El Nino-Driven Storms To Dent California’s Drought With Inches Of Rain Next Week

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Survival World News

By Brett Rathbun  AccuWeather

Following a warm, dry February in California, a shift in the weather pattern will open the door for several storms to soak the state during the second week of March.

Enough rain may fall to put a noticeable dent in the drought across the state.

By the end of this weekend, storms will usher in moderate to heavy rain across California and heavy snow to the Sierra Nevada.

Continue reading at AccuWeather: El Nino-Driven Storms To Dent California’s Drought With Inches Of Rain Next Week

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El Nino-Driven Storm To Blast California, Southwestern US With Rain And Snow

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Survival World News

By Brett RathbunAccuWeather

Stormy conditions, common of a strong El Niño weather pattern, will make a brief return to Southern California and the southwestern United States this weekend.

This storm will also end the warmth across the region through Saturday by sending temperatures below normal into early February.

How intense this storm will be once it arrives across the Southwest remains in question.

“How heavy the rain, snow and wind get in Southern California will depend on how quickly the storm strengthens as it approaches the coast,” AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski said.

Showers will make an appearance to San Francisco, Phoenix and Las Vegas. The heaviest rain may fall from Los Angeles to San Diego.

Continue reading at AccuWeather: El Nino-Driven Storm To Blast California, Southwestern US With Rain And Snow

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El Nino to drive flooding rain, mountain snow into California this week

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By AccuWeather

A series of El Niño-enhanced storms will continue to bring more beneficial rain and snow along with hazards to California and the southwestern U.S. in absence of a pineapple express.

The above-average temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean, known as El Niño, tend to strengthen the storm track into the West Coast and occasionally California during the winter.

The current El Niño has tied the strength of the El Niño during 1997, which was the strongest on record.

The storms which initially brought rain, snow and ice to much of the Pacific coast of the United States to start the week will spiral progressively farther south into Friday.

Continue reading at AccuWeather: El Nino to drive flooding rain, mountain snow into California this week

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Train of storms to drench California, southwestern US as El Nino drives the pattern

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By Brett Rathbun – AccuWeather

A series of storms will bring welcome rainfall across California and other portions of the southwestern United States this week.

The track of these storms is fueled by El Niño in the tropical Pacific Ocean.

“The above-average temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean, known as El Niño, tends to strengthen the storm track into the West Coast and occasionally California during the winter,” AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski said.

While a parade of storms slammed into the northwestern United States during November and December, the southwestern U.S. will receive days of precipitation this week.

Continue reading at AccuWeather: Train of storms to drench California, southwestern US as El Nino drives the pattern

Filed under: News/ Current Events, Weather

A Brief Summary of This Week’s Incredibly Freaky Weather

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storm wikimediaIn case you didn’t notice, this week has seen some of the strangest weather in recent memory. All over the world there have been countless records broken and no shortage of unseasonable climate events. In some regions, things just seem upside down with rain, snow, and heat showing up in places where they typically aren’t seen this time of year. By themselves, each of these events appear to be nothing more than odd anomalies. When considered together however, there’s seems to be an epidemic of unusual weather.

Experts and layman alike have been blaming these events on the arrival of El Niño, though it’s not clear if that weather pattern can explain everything. If El Niño really is to blame, then we may be in for some downright freaky weather for the next few years.  Here’s what’s been reported so far:

  • The Mississippi River has seen some of the worst flooding in 25 years, between Missouri and Illinois. In some parts, there have been 3 day rainfalls of 9-11 inches, which usually only happen every 100 to 300 years. Nine levees have failed to contain the water, and at least 20 people have been killed.
  • Los Angeles, which is notorious for its perpetually sunny weather, has experienced “real weather” for the first time in years. For those of you who live in states that experience blistering cold weather in the winter, you can laugh all you want, but the weather station at the USC campus reported a low of 36 degrees on December 27th. That was a tie for the station’s all time record low, which was set in 1916. Also, California is finally getting the rain it so desperately needs. Sierra snow pack levels are 136% higher than they usually are this time of year.
  • The Dallas area experienced a tremendous tornado over the weekend that had 166mph winds. It killed 11 people and destroyed over a thousand homes and businesses. While Texas is no stranger to tornadoes, this was the first time in 15 years that an EF-4 tornado occurred on American soil in December. It’s also the furthest west that a tornado of that size has been seen in December.
  • Canada has also been hit with a storm that experts believe is related to the weather conditions in Texas. But the storm itself isn’t that strange. It’s the fact that it was the first major winter storm to hit the region this season, and it arrived a month later than usual.
  • South America is also seeing some crazy floods this week, which have been blamed on El Niño. Over 150,000 people have been displaced in Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Brazil.
  • And finally, the craziest weather in the world is happening where there aren’t any people. The same weather pattern that caused flooding and tornadoes in the US, is making its way towards the North Pole. It has brought with it, some unseasonably warm weather for the region. The temperature around the North Pole rose to 32 degrees, which is 50 degrees warmer than it would normally be this time of year.

So what do you think? Is El Niño responsible for all this wicked weather, or is there another good explanation?

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Why Is The United States Being Hit By So Many Fires, Floods And Earthquakes?

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By Michael Snyder – End Of The American Dream

What do you get when you add together one of the strongest El Ninos ever recorded, the worst year for wildfires in U.S. history, and unprecedented earthquake swarms in diverse places all over the country? Since the end of the summer, America has been hit with a truly unusual series of natural disasters. The state of Oklahoma has already set an all-time record for the number of earthquakes that it has experienced in a year, more acres have been burned by wildfires in the U.S. than we have ever seen before, and a “1,000 year rainfall” caused horrific flooding in South Carolina. Those are just a few examples of what we have been seeing, and many believe that this is just the beginning. So why is this happening? Is there something that connects all of these natural disasters together?

Let’s start by talking about earthquakes. In the past, we would expect to see earthquake activity along the west coast, but not much elsewhere.

Today, things have dramatically changed. For example, this year the state of Oklahoma has seen nearly eight times as many magnitude three or greater earthquakes as it did just two years ago

As 2015 nears its end, 850 earthquakes of magnitude three or greater have stirred the state of Oklahoma. Compared to 584 of the same magnitude in 2014 and 109 in 2013, the trend is clear: earthquakes are on the rise.

Other areas of the nation are experiencing highly unusual seismic activity as well. Just recently, east-central Idaho was hit by a swarm of more than 40 small earthquakes

More than 40 small earthquakes were recorded in east-central Idaho last week in what experts say is another earthquake swarm in the region.

Officials in the Challis area on Friday reported no damage from the micro-quakes that started Tuesday and have mostly gone unnoticed or unreported in an area with residents accustomed to more vigorous shaking.

But the temblors ranging up to 2.9 magnitude have perked up scientists trying to understand the fault system in the area where a 5.0 magnitude quake struck in January.

So why are we seeing so many earthquakes all of a sudden?

That is a question that none of the “experts” seem to have an answer for.

Meanwhile, we are currently on pace for the worst year for wildfires in the history of the United States. Earlier in the year this was not the case, but in August and September there was a sudden explosion of massive wildfires, and now it looks like we are going to easily break the all-time record by the end of this month

Continue reading at End Of The American Dream: Why Is The United States Being Hit By So Many Fires, Floods And Earthquakes?

About the author:

Michael T. Snyder is a graduate of the University of Florida law school and he worked as an attorney in the heart of Washington D.C. for a number of years.

Today, Michael is best known for his work as the publisher of The Economic Collapse Blog and The American Dream

Read his new book The Beginning of the End

Filed under: Earthquakes, News/ Current Events, Weather

Storm Train to Return to Northwestern US by Late Week

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By Brett Rathbun – AccuWeather

Though much of the Northwest will receive relief from the continuous storm train through the day Wednesday, storms will return to the region Wednesday night and continue into next week.

Storms rolled across the Northwest almost daily for the first two weeks of December. The storms starting Wednesday night and continuing into next week will move across the region every two or three days.

“A storm in the Gulf of Alaska will continue the trend of pulling moisture into the northwestern United States beginning Wednesday night,” AccuWeather Meteorologist Evan Duffey said.

Thursday into Thursday night will be the wettest period across western Washington and Oregon as the heaviest rain will focus on northern California by Friday into Friday night.

With this being a mild system, snow levels will be mainly above pass levels into Friday. However, the recent snowpack keeping temperatures at or below freezing could lead to areas of sleet or freezing rain near pass levels, including Snoqualmie Pass in Washington before changing over to rain.

Continue reading at AccuWeather: Storm Train to Return to Northwestern US by Late Week

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Persistent Northwest US Storms to Unleash Feet of Rain, Snow Into Next Week

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By AccuWeather

As the train of storms associated with El Niño continues to track into the Northwest, colder air will again press across the interior West with more opportunities for snow later next week.

There is no end in sight to the freight train of storms on track for the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada.

Storms are lined up for thousands of miles over the northern Pacific.

According to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Brett Anderson, “The pattern over the Pacific Ocean is beginning to take on the look of El Niño.”

Continue reading at AccuWeather: Persistent Northwest US Storms to Unleash Feet of Rain, Snow Into Next Week

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Eastern US to Remain Mild as El Nino Keeps the Polar Vortex at Bay This Winter

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By – AccuWeather

Much of the central and eastern United States can expect mild weather often from December into January due to El Niño.

El Niño occurs when tropical Pacific waters are warmer than normal, and the pattern can last several months to a couple of years. The warm waters can impact the weather patterns around much of the globe.

While the pattern may not be good news for cold weather enthusiasts, it will translate to savings on heating for at least part of the winter.

According to AccuWeather Chief Long Range Meteorologist Paul Pastelok, an ongoing and strengthening El Niño may succeed in keeping arctic air out of much of the United States well into the winter.

“We see impressive signals that the overall mild pattern that got rolling in the Central and Eastern states during October and November will hold through December and into January,” Pastelok said.

Continue reading at AccuWeather: Eastern US to Remain Mild as El Nino Keeps the Polar Vortex at Bay This Winter

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Filed under: News/ Current Events, Weather

El Niño Is Going to Be Followed by a Devastating La Niña

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cyclone wikimediaAs you probably already know, El Niño is on its way. It’s been in the news quite a bit since August, when scientists first announced that we were due for a very wet winter. Since that time they’ve determined that it’s pretty much guaranteed at this point. Within the next few weeks, the West Coast is going to be inundated with record breaking rain storms that could rival the El Niño season of 1997. And despite the disastrous possibilities of this weather pattern, Americans living on the West Coast are pretty excited about finally receiving some heavy rain after several years of severe drought.

However, these people may be counting their chickens a little too soon. All they’re thinking about is the torrential El Niño that is imminent, and they’re forgetting the La Niña that often follows right after. Typically, the La Niña has an almost equal and opposite effect of the El Niño, which means that we’re only going to have a very brief respite from the drought.

However, there is another consequence of this year’s El Nino that is virtually a sure thing to happen within the next half year. A very rapid change in El Nino water temperatures will follow – in nine months we will have gone 180 degrees in the opposite direction and we will be dealing with a very strong La Nina.

The following plots the changes from El Nino (red) to La Nina (blue). Note the rapid change that occurred from November of 1997 to the fall of 1998. A very big La Nina followed the record El Nino:

The numbers:chart 1

A chart of the 1998 event:chart 2

 

As you can see, a heavy El Niño is often followed by a very drawn out La Niña. That means we’ll probably have horrendous drought conditions for another few years after this rainy season concludes, which will be felt in the Southwest and the Midwest. This could easily result in a major crunch in the food supply of the United States, and the rest of the world. According to Bloomberg:

The current El Nino, forecast to be the strongest since 1997-98, will weaken by spring, potentially giving way to La Nina, according to MDA. In the 1983-84 marketing year, when U.S. farmers planted corn under El Nino conditions before La Nina developed during the crop’s growing and maturing phases, production fell by almost half, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and an Oct. 26 report by Citigroup Inc.

And keep in mind that the real issue at hand here, isn’t the length or frequency of these weather cycles, it’s their severity. Between a third and a half of the seasons we experience are either coinciding with El Niño or with La Niña at any given time, and they don’t usually lead to any remarkable conditions. However, since this cycle is going to be so extreme, it means that the entire world is going to have a lot of problems over the next few years.

Just as both of these weather patterns have an inverse relationship, the kinds of damage they cause varies wildly across the world. Rain in one country means drought in another. Those countries may then experience the exact opposite of these extremes once El Niño shifts into La Niña.

Essentially what we’re looking at is several years of devastating floods and crippling droughts all across the planet. While we often think of this weather pattern in localized terms, the severity of this particular cycle now carries a few geopolitical implications. There will be more natural disasters, which means there will be more disease outbreaks and food shortages, which means there may also be more wars and revolutions.

In other words, the next few years are going to be nuts.

Will it be the end of the world? Hardly. But it’s definitely something you should be preparing for.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

South America Summer Forecast: El Nino to Bring Flooding Rain to Argentina, Uruguay and Southeast Brazil

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By Eric Leister – AccuWeather

The ongoing El Niño will continue to be a major factor in the weather across South America as frequent rainfall leads to new flooding events in parts of Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil this summer.

Elsewhere, infrequent rainfall will bring little or no relief to drought-stricken Chile and northern Brazil. Surges of heat that build across the interior of Brazil will frequent Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro and result in numerous uncomfortable days throughout the summer.

Continue reading at AccuWeather: South America Summer Forecast: El Nino to Bring Flooding Rain to Argentina, Uruguay and Southeast Brazil

JUMP TO: Wet Weather to Continue Through Summer From Northern Argentina to Paraguay and Southeast Brazil | Drought to Worsen Across Northern Brazil as Summer Heat Builds | Chile: Sparse Rain, Warm Stretches for Central and Northern Regions | Frequent Storms to Target Ecuador to Bolivia

Filed under: Climate, News/ Current Events, Weather

Too Big to Fail: El Niño Event Is Practically Guaranteed This Year

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hurricaneIt seems like every couple of years, the folks at NASA or NOAA will issue a press release saying something along the lines of “this year we’ll have the big one” before adding that El Niño may be gearing up to dump devastating rains all over the Americas. The frequency of these predictions seems to have increased in recent years, largely due to the epic drought that has been drying up the Western United States as of late. The people living in these regions are praying for rain, even if it arrives in disastrous proportions, and the media is more than willing to entertain their fantasy.

This year has been no different, with climatologists predicting an El Niño weather pattern that could break records. Of course, making long-term weather forecasts is no easy task, and they’re wrong more often than they’re right. However, based on past climate trends this year looks like it might finally be the one, as climatologists admit that the odds of a devastating El Niño occurring this winter are on the rise.

An El Niño that is among the strongest on record is gaining strength in the Pacific Ocean, and climate scientists say California is likely to face a wet winter.

“There’s no longer a possibility that El Niño wimps out at this point. It’s too big to fail,” said Bill Patzert, climatologist for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge.

“And the winter over North America is definitely not going to be normal,” he said.

Just three weeks ago, the National Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center raised the odds of California getting doused with a wetter-than-average winter. Southern California now has more than a 60% chance of a wet winter, a 33% chance of a normal winter and less than a 7% chance of a dry winter.

The odds of a wet winter further north are increasing too. San Francisco has more than a 40% chance of a wet winter, 33% chance of a normal winter and less than a 27% chance of a dry winter.

With rising sea temperatures in the South Pacific, and trade winds that are weaker than normal, all signs are indicating that an unprecedented rainy season is on the horizon. For now though, it’s hard to say how bad it will be. Initial reports suggested that it would be the rainiest El Niño ever recorded, but now some scientists are predicting that it will be the second rainiest.

Whatever the case may be, it’s going to be a doozy, and likely on par with the famous El Niño of 1997. That year saw floods all across North and South America, as well as droughts and disease outbreaks in Africa. It was a global disaster that managed to inflict billions of dollars in damages and untold casualties (by the way, we’re still learning about all the shocking ways that El Niño can kill people). Time will tell if this year has a disaster of those proportions in store for us.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition