A Guide to Veterinary Drugs for Human Consumption

Click here to view the original post.

A Guide to Veterinary Drugs for Human Consumption In times of uncertainty, we humans like to stockpile and hoard.  We seek information that will keep us safe and provide for our well-being. It’s not a big secret that veterinary antibiotics and drugs do not require a prescription. I personally have the fish-MOX stockpiled. I know a …

Continue reading »

The post A Guide to Veterinary Drugs for Human Consumption appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

WENDELL BERRY’S THOUGHTS ON CONSUMPTION AND OLDER TECHNOLOGY

Click here to view the original post.
facebooktwittergoogle_plus
(By Guy Mendes, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29726407)

(By Guy Mendes, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29726407)

 

Wendell Berry’s nine rules for consumption

1. Be happy with what you’ve got. Don’t be always looking for something better.

2. Don’t buy anything you don’t need.

3. Don’t buy what you ought to save. Don’t buy what you ought to make.

4. Unless you absolutely have got to do it, don’t buy anything new.

5. If somebody tries to sell you something to “save labor,” look out. If you can work, then work.

6. If other people want to buy a lot of new stuff and fill up the country with junk, use the junk.

7. Some good things are cheap, even free. Use them first.

8. Keep watch for what nobody wants. Sort through the leavings.

9. You might know, or find out, what it is to need help. So help people.

 

Wendel Berry’s nine requirements for replacing an older technology

1. The new tool should be cheaper than the one it replaces.

2. It should be at least as small in scale as the one it replaces.

3. It should do work that is clearly and demonstrably better than the one it replaces.

4. It should use less energy than the one it replaces.

5. If possible, it should use some form of solar energy, such as that of the body.

6. It should be repairable by a person of ordinary intelligence, provided that he or she has the necessary tools.
7. It should be purchasable and repairable as near to home as possible.

8. It should come from a small, privately owned shop or store that will take it back for maintenance and repair.

9. It should not replace or disrupt anything good that already exists, and this includes family and community relationships.

You can learn more about Mr. Berry HERE and HERE.

Keep up with everything Practical Tactical by subscribing to our mailing list and be sure to LIKE, SHARE and FOLLOW us across all of our social media platforms as well.