The Prepper’s Guide to Non-Dairy Milk

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The Prepper’s Guide to Non-Dairy Milk Most preppers stock a significant amount of dry milk because it’s so highly perishable that it tends to be one of the first things that people run out of when a disaster strikes. But for someone who has difficulty digesting lactose, adding that kind of milk to their coffee …

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5 Classic Fall Recipes That Can Be Made Healthier

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favorite fall recipes made healthyThere’s something about the cooler fall weather that makes my family want to huddle up indoors and eat sweets. Humans are likely programmed to do just this, but let’s not let a change of seasons derail our healthy eating. Here are 5 modified classic fall recipes that will still make your house smell amazing and satisfy your sweet tooth—all without packing on the pounds.

5 Favorite Fall Recipes – the Healthy Way!

1. Pumpkin Pie

Pumpkin pie defines the Thanksgiving holiday in my household—we eat it as a dessert, but we also eat the leftovers for breakfast. This version adds in rolled oats for fiber and has healthy ground flax, but the full-fat coconut milk means a rich, creamy pie that satisfies.

Ingredients:

  • 1 can (15oz) pumpkin puree
  • 1 (13.5oz) can full-fat coconut milk
  • 1/4 cup gluten-free rolled oats
  • 2 tbsp ground flax
  • 1/4 cup coconut sugar
  • 2 tbsp molasses
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp pure vanilla extract

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Mix the above ingredients together, then pour into a prepared pie crust in a 10-inch round pan.
  3. Bake for 30 minutes (it might still appear undercooked—don’t worry!).
  4. Let your pie cool, then refrigerate for at least 5 hours.

2. Apple Cider

Ingredients:

  • 6 cups of organic apple juice
  • 1/4 cups of real maple syrup (you can use even less – let’s face it, apple juice is sweet on its own)
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 6 whole cloves
  • 6 whole allspice berries (optional)*
  • 1 orange peel, cut into strips (optional)*
  • 1 lemon peel, cut into strips (optional)*

*Remember, the richness of flavor makes up for a lack of sugar—I’d rather have a spicier cider than one that is too syrupy sweet…

Instructions:

  1. Pour the apple juice and maple syrup into a large stainless steel saucepan.
  2. Place the cinnamon sticks, cloves, allspice berries, orange peel and lemon peel in the center of a washed square of cheesecloth; fold up the sides of the cheesecloth to enclose the bundle, then tie it up with a length of kitchen string. Drop the spice bundle into the cider mixture. I’m not that concerned if it all sits in the broth loose – just be careful not to pour it into your mugs when you serve it.
  3. Place the saucepan over moderate heat for 5 to 10 minutes, or until the cider is very hot but not boiling. You can leave it on the lowest simmer during a party.
  4. Remove the cider from the heat. Discard the spice bundle. Ladle the cider into big cups or mugs, adding a fresh cinnamon stick to each serving if desired.

3. Slow Cooker Baked Apples

I love using my slow cooker, especially during autumn. It’s so nice to throw some ingredients in during the morning and then to come home to a house that smells amazing. This simple dessert makes use of the natural sweetness of apples and leaves out much of the sugar.

Ingredients:

  • 5 cups sliced peeled Granny Smith apples (4 medium)
  • 5 cups sliced peeled Braeburn apples (4 medium)
  • ¼ cup margarine (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • ¼ cup packed brown sugar (you can even use less or leave it out entirely—experiment to see what works the best for you)
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • ¼ cup apple cider

Instructions:

  1. Simply mix all ingredients and cook on low for 3-4 hours. If you’re going to be out all day make sure to set the timer on your slow cooker so the apples don’t get mushy.

4. Spiced Pear Cake

 This spiced pear cake is a crowd pleaser and a great way to use up your canned pears. We’re leaving off the icing in order to make this a healthier choice, but see this recipe for a richer, more decadent version.

 Ingredients

For cake:

  • 1 quart-size jar of canned spiced pears, drained (about 3 cups)
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups of maple syrup
  • 1 1⁄4 cups coconut oil
  • 3 cups gluten-free all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 cup walnuts or pecans, coarsely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, beat eggs, 2 cups sugar, and oil until blended.
  3. Combine flour, salt, and baking soda, and add to egg mixture, stir slowly until blended.
  4. Fold in pears, chopped nuts, and vanilla extract.
  5. Pour batter into a greased and floured 10-inch Bundt pan.
  6. Bake at 350° for 1 hour or until a wooden pick inserted in center of cake comes out clean.

5. Pumpkin Spice Waffles

Adding a little pumpkin spice is a surefire way to savor the fall weather (just ask Starbucks!). Working pumpkin into this traditional waffle recipe (and then tweaking to make it healthier) is a great way to make your breakfasts festive for the fall.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup maple syrup
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1-1/4 cup gluten-free all-purpose flour
  • 1-1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoon ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup 2% milk
  • 1 cup canned solid-pack pumpkin
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and warm

Instructions:

  1. Lightly oil and preheat waffle iron.
  2. In a large bowl, combine brown sugar and cornstarch in a large bowl. Whisk together to break apart the cornstarch and blend. Add the remaining dry ingredients, and whisk to blend.
  3. Separate eggs: yolks go in a medium sized bowl and whites get set aside in a smaller bowl.
  4. In a medium bowl, add pumpkin, milk and egg yolks. Whisk to blend.
  5. In a small bowl, whip egg whites with a hand mixer on high until stiff peaks form. Set aside.
  6. Pour melted butter into pumpkin mixture. As you pour, whisk to combine.
  7. Add the pumpkin mixture to the dry ingredients, and mix together until just combined.
  8. Slide the whipped egg whites out of the bowl and onto the mixture you just prepared. Gently fold them in until completely mixed.
  9. Once the waffle iron is heated, pour batter and press down until ready – about 3 minutes.

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

4 Reasons Why Drinking Coffee Is Great For Your Health

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coffee healthReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this piece is to laud the many wondrous benefits of coffee.  Really, I love it without all of the benefits that we’re going to mention, and drink it by the gallon.  There are a few studies that came out about coffee that I think you’ll find interesting; therefore, there’s a little in this article for everyone.  Let me take a sip of my coffee, now, and then we’ll continue.

Ahh, that’s good!  Now, coffee beans happen to be the seeds of Coffea arabica, a cash-crop harvested in Central and South America, Africa, and Asia.  The beans are harvested nine months after the plant is in its flowering stage.  Then they are dried, either by the sun for about a month, or with machines.

Why many say this beverage is unhealthy is all the “extras” you put in your java. Cream, artificial sweeteners add extra calories and fat to coffee. If you drink it without any of these, then you receive the most health benefits.

Coffee Has Naturopathic Tendencies

As a naturopathic aid, coffee has quite a few uses.  It can be used to treat nonspecific, acute diarrhea.  This is diarrhea that isn’t long term, and could come from a number of different stressors, most of them not disease-related, such as severe fatigue and overwork, or a sudden change in diet.  Caffeine (the main constituent of coffee) is also a diuretic, which means it causes urination.  For this reason, it isn’t used in diarrhea caused by diseases of the stomach and intestines, as it will help with the diarrhea but cause you to lose water through excessive urination.

Coffee Provides Mental Alertness Seconds After Drinking

The caffeine restores mental alertness, and these stimulating effects occur within just a few minutes after ingesting it, in this case with your cup of coffee.  Although we’re primarily concerned here with it as a drink, caffeine as well as ground coffee is available in other forms, such as tablets and as an ingredient in a mixture.  It takes a lot to overdose, and the lethal dose for an adult is 150 to 200 mg of caffeine per kg of body weight.  To place this into perspective, if you weighed about 120 lbs., you would have to drink about 75 cups of coffee before you checked into the big Starbuck’s in the sky.

Drinking Coffee Helps To Lower Health Hazards

An article by Maggie Fox entitled Study Finds More Evidence Coffee Can Be a Life-Saver,” explains some little-known benefits of drinking coffee.  The study comes from Harvard University’s School of Public Health, in which it explains that coffee can actually help you live longer.  Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology helped run the study, and he and his colleagues found that coffee consumption helps with diabetes, cardiovascular problems, feelings of depression/suicide, and can lead to an overall lowering of mortality risk.  The study found that having 3 to 5 cups per day can lower the risks associated with these health hazards.

Coffee Is Full Of Antioxidants

Coffee happens to be the Number 1 source of antioxidants in the American diet.  Antioxidants are chemical compounds that offset the damage by free radicals to your cells that occurs on a daily basis.  The studies went on to tell how inflammations in your body’s system and resistance to insulin is diminished in diabetic patients by several ingredients in coffee, such as quinides, lignans, and magnesium, among others.

The reason the study is very reliable is this: it was taken from a sampling of 200,000 doctors and nurses over a period of a decade that tabulated their habits.

Statistically speaking, those are pretty good numbers, when you consider the persons being sampled are in a high-stress, high-pressure work environment.  This is not to say that coffee is for everyone, but the really good news about the coffee intake is this:

The beneficial effects were with (regular) caffeinated coffee as well as (“unleaded”) decaffeinated coffee.

In addition to the points made above, you can make your coffee even healthier by adding these superfoods to your favorite brew. It must be mentioned that your coffee grounds can do wonders for your garden. Here are 14 genius ways to use coffee grounds.

The Final Say-So

The final say-so rests with your happy, smiling, family doctor.  Obtain his smiling permission before undertaking any regimen of therapy suggested in the referenced article or using any information in this one.  If coffee is something you normally enjoy (such as I’m enjoying this very moment), then this article should have given you some food for thought that is positive reinforcement to “our” indulgence in coffee.  So, bottom’s up, and keep up the prepping and learning!

 

JJ

 

coffee health

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Overcome Your Coffee Addiction With This Healthy Alternative

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  Yerba Mate (yer-bah mah-tay) is my new saving grace. I love coffee as much as the next person, but recently I noticed I was having trouble sleeping at night on the days I drank it. I was also getting the jitters after my second or third cup, even though I wasn’t feeling fully awake. I have small children, so the idea of giving up caffeine entirely is unfathomable, but tea never really gets me going and energy drinks (especially those with mythical creatures in their titles) make my heart race and my palms sweat.

What is Yerba Mate?

I first heard of Yerba Mate from a friend of mine who visited Paraguay, where everyone from university students to the elderly to children have been known to sip it (this is the brand she saw people drink the most often and is consequently what I now drink). Yerba Mate is made from the leaves of a South American holly tree that grows in the rainforest. It has approximately the same amount of caffeine as a cup of coffee (around 75 mg) but the way the body processes it is very different. While it has energizing properties, Yerba Mate doesn’t result in the same jittery quality caffeine sometimes does. People tend to drink it all day long, not only in the morning, and it’s been said to actually aid in sleep. In Central and South American cultures people often drink from traditional gourds, but I found a travel gourd that is super cute and works just as well (and you won’t get strange looks from your coworkers when you show up to work with a hollowed-out coconut). You suck Yerba Mate through a metal straw with a filter (called a bombilla) but you can also run it through a coffee machine or use a tea ball or French press and get basically the same effects.

Energy without the Jitters

As soon as I switched from coffee to Yerba Mate I noticed an immediate difference in my ability to concentrate. Besides that, I didn’t have the anxiety I sometimes get from coffee. I’m not going to lie, the taste is very different—closer to a very strong, almost oaky, black tea—but I drink coffee for the pick-me-up, not the flavor. On the first day that I switched, I opened a very long, tedious document I was to copyedit. It usually takes me well into my second cup of coffee to get into the flow with this type of work, but before I had finished one gourd of Mate, I was in the zone. I drank two gourds full over 4 hours and easily completed my assignment. I didn’t drink any more Mate that day because I didn’t need it.

Sweet Dreams

I’ve never been the type to drink coffee after noon, but even still, I was finding it difficult to turn off my brain at night to sleep. Once I switched to Yerba Mate I had no problems sleeping—in fact, these days I’m often able to sleep when my baby takes his nap—something I always try to do but find difficult. In addition, I’ve begun having vivid, cinematic dreams, both during naps and at night. I’m also able to remember these dreams after I wake up, which is unusual for me.

Other Benefits

Besides simply being a great, energizing drink, Yerba Mate contains several antioxidants, 24 vitamins and minerals, and 15 amino acids. Because it is lower in tannins, it is not as acidic as coffee, so people with stomach issues might find it easier to tolerate.

It’s been about 6 weeks and I’m still extremely happy with my switch to Yerba Mate. I still drink the occasional cup of coffee just for the ritual of it—plus I like to work in coffee shops and I have to buy something to “rent” my table—but these days I choose decaf instead of regular.

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

You’ll Go Bananas Over This Natural Sleep Remedy!

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SLEEPWe live in a world of constant stimulation: light from laptops and iPhones, noise pollution, and the stress of being so very connected all of the time. As well, insomnia could be caused by environmental influences. Luckily, there are lots of natural remedies, and if you are anything like myself, you have tried all of them. I’ve had success with melatonin, chamomile tea, valerian root, and even just a cup of nice, warm milk. But I’m always happy to add to my sleep remedy arsenal, so when I read about a banana and cinnamon tea meant to help you sleep, it sounded right up my alley.

Making the Natural Sleep-Aid is a Breeze

teaBananas are rich in magnesium and potassium, both components known to aid in sleep, so the science checks out. But was it possible that something so common in a household could be the cure for insomnia? I decided to find out.

The recipe is simple enough. You’ll need:

  1. 1 organic banana with the peel still on
  2. 1 small pot of boiling water
  3. a little dash of cinnamon

The first thing you do is cut off both ends of the banana. Next, put the banana into a pot of boiling water. Boil for 10 minutes to allow the magnesium and potassium to leech into the water. Finally, sprinkle some cinnamon into the water and let it simmer for two additional minutes. Use a slotted spoon to fish the banana out of the water or pour the water through a coffee filter or tea strainer and into a mug. If you’d like to add some sugar or honey, that’s fine too, though remember that sweeteners can spike your blood-sugar levels before bed.

What to Expect When Drinking Banana Tea

On the night I tried the banana tea, I was surprised at how easy it was to make it. It tasted a little bit bitter, but not at all unpleasant. Almost immediately after drinking the tea, I started to feel drowsy. I’m not sure if that was actually the tea at work or if I was just particularly tired, but I slept very soundly. I woke up around 3 AM, which is normal for me, but I was able to go back to sleep rather quickly. When I woke up in the morning, I felt very well rested.

Sometimes with sleep aids like melatonin or Tylenol PM I wake up feeling a little groggy, but that wasn’t the case this time. I think I’ll need to do a few more experiments to see if the banana tea truly works, though I have to say I’m very impressed so far. Since most people have bananas and cinnamon and their homes already, it’s a pretty low-risk option to try. And even the most challenged chefs among us know how to boil water.

Why not give it a chance? Worst-case you’ll get a little dose of potassium and magnesium and you’ll use up some of those old bananas!

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Make Your Own Healthy Homemade Ginger Ale

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 So, ReadyNutrition Readers, last week we covered the finer points of the “3-G’s” for herbs…garlic, ginger, and ginseng.  I want to expound a moment on those benefits I covered on ginger.  Hopefully you guys and gals like ginger ale.  It is really good for aiding with the digestion after a large meal, and I have found it to be an excellent tonic for upset stomach.  Besides all of that, it tastes really good, and I like the daylights out of ginger ale to begin with.

In a nutshell, here are the ingredients and supplies you’ll need to make yourself a batch of delicious ginger ale.

JJ’s Ginger Ale:

  • 1-1 ½ tablespoon ginger root
  • ¼ cup molasses
  • ½ cup raw/unrefined sugar
  • 1 orange or ½ grapefruit
  • ¼ teaspoon yeast  
  • Filtered water
  • 48-ounce juice bottle (the type with “rounded” shoulders of firm/sturdy plastic)
  1. So, if you’re a ginger fanatic the way I am, you can add up to 2 tablespoons, but be advised: it will have quite a bite when you’re done!  You can chop up the ginger fine, and peel it if you wish.  I just rinse it off and use all of it.  Also, I slice mine into really thin slices.  When this is done, throw it in the sturdy plastic bottle.
  2. Next, add your ½ cup of sugar.
  3. Then squeeze the two halves of your orange, or your ½ grapefruit and pour the juice into the bottle.  You can add some segments of either the orange or grapefruit if you wish some of the pulp in your ginger ale.
  4. Add ¼ cup of molasses.
  5. Lastly, add your ¼ tsp of yeast.  Now you’re ready to add your water.  First fill your bottle halfway and then cap it up tight.  Shake the bottle vigorously for about a minute and blend all of the ingredients inside well.
  6. Now open up your bottle and fill it with filtered water until it reaches just at the curve of the shoulders of the bottle…this will correspond to about two inches below the mouth/opening of the bottle.  This part is important!
  7. Squeeze the air out of the bottle with one hand…there’ll be a little bit of foam at the mouth of the bottle.  Use your other hand to pat down this foam.  When the liquid reaches the top of the mouth, keep it there…and cap the bottle tightly with your other hand.
  8. Shake the bottle vigorously for half a minute.  Don’t worry…you won’t hear a lot of sloshing around, as you just removed the air.  There’s a reason for this.
  9. Set the bottle in a fairly warm, open area, about 65 to 70 degrees F.  Leave it there undisturbed.

The Waiting Game

Now that your ginger ale has been bottled, you want to look for the bottle beginning to swell. This usually takes about 6-12 hours.  Don’t open it!  The yeast is fermenting, and you’ll ruin the process with the introduction of any air.  When the shoulders begin to swell really firmly?  It will then be time to refrigerate the bottle.  Leave it in the fridge for 24 hours to complete the whole process…some of the swelling will diminish after this time is done.

Careful when you open the bottle…your ginger ale is now carbonated!  Yes, then all you need do (if you wish) is to strain the ginger ale into a glass and drink.  Voila!  You want to keep it capped tightly when not pouring it, and the carbonation will last about 24-48 hours.

Measures up equally in taste with Reeds, and of course you can do other things, such as add some nutmeg or cinnamon to taste.  Less on the sugars if you like it dry, keeping in mind it is the sugar that the yeast feeds on to ferment and produce the carbonation.  You’ll end up with a full-flavored Ginger Ale that is good for the stomach that you made yourself.  So, with all of this, bottoms up, and I hope you enjoy the recipe!  JJ out!

 

For other homemade soda recipes, click here!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Delicious Fall Recipes That Actually Include Pumpkin Spice

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Pumpkin pie spice recipes.Another autumn has crept up on us quickly, and with this change in weather comes the flurry of  pumpkin spice everything. It was in 2004, in fact, that the pumpkin spice phenomenon really took off, after Starbucks introduced their Pumpkin Spice Latte nationwide. And ever since, the obsession with this flavor has simply taken over the season, flooding advertisements and hitting the shelves of supermarkets and menus of coffee shops with equal fervour. It’s so in-your-face you can surely almost taste it.

There’s pumpkin spice vodka, pumpkin spice hummus, pumpkin spice bagels, and pumpkin spice Pringles. The fiercely followed spice is in granola bars, pudding, soy milk, Clif Bars, popcorn, Peeps, Four Loko… and the list goes on, and on… and on.

I myself have never tasted the annual Starbucks treat or purchased the various items filling up the shelves as I saunter through the aisles of the grocery store, but it has concerned me that the mass production of the flavour, in such a wide range of items for such a short period of time, is a marketing ploy by companies to get it while it’s hot, and not while it’s real. And when The Wall Street Journal broke the news that Starbucks’ most beloved fall beverage contains no real pumpkin, rather natural and artificial pumpkin spice flavor, the jig was truly up.

So what’s a pumpkin spice fanatic to do? Well, you could carry on trying to pick apart every product presented to you in hopes that it does, indeed, come complete with real pumpkin spice, or you can try to make the following five recipes from scratch that actually come complete with the real deal.

Healthy Homemade Pumpkin Spice Latte

Homemade Pumpkin Spice Latte

Source: Eating Bird Food

This drink can be whipped up in a total of 10 minutes. Complete with pumpkin puree, pumpkin pie spice, unsweetened vanilla almond milk, vanilla extract, and cinnamon, you’ll be happy to find Starbucks isn’t your only option. Try the recipe here.

No Bake Pumpkin Spice Energy Bars

 

Pumpkin Spice Energy Bars

 

 

Source: Happy Healthy Mama

Granola bars are one of the go-to options for a healthy snack when time isn’t on your side. But not all bars are created equal, so it’s important to be mindful of what’s really in the ones you get. And if DIY is your thing, then these no-bake bars featuring dates, walnuts, almonds, pumpkin puree, and pumpkin pie spice ought to be on your list. All you have to do is put the ingredients in a food processor and pulse until the mixture is well combined. Here’s the recipe.

Healthy Pumpkin Pie Spiced Hummus With Cinnamon Graham Crackers

Pumpkin Spiced Hummus Recipe

Source: Gringalicious

Whip up this sweet snack in no time. The crackers call for ingredients like honey, vanilla extract, whole wheat flour, and cinnamon, while the hummus includes pumpkin puree, garbanzo beans, molasses, and walnuts. Find the recipe here.

Pumpkin Spice Baked Apples

Clean Eating Pumpkin Spice Baked Apples

Source: The Gracious Pantry

It’s fall, so undoubtedly apples are in abundance. This 5-ingredient healthy dessert is full of fiber and vitamins. All there is to it is one apple, honey, pumpkin spice, dried cranberries, and walnuts. Get the recipe here.

Pumpkin Spiced Nuts

IMG_4169.jpgSource: Bare Root Girl

Mix together avocado oil, maple syrup, vanilla, salt, pumpkin pie spice, cayenne pepper, and almonds to bake for a crazy good recipe that will feel festive for the season, satisfy your sweet tooth, and still leave you feeling full with healthy fuel. Here’s the recipe.

 

Featured Image: Gimme Some Oven

CE inspires us to begin expanding our way of thinking so we can take conscious steps towards creating BIG change on the planet. CE’s Mission!

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Make Your Own Pumpkin Pie Infused Moonshine

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Gear up, I’m about to take the whole PSL (pumpkin spice latte) fad to a whole new level! Many of you are getting ready to Halloween festivities and may be looking for a yummy adult beverage to serve at the parties. With all the flavors of fall, pumpkin spice moonshine is a fun drink that has a great kick! Here’s my favorite pumpkin spice blend:

2 teaspoons cinnamon
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

 Whether you have made your own moonshine from scratch and want to kick it up a little or go the easy route and purchase some high proof alcohol, this is a great drink to serve at all the adult-centered Halloween parties.

Pumpkin Spiced Moonshine

Ingredients

  • 1 large can 100% pumpkin puree
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp. pumpkin pie spice mix
  • 1 can (12 fl. oz.) of thawed frozen apple juice concentrate.
  • 2 pints of high proof alcohol (vodka, everclear, “moonshine.”)*
  • Whip cream *optional

Directions

  1. In a blender combine pumpkin puree, brown sugar, 1 can of thawed frozen apple juice concentrate.
  2. Add mixture to a large pot and add two 2 pints of alcohol. (You won’t be cooking with the pot, I just found it to help mix the contents up better).
  3. Stir mixture until smooth and then ladle into into Mason jars, seal and refrigerate. When you are ready for beverage drink to mix the spices up and, if preferred, add a dollop of whipped cream for the full effect. (We made a sugar rim on the glass and served it as is, and it was amazing!)

Recipe source

Remember to drink responsibly and make good choices!

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition