How To Make Deodorant, Toothpaste, Shaving Cream & Hand Soap With Coconut Oil

Click here to view the original post.
How To Make Deodorant, Toothpaste, Shaving Cream & Hand Soap With Coconut Oil

Image source: Pixabay.com

Coconut oil is labeled as a superfood, and for excellent reason.

Considered the “tree of life” in much of India, the Philippines, Southeast Asia and other tropical locations, the coconut tree can now be found in more than 75 countries throughout the world.

But for the modern homesteader, coconut oil has more uses than just for cooking.

Learn How To Make Powerful Herbal Medicines, Right in Your Kitchen!

For the following uses around the house, be sure and melt the coconut oil first so that you can add the ingredients and stir. You can do that by using a double boiler, a lighter or a microwave. Don’t overheat.

1. A homemade, all-natural deodorant

  • 1/3 cup coconut oil
  • 2 tbsp baking soda
  • 1/3 cup arrow root powder
  • 15 drops essential oils of your choice ─ (I prefer to use lavender oil, sweet orange oil, jasmine oil, may chang oil or rose oil. They all have great skin healing properties and smell wonderful)
  • For a more powerful deodorant, use citronella oil

2. A homemade, all-natural shaving cream

  • 4 tbsp shea butter
  • 3 tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 tbsp sweet almond oil
  • 6 drops lavender essential oil
  • 6 drops Roman chamomile essential oil
How To Make Deodorant, Toothpaste, Shaving Cream & Hand Soap With Coconut Oil

Image source: Pixabay.com

3. A homemade, all-natural toothpaste

  • 6 tbsp coconut oil
  • 6 tbsp baking soda
  • 15 drops eucalyptus essential oil
  • 10 drops grapefruit essential oil
  • 1 tsp Stevia (for taste)

4. Lemon & coconut skin moisturizer

  • 4 tbsp coconut oil
  • Squeeze in two lemons
  • Squeeze in 1 opened, liquid vitamin E pill
  • Add several drops of lavender essential oil if you prefer, or any essential oil of your

5. Homemade, all-natural hand soap

  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 tbsp raw honey
  • ¼ cup sea salt
  • ¼ cup organic sugar
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • Add peppermint essential oil, or any of your favorite essential oils.
  • Stir together the coconut oil and honey separately. Then, mix together the rest of the ingredients in a separate bowl before adding it to the first mixture. Stir until it is smooth.

Enjoy these recipes to start, and let us know how you use coconut oil every day.

Do you know of other uses for coconut oil? Share your suggestions in the section below:

hydrogen peroxide report

Survial Mom DIY: Make Pure Beeswax from Honeycomb

Click here to view the original post.

how to make beeswaxThis year I began a beehive, but didn’t get to harvest any honey for myself. The bee population outgrew their home and I lost half my bees. The remaining ones only produced enough honey for themselves, so I will have to wait until next year. I was looking forward to having my own raw organic honey, honeycomb, and wax products from my own hive. What a bitter disappointment! But, a fellow beekeeper offered me his honeycomb after he took the honey from it. Of course, I accepted.

Preparing

photo 1 (2)My husband picked up the big box of honeycomb on his way home from work. Inside the box was a large plastic bag, filled with a gooey, sticky mess. Just pulling it out of the bag was enough to coat me in honey up to my elbows. It was also kind of dirty looking. Then I noticed bugs, like ants, moths, and dead bees in it. I always thought honeycomb was all a pretty yellow or gold color, but its not. This had some yellow comb, but also had brown, orangey, and even some black streaks running through it. I was a bit skeptical at this point, unsure if this was even usable material.

I photo 2 (2)decided to make a go of it despite my concerns. I really didn’t want to tell the beekeeper I threw his honeycomb out. I’d feel guilty. So, I cleaned my deep kitchen sink really well and filled it with warm water and added the honeycomb, piece by piece.  I washed, rewashed, and rinsed it several times to just get rid of the honey residue. Then I put a pot with an inch or so of water on the stove on low and added the comb. I watched it start melting and kept adding more until the pile in my sink was all in the pot.

It was funny to compare how much space it took up in the box and my sink with the melted wax that fit into an average size pot. Honeycomb has a lot of volume, but it condenses down into a much smaller amount of actual wax.

Getting started

photo 1 (1)As the honeycomb melted, it “released” the dead bugs, impurities, and strange colors I had seen earlier. The debris went to the bottom of the pot and the wax floated to the top.

Next, I cooled it until the wax became solid.  (I put it in my refrigerator to speed up the process) I couldn’t drain the water until I broke the wax block up a bit, but thee was already a crack across the top from the cooling process. I drained the pot, rinsed the pot and the block of wax, and put an inch of clean water back in the pot.  The bottom of the wax had to be scraped off  in a few areas with imbedded debris.  It took several rounds of doing this until I judged it “clean” enough.

photo 1When it was time to pour it into a clean container, I used an old Cool Whip tub. If I melted it or damaged it, who cares? I found a funnel, washed and dried it, then stretched clean knee high panty hose over the funnel. That would keep any floaters that still remained, out of the wax. I made a small indentation, a little “well”, in the middle of the panty hose so the wax wouldn’t run off the sides. I held my funnel in one hand, and poured the wax with the other.  The wax did cool a bit and plugged up the nylon, but I just moved it over a little bit each time it happened. I’m very glad I had the nylon there, especially at the end, because it caught quite a bit of “sediment” from the bottom of the pan.

Finishing

photo 2Because I wanted small cubes of wax, I hunted around for some containers to use as a mold. Fortunately, I had some one ounce containers with lids that I bought from a garage sale. They were leftover from a bridal or baby shower. I thought I could put them to use one day. They were perfect, and only .25 for all 10 containers! Silicone ice cube trays are another great option for this. I don’t know about you, but I have a stack of them in different shapes.

I rewarmed the wax in the microwave, although I probably should have used a double boiler method for safety reasons. I filled all ten containers with beautiful pure yellow beeswax. Now I have to decide if I am going to keep them or give some to friends.

It is tempting to keep them all for myself because I want to learn to use wax for candles, to make homemade deodorant, and as a base for medicinal ointments. Here is one of the recipes I’ve made, but feel free to try different Essential Oils for different conditions.

Tea Tree Oil Antiseptic Cream

1/4 cup Beeswax. Shavings or pieces are easier to melt.

2 TB Coconut Oil

2 TB Almond Oil

10 drops Tea Tree Oil

10 drops Lavender Oil

Melt the beeswax and coconut oil over a low burner, Crockpot(TM), or double boiler. (This particular double boiler is silicone and folds flat for storage.) Once melted, remove from heat. Add all the other ingredients. I like to pour mine into Altoids tins. I ask everyone to save their tins of any type for me. You can also make lip balm in empty tubes you can buy online.

There are recipes for deodorant, too. I made a large batch some time ago, but haven’t finished it up yet. I just don’t want to be putting the aluminum found in most anti-perspirants on my skin. It’s not good for you. I also found a great link for my next project – learning to make your own Beeswax candles.  It’s exciting to learn how to become self-sustaining by using the things around you in your environment!

I am glad I tried rendering down the raw honeycomb into pure beeswax. It wasn’t hard, just time consuming, but the benefits outweighed any inconvenience I went through. I can improve upon it each time I try it again. So, if anyone ever offers you some raw honeycomb, take it, and turn it into a DIY project of your own.

how to make beeswax

10 Comfort items you’ll wish you had!

Click here to view the original post.
10 Comfort items you’ll wish you had!

10 Comfort items you'll wish you had!The following 10 items are not just a wise idea to think about for that emergency kit but also for that weekend camping trip or that visit to the relatives for a weekend. Can you count the number of times when upon reaching you destination you realized what it was you had forgotten? Maybe you will see that item in this list or other items in this list you may want to add to yours.

While not exactly edible, having these ten comfort items will make everyday life more comfortable, whatever your emergency, wherever you are.

  1. Deodorant/anti-perspirant. Picture this. You’ve been in your bunker for three weeks. Sponge baths are a rare treat. Then you remember your stash of Secret anti-perspirant. Ahhhh….. instant morale booster, especially if shared.
  2. Feminine products. Aunt Flo doesn’t stop her visits for something as trivial as a nuclear war. A six month’s stash, especially o.b. brand, won’t take up much room, and will greatly improve your quality of life.
  3. Small items for entertainment. Choose multi-use toys and games. Playing cards or Play-Dough, for example. Include a lengthy, multi-chapter book for yourself but family-friendly enough to serve as a read-aloud.
  4. Bar soap. In a pinch it can be used for shampoo and even laundry.
  5. Zip-Locs of all sizes. These can’t be beat for everything from a tooth for the Tooth Fairy to containing nuclear waste, aka dirty diapers.
  6. Rope for a clothesline and clothes pins. Air-dried laundry smells and feels so clean and crisp. It may become your preferred method of drying, even after the electricity comes on, and of course there’s the added benefit of being oh-so-Green!
  7. A pack of never-before-opened underwear for each family member. Enough said.
  8. Battery-powered CD player & CDs. There’s just something about beautiful music for defusing tension and calming nerves.
  9. Tylenol PM. Seriously. Do you really want to be 100% conscious wrapped up in your silver emergency blanket, huddled in the back seat of your mini-van?
  10. Toilet paper. But you knew I was going to say that, didn’t you??

Preparing for natural disasters, nuclear war, or a complete societal breakdown, doesn’t mean we have to lose our sense of humor. In fact, your sense of humor should be #1 on this list! Don’t ever hunker down in your bunker without your comfort items!

Original article on comfort items posted on APN

The post 10 Comfort items you’ll wish you had! appeared first on The Prepper Broadcasting Network.