you had developed a mild form of food fatigue. Suddenly, it didn’t taste all that great and your family wasn’t giving it rave reviews anymore.

When it comes to food storage, don’t assume that someone will eat a certain item they currently hate, just because they’re hungry. If you stock up on dozens of #10 cans of Turkey Tetrazzini, sooner or later the family will revolt, no matter how hungry they are.

Myth #4. All I need is lots and lots of canned food.

There’s nothing wrong with canned food. In fact, that’s how I got started with food storage. However, canned food has its limitations. A can of ravioli is a can of ravioli. You can’t exactly transform it into a completely different dish. As well, canned food may have additives that you don’t care to eat and, in the case of my own kids, tastes change over time. I had to eventually give away the last few cans of ravioli and Spaghetti-O’s because my kids suddenly didn’t like them anymore.

Be sure to rotate whatever canned food you have, since age takes a toll on all foods, but, as I’ve discovered, on certain canned items in particular. My experience with old canned tuna hasn’t been all that positive, and certain high-acid foods, such as canned tomato products, are known to have issues with can corrosion. Double check the seams of canned food and look for any sign of bulging, leaks, or rust.

Lightly rusted cans, meaning you can rub the rust off with a cloth or your fingertip, are safe to continue storing. However, when a can is badly rusted, there’s a very good chance that the rust has corroded the can, allowing bacteria to enter. Those cans should be thrown away.

Worried about the “expiration” date on canned food? Well, those dates are set by the food production company and don’t have any bearing on how the food will taste, its nutrients, or safety after that date. If the food was canned correctly and you’ve been storing it in a dry and cool location, theoretically, the food will be safe to consume for years after that stamped date.

Myth #5: I can store my food anywhere that I have extra space.

Yikes! Not if you want to extend its shelf life beyond just a few months! Know the enemies of food storage and do your best to store food in the best conditions possible.

TIP: Learn more about the enemies of food storage: heat, humidity, light, oxygen, pests, and time.

I emphasize home organization and decluttering on this blog, mainly because it frees up space that is currently occupied by things you don’t need or use. Start decluttering and then storing your food in places that are cool, dark, and dry.

Myth #6: My food will last X-number of years because that’s what the food storage company said.

I have purchased a lot of food from very reputable companies over the years: Augason Farms, Thrive Life, Honeyville, and Emergency Essentials. They all do a great job of processing food for storage and then packaging it in containers that will help prolong its shelf life.

However, once the food gets to your house, only you are in control of how that food is stored. Yes, under proper conditions, food can easily have a shelf life of 20 years or more, but when it’s stored in heat, fluctuating temperatures, and isn’t protected from light, oxygen, and pests, and never rotated, it will deteriorate quickly.

NOTE: When food is old, it doesn’t become poisonous or evaporate in its container. Rather, it loses nutrients, flavor, texture, and color. In a word, it becomes unappetizing.

Myth #7: Just-add-hot-water meals are all I need.

There are many companies who make and sell only add-hot-water meals. In general, I’m not a big fan of these. They contain numerous additives that I don’t care for, in some cases the flavors and textures and truly awful, but the main reason why I don’t personally store a lot of these meals is because they get boring.

Try eating pre-made chicken teriyaki every day for 2 weeks, and you’ll see what I mean. Some people don’t require a lot of variety in their food, but most of us tire quickly when we eat the same things over and over.

These meals have a couple of advantages, though. They are lightweight and come in handy during evacuation time and power outages. If you can boil a couple of cups of water over a rocket stove, propane grill, or some other cooking device, then you’ll have a meal in a few minutes.

TIP: Store a few days worth of just-add-water meals with your emergency kits and be ready to grab them for a quick emergency evacuation. Be sure to also pack a spoon or fork for each person and a metal pot for meals that require cooking over a heat source.

However, for a well-balanced food storage pantry, stock up on individual ingredients and fewer just-add-hot-water meals.

Myth #8: I can stock up on a year’s worth and won’t need to worry about food anymore.

That is probably the fantasy of many a prepper. Buy the food, stash it away, and don’t give it a thought until the S hits the fan. There’s a big problem with that plan, however. When everything does hit the fan and it’s just you and all that food:

  • Will you know how to prepare it?
  • Will you have the proper supplies and tools to prepare the food?
  • Did you store enough extra water to rehydrate all those cans of freeze-dried and dehydrated foods?
  • Do you have recipes you’re familiar with, that your family enjoys, and that use whatever you’ve purchased?
  • What if there’s an ingredient a family member is allergic to?
  • Does everyone even like what you’ve purchased?
  • Have any of the containers been damaged? How do you know if you haven’t inspected them and checked them occasionally for bulges and/or pest damage?

If you’ve purchased a pre-packaged food storage supply, the contents of that package were determined by just a small handful of people who do not know your family, your health issues, or other pertinent details. These packages aren’t a bad thing to have on hand. Just don’t be lulled into a false sense of security.

Myth #9: Freeze dried foods are too expensive.

Yes, there is a bit of sticker shock initially when you begin to shop online at sites like Thrive Life, Augason Farms, and Emergency Essentials. If you’ve been used to paying a few dollars for a block of cheddar cheese and then see a price of $35 for a can of freeze-dried cheddar, it can be alarming.

However, take a look at how many servings are in each container and consider how much it would cost to either grow or purchase that same food item and preserve it in one way or another, on your own.

The 3 companies I mentioned all have monthly specials on their food and other survival supplies — that’s how I ended up with 2 cases of granola from Emergency Essentials!

Myth #10: This expert’s food storage plan will fit my family.

The very best food storage plan is the one that you have customized yourself. By all means, use advice given by a number of experts. Take a look at online food calculators, but when it’s time to make purchases, buy what suits your family best. What one person thinks is ideal for food storage may leave your kids retching.

Lots of resources to help you with your food storage pantry

Want this info on video? Here you go!

Food Storage Myths, Part 1: Myths 1-5

Food Storage Myths, Part 2: Myths 6-10

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 food storage myths

From a Complete Newbie to a Confident Canner

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From a Complete Newbie to a Confident Canner Canning or ‘jarring’ your own food is a skill that is making a huge comeback. People are learning how to make jams and jellies and pressure canning their harvests. In doing so, they are creating shelf-stable foods that require no refrigeration and will last years if properly …

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Principles of Home Canning

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Principles of Home Canning Food preservation and storage is pretty high on the list of priorities for anyone who is prepping or homesteading. We can always buy preserved food for SHTF situations or the winter months, but what happens when that supply runs out? We need to be able to get our own food supply …

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Meat Potting: An Almost Forgotten Skill Worth Rediscovering

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Meat Potting: An Almost Forgotten Skill Worth Rediscovering When I sat down to write this, I remembered my grandmother. She potted meat like this in 10 gallon crocks. The cooler you could keep the crock, the longer the meat will last. (Basement, cellar, etc), but don’t let it hard freeze or the crock will crack. …

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10 Canning Tips for the Newbie Canner

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10 Canning Tips for the Newbie Canner My wife and I can all the time and love it. It gets us together as a family unit and after a good batch of canning you can sit back and look at them and say, “well dear, that’s us good for a week or so if SHTF” …

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Our 2017 Garden Plan – Growing Incredible Flavor In The Garden

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It’s time for our 2017 garden plan! To an avid gardener, creating a garden plan is like trying to paint a masterpiece. Or perhaps, attempting to write a prize-winning novel. For us, it has always been a great way to look

The post Our 2017 Garden Plan – Growing Incredible Flavor In The Garden appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

How To Can Water for Emergencies

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How To Can Water for Emergencies Stocking an emergency water supply is something everyone should do-regardless of their situation. Natural disasters can disrupt water supply, contamination can occur with chemical or biological hazard leaks, and cold weather can cause pipes to freeze and burst. Bottled water is definitely easy to come by when conditions are …

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Beans: The Super Food that Keeps You Full

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Beans: The Super Food that Keeps You Full Stocking up your food supply is one of the main aspects of prepping and something that a homesteader always keeps in mind.  There are plenty of options for storage foods, like canned food, pouched food, dried foods or fresh produce in root cellars.  A problem a lot …

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16 Facts You Should Know Before Dehydrating Food

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16 Facts You Should Know Before Dehydrating Food

Dehydrating food is one of my favorite ways of preserving; I love it so much I’m teaching a class on dehydrating foods! So if you’ve got a dehydrator in the closet that you bought for just making jerky–get it out! Because let me tell you, it can do so much more than make jerky! There are 25 lessons in the dehydrating eCourse and only one of them is about making jerky. Yes, you read that correctly–25 classes, and I keep trying to make them short and sweet but they all at least 20 minutes long, most are a little more. Not to worry, they are not too long, most are under 30 minutes. I only mention this because there is so much more to dehydrating than jerky.

Maybe you don’t even have a dehydrator yet and are wondering if dehydrating is for you. I hope I can convince you to give it a try because it’s fun, easy and so versatile. You can build a complete food storage easily, quickly and safely.

Dehydrating is a very old method of food preservation. If you remove 90 to 95% of the water content from food then bacteria that aids in the decomposition process can’t survive. Your food is preserved in a sort of suspended state waiting for you to add the water back in order to nourish your body. Here are some important facts you should know about this great food preserving method.

Facts About Dehydrating Food

Easy To Do
Dehydrating is fun and easy. Most foods can be dehydrated and there aren’t a ton of rules you have to remember like other food preservation methods. There are techniques that help your food be at its best through the dehydrating process but it’s really hard to “mess up” when dehydrating.

Risk Factor Is Low
There is a risk factor with all preserved foods. After all, they are not fresh, so something had to make them safe to eat at a later time. The risk of your food not being safe to eat after you have preserved it is very low with dehydrating. There is also a low risk of your food not tasting good after you’ve dehydrated it, provided you’ve used the correct pre-treatment.

Nutrition
Dehydrating preserves more of a food’s natural enzymes than other forms of food preservation. Dehydrated food can be as nutritious as fresh food provided the food is dehydrated at low temperatures. This is especially handy for preserving herbs for natural remedies, since all of the herb’s healing properties can be preserved.

Light and Portable
Dehydrated food is light and portable. All the heavy water content has been removed so the food is super light. This makes stuffing it in a backpack, a bug out bag or a 72 hour kit a great choice. You can carry considerably more dehydrated food than fresh or other food preserved by a different method.

Easily Add Food To Your Food Storage
Since dehydrating is such an easy process you can quickly build up a food storage for whatever emergency might come along, or just for a rainy day.

Takes Up A Smaller Amount Of Space
Since dehydrated food is missing the water content, not only is it light and portable, but its size is greatly reduced. So your food storage takes up less space. This is great for people who don’t have a lot of storage space. Also, it can be stacked, unlike home-canned food.

Preserve Your Organic Garden
You worked hard on that organic garden. Dehydrating is a great way to preserve your harvest. You can simply put things in your dehydrator as they become ripe. You can dehydrate in large or small batches.

Unique Recipes
You can create some great-tasting recipes even if you’re not trying to build a food storage. Have you ever had homemade crunchy spiced corn or kale chips? They make great healthy snacks.

Less Running To the Grocery Store
This one is kind of a no-brainer if you have a food storage. But the thing is that sometimes you’d rather run to the store before opening a case, jar or can of something in your food storage. But when you dehydrate you can open almost any container, take a little out, and seal it back up with little or no trouble.

Uses A Minimum Amount Of Energy
Other forms of food preservation use a lot of energy either for the process itself (C

) or to maintain the environment (freezing). Dehydrating takes very little energy to process food and none to store it.

Dehydrated Food Is Easy To Cook With
Dehydrated foods are really easy to cook with. Most of the time you can throw them into soups or stews without even reconstituted them. Even if you need to rehydrate them for a recipe it usually only takes a quick soak in a bit of water.

Save A Ton Of Money Making Powders
Not only can you save a ton of money by preserving things from your garden but you can save a ton of money by not having to buy so many items from the spice isle. You can make your own garlic and onion powder. Dry your own basil and rosemary. You can even make some of your own spice powders like ginger and turmeric powder.

Equipment Is A Good Investment
A good dehydrator is not super cheap but it’s probably not the most expensive thing in your kitchen either. The thing is if you buy a good dehydrator (I recommend an Excalibur) then you’re likely to have it for years. They are excellent dehydrators and mine has paid for itself many times over.

Can Be Done In Any Location
You can dehydrate most any place on earth. All you need is either a bit of electricity or the sun. Sun Oven makes a dehydrating kit for their solar oven, and you always have the option of making your own solar dehydrator. So dehydrating is a great off-grid food preserving option.

Children Love It
Kids love bite-sized snacks, and dehydrating different foods can give them a variety of healthy snacks. They are no longer limited to just raisins. You can dehydrate most any food and kids love the sweet (most fruit is sweeter once it’s dehydrated) chewy bites.

Dehydrated Foods Can Be Stored At Room Temperature
Although any food will last longer the cooler, darker and dryer it stays, dehydrated food will last a good long while at room temperature as long as it stays dry. So that means you can store it in a closet or bedroom.

Did I leave any dehydrating facts out? What’s your favorite reason for dehydrating food?

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Source : selfreliantschool.com

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Basic Survival Skills for Living a Good Life

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Basic Survival Skills for Living a Good Life It may seem like survival skills should come along with common sense, but with modern conveniences, it’s easy to get someone else to do most things for you.  Food preparation, laundry services, and vehicle maintenance can be easily outsourced these, days but what do we do in …

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Are You Only a Prepper If You Call Yourself One? Preparedness as a Way of Life

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Are You Only a Prepper If You Call Yourself One? Preparedness as a Way of Life Do you know many other preppers in person? Are there people in your life that don’t call themselves preppers but pretty much do the basics of what any prepper would want to do – keep their house well stocked …

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Vegetable Storage in a Root Cellar

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Vegetable Storage in a Root Cellar As the growing season draws to a close and the winter months approach, it’s time to think about storing food for the winter.  Freezing and canning are a great option and can definitely extend the shelf life of your harvest.  Nothing beats fresh vegetables in the winter months, though. …

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How to Can Your Leftover Turkey

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Every Thanksgiving that we’re cooking our own meal, I get the biggest turkey I can find because we love the leftovers.  Some years, there’s so much left on the turkey that we won’t be able to eat it all before it goes bad in the fridge, so we can it to use it later.  Canned […]

18 Low-Cost Ways to Start Prepping

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18 Low-Cost Ways to Start Prepping Prepping can be expensive and yes you can spend a lot of money on a few preps BUT I found 18 low cost ways to start your prepping journey. When the need to prepare for an uncertain future becomes a pressing reality for the new prepper, it’s easy to get …

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Harvest Time the right time to Preserve!

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Harvest Time the right time to Preserve! Bob Hawkins “The APN Report” Listen in player below! Now that we’ve reached the Fall season, we’ve reached the time to harvest & preserve foods for the coming winter… or at least that’s what people have done from the dawn of time. Today, normal folk now count on … Continue reading Harvest Time the right time to Preserve!

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11 Ways Anyone Can Be Self-Sufficient

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11 Ways Anyone Can Be Self-Sufficient Self-sufficiency is an attainable goal, and there are some easy steps you can take to get there. Growing your own herbs is one example – not only do they make runs to the store for that one missing ingredient unnecessary, but they just taste better. From there, you can …

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Here’s Why Your Canned Jars Aren’t Sealing

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Here’s Why Your Canned Jars Aren’t Sealing

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Speaking from experience, there is nothing more frustrating than finishing a batch of canned goods only to find that some, or even all, of your jars didn’t seal.

While there are a variety of reasons your jars might not be sealing, I’m going to focus on issues with the main components: the jars, the lids and the rings.

The Jars

While this might seem rather obvious, you don’t want to use jars that aren’t made for canning, as they are more likely not to seal. Even though it is cheaper to reuse glass jars from the grocery store, it is ultimately not worth it if you end up with a whole batch of unsealed jars. Canning jars are made to fit the lids, seals and rings just right, so it is better to spend the extra money to make sure your jars seal.

Food Storage Secrets: Discover How To Make Your Food Last Forever!

You also want to make sure that your canning jars are not defective in any way. Specifically, you want to make sure that your jar rims are free of cracks, chips and debris, as that will prevent the lids from sealing properly. Running your finger along the rim of each jar is an easy step to take to ensure that your jar rims are in the best condition to seal. You also should take caution when filling your jars, so that you don’t end up with any food on the rim. If you do, quickly, but thoroughly, wipe away any residue before putting the lid on the jar.

The Lids

Here’s Why Your Canned Jars Aren’t SealingNow that you know how to get the jars ready for sealing, the next component you need to look over is the lid. The lids are especially important in the sealing process, because they have the rubber seal that will make or break your canning process. While canning jars and rings can be used multiple times if they are still in good shape, canning lids and the rubber seal compound were designed to be used only once. Therefore, if a lid looks like it has been used before, it is best to just put it aside for some other use. When in doubt, it is always better to buy new lids, but even those need to be checked for any defective spots that could prevent the rubber seal from doing its job.

The Rings

If you have good jars and lids, the last thing you want is to spoil all of your hard work because of bad rings. While they might not seem as important as the jar or the lid, ill-fitting or rusty lids can prevent your jars from sealing just as quickly as a chipped rim. If the rings are bent, they will not apply equal pressure around the lid. This will prevent the seal from bonding properly because it won’t be able to get a good grip on the rim. Before you use any rings, you can test them by screwing them on the jar before it’s filled and by running your fingers around it to feel for bumps or rust. Another good test is to set it on a flat surface to see if the ring wobbles or if it lies flat.

You also should make sure that the rings are tightly screwed onto your jar, so the lid sits with even pressure on the rim. However, you don’t want them to be too tight or else the air will not be able to escape to create the necessary vacuum that develops as the jars cool.

Before you go through the process of making a delicious jam or other canned good, you want to make sure that you have all of the proper components in good condition. It does not take much to ruin an entire batch if you make just one mistake. Checking the jars for any damage or debris, using new lids, and using proper-fitting rings are very simple steps to take to make sure your lids seal properly so that you can enjoy the spoils of your hard work.

What canning advice would you add? Share it in the section below:

Discover The Secret To Saving Thousands At The Grocery Store. Read More Here.

The Beginner’s Guide To Emergency Food Storage

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Having a large food stockpile is one of the main goals of every prepper. Unfortunately, many newbies think that all they have to do is run to the store and fill a cart with canned foods. This is a costly mistake. You need to take some time to figure out what foods to store and […]

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7 Dangerous Canning Mistakes That Even Smart People Make

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How To Build An Off-Grid Home Without ANY Construction Skills

Autumn is filled with tons of chores for homesteaders: raking leaves, preparing the livestock for winter, and, of course, canning.

Canning is the time-tested method used by our great-grandparents and grandparents to extend the shelf life of food, and – if done properly – can form the core of an emergency stockpile. But if the right steps aren’t followed, the results can be disastrous … even deadly.

On this week’s edition of Off The Grid Radio we examine seven common canning mistakes that nearly everyone makes. Our guest is Kendra Lynne, a homesteader and canning expert whose DVD, “At Home Canning For Beginners and Beyond,” is one of the more popular tutorials for beginning canners.

Kendra, who also leads classes on canning, tells us:

  • Which mistake is the most common – and also perhaps the most dangerous.
  • Which types of foods should never, ever be canned.
  • Which vegetables should be used with a water bath canner, and which ones with a pressure canner.
  • Which mistakes can be easily corrected without buying any new equipment.

Finally, Kendra answers a much-debated question: How long will canned food really last? She also shares her best tips for storing canned foods.

If you’re a homesteader or just someone who enjoys canning, then this is one show you need to hear!

5 Reasons to Learn Food Preservation

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5 Reasons to Learn Food Preservation Do you know how to preserve food, other than using the freezer? Even then, do you know ways to make your food last longer without any freezer burn? What if there’s no power? You need to learn food preservation that goes beyond the freezer! To understand food preservation, you …

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Crunchy Dill Pickle Recipe

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Crunchy Dill Pickle Recipe There is nothing like nibbling on a crunchy, fresh crisp dill pickle. I am sure we have bought them from the supermarket and noticed that they are way overpriced. The ones from the store also have added ingredients like GMO’s and carcinogens. carcinogens can cause cancer. Well, do not worry. You can now …

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How To Can Rabbit, Chicken & Small Game

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How To Can Rabbit, Chicken & Small Game Modest food independence and sensible food storage are goals that many families strive to achieve. Raising a part of your own food is not complicated and a good amount of food can be produced yourself whether you live on a small town lot or in the suburbs. …

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How To Buy Meat Only Twice a Year

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How To Buy Meat Only Twice a Year No matter what part of the country you live in, food prices are going up. Even on items where the price hasn’t gone up much, the size of the packages has gotten smaller and that means you have to buy more. Across the whole store, all departments, …

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How To Cook Using Food Storage Ingredients

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How To Cook Using Food Storage Ingredients Cooking with just the foods in your food storage (whether that is emergency storage or just your pantry) can be challenging, especially when the more ‘easy to use’ items start to run out. Imagine being in week 3 and all you have in your storage are just the …

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11 Secrets To Properly Freezing Produce

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11 Secrets To Properly Freezing Produce Are you sick of freezer burned food? Check out these amazing 11 secrets to properly freezing produce and have fantastic frozen food. Never throw away another frozen item again! How many times have you gone to the freezer and discovered that your food was freezer burned? I know I …

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Pressure Canning for Preppers

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editor’s Note: This post is another entry in the Prepper Writing Contest from Cannin’ Nancy. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today.


Pressure canning is, by its nature, done by those who wish to preserve an overabundance of fresh food for consumption at a later date, and as such is an activity routinely engaged in by many preppers. Of course, there are many other reasons people do their own pressure canning: environmental (only a thin metal lid to dispose of as the jar is reusable); nutritional (you know what’s in that jar); financial (saving energy by cooking several meals at once and by having convenience foods on hand).

However, most people preparing for the dark days ahead don’t use their pressure canning to its fullest potential. Often people just don’t realize how important it is going to be to have variety in the diet, especially in a world where fresh and frozen foods will be lacking. Having a wide variety of pressure canned foods, many of which really aren’t available commercially, will be a welcome addition to our diets.

Most people look at pressure canning as a means of preserving garden produce and maybe some meat or a few stews here and there. And for those reasons alone a pressure canner is a worthwhile investment. But there is so much more that can be done. So let’s take it to the next level. The Ball Blue Book of Canning (hereafter the “BBB”) should be found in every prepper’s library and will provide all the guidelines for canning the basics. It should be consulted for all matters related to food preparation and processing times. This article is focused more on preserving some of the foods you really want to have on hand, those that will make meals a little more delicious and boost morale in difficult times.

Vegetables

Most of what is in the BBB regarding vegetables is pretty straightforward and beyond jazzing them up with spices or peppers, there isn’t a whole lot to discuss, with two exceptions. The first is canning shredded zucchini. Most people prefer to simply freeze their shredded zucchini to use later in zucchini breads and cupcakes (a favorite around here) and soups. But we’re preparing for when we won’t have freezers. So every year we can a few jars of shredded zucchini so that we can make our treats. The zucchini simply gets shredded in the food processor, packed in jars, and processed per the BBB.

Ball Blue Book Guide To Preserving

Ball Blue Book Guide To Preserving should be found in every prepper’s library

The other exception is potatoes. Yes, potatoes are routinely canned so as to be able to make soups and mashed potatoes long after the fresh potatoes in the root cellar have run out. But in this case we’re talking about that other main food group in the American diet: the French fry. Even if the pressure canner was not used for anything else, it would be worthwhile (in this family, at least) to acquire one just to be able to have French fries when the grid goes down. These fries are so incredibly divine. Unfortunately, I can’t give you a taste. You’ll just have to trust me.

You’ll want a French fry cutter to make preparation a whole lot faster. Amazon sells them for about $15. (Use the larger blade—1/2”. The smaller blade is just too fine and the fries will kind of disintegrate. ) Buy a bag of large potatoes—not the super huge ones. The potatoes need to be scrubbed well, but as long as they are being used for fries, they don’t need to be peeled (soil can harbor the botulism spores, but deep-frying will kill the botulism, so no need to worry about peeling). Cut the potatoes into fries and follow instructions in the BBB, except instead of boiling potatoes for 10 minutes, only boil for three. Place the fries in wide mouth canning jars. Continue canning per instructions from your BBB.

When you wish to eat some fries (which will be often!), open the jar and put the fries into a strainer. Thoroughly rinse and drain to remove excess starch. Deep fry in peanut oil until they reach a golden brown.

Dry Beans

Dry beans aren’t a particularly exciting item to can, unless you get excited about saving money, time, and energy. Dry beans normally take hours to prepare for each meal. By utilizing a pressure canner, you prepare beans for several meals at once, saving money now and time down the road. So how is it done?

By utilizing a pressure canner, you prepare beans for several meals at once

Soak beans for several hours or overnight. Rinse and drain beans several times, then fill jars about halfway. This is the part that is a little tricky, and I can’t be more precise than “about halfway.” You see, the exact amount to put in the jar will vary due to several factors—the type of bean, for example black beans usually expand more than pinto beans; the age of the bean; and how dry the bean is.
After filling jars about halfway with beans, add salt (1/2 teaspoon per pint, 1 teaspoon per quart) and boiling water. Process per instructions in your BBB.

Meats

For those who haven’t ever ventured into the world of canning meats, but do have experience with canning fruits and vegetables, don’t be scared. Yes, you need to follow directions and be careful, just like for produce, but canning meats is so much faster and easier! All meats are canned exactly as outlined in the BBB; what I present here, however, are some ideas for preparing and packaging meats for other uses generally not discussed elsewhere. Having a variety of dishes in our menus will be critical to good morale in the coming crisis.

Beef

I can a good quantity of stew meat to be used as is in stews, but also to be shredded for use as taco filling, French dips, etc. Ground beef also gets browned and canned so that I can make soups and casseroles very quickly. Most people who are preppers and canners are already familiar with this. However, I know it will be very nice in the future to also be able to have a hamburger now and then. Obviously stew meat won’t work for this purpose, and neither will ground beef that hasn’t had a little extra preparation.

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So this is what I do to have some hamburger patties. Form about one pound of ground beef into a log and roll it up in parchment paper that has been cut so that it is about an inch wider than the wide mouth jar being used for canning. Fold the parchment paper over the ends to help hold the hamburger log together. Put the hamburger log into the jar, making sure that you have one inch of head space. Process as per ground beef instructions in your BBB.

When you’re ready for some slider-sized burgers, run the jar under hot water for a minute or so to loosen the hamburger from the sides of the jar. Carefully slide the hamburger log out and remove the parchment paper. Slice the patties about ½” thick and fry them in a little butter or bacon grease for extra flavor. Serve with buns and all your favorite condiments.

Pork

Some pork is canned in chunks for later use in chili or to be shredded for taquito filling or super quick pulled pork sandwiches. Leftover ham from Christmas and Easter (we always get a large one for just this purpose) gets canned for adding to soups or fried rice.
I think bacon will be one of the most important morale boosters in the food department, so I can quite a bit. To can bacon strips, cut a piece of parchment paper about two inches longer than the height of a wide mouth pint jar. Lay the bacon strips (which you have cut into halves or thirds) side by side down the middle of the parchment, fold the parchment over the bacon ends, and tightly roll the bacon up as you go. You’ll need a few pieces of parchment, and you’ll want to overlap each additional parchment strip with the previous one to hold everything in place. Stop when the roll is large enough to fill the jar and place the roll in the jar. Process per BBB instructions for canning pork. When you wish to cook your bacon, you’ll need to run the jar under hot water to soften the fat and be able to remove the roll from the jar. Lightly brown the bacon and enjoy.

Can there be such a thing as too much BBQ after the grid goes down?

I also can bacon ends and pieces. These are typically sold in three-pound packages. There is usually quite a bit of fat, but there is also quite a lot of solid meat, and there are some pieces that look more like regular bacon. They all get canned separately. I use the bacon fat in some of my cooking, and the meat will become bacon bits for salads and baked potatoes. Some will say that in a TEOTWAWKI situation, bacon bits will be a bit of a ridiculous luxury. And I might have agreed a few years back, but for this one experience. A few years back we had a phenomenal crop of potatoes, and as such baked potatoes were a frequent dinner in our home. The kids were getting a little tired of them, so I decided to fry up a can of bacon bits to add to the spuds that night. I could not believe what a difference it made in the kids. They were so excited! Another lesson learned in avoiding flavor fatigue.

Chicken

This is probably what we can the most of in the meat department, mostly because I have one son who cannot have beef or pork. Home-canned chicken is perfect for making quick casseroles or adding to a summer salad for a main dish meal. And with a can of chicken on hand, it takes no time to get homemade chicken noodle soup ready when someone comes down with a cold.

Chicken bones. No, this isn’t being recommended as food for people, but chicken bones can be pressure canned (using directions for canning chicken meat) for feeding cats. Because the bones are hollow, after being pressure canned they can be easily mashed with a fork and fed to cats. Unfortunately, the chicken bones are too high in protein to be fed to dogs. (Too much protein can cause kidney damage in dogs.)

Convenience foods

Pressure canning is mostly about preserving the harvest, but it’s also just as much about making life easier. It’s what people have been doing for decades when purchasing processed foods at the grocery store. However, as more of us realize what kind of garbage is being added to commercially produced convenience foods, we’re opting to do more of our own. While we all enjoy freshly prepared meals, sometimes that just isn’t an option—the chief cook is sick, there’s been an emergency, or labors that day were needed elsewhere.

Keeping a ready supply of stew, chili, soup, and spaghetti sauce on hand for just such situations is a great way to reduce stress and be prepared at the same time.

Having some home canned convenience foods can really save the day. Keeping a ready supply of stew, chili, soup, and spaghetti sauce on hand for just such situations is a great way to reduce stress and be prepared at the same time. Because every family will have their own favorite recipes, I’m not providing any here. Most any recipe can be adapted for canning; one just needs to always remember to process for the time stated for the ingredient that needs the most time and highest pressure.

Traditional favorites for convenience foods to can at home are stews, soups and chili. Bear in mind, however, that some items just don’t do as well in a pressure canner at home. I’m not sure what the difference is between commercial canning and home canning, but unlike their commercially canned counterparts, noodles and rice just seem to go to mush when canned at home. So in this house we always add those ingredients just before mealtime.

With dark days ahead, and days that could quite conceivably turn into years, why not invest in a pressure canner and start preserving your own (at significantly greater savings over purchasing commercial products)? With more and more food being sourced from who knows where and with increasing reports of unsavory individuals employed at food processing plants, why not take control for more of our own food needs? A pressure canner is going to cost $100-$300. But the peace of mind that comes from preparing your own food? Priceless.

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PANTRY: Long Term Food Storage

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PANTRY: Long Term Food Storage Bobby Akart “Prepping For Tomorrow” Audio in player below! On this week’s episode of the Prepping for Tomorrow program, Author Bobby Akart continues his discussion about stocking your Prepper Pantry. Last week, the program focused on growing your own food and heirloom seeds.  This week, we’ll focus on food storage … Continue reading PANTRY: Long Term Food Storage

The post PANTRY: Long Term Food Storage appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

How to Can, Freeze, Dry and Preserve Any Fruit or Vegetable at Home

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How to Can, Freeze, Dry and Preserve Any Fruit or Vegetable at Home Knowing How to Can, Freeze, Dry and Preserve Any Fruit or Vegetable at Home is a not only for homesteaders, survivalist and people on a budget should be doing this too. I have been canning for years, I love doing it. It’s never …

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The post How to Can, Freeze, Dry and Preserve Any Fruit or Vegetable at Home appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

1000+ FREE Canning Recipes

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1000+ FREE Canning Recipes Are you just starting to can? Are you a seasoned canner? We all could do with more canning recipes, the site I came across has over 1000 recipes for you to browse and download for free. There are recipes for sauces, jellies, healthy food and even puddings. Canning food is not …

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Food Preservation – Preserving Your Harvest     

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It’s that time of year in Vermont… apple season.  We live near several family owned orchards that have a plethora of apple options – pre-picked, pick your own, utility apples, fresh pressed cider, and mouth-watering apple cider donuts.  It’s also the season for some wonderful wild mushrooms such as Black Trumpets – a relative of chanterelles.  Of course, it’s time for my herb garden to end the season – if I actually plant an herb garden.  Obviously I can’t keep all of this bounty in its current form for the winter, so now I’m in the process of preserving what I’ve grown, gathered, picked, and purchased.  Here’s an overview of my favorite food preservation options:

Food Preservation – Canning

seal-test
I love canning; but I truly believe it’s the messiest food preservation option out there.  It also requires the most specialized equipment.  You’ll need a pressure canner or water bath canner and jars and lids.  Canning also requires the most preparation; but this includes preparing jams, jellies, applesauce, fruit butters, tomatoes, etc.

There are two types of canning – water bath and pressure canning.  High acidity foods like fruits and tomatoes can be canned using the water bath method.  The Ball Kerr website has a great step-by-step guide to water bath canning.  Water bath canning can be done using a special water bath canner, a pressure canner or a large stockpot with a lid.

Pressure canning is necessary for low acid foods to ensure there won’t be spoilage.  Pressure canners are not cheap and I recommend that you buy the best one you can afford.  Remember, a pressure canner can become a bomb if used improperly.  Don’t let this scare you; using a pressure canner correctly can store your entire harvest.  Again, the Ball Kerr website has a wonderful step-by-step guide to pressure canning.

Be sure that the jars seal.  You can hear them seal when they pop as they cool and the lids will be slightly concaved.  Never eat any foods from a jar with an unsealed lid or a broken seal.  Never reuse a lid; they are made for single use only.  Jars and rings can be reused again and again.

Canned foods take up more storage space than dehydrated and frozen foods.

Food Preservation – Dehydrating

diy dehydrator
Dehydrating is probably the easiest food preservation method with the least amount of preparation and special equipment.   Dehydrating is simply removing the majority of the moisture from the food.

Before you actually start the process you need to prepare the items.  Most often you need only to cut or slice the produce; think commercial apple chips or sun-dried tomatoes.  There is no hard, fast rule for this.  Simply reduce the size of the item and expose the “wetter” interior of the item.  Smaller, thinner pieces are going to dehydrate faster, but may not be what you want your final product to be.  Most fruits benefit from a short soak in water with a bit of lemon juice.  This keeps the fruits from browning.  Note – this doesn’t change the fruits, but keeps them from browning too much.

Fruit leathers and jerky take more preparation.  Fruits must be pureed for fruit leathers and spread thinly on a baking sheet or fruit leather tray for your dehydrator.  For jerky, the meat must be sliced thinly with the grain then marinated.  There are lots of recipes, suggestions and even premade marinades available.  Select very lean meat, as the fat increases the possibility of spoilage.

The actual dehydrating can be done in your oven, in a counter top – or larger – dehydrator or out in the sun.  A dehydrater can be counter top or larger.  There are so many options than run from <$50 to several hundred.  I have this Nesco model and love it.  What I like about my dehydrator is that it doesn’t tie up my oven and my baking sheets.  To use your oven, simply spread your prepared produce in a single layer on a baking sheet and put into your oven heated to 150F-200F.

If you want to dehydrate in the sun, all you actually need is something on which to spread your prepared produce.  Of course, this leaves it exposed not only to the sun, but also to the wildlife.  A quick, inexpensive trip to the hardware store or a browse about the garage, and you can make a dehydrating frame.  Make a square frame with wood- 2x4s work well because they allow some space for the items.  Tack wire hardware cloth or small gauge chicken wire to one side.  You can spread you prepared items on a flat surface and cover with the screen or you can make two screens and stack them.  Use clamps or something heavy to weigh down and make it harder for furry thieves.  Using the sun will take longer than using a dehydrator or your oven, but it adds a little something extra that’s difficult to define.

Be sure to remove as much of the moisture as possible before storage.  Once your items are dehydrated, they need to be stored in a sealed container – a vacuum sealer is great for this.

Food Preservation – Freezing

foodsaver gamesaver
Freezing produce retains more of the items “integrity” than other options.  Freezing requires very little preparation of the items, usually just washing then cutting or chopping the item.  The only equipment you need is a freezer (duh) and freezer-safe containers.  Reusable containers are great, but require more space in your freezer and initial investment.  Zipper bags are also good options.  The biggest issue with these options is freezer burn, be careful that you remove as much air as possible from your containers.  This is where a vacuum sealer is worth the investment.  Seriously, why spend the effort of growing, harvesting and gathering or spending the money on produce if it’s going to be ruined with freezer burn?

Vacuum sealers are available at most big box home stores and department stores as well as my favorite vendor, Amazon.  I have a FoodSaver GameSaver model.  This gives me the option of using the film as well as special reusable containers.  I’ve learned that wider, flatter bags store better and defrost faster.  Unless your seal breaks or the film is punctured, you won’t lose any food to freezer burn.

Before you prepare stacks and stacks of containers for your freezer, be sure you have the freezer space.  Refrigerator freezers have extremely limited space and should really only be used for short term storage since the door is opened so often giving fluctuations in the temperature.  Chest or stand freezers are available everywhere – Lowes, Home Depot, Amazon, Walmart, Craigslist, etc.  Get one that works with your space and lifestyle.  Remember, bigger is not always better, especially with a chest style.  Things tend to get lost at the bottom and you may find something you put in there 10 years ago.  It’s good to keep an inventory of your frozen foods to keep things from getting “lost”.

Food Preservation – Root Cellar

root cellar
When I was growing up, I was a little afraid of my grandparents’ root cellar.  It was built into the side of a hill and had a damp, mustiness about it that was in comforting in a way.  I wish I had one just like it. Traditionally, root cellars were below ground but that really isn’t necessary.  Root cellars are basically below-ground rooms to store food with a consistent temperature around 35F-40F with high humidity of 90%-95%.  Ventilation is also very important; good circulation inhibits mold growth.  Potatoes, carrots, beets, turnips, rutabagas and even apples can be stored for the winter in a root cellar.  I found this great article to help you set up your root cellar.  My husband and I keep trying to figure out where we can put one.

Don’t let all of the effort and expense you spent over the summer go to waste. Start small and within your budget, space and resources.  Enjoying these foods throughout the year is why we do this, right?

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6 Popular Fruits & Vegetables You Didn’t Know Could Be Preserved

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6 Popular Fruits & Vegetables You Didn’t Know Could Be Preserved

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When most people think of putting up food for winter, there are a few vegetables and fruits that immediately come to mind.

But a look through any good quality food preservation book—such as the ones published by Ball, the National Center for Home Food Preservation, or the USDA—can reveal some interesting options.

When I find myself with an overabundance of something from my garden and do not want to see it wasted at the end of the season, I am often inspired to search for creative ideas to preserve my harvest in new ways. Over the years, I have dug up a few possibilities that can surprise even some experienced home food preservationists.

Here are a few fruits and vegetables you may not have realized you can preserve:

1. Eggplant. Although there is no recommended method for canning eggplant and it is listed in the “poor to fair” category for dehydrating success, you can still enjoy your eggplant harvest all year long by freezing it. The trick is to use lemon juice in the blanch water. Add a half cup per gallon of water, process in small batches, and prepare only enough fruit for one batch at a time.

For eggplant that I plan to use for frying, I slice it one-third of an inch thick. If it is fresh from the garden and not at all overripe, I leave the skins on. Otherwise, I peel it. After blanching for 4 minutes and cooling the slices in an ice bath, I pat dry on towels and freeze in zip-top bags with wax paper between the layers.

For other uses—ratatouille, stews and casseroles—I peel the eggplant, cut it into chunks, blanch and cool in lemon water the same as with slices, spin dry in a salad spinner, and freeze in batches the right size for one recipe.

It has occurred to me that it would work well to bread it and fry it before freezing, but my garden harvest keeps me too busy for that. If you have time to do so before freezing and save yourself the trouble later, I encourage you to try it.

2. Onions and peppers. The happy surprise here is not that you can preserve them, but the fact that it is so ridiculously easy. To freeze onions, shallots and peppers of all kinds, just cut them to the size and shape in which you are most likely to use them—sliced, chopped or in wedges—put them in bags or containers, and toss them into the freezer. No blanching, no fuss. Just clean, peel, cut up and freeze. They will not be suitable for raw eating when they come out, but will be excellent for just about everything else, from casseroles to omelets to soups to stir-fries.

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They can be preserved in other ways, also. Sweet peppers can be canned plain, pickled or in a variety of relishes. Hot peppers can be pickled, made into jam, or added to hot sauce. Onions, too, can be canned in vinegar, added to relishes and chutneys, and even made into marmalade!

Onions and peppers also dry very well, resulting in excellent culinary options for those off grid or with minimal freezer space.

6 Popular Fruits & Vegetables You Didn’t Know Could Be Preserved

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3. Zucchini and summer squash. The truth is, you will never be able to achieve an exact duplicate of yummy fresh-out-of-the-garden squash. But if you cannot bear the thought of going without squash on pizzas and in frittatas and sautéed in olive oil for the winter months, try freezing some slices. Slice, blanch 3 minutes, cool in ice water, pat dry on towels, and pack in bags or containers with wax paper between the layers.

As with eggplant, you may do well to fry it first if you have the time.

You can also grate it and freeze it that way, for use in winter breads, cakes and cookies. I measure out what I need for my favorite recipes and freeze it in those quantities. It does not need to be blanched if it will be used in baked goods, where the texture of the end product does not matter, but be aware that it will become watery when thawed.

Do not can summer squash. Its texture does not allow for it to be safely canned by itself. There is an approved recipe for canning zucchini in pineapple and sugar, but the end result may not taste much like the vegetable you are trying to preserve.

4. Watermelon. Wait, what?! The books say you can freeze it, in seedless cubes or balls, either plain or packed into a container of heavy syrup. I admit I have never done this, and the reason is simple. I live far enough north that raising melons is iffy. When I do manage to raise a few successfully, I indulge in them right then and there.

The one method I have tried is watermelon rind preserves. It is a delicious way to use a part of the melon I would have thrown away anyway, and makes a nice winter treat.

Melons can be dried, but is not recommended. I know people who have done it, but because melons are almost all water, the result may not be satisfactory.

5. Greens. Canning greens is hard work, but the results taste great. If you have a pressure canner and are up for the task, canned greens are an excellent choice.

You also can blanch and freeze them, but you end up with a product that does not look anything like store-bought.

Another option for greens is to simply freeze as-is. If your intention is to use them in a way in which the texture is irrelevant, such as in a smoothie, and you will use them up within a few months, this is the way to go. Pack enough for a single usage into a zip-top bag, flatten to remove as much air as possible, and freeze.

6 Popular Fruits & Vegetables You Didn’t Know Could Be Preserved

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6. Fruits and berries without sugar. Many people think it is necessary to make a sugar syrup for canning fruits and berries, but water or fruit juice can be used in most cases. I found a recipe for canning blueberries in water this year—I should note that I use canning recipes only from sources I know to be safe and reliable, and this one is from the National Center for Home Food Preservation—and was happy to can my home-grown blueberries using this healthy and hassle-free method.

It is wise to do some searching and read the side notes in order to find low-sugar and no-sugar options for canning fruit. Sometimes they can be found in the “special diet” section.

A word about experimentation—before you try it, ask yourself if the worst thing that can happen is about quality or safety. If it is about quality, and if you can afford the potential loss of losing the product, go ahead and try. But if it is about safety, do not risk it. What you stand to gain is not worth the possible cost.

Use this list for starters, use trusted resources, and have fun. You just never know what you might end up enjoying from your garden on a snowy January day.

What would you add to this list? Share your preserving tips in the section below:

Bust Inflation With A Low-Cost, High-Production Garden. Read More Here.

200+ Canning and Preserving Recipes

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200+ Canning and Preserving Recipes These 200+ Canning and Preserving Recipes will rock your socks off and will keep you busy for a long time. If you are anything like my wife, you will be constantly looking for new canning recipes, she loves to can, if she could can my socks I think she would. Canning is …

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Which Preservation Method Is Best For Which Foods? (Here’s How To Know)

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Which Preservation Method Is Best For What Foods? (Here's How To Know)

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I am frequently asked what is the best preservation method for various foods, and the answer is almost always the same: It depends.

The best bet is to be ready and able to do a combination of canning, freezing, dehydrating and root cellaring in order to maximize your efficiency and to end up with the best possible end result for the least effort and cost.

There are pros and cons to each type of food preservation, and which one you choose depends upon the food you are preserving, your own particular needs, your facilities and equipment, and the time you are willing and able to put into it.

The general rule of thumb in food preservation is to shoot for the shortest distance between two points. That is to say, choose the easiest and cheapest way to get the job done in a satisfactory manner. However, there are often additional factors which must be considered.

Let us first look at a few basic facts about each preservation method.

Canning

What Is The Best Food Preservation Method? (Here's How To Know)

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The upside of canned food is that it can be stored without the use of electricity, making it versatile for off-grid situations and worry-free for possible power outages. In addition, jars of food can be stored just about anywhere, making storage space less of an issue than with other options. The contents of canned foods are ready immediately without waiting for thawing or rehydrating. Also, many people prefer the taste and texture of canned foods, especially that of meats.

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On the other hand, canning is generally the most labor-intensive method of food preservation. It also presents a certain level of risk that is less prevalent with other methods—although the likelihood of botulism in properly canned foods is miniscule. Many canned vegetables have a less desirable texture than their frozen counterparts, and some are even said to contain less nutrients when canned.

Freezing

The best part about freezing foods is minimal preparation. Another great plus is the increased flavor, texture and color of many foods.

The downside of freezing is that it costs more. Purchasing a freezer is a big investment, and running it continuously year-round adds up. Using a freezer to preserve food is a real challenge without a steady reliable source of electricity. Freezer space can be a problem, too. It takes up floor space in your home, and when it’s full, it’s full. Unlike other methods, the space is finite—16 cubic feet of food is not going to fit into 15 cubic feet of freezer.

Dehydrating

Not all foods can be dried safely and effectively, but those that can are able to be stored easily, using minimal space and no power, for a long period of time. Taste and texture can be an issue with dried foods, which somewhat restricts their usage. The cost of dehydrating equipment covers a wide range, from a simple homemade screen which is adequate in some climates to high-end electric models that do offer a certain appeal. There is a learning curve to dehydrating, as well, with it being arguably the most subjective of methods—unlike canning instructions that give specific processing times and freezing directions with blanch times. Dehydrating the same food can range from four to 12 hours.

Root cellaring

Root cellaring is easy and no-fuss. One of the older preservation methods, it involves at its most rudimentary level simply finding a cool place to store a vegetable and placing it there. But like most skills, it requires a little judgement and experience to know what goes where, how long it can be expected to last, and what not to pair with it. It can be as inexpensive and no-frills as a shelf alongside the cellar stairs or under the guest room bed, or as elaborate as an intentional structure out of stone and mortar.

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A word about smoking: Although recognized as an excellent option for food preservation, it probably involves more skills and equipment than everyday gardeners may have access to in their backyards and kitchens and pantries. For that reason, I have chosen to omit it from this discussion. But if it is your preservation method of choice, thumbs up to you!

What Is The Best Food Preservation Method? (Here's How To Know)

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My personal food preservation plan looks something like this: I reserve freezer space for foods which do not generally can well—if at all—such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, eggplant, green peppers, pureed squash and most berries. If there is space beyond that, I add in foods which I prefer frozen, such as green beans.

If I have an abundance of beans—which I almost always do—I will can some. I like to can a few batches of blueberries to eat with yogurt, in addition to many pounds I freeze for use in baking. I always can my jams and pickles because I prefer the texture and cannot afford the freezer space.

I dry some fruits and like to make fruit leather. I also dehydrate vegetables when they are so abundant that I still have some left over after other methods, for use in soups and casseroles.

My root cellaring depends upon the weather. If it gets cold early in fall without too much of an Indian summer, so that the temperature in my house cellar drops and stays down, it is a prime opportunity for storing a bounty of food. I set apples in screened crates on the stone steps of my exterior bulkhead, where it gets very cold and stays damp, and keeps my apples separate from other foods. I place carrots and rutabagas and leeks in bins of sand in the main part of the cellar, and stash winter squashes in the closet in my utility room.

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If I have time, I prepare some convenience foods—those which I am glad to reach for when I need something instant, such as canned potatoes, canned stew and canned pork-and-beans.

Your personal preservation plan might look different than mine. To sort it out, ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Do I realistically have time to can it?
  2. Can I afford the purchase price for a freezer, do I have room to store it, and do I have an adequate source of reliable electricity?
  3. Will I be satisfied with the end product of dehydrating foods?
  4. Do I have, or can I create, a place to store root crops as-is or in sand?
  5. Do I enjoy the taste and texture of my chosen method?

Certain foods ought not be canned, due to either quality or safety reasons. Brassicas, eggplants, summer squash, pureed vegetables and untested recipes are among these.

Other foods are able to be canned but often yield a disappointing result. Strawberries lose flavor and texture. Greens such as spinach and Swiss chard are a lot of work.

Conversely, tomatoes are generally better canned than frozen, but cherry types can be popped whole into freezer bags for use in soups and casseroles, and leftover batches that did not seal in the canner freeze fine, too.

Some foods have many options. Potatoes are great root cellared, canned, frozen or dehydrated. Most cuts of beef are, too, as well as many other meats and vegetables.

Sometimes, you can even use more than one method on the same food. For example, I hang my onions from cellar rafters, inside the legs of pantyhose with knots tied between them to keep them from touching, and they store well that way for months. But when they start to get soft—or when it gets cold enough for me to fire up my cellar stove—I peel them and freeze them in bags of slices or chunks. This two-phase method minimizes my processing efforts to only that which is absolutely necessary and still allows me to use onions at my convenience throughout the year.

There are many factors to consider when preserving food. Cost, space, effort and end result are all important considerations to be balanced. As long as you follow safety guidelines, there are plenty of options that can be tailored to a food preservation plan that works just right for you.

What advice would you add? Share it in the section below:

Discover The Secret To Saving Thousands At The Grocery Store. Read More Here.

Be a Food Preservation Planner

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Do you know what will heppen with every piece of produce from your harvest?You need a food preservation planner | PreparednessMama

Next year have a plan for every piece of produce. Do you plan what you are going to do with your garden produce ahead of time? Well, eat it of course, but what else? Sometimes I find myself with a box of peaches that I couldn’t pass up from the grocery store and think ” […]

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DIY Canning Jar Vacuum Sealer

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DIY Canning Jar Vacuum Sealer This is a great project to do one night. Don’t spend a lot of money on a canning jar vacuum sealer when you can make one yourself for half the cost, maybe free if you already have the parts. I found this video on YouTube that shows you how to make …

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Lots of Apples? Here’s What to Do

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Lots of Apples? Here’s What to Do Apple harvests are pouring in and sales at the store are all over the place. It’s apple time and canners are firing up all over the country. Eventually though, you get to the point where you just don’t want to make any more applesauce! You realize that you …

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3 Things Your Grandmother Got Wrong About Canning

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Here’s What Your Grandmother Got Wrong About Canning

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There are a lot of misconceptions out there about canning safety. As is true with many topics, information found on the Internet supports a wide variety of truths and opinions, and it can be hard to differentiate between them.

Canning safety is a big deal. Doing it right is what comes between eating home-preserved food with confidence and risking upset stomachs, spoiled and wasted food, serious illness, or in very rare cases even death.

Before I explain which techniques are considered safe according to modern-day science and which are not, let me address the inevitable questions.  I hear them at every workshop I conduct and see it in every comment thread on forum discussions and social media.

“My grandmother used wax on her jams and all us kids grew up eating them.”

“The ladies at church just flip the hot chow-chow jars upside down and call it good.”

“My mother never owned a pressure canner and we all ate her canned beans and beef just fine.”

“We eat canned cake at camp every summer… and nobody ever died.”

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And my answer is always the same. Sure. Each one of us knew of someone consuming food canned by what is considered today to be unsafe practices, and many of us did it ourselves. And we did indeed all live to tell the tale.

But why take the risk? People survived automobile travel before seat belts came along, but most of us wear them nowadays. Communities have thrived for centuries without modern-day sanitation and plumbing, but most of us today consider running water and flush toilets to be good things. Mammograms, steel-toed work boots, prenatal ultrasounds, child safety locks—all things people lived without, until the advantages of using them became clear.

You can take the chance of doing it the old-fashioned way if you want to, but know that it is a risk. No home-canning method is guaranteed 100 percent bulletproof, but using techniques tested and approved by science and research are the best ways to minimize potential problems.

There are three main points I would like to highlight – three things our grandmothers often didn’t do when canning. First, processing in a canner is necessary for every canned product. No shortcuts, no alternatives. And second, using a pressure canner is essential for all low-acid foods. Third, all recipes are not created equal. Read on for details.

1. Processing is crucial.

Old-fashioned methods and trendy hacks are not good choices. Topping preserves with hot wax allows potential harmful bacteria and molds to seep in. Even after mold is scraped off the top—like our grandmothers used to do when we were not looking—it has been determined by recent science that there could well be lingering pathogens below the visible mold. The safe bet is to just pop them into the hot water bath canner for a short process time instead.

So-called “oven canning” and “open-kettle canning,” along with creative ways to can foods in the dishwasher and microwave, have not been tested to be safe and are not recommended. Food processed in this way does not always kill potential contaminants which may spoil food and make you sick.

Neither is it safe to simply invert the jars when hot and allow the product to seal itself—it might appear to seal nicely at the time, but is apt to unseal and reseal itself as the storage temperature fluctuates between now and the time you eat it.

Process, process, process—in a canner. There is no shortcut that is worth the risk.

2. Process all low-acid foods using a pressure canner.

Here is why:

3 Things Your Grandmother Got Wrong About Canning

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Hot water bath canners heat water to 212 degrees Fahrenheit. That is as hot as they can get. Pressure canners, by design, heat water to 240 degrees. The reason heat is an issue is because of rare but naturally occurring spores of the microorganism C. botulinum. When given exactly the right conditions—low acid and anaerobic—they can develop into botulism, which can be deadly. When canning low-acid foods, care must be taken to kill the spores before the product goes into the anaerobic jars, and 212 degrees is not sufficient to do so. It is imperative to use the higher-heat pressure canner to destroy any possible C. botulinum spores present.

Some folks insist that by canning them longer, all foods can be safely canned using a hot water bath canner. This is not true. Boiling water will never reach the temperature needed to kill possible dangerous spores. And besides, who wants to eat green beans that have been boiled for an hour and a half?

High-acid foods—most fruits and tomatoes—do not provide conditions for botulism to develop, and so hot water bath canners are sufficient. Vegetables, meats and other low-acid products need to be pressure-canned. The exception to this rule is when the vegetable is “acidified.” When sufficient amounts of acid, usually vinegar or lemon juice, are added, the end result is a food with enough acid content to safely can in a hot water bath canner.

3. Always use an approved recipe.

In addition to giving you the exact amounts of every ingredient and explaining exactly how to cut, chop, combine and cook them, a good recipe will tell you which canner to use, what size jars are best, and how long to process the products.

I know, I know. Great Aunt Hilda’s relish recipe was the best! And that wonderful easy salsa recipe on Facebook—yum! But has it been tested? Is the ratio of high-acid and low-acid foods adequate for the method and time given for canning? Is it worth the risk?

Another way people get into trouble is by starting off with a safe recipe and making their own modifications. Tomatoes are generally high acid, but peppers and onions are not. Adding low-acid foods can alter the acidification of a recipe enough to change the safety factor.

The perfect way to have your cake and eat it, too, is this: If you absolutely must use that online salsa recipe with questionable ingredients, go right ahead. Just freeze it. Botulism will not develop in the freezer, and your salsa will be good to go.

Use a recipe source approved by your cooperative extension. These include publications by Ball, USDA, and the University of Georgia’s National Center for Home Food Preservation. Ball canning books are inexpensive and can be found in most supermarkets and department stores. The National Center for Home Food Preservation’s excellent publication, “So Easy to Preserve,” sells for a little more money, but all of its recipes are available online for free at http://nchfp.uga.edu/

In addition to these three must-dos, remember to keep everything painstakingly clean. Pots and utensils, jars, lids, canning equipment, kitchen linens and hands all need to be carefully washed and rinsed before you begin any canning project.

Stay safe, play it smart, follow the guidelines, and you and your family will enjoy the fruits of your labors for seasons to come.

Do you agree? What canning advice would you add? Share it in the section below:

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6 Secrets of Hot Water Bath Canning You May Not Know

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6 Secrets of Hot Water Bath Canning You May Not Know Hot water bath canning is one of the most used canning methods used today. Get 6 secrets of this old school hobby and improve your method and food stockpile. Knowing how to can food is just a homesteaders daily life, this article I found …

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Vintage Canning Techniques Your Ancestors Used (But Are They Safe?)

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Vintage Canning Techniques Your Ancestors Used (But Are They Safe?)

Canning food in the modern world is easy. We have well-made jars, proven methods developed over a century and a half of trial and error, and the ability to consistently put up safe, nourishing and delicious food.

Even a century ago, canning was a well-established science, regardless of if you used Mason jars with zinc lids and rubber lids, or jars with glass lids and wire bails that locked down tight over a rubber ring. The end result was the same, even if the methods were quaint and old-fashioned today. But prior to our WWII-era metal bands and disposable lids, and prior to the old Lightning jars with wire bails or their competitors, and prior to the earliest Mason jars, there were other methods, and that’s what we are looking at today.

In 1858, John Landis Mason patented the basic screwtop canning jar. It used a zinc lid and a rubber band to provide an airtight seal, and with only minor modifications this method would remain unchanged until WWII. Mason revolutionized home canning with his simple invention, as it brought the reliability of consistently made canning jars, lids and rings into the public sphere for the first time. Prior to that, our ancestors had all manner of ways to put food up in glass and crockery jars.

Make ‘Off-The-Grid’ Super Foods Just Like Grandma Made!

In 1810, Nicolas Appert, a French inventor, worked out the idea of hermetically sealing food in jars after cooking it. His methods involved placing food in jars, corking it, sealing the cork with wax, wrapping the jar in cloth and then boiling it. While science tells us now that the boiling of the jar essentially pasteurized it, Appert was unaware of the scientific reasons that ensured his method worked, only that it in fact worked.  He was the first to put up food in glass jars, and he thought it was the exclusion of air that preserved the food (he was half right; the other half was in the boiling).

But prior to his efforts, people were still storing food in jars and crocks. The most common methods involved cooking food with a high sugar content or pickling them. In either case, the final product was placed in glass or crockery jars, and sealed in some form or another with glass, crockery, wooden or metal lids, wax, cloth or paper. Here we see the origins of canned food, but grossly lacking in the kind of processing that allows for safe, long-term storage. Such foods relied on their ingredients, being closed off from the air and stored in a cool dark place, and some of them are considered unsafe today.

Vintage Canning Techniques Your Ancestors Used (But Are They Safe?)The mid- to late-19th century was a boomtime for canning jars and canning technology. Before the Mason jar, we would see “wax sealers,” which used a glass lid and ring of hot wax to provide an airtight seal. This technology is echoed by modern homesteaders who may still use wax to seal jars of jams and jellies. It should be cautioned that wax-sealing of any sort, with or without a lid, was not always successful when it was in vogue, and should not be practiced now; it’s impossible to tell if you’ve gotten a good seal, and it’s easy to break the seal. I remember eating jams put up in wax-sealed jars by my grandmother, but I’d be hard-pressed to do it today.

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Another common sort of jar was the “Lighting” or wire bail jar. Countless variations on this theme exist, ranging from the common sort we may know today to complex systems involving levers or even thumbscrews. All work on the same idea, though, of securely latching a glass lid over a rubber ring that has been sealed through boiling.

The harsh reality is until the 19th century, canning really didn’t exist, and food storage in jars, bottles and crocks was as much hit and miss, as accepting the fact you were stuck with heavily brined or sugared food. Modern concepts of sanitation did not exist, and stored foods were at a greater risk of loss through spoilage.

The current Mason jar, with its on-time use metal lid and reusable metal rings, represents the ultimate in home glass jar canning, and should be embraced with great vigor, due to the low cost, ease of use and proven sanitary track record. If you have older shoulder-seal jars like the old blue Ball jars, or wire bail seal jars, those are best left for decoration or dry storage, and given a gentle and loving retirement.

If you are looking to understand and practice home canning as done by our ancestors, then applying modern sanitary methods and storage, combined with well-made modern storage containers can be rewarding, but outside of an emergency, such methods should really only be practiced for entertainment. An exception could be argued in favor of certain pickling techniques, but those exceed the scope of this article.

Hundreds of companies made thousands of variations of canning jars through WWII, and many still survive today. They are a fascinating glimpse into a time in our nation’s history when self-reliance and sufficiency was an important part of many American’s lifestyles, and the ability to “put up” food for the winter could mean the difference between life and death.

Harness The Power Of Nature’s Most Remarkable Healer: Vinegar

How To Make Homemade Jam Without Adding Pectin

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How To Make Homemade Jam Without Adding Pectin Nothing says “summer preserving” more than homemade jam, but if you’re using store-bought pectin, you may be adding ingredients that you’d rather leave out. Nearly all of the boxed and liquid pectins that you can buy at the store contain genetically modified ingredients, something many people are …

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Hundreds of Free Canning and Preserving Recipes in One Place

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I’m not much of a cook. In fact, I almost always eat plain food–sandwiches, grilled chicken, steamed vegetables, etc. If I ever do follow a recipe, it’s a recipe for survival food or preservation, and never for anything really fancy. So naturally, I don’t visit recipe sites like AllRecipes.com very often. But recently a friend […]

The post Hundreds of Free Canning and Preserving Recipes in One Place appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

6 Ways to Store Food Long Term

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When preparing food for long-term storage, consider how much is required, how long it needs to last, its nutritional value, and the resources available for preparation. Depending on your goals, there is a long-term food storage method for you.

Freezing

  • Depending on the emergency, freezing may be an acceptable option. Storage times vary depending on the type of item and its packaging, but meats can last up to two years when frozen properly. Blanch fruits and vegetables to halt quality-compromising enzymatic processes before freezing them. Most of the nutritional content remains stable when frozen items are stored in air-tight packaging.

 

Dehydrating

  • Dehydrated items maintain much of their nutritional content. Herbs, which are both beneficial to health and flavorful, are good candidates for dehydration. Fruits and vegetables also store well when dried. Blanch vegetables and fruits first to extend their shelf life. You can use a dehydrator or your oven on low heat to dehydrate items.
  • The key with dehydration is to ensure that all of the moisture has been removed. Food fresh off the dehydrator may still feel soft or moist. Follow instructions for each food, and take a sample off the dehydrator to cool for a minute or two in order to test its dryness. Dehydrated items should be stored in cool, dry, dark places. Use glass jars and vacuum-sealed pouches to extend the life of dehydrated foods.

 

Curing

  • The curing process harnesses the power of salt to eliminate moisture and prevent the growth of bacteria. Curing can be time intensive at the outset, but it will enable you to preserve flavorful meat for extended periods of time.
    • Dry curing involves coating a cut of meat in salt and other herbs and letting it set for an extended period. Smoking is another method of curing which adds flavor to meats. Brining is a wet curing method in which meat is soaked in a salt-rich solution. Research instructions for dry curing, brining, and smoking before using any of these methods. If cured incorrectly, items can harbor botulism, which can lead to food-borne illness.

Canning

      • Canning is a time-tested method for preserving fruits and vegetables. The acidity of the food will help you determine how to process it. Most jams and tomato-based products are safe to prepare through boiling. Low-acid vegetables and meats necessitate the use of a pressure canner. It is wise to look for updated canning recipes to ensure that new food safety measures are included in the instructions. Once food is canned, check to make sure that the jars are sealed. Store canned items in a dark, cool, and dry environment. With regard to shelf life, items with a high acidity can last one to one and a half years. Foods with a low acidity can last up to five years.

 

Fermenting

      • Fermented foods have been making a comeback in recent years. Their popularity is likely due to the health benefits associated with consuming them. Items like kimchi, sauerkraut, kefir, and pickles are rich in pro-biotics. During a disaster, the benefits that fermented items have on the immune system make them must-haves.
      • The fermentation process involves many considerations. Fermenting can extend the life of your foods for months or years. While the items may be safe to consume after extended periods, their health benefits may decrease as they age. Using a fermentation pot is the most common way to get results.

Vacuum Sealing

      • Vacuum sealing may be performed on nearly any food. It is important to remember that vacuum sealing is most often used as an adjunct to other preservation methods. For example, you may vacuum seal meat, but you will still have to keep it in the refrigerator or freezer in order for it to be safe. Jerkies and dried fruits and vegetables may also be vacuum sealed to increase their shelf lives.
      • Vacuum sealing can be accomplished with equipment such as the Food Saver, but Mylar bags may also be used without a special machine. If you are not using a machine to suck the air out of the packaging, oxygen absorbing pouches can be used to achieve the same effect. This method is great for processing bulk grains. Vacuum sealed bags can be placed in five-gallon plastic buckets to make them easy to store and protect them from pests.

 

There are so many options for long term food storage. A conscientious prepper will take advantage of multiple food preservation methods in order to reap the benefits of each type. With proper research about storage environments, recipes, and food safety guidelines, it is possible to maintain a safe, balanced, and flavorful food supply – even during a disaster.

The post 6 Ways to Store Food Long Term appeared first on American Preppers Network.

How To Can BUTTER For Food Storage

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How To Can BUTTER For Food Storage I have been reading a lot of canning articles and looking at a lot of canning websites as I want to start canning my vegetables I am growing this year. I never knew you could can butter. I know there are foods you shouldn’t can and I honestly …

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Use Dry Pack Canning Methods to Preserve Food

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5 Ways to store food using dry pack canning techniques | PreparednessMama

5 Ways to Store Food Long-Term Dry Pack Canning is the process used to  store foods that have less than 10% moisture and are low in oil content. When properly done, these items will last a long time, maybe even 30 years under certain conditions. We’ve talked in the past about the reasons to have extra […]

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Raspberry Jam made with Clear Jel….

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#amatterofprep
Yes, it is glorious Raspberry season again.  I look forward to fresh Raspberries to eat in salads, alone, and certainly in Jam!  Don’t you just love fresh Raspberries?

Making Raspberry Jam with Clear Jel:

I have many folks visit my blog to learn more about using Clear Jel.  I wrote a post about making many different Jams using Clear Jel a few years ago.  Even now, this post gets a great deal of attention this time of year.  I have used it to make Salsa as well.    Additionally, I have used it in canning Pie Fillings  because unlike cornstarch, it does not separate and break down the gel portion of the pie filling.
Well, Rooster Senior likes Raspberry jam a whole lot. So, I got busy and made some Raspberry Jam:
#amatterofprep

The recipe calls for crushed berries. I use my potato masher/ricer.

#amatterofprep

Instead of using the standard Pectin products that require copious amounts of sugar, you will use less sugar when you use a recipe that requires Clear Jel.  The secret to success is to mix your Clear Jel to the dry ingredients first.

#amatterofprep

Although the recipe that will appear at the bottom of this post does not call for Koolaid (per the author), please consider adding a packet to each batch.  It really enhances the flavor.
#amatterofprep

Mix the dry ingredients to the heated berry mixture slowly.  Bring to a boil.

#amatterofprep
Ladle your mixture into clean/sterilized jars.  There is some discussion about whether jars need to be sterilized.  I choose to error on the side of caution. Process per the directions in a Hot Water Bath. 

Would you like the Recipe?

Berry Jam4 cups crushed berries or juiced
1/4 cup lemon juice
7 tablespoons Clear Jel®
Sugar to taste (approximately 1 1/2 cup)
Add lemon juice to berries. Combine Clear Jel® with 1/4 cup of the sugar. Add to berries. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Add rest of sugar. Boil for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Pour into jars, leaving 1/4” headspace. Process 10 minutes in boiling water bath or freeze.

(Don’t forget to add the Koolaid, it is really delicious!)

Take Home Points:

  • Clear Jel is shelf stable and according to my research lasts indefinitely.  Compare that with traditional products that are used to make jam. 
  • Jam recipes calling for Clear Jel often use nearly half of the sugar that traditional jam recipes call for.  
  • When added to dry ingredients, it mixes well and give the jam a wonderful consistency.
  • This is a simple recipe that does not take a lot of time.  
  • Rooster Senior has already polished off one jar. Rooster Junior took a jar, and I have 2 to the neighbors already.  The magic or jam brings smiles to all those who receive it!

Where do you purchase Clear Jel?

If you use a Search Engine like Google/Chrome to find Clear Jel, be sure to click on the “Shopping” option at the top of the page. You should see many options to purchase this product.  I have purchased mine locally from a little shop in South Salt Lake that declines to get a website.  Alas I would give you a link but there is none.

Try it!


How Many Canning Jars Do You Need?

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Written by R. Ann Parris on The Prepper Journal.

When we work our way toward a goal of self-sufficiency, a lot of times producing and preserving food comes up. There are lots of methods, and there are thankfully things like dry meats, grains and legumes, and fruits and veggies that can go straight into cellars and other cold storage. However, for most of us, […]

The post How Many Canning Jars Do You Need? appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Canning Tomatoes: Here’s What Grandma May Not Have Told You

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Canning Tomatoes: Here’s What Grandma May Not Have Told You

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It is never more gratifying to be a gardener than when luscious ripe tomatoes are rolling off the plants and into our kitchens. For most of us, though, there are often far more tomatoes than we can eat at the time. After slicing, sautéing, roasting, making salads and salsa, adding to pizza and ratatouille and grilled burgers, and filling the freezer with sauce, there is only option left.

It is time to can tomatoes. People have been canning tomatoes for long enough that everyone and their great-grandmother—and I do mean that literally—has strong opinions on how it should be done. Some folks use strictly paste tomatoes, meaning only those varieties developed specifically for use in homemade sauces. Others use any varieties of tomatoes at all, from commercial or traditional to heirloom, in all shapes and sizes.

There is no single correct answer when it comes to the best tomato varieties for canning. The primary difference is that paste types usually have less water content and therefore require less reduction for sauces and ketchup. Taste, texture and personal preference are factors that matter.

The thing about canning tomatoes is that there are a lot of choices, not the least of which is whether to use a pressure canner or a boiling water bath canner. And the right answer to this question is that both methods are correct.

The Quickest And Easiest Way To Store A Month’s Worth Of Emergency Food!

This is unusual. For almost every other food, there is only one right choice. All vegetable, meats and seafood products need to be pressure-canned for safety. And while fruits can be processed using a pressure canner, it would diminish the quality of the product.

Canning Tomatoes: Here’s What Grandma May Not Have Told You

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So why can tomatoes go either way? To explain, let me first talk about acid. The value of various foods are either very acidic—which registers very low numbers on the pH scale—or very neutral and registering very high pH numbers.

Almost all fruits range from 3.0 to 4.0 and are considered to be high acid. Vegetables range from 4.8 to 7.0 and are considered to be low acid.

And then there are tomatoes. The average tomato sits at 4.6, right on the cusp of high acid versus low acid. In this sentence, “average” is the key word. If the average is at 4.6, that means there are some varieties that are a tad more acidic, and a few—particularly some of the heirloom types—that are a little less acidic.

Therefore, the safety rule with tomatoes is to acidify them. By adding a little acidic content to every jar of canned tomatoes, we can be absolutely sure that they are adequately acid. Just a tablespoon of lemon juice or ¼ teaspoon of citric acid per pint of tomatoes does the trick. It is super easy, inexpensive and does not affect the taste of the finished product.

It may sound as if it is alright to skip the acidification step—adding the lemon juice or citric acid—if you are pressure canning, but that is not the case. Acid needs to be added with both processes, and here is why: The directions and processing times for both canning methods have been tested using acidified tomatoes. If you do not use added acid, the processing times given may not be adequate.

The major difference in canning tomatoes using the boiling water bath method versus pressure canning is processing time.

For example, tomatoes packed in water take 40-50 minutes (depending upon the size of the jars) in a boiling water bath canner and only 10 minutes in a pressure canner. Tomatoes with no added liquid take a whopping 85 minutes in a boiling water bath canner and 25 minutes in a pressure canner. With crushed tomatoes, there is a huge time difference as well—35 to 45 minutes versus 15 minutes.

However, there is more than just processing time to consider. Using a pressure canner involves 10 minutes of venting, several minutes to build pressure, and more time to depressurize after processing. When you add it up, the actual time differences are less dramatic.

So why use a pressure canner for tomatoes? Many people say it is about the quality of the finished food. Pressure canned tomatoes often have brighter colors and flavors, retaining more of that tart zing that only a fresh backyard tomato can pack.

Prepare now for surging food costs and empty grocery store shelves…

Either way, there are some basics to go by. Following is a synopsis, although complete step-by-step directions can be found either in Ball’s Blue Book Guide to Preserving, which can be purchased for under $10 at most stores, or accessed free online at the National Center for Home Food Preservation.

Canning Tomatoes: Here’s What Grandma May Not Have Told You

Image source: Flickr

Prepare your supplies. Wash and rinse jars and lids, and keep warm. Assemble equipment:  canner, jar lifter, funnel and headspace tool.

  1. Peel tomatoes by dipping in scalding water until skin loosens, plunge in ice water to make them cool enough to handle, and pull skins off. Trim ends. Cut or crush as needed for recipe.
  2. Prepare your canner and heat the water to simmering.
  3. Add lemon juice or citric acid to each jar.
  4. Pack tomatoes according to recipe: crushed, whole or halved packed in water or tomato juice, or whole or halved with no liquid added. Add salt if desired.
  5. Remove air bubbles, wipe rims, and adjust lids to finger tight.
  6. Process in either boiling water bath canner or pressure canner, following times and procedures for the one you are using.

Processing times cannot safely be mixed and matched. It will not work to use pressure canning times in a boiling water bath canner, or to go with times given for whole tomatoes with added liquid for crushed tomatoes. If using the boiling water bath method for whole tomatoes, follow that recipe to the letter.

I have canned many tomatoes and have used very nearly all of the permutations—with liquid and without, whole and crushed, boiling water bath or pressure canner processed. I admit that I do not have a single go-to way of doing it. An hour and 25 minutes is a long process time, but once it’s boiling, I can set it and forget it. Pressure-canned tomatoes do seem a little tastier, but it is more of a multi-step process than a boiling water bath. Crushed tomatoes are easier to pack into jars, but require more prep work and yield a product that I tend to use less in recipes. Most years, I do a variety.

Even though it seems a little more complicated at the outset, tomatoes are the perfect food for canning and are just right for those who prefer a wide variety of methods. And as long as you use an approved recipe, there is no wrong way to can garden-fresh tomatoes.

What canning advice would you add? Share your tips and secrets in the section below:

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A Guide to Making and Canning Homemade Spaghetti Sauce Like an Italian Grandma

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Do you have tomatoes running out your ears?  Get more. Once you taste genuine homemade spaghetti sauce you will definitely want enough that you never have to resort to … Read the rest

The post A Guide to Making and Canning Homemade Spaghetti Sauce Like an Italian Grandma appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

How to Make and Can Apricot Nectar

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Making and canning your own homemade delicious apricot nectar is so easy! Step by step directions here!It’s apricot season! If you have access to an apricot tree, you know they can produce plenty of the sweet tart little guys. Where we live, apricots are a luxury, only producing on years where there is a mild enough spring not to freeze all the blossoms. And this year is one of those! I’ll be posting a few different ways to preserve them over the next couple of days so you can get some variety in how you preserve your apricot harvest this year. One of the easiest and tastiest ways to can a lot of apricots is to make apricot nectar. It’s so pretty, and tastes fantastic!

Here’s what you’ll need:

Step 1: Pick and wash your apricots.

We only hire the best 5 year old help around here.

Making and canning your own homemade delicious apricot nectar is so easy! Step by step directions here!

And I set up the washing/halving station outside to save some mess in my house, so we’re washing in a big mixing bowl like this one.

Making and canning your own homemade delicious apricot nectar is so easy! Step by step directions here!

Step 2: Halve the apricots, discarding the pits and trimming off any damaged parts.

Hire the kids for this part!

Making and canning your own homemade delicious apricot nectar is so easy! Step by step directions here!

I put the cut apricots directly into a mixture of 2 quarts water and 2 TB Fruit Fresh to keep them from browning while we cut the rest.  This is entirely optional, but does help preserve the color.

Making and canning your own homemade delicious apricot nectar is so easy! Step by step directions here!

Step 3: Cook the apricots.

Put the apricot halves in a pot, adding enough water so they don’t stick to the pan, and boil them until soft.  Apricots that are more ripe will soften faster.

Making and canning your own homemade delicious apricot nectar is so easy! Step by step directions here!

Before

Making and canning your own homemade delicious apricot nectar is so easy! Step by step directions here!

After

Step 4: Run the softened apricot mixture through your food sieve.

I use my Kitchen-aid with the strainer attachment to make this super easy!

Making and canning your own homemade delicious apricot nectar is so easy! Step by step directions here!

Step 5: Pour strained apricot nectar into a pot and keep it hot while you’re preparing to can it.

At this point I also put the canning lids I’ll be using into a small pot of water and heat them so they’ll be ready to put on the jars and get the canner filled with hot water as well.

Step 6: Fill jars.

Measure 1/2 cup sugar and 1 TB lemon juice into each clean quart jar.  A canning funnel makes this step lots less messy!  Add apricot nectar to slightly more full than the 1″ headspace you want to end with, and stir it up with a wooden spoon or long handle of any kitchen tool.  Air is released from the sugar pile as you stir which will lower the level of liquid in the jar slightly.  Don’t stir with metal as it could damage your jars.

Making and canning your own homemade delicious apricot nectar is so easy! Step by step directions here!

Left to right: sugar and lemon juice in jar, nectar added, and all mixed up!

Step 7: Put lids on jars.

Wipe the jar rims clean of any residue, apply the hot lids, and screw them on finger tight.

Step 8: Process jars in a water bath canner. 

Process 10 minutes, adjusting for altitude.  I processed mine 20 minutes because we’re at about 5,800 ft.  I also set up my canning station outside using a Camp Chef Explorer stove which saves a ton of mess and heat in the house!  One of my canners is this larger style that will process 9 quarts at a time instead of the standard 7.  Remove from canner and let cool.

Making and canning your own homemade delicious apricot nectar is so easy! Step by step directions here!

Making and canning your own homemade delicious apricot nectar is so easy! Step by step directions here!

Step 9: Enjoy!

If the apricot nectar is too thick for your liking or you just want to mix it up a bit, you can add water, or it is fabulous mixed with apple or pineapple juice.  Yum!

Keep preparing!
Angela

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Canning Water In Case Of Emergencies

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Canning Water In Case Of Emergencies In all my years as a prepper I have not come across this. I feel really silly looking at this because I am saying to myself “why didn’t I do this sooner”. Water is the most important thing to have in an emergency so wouldn’t it make sense to …

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Everything You Need to Know About Canning Jars (And More!)

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Everything You Need to Know About Canning Jars (And More!) Canning and the canning jars we know and use today have a rich and long history behind them. Knowing the history of not only the jars we use, but also how it was first discovered to be a viable method of food preservation is surprising. …

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Complete List of Home Canning Recipes

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Complete List of Home Canning Recipes These canning recipes will not only keep you busy any time of the year but they will keep your grocery bills low too. Canning any time of the year is just wonderful. If you have an abundance of crops, fruits and veggies to eat or get rid of, canning …

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9 Foods You Definitely Didn’t Know Could Be Canned

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9 Foods You Definitely Didn't Know Could Be Canned

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People have been canning at home for years … decades actually. With all of this experience, you would think we all would know what can be canned in pressure cookers. We don’t.

In fact, many people are under the very wrong assumption that fruits, vegetables and things like jam and soup are the only things they can home can.

The reality is that you can home can just about anything you serve your family today. You aren’t limited to eating mushy veggies and fruits if you are relying on your food storage.

You are in for a real treat when you see the following list of foods that can be canned and stored for years. Check out nine things you can preserve in your pressure canner so your family will be eating like kings for years down the road.

1. Hamburger patties. Imagine being able to have a juicy burger, perfectly seasoned, after a blackout. The next time ground beef goes on sale or you get a great deal on a side of beef, you don’t have to put it all in the freezer. It isn’t just patties you can preserve. Ground beef, in general, can be stored for years on your pantry shelf – as can meatballs.

The Quickest And Easiest Way To Store A Month’s Worth Of Emergency Food!

2. Chicken legs and thighs. Eating your favorite cut of chicken cooked the way you like is a pretty common comfort food. You can bake it, fry it or put it on the barbecue with your favorite sauce. Your family will love the idea of their favorite meal, just like they used to eat, when things were normal. You can buy packs of chicken legs and thighs for just a few dollars. This is an excellent, inexpensive way to stock your food storage shelves. Chicken breasts are also an option.

3. Fish. Going fishing is a fun activity and instead of wrapping up your catch and popping it in the freezer, can it instead! Salmon, steelhead, halibut and trout are all excellent tasting after the canning process. You can fillet the fish or dice it up. You don’t need to add any salt or preservatives to the water in the jar. Let the fish do the flavoring. Add a little vegetable oil if you like.

4. Pot roast. It often goes on sale and the next time it does, buy a bunch and home can it. Cutting the roast into small chunks, adding a little salt and then processing it in the pressure cooker is all you need to do to add some nice red meat to your food storage.

9 Foods You Definitely Didn't Know Could Be Canned

Bacon can be canned? Yep. Image source: Pixabay.com

5. Bacon. This is something few people want to live without. Canning it and adding it to your food storage means that, during a blackout or crisis, you will be able to make Sunday breakfast like you used to, bacon included.

6. Hot dogs. OK, it may not be the healthiest food, but imagine being able to grill up some hot dogs or whip up a batch of corn dogs for your little ones, even if the food in the freezer is spoiled. Hot dogs are cheap and often go on sale during the summer months, which is a perfect time to load up.

The World’s Healthiest Survival Food — And It Stores For YEARS and YEARS!

7. Butter. This is another staple you won’t want to live without. Load up on butter when it goes on sale and melt it down to put into your canning jars. It is important to note that the USDA does not have any approved methods for canning dairy products, and actually discourages it. However, any seasoned homesteader or canner will probably tell you many stories about eating canned butter without getting sick. Ghee, which is basically canned butter — regularly used in foreign countries.

8. Cheese. Cheese, glorious cheese in all styles like mozzarella, cheddar and even cream cheese. Again, this is another one of those items that people have been home canning for decades, but there is no official approved method. There is always some concern about bacteria growth, but if you go through the canning process the right way and store the jars in cool areas, you reduce the risk of bacteria growing and making anybody ill.

9. Cake. This is something nobody wants to live without, but baking a cake during a blackout or emergency could be difficult. Having jars filled with your favorite flavor of cake ready to eat when you get that craving will be an appreciated luxury. Cake mixes are easy to make or buy in bulk and you can fill your shelves with lots of cooked cakes to make any occasion a little more special.

What foods would you add to our list? Share your tips in the section below: 

Discover The Secret To Saving Thousands At The Grocery Store. Read More Here.

Storing Dairy Without a Fridge

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What about the milk and eggs? If you have a food stockpile, then at some point you probably asked yourself this question. Most people purchase milk and eggs every week, and the only place you can keep them is in the refrigerator. So how are you supposed to stock up on these things when they […]

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24 Food Storage Tips From 100 Years Ago

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24 Food Storage Tips From 100 Years Ago I have always struggled with my food. When I first started prepping I would just buy extra food and then forget about it. Then years later I would go to it and it had expired, I know you can still eat it but with the meat I …

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Pressure Canning Pinto Beans

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How to Pressure Can Pinto Beans for Long Term Food Storage

Clean and rinse beans to make sure there aren’t any rocks etc.
I then soaked 3/4 of a cup of beans in each jar full of water overnight.
Next morning drain water and refill with fresh water

These need to go for 70 minutes at 10 pounds.
SUPER easy. For me, even better than Mylar bags for long term storage.

One pint of home canned is about 2 store bought cans. Those beans are packed in there where a store bought has more water.

Rough break down of cost

Canning jars: $7.50 per doz (.62 per jar)
Beans roughly .25 per jar full.
So around .87 a pint
Not including electricity for the stove
And more bang for your bean in terms of servings.

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How To Can Food Without Electricity

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How To Can Food Without Electricity Canning is a safe sure way of having food after any disaster. Canning is fun and a great family night spent preparing. I call canning my insurance for the future, Now, if SHTF how can you carry on canning? There is no electricity or gas? Growing a garden, hunting …

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Planning To Can and Freeze – Stocking Our Pantry From The Garden

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Garden season is starting to heat up, and that means it won’t be long until the produce starts to roll in! As much as we love creating meals from all of the fresh berries, cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers and more during growing season –

The post Planning To Can and Freeze – Stocking Our Pantry From The Garden appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

5 Deadly Canning Mistakes Even Smart People Make (No. 1 Is Where Most Goes Wrong)

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5 Deadly Canning Mistakes That Even Smart People Make (No. 1 Is Where Most People Goes Wrong)

Image source: Flickr

Canning is an annual task for all homesteaders, ensuring a long-lasting stockpile of meals to eat.

And while most people may think of staples such as relish, pickles, tomatoes and olives, canning actually can include foods such as meatloaf, ground beef and chicken.

But if canning is not done properly, the food can quickly go bad, leading to illness or even death due to Botulism.

Stay safe this year when canning by avoiding these five mistakes:

1. Not property sterilizing

Cleaning the jars, bands and lids is essential to ensuring that no bacteria can grow. The method to follow when sterilizing the jars is to first wash them in the sink with hot soapy water. Then put them in hot, boiling water for 10 minutes. For the bands and lids, it is appropriate to just wash them in hot soapy water.

Prepare now for surging food costs and empty grocery store shelves…

Ball actually discourages the boiling of lids, due to the fact that it could damage the rubber gasket. Ball’s recommendation is to simmer (180 degrees Fahrenheit) and not boil (212) the lids.

2. Not following the recipe

Everything that is stated in a recipe is there for a reason. From preparing the food to how much headspace is needed – it is all required. Most importantly, make sure to pay attention to the various times in the recipe. Additionally, choose a recipe from a credited source. You may be placing these jars in storage for months or even years, and it’s no time to cut corners.

3. Not property sealing

5 Deadly Canning Mistakes That Even Smart People Make (No. 1 Is Where Most People Goes Wrong)

Image source: Wikimedia

This is the whole magic behind canning. To hear that “pop” is music to a homesteader’s ears. When putting the food into the jar, it is a great idea to use a funnel. This will help ensure that any food chunks do not get on the rim of the jar. Then, have a warm and clean towel ready to wipe off the tops. Next, when placing the band and lid on, hold the lid with one finger while twisting the band on. This should allow for proper sealing.

4. Now allowing the pressure canner to cool down by itself

After letting the pressure out of the canner, as directed by a recipe, you can simply leave it alone. Speeding up the process by putting the canner under cool water can lead to problems, such as the cracking of jars or the food being under-processed. These extra few minutes actually are critical to the canning process.

5. Not using the correct method of canning (hot water bath or pressure)

The rule of thumb is to put non-acid foods such as peas or chicken into a pressure canner and acidic foods such a pickles or jam into a hot water bath. The reason is simple: The potentially deadly Clostridium botulinum spores don’t grow in acidic foods.

What would you add to this list? Share your canning tips in the section below:

If You Like All-Natural Home Remedies, You Need To Read Everything That Hydrogen Peroxide Can Do. Find Out More Here.

Care and Maintenance of Pressure Canners

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Care and Maintenance of Pressure Canners As preppers, it can be a challenge to think of all the little details. Rotating everything into your normal food stock as it nears expiration is, in itself, a chore! It can be very easy to overlook the maintenance of pressure canners. If you are like the millions of …

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How to Preserve Meat: 5 Easy Ways

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How to Preserve Meat: 5 Easy Ways Let’s face it: meat doesn’t have a very long lifespan. If left out in the open, it will deteriorate in quality very quickly, essentially becoming useless. But if you know the different techniques for preserving meat, then you can make it last much longer without going bad. One …

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Strawberry Chipotle BBQ Sauce

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bbq sauceSweet. Smoky. Spicy. Is there anything better than these flavor combinations? This recipe happened purely by chance when I accidently let a pot of strawberry preserves go too long on the stove. I’m not about to let a pot of preserves go to waste, so I decided to make a barbecue sauce out of it. My mistake ended up being one of the best recipes I have ever come up with!

The chipotles will balance out the sweetness of the strawberries and really give some oomph to this sauce and is amazing on all meat types. My family loved it on ribs, chicken and pork tenderloin.

Now that barbecue season is quickly approaching, I thought I’d share this new take on the traditional bbq sauce and kick things up a notch. Happy grilling!

Strawberry Chipotle BBQ Sauce

  • 4 cups strawberries, hulled (if they are large cut them in half)
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup ketchup
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 chipotle chili in adobo, chopped
  • 2 tablespoon garlic, grated
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon mustard
  1. In a large pot, sterilize pint size canning jars, lids and rims.
  2. In a large sauce pan, add strawberries, lemon and sugar and cook over medium heat until they start to caramelize, about 15-20 minutes. Skim off any foam that may develop from the cooking process.
  3. Add remaining ingredients to blender and blend until pureed. Add ingredients to strawberries and simmer for 2o minutes.
  4. Ladle bbq sauce into canning jars, remove air bubbles and wipe rims before sealing.
  5. Process in hot water bath for 20 minutes.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

9 Things To Know Before You Start Canning Food

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To most people, canning appears to be the scariest and most complicated food preservation method. It requires specialized equipment, recipes, knowledge, and can even be dangerous if you don’t know what you’re doing. But before you panic and abandon the idea of canning altogether, keep reading. The basics of canning and how to do it […]

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The Right Way To Safely Can Non-Acidic Foods (And Avoid Deadly Botulism)

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The Right Way To Safely Can Non-Acidic Foods (And Avoid Deadly Botulism)

Image source: Pixabay.com

Knowledge on canning non-acidic foods is invaluable to the modern homesteader. Knowing that these canned items will rest safely on the shelves of your storage room or pantry – and be edible when you need them – can give you peace of mind.

What Is Non-Acidic Food?

Non-acid foods do not contain acids like tomatoes do, and they are not canned with vinegar. As stated by the Ball website, non-acidic foods need to process at a temperature of 240 degrees Fahrenheit. This ensures that no fungus grows within the jars.

Make ‘Off-The-Grid’ Super Foods Just Like Grandma Made!

Non-acidic foods also need to be pressure canned. Unlike non-acidic foods, acidic foods only need to be put into boiling water for a set amount of time. Examples of non-acidic foods include meats, soups and vegetables such as carrots, peas or asparagus.

Materials Needed to Can Non-Acidic Foods

Pressure canning non-acidic foods requires you to have a few items:

  • Pressure canner.
  • (Make sure there aren’t any indents, scratches, rust, etc., on the bands.)
  • (Make sure that there aren’t any scratches or tears on the seals.)
  • Clean glass jars.
  • Ladle.
  • Funnel.
  • Jar lifter (optional).
  • Head space measurer (optional).
  • Long thin spoon.
  • Recipe from a safe canning book such as a Ball book.

How to Pressure Can Non-Acidic Foods

1. The first step to pressure canning is ensuring that the glass jars, bands and lids are cleaned with hot soapy water. Also, make sure that they don’t have any nicks or cracks.

2. Put the jars in hot water until needed. This ensures that when you put the food into the jars and put the jars into the water, they don’t crack.

The Right Way To Safely Can Non-Acidic Foods (And Avoid Deadly Botulism)

Image source: Pixabay.com

3. Get the pressure canner and add two to three inches of water into it. Bring and keep the water at a simmer until the cans are ready to be put in.

4. Prep the food that you are putting into the jars. This depends on what your recipe says.

5. Remove the jars from the hot water, and add the food. Make sure the correct headspace is achieved as in the recipe you are using. Take out air bubbles with the spoon or headspace tool.

Just 30 Grams Of This Survival Superfood Provides More Nutrition Than An Entire Meal!

6. Clean the rims of the jars with a clean moist rag to wipe off all of the junk that could prevent a proper seal.

7. Add the seals and then the bands. Tighten until fingertip tight.

8. Put jars in the pressure canner.

9. Lock the pressure canner and open the vent pipe. Leave the heat on medium to high heat and let it blow steam for 10 minutes to ensure that there isn’t any air in the pressure canner.

10. Close the vent pipe by whatever means is appropriate for your own canner. Allow the pressure to build up to where you need it and then keep it at whatever your recipe calls for by adjusting the heat.

11. When it has finished after the amount of time needed for your recipe, take the jars out of the canner using the jar lifter, if you have one.

12. Put them on a towel or on the stove.

13. Leave them alone for a day to ensure proper sealing.

14. Lastly, check the seals to ensure that they have been properly sealed. You should be able to press on the top and it should not move up and down. Also, try to pry off the seal, gently. If you cannot pull it off and it does not move up or down, then you have a perfect seal. If there is a jar that did not seal, then put it in your fridge and eat it soon. As for the sealed jars, put them in a cool and dark place, label them, and leave them there for as long as they stay good (check the jars every year to ensure they are still sealed and suitable for consumption).

Why You Need to Be Careful

It is critical to ensure that the cans of food are properly pressure canned during the processing. Without proper sealing, mold can grow in it, and one could be Clostridium botulinum. This is a very dangerous mold that can paralyze and kill you. Following these directions will ensure that you have a safe and fruitful canning experience each time!

What advice would you add? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Harness The Power Of Nature’s Most Remarkable Healer: Vinegar

26 Useful Hobbies that Pair Well with Prepping

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26 Useful Hobbies that Pair Well with Prepping George Matthew Allen once said “People with many interests live, not only the longest, but the happiest.” While I am not sure if Allen said anything else worthwhile, this quote hits home for us preppers.  With the majority of the people in the US living sedentary lives, …

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Water Bath & Pressure Canning Recipes

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Water Bath & Pressure Canning Recipes These water bath and pressure canning recipes will not only rock your socks off but keep you busy all season long. 🙂 Do you want to get into canning your food this year? I have been looking at different canning articles over the past few days and I actually came across …

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Can You Help Us? A Special Plea From Jim and Mary

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Yes- this is an extra post today – and we certainly promise that it will be the only “extra post” that you get from us for a long time to come.  First and foremost, we always enjoy writing about our

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Massive Survival & Preparedness Printable PDF Collection

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Massive Survival & Preparedness Printable PDF Collection Let’s say you weren’t paying attention to great sites like SHTFPreparedness.com, owned little or no books on preparedness and survival and let’s face it, wanted to learn some new skills quickly because you were caught entirely with your pants down when SHTF. I have been asked a number of …

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10 Reasons You Should Learn How to Pressure Can Food

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With freeze-dried foods and survival seeds vying for your dollar–not to mention emergency gardens full of fresh foods–pressure canning just doesn’t feel necessary to many people in the preparedness world. If that sounds like you, your feelings are wrong. Having come to preparedness late in the game, I empathize with the overwhelming urge to learn […]

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Just For Fun on a Spring Day- Dandelion Petal Jelly!

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dandelionjelly

A couple weeks ago, a friend of a friend remarked during dinner about her enthusiasm for making dandelion jelly. “Tastes like honey…” was her commentary and since I love honey, I purposed to create this nectar of the dandelion at my first opportunity.  (In addition to jelly, you can create a syrup or wine from the blossoms as well.)

dandelion jelly

Dandelion Petals Have Some Medicinal Value

In my research, in most of my go-to resources, I could find no mention of any real medicinal value to the flowers, fresh or as an infusion (the leaves and roots are another story), until I dug into Healing Wise by Susun Weed.  (I think it is too funny that that is her name and she is an herbalist!) According to her, dandelion flowers are good for beautification, pain relief and heart health.  She says fresh blossoms steeped in boiling water for at least an hour are amazing for beautifying your face and dealing with just about any facial skin anomoly you might have – putting the strained flowers on your face first for a while and then rinsing off with the liquid w/o following with plain water.  I must try this!

She recommends making dandelion wine for a heart strengthener and claims that an infusion will rid one of aches of all kinds -head, back, stomach, cramps, etc.!  In addition, if you infuse an oil with the blossoms and then rub it into painful, sore and stiff areas, it should help with stiff necks, arthritic joints and such. I have infused St. John’s Wort in oil for this reason…hmmm – I think this year I will add in some dandelion heads!

Now, I’m not sure if any healing value is left after all the processing of a jelly, but it is fun to just know that this is a creation from a gift of nature.  These are my favorite ventures in life!

dandelion jelly

What To Do On A Sunny Day

Yesterday was the sunny, pleasant, relaxed day I was looking for to pick the flowerheads. Little did I know it would take me 3 hours(!!) to collect enough flower petals (a loosely-packed quart) to do a batch of jelly! This is one situation where you want to ask all hands on deck to help because otherwise, I’m just not sure the result justifies the time expense! But for me, I was just enjoying the sun and downtime as I picked enough flowers and de-bracted them.

dandelion jellydandelion jelly

Don’t Leave Any Green!

Dandelion greens are bitters, so that includes the bracts that hold in the flower petals…it is important that if you want a sweet product, that you remove all the green parts! This is very time consuming! I used my thumbnails and broke each base in half and then ran my thumbnail along the base of the flower head to release the petals. Another friend says you just have to develop a technique of twisting the bracts while squeezing them and the petals will just fall into your hand.

 

It takes a lot of flower heads to get a quart of petals and honestly, I just had to be done at one point and shook up my jar to expand the volume! (They had indeed settled down into the jar and gotten moist.)

dandelion jelly

Make the Infusion First

I then brought the petals indoors and boiled them in a pot with 2 quarts of fresh, non-chlorinated water for 10 minutes. I decided to let this infusion sit overnight for the best potency. In the morning, I strained twice, first through a double layer of cheesecloth and then through a coffee filter. I had 6 cups of liquid.

dandelion jellydandelion jellydandelion jellydandelion jelly

Then Make Jelly!

Using Pomona’s Universal Pectin, I came up with the following recipe for 6 cups of dandelion tea:

3/4 cup fresh (if possible) lemon juice
zest from two lemons
1 vanilla bean, split and seeds scooped into the liquid
3 cups sugar
2 Tbs. calcium water
2 Tbs + 1/2 tsp pectin

Then I just followed the general directions for using Pomonas. Altogether I got 5 1/2 pints and 8 4-oz jars. (About 4 1/2 pints)

dandelion jellydandelion jellydandelion jellydandelion jellydandelion jellydandelion jellydandelion jellydandelion jelly

My honest first impression was that it tasted like lemon meringue pie!  This recipe jelled nicely and has a very pleasant delicate lemony-vanilla flavor.

I think this is going to be a very nice accompaniment to popovers!

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How To Make A DIY Beehive In A Jar

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How To Make A DIY Beehive In A Jar There are so many benefits to beekeeping: honey, beeswax, royal jelly and the knowledge that you are helping the bee population survive. It is a fun and rewarding hobby or occupation; more and more people are raising bees in suburban areas than ever. I mean, how …

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50 Tips for Eating From the Pantry When You Have No Money for Groceries

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50 Tips for Eating From the Pantry When You Have No Money for Groceries When do you actually use the stuff in your prepper’s pantry? Have you ever stopped to think about what is the most frequent disaster that causes people to turn to their emergency food supplies? It isn’t what you might think. The …

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Canning 101: Canning Equipment

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Where should you begin? Most items suitable for canning can already be found in your kitchen. Next look at garage sales and then follow our recommendations. For under $50 you can have the tools to preserve your own food | PreparednessMama

Small investment, Big return By now you have planned and maybe even planted your garden in the hopes of preserving the harvest in months to come. Even if you don’t have room for a garden you can still preserve fruits and vegetables purchased from the grocer. This week I got a killer deal on asparagus! Start […]

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5 Proven Ways Our Ancestors Preserved Meat Without Refrigerators

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5 Proven Ways Our Ancestors Preserved Meat Without A Refrigerator

Stockpiling food and other supplies is central to being prepared for an emergency, but there are some foods – such as meat — that are harder to pack for long-term storage than others.

I’m sure there are some people out there who think that they can live off of rice and beans, getting all the protein they need from the beans. While that may be technically true, I, for one, don’t want to try it. Not only am I not a huge fan of beans, but I also am a huge fan of meat. So, I need to have ways of preserving that meat and ensuring that I’ll have it available when a disaster strikes. Fortunately, there are actually a number of ways of preserving meat which work quite well — ways our ancestors used.

The Key to Preserving Meat – Salt

If there’s any one key ingredient for preserving meat, it’s salt. Salt is one of the few natural preservatives, and it works ideally with meat. Salt draws the moisture out of the cells in the meat in a process known as osmosis. Essentially, osmosis is trying to equalize the salinity on both sides of the cell wall (which is a membrane). So, water leaves the cell and salt enters it. When enough water leaves the cell, the cell dies.

Discover 1,147 Secrets Of Successful Off-Grid Living!

This happens with bacteria, as well. Any bacteria that are on the surface of the meat go through the same osmosis process that the cells of the meat do. This dehydrates the bacteria to the point of death. Unfortunately, the salt won’t travel all the way through the meat quickly, killing off the bacteria, so salt is usually used in conjunction with other means of preserving.

1. Canning

Probably the least complex form of preserving meat is canning it. Canning preserves any wet food well through a combination of killing off existing bacteria in the food and container, while providing a container that prevents any further bacteria from entering.

Canning uses heat to kill off bacteria. All you have to do is raise the temperature of the bacteria to 158 degrees Fahrenheit, and it dies. This is called “pasteurizing,” so named for Louis Pasteur, a French microbiologist who discovered the process in the mid-1800s. To kill viruses, you raise the temperature a bit more, to 174 degrees Fahrenheit.

The only problem with canning meat is that it has to be canned at a higher temperature than fruits and vegetables. This is accomplished by canning it in a pressure canner, essentially a large pressure cooker. The higher atmospheric pressure inside the pressure canner causes the water to boil at a higher temperature, thus cooking the meat.

Meats that are canned tend to be very well-cooked. You have to at least partially cook them before canning, and then the 90 minutes they spend in the canner cooks them further. That makes for very soft meats, but they do lose some of their texture.

2. Dehydrating

Dehydrating takes over where salt leaves off, removing much more moisture from the meat than just salting it will. However, dehydrating of meats is usually combined with salting the meat with a rub or marinating it with a salty marinade. The salt on the outside of the meat attacks any bacteria that approach the meat once it is dehydrated. Meat that is dehydrated without salt won’t last, as the bacteria can attack it.

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5 Proven Ways Our Ancestors Preserved Meat Without A RefrigeratorThe American Indians used dehydrating as a means of preserving meat, making jerky. While a very popular snack food today, jerky is excellent survival food. Not only will it keep without refrigeration, but it can be rehydrated for use in soups and stews. That takes it beyond being a snack and makes it possible to use jerky for part of your meals.

Dehydrating can either be done in the sun, in an electric dehydrator or in a solar dehydrator. The American Indians used the sun, hanging strips of meat on poles. However, there is a risk in dehydrating meat as they did, in that the meat may start to spoil before it dries. All fat should be removed from the meat, as the fat can turn rancid.

3. Salt fish

Salt fish is another means of dehydrating meat, something like making fish jerky. It has been done for centuries and is still a popular dish in some countries. Salt fish uses the concept that the salt draws the water out of the fish, starting the drying process. This is accomplished by packing the fish fillets in alternating layers of salt and fish. Then, the fish is sun dried to complete the process.

4. Smoking

Smoking is another method that combines salt with a secondary method of preservation. For preserving, one must use hot smoking, which cooks the meat, and not just cold smoking, which is used to flavor the meat. Typically, the process consists of three major steps: soaking the meat in brine (salt water), cold smoking and then hot smoking.

When meat is smoked, the proteins on the outer layer of the meat form a skin, called a pellicle. This is basically impervious to any bacteria, protecting the meat. However, if the meat is cut, such as to cut off a steak from a chunk of smoked meat, the open surface can be attacked by bacteria.

In olden times, this problem was solved by hanging the meat in the smokehouse once again. In some homes, the kitchen chimney was large enough to be used as a smokehouse, and meat was hung in it, where the constant smoke helped to protect it. Most of the fat was usually trimmed off the meat, so that it would not turn rancid.

5 Proven Ways Our Ancestors Preserved Meat Without A RefrigeratorOne nice thing about smoking meats, besides that it adds that lovely smoke flavor, is that the smoking process is a slow-cooking process, much like cooking meat in a crockpot. This helps to break down the fiber in the meat, turning otherwise tough cuts of meat tender.

5. Curing

The deli meats we pay top dollar for today are actually cured meats. Curing is a process that combines smoking, with salt, sugar and nitrites. Together, these act as an almost perfect preservative, protecting the meat from decay-causing bacteria. Technically, smoking is a type of curing, but normally when we talk about curing, we’re referring to what is known as “sausage curing,” which is the method used for making most sausage and lunch meat.

The curing process is all about killing the bacteria and is done mostly by the addition of salt to the meat. For sausage curing, the meat is ground and then mixed with fat, spices salt and whatever else is going to be used (some sausage includes cheese). It is then allowed to sit, in order for the salt to permeate all the meat and kill the bacteria. Cooking or smoking is accomplished once the curing is done.

Curing meats, like smoking, tenderizes it. So, traditionally, the tougher, lower grade cuts of meat were usually used for the making of most of what we know today as lunch meats. One nice thing about properly cured meats is that they can be left out, with no risk of decay, even when they have been cut. That is, if it is properly cured. I wouldn’t try that with commercially prepared lunchmeats, as they are not cured with the idea of leaving them out.

What meat-preserving methods would you add to this list? Share your ideas in the section below:

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9 Good Reasons to Can Your Own Food

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9 Good Reasons to Can Your Own Food Canning your own food will not only save you money at the grocery store but it will give your family “food insurance” if SHTF. I touched on this a little in my 6 Secrets of Hot Water Bath Canning You May Not Know article. Now is the perfect time …

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How To Preserve Dairy Products For Emergency Situations

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How To Preserve Dairy Products For Emergency Situations When it comes to being prepared, food and water is usually right at the top of the list. The focus is generally on getting proteins stored for the long term but many of them overlook the importance of having preserved dairy products on hand as well. Sure, …

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