Getting Caught Off-Grid

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Getting Caught Off-Grid
Micheal Kline “Reality Check” Audio player below!

In the following player we are discussing the reality of the electric grid going down and a personal story about me being somewhat caught off-guard. I have been on vacation with my family this past week in the North Georgia area with Tropical Storm Alberto coming through. So, like a good little prepper, I packed a small propane stove, my EDC, my camping cook set, and a family size battery powered lantern.

Continue reading Getting Caught Off-Grid at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

New Water Pump.

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I decided that as we have so much excess solar power I would be better off with an electric water pump to pump water from our lower collection 5000 gallon cement water tank to our upper house feed tank than the petrol fire pump we have been using. Survival wise we will probably always have 240 volt solar power, but we may not always have fuel!
So I purchased an electric water pump with what fittings I needed, & my wife came up with the idea of using a storage container to keep it in.

Power lead goes a short distance underground through some spare water pipe that I had & up into the power shed.

Electrifying developments in bicycling!

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Electrifying developments in bicycling! Bob Howkins “APN Report” Audio in player below! Throughout the bicycle industry two trends have created a bright future in bicycle development, an aging customer base, and the rise in popularity of electric powered vehicles. In some ways, both are joined at the hip. With more people re-discovering their health by … Continue reading Electrifying developments in bicycling!

The post Electrifying developments in bicycling! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Keeping Warm with Winter Preps!

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Keeping Warm with Winter Preps! Highlander “Survival & Tech Preps” Audio in player below! BRRRRR! Getting cold out there! What are you doing to keep warm in the beginning months of winter? Well fall is almost over and winter is right upon us. In this episode I will be talking all about how to keep warm. … Continue reading Keeping Warm with Winter Preps!

The post Keeping Warm with Winter Preps! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

2 Years with a WORX 14″ Electric Chain Saw

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There are times when “You get what you pay for“, doesn’t hold water.
In the case of a 14″ Electric Chainsaw by WORX, you get MORE.

Well into a 2nd. year of hard service, buying this wood cutting powerhouse was money well spent. I had my doubts on a electric chainsaw, surely it can’t hold up too long, but after several good-sized tree-falls, and yards of firewood, the saw is just as sure & efficient as the day I pulled it out of the box.
My yard is full of trees. That means I’m cutting up deadfalls, loping off branches, and harvesting firewood a lot. Over the years I’ve burned out two gas chainsaws, each time cussing them for the aggravation.  Unless I was using the gas chainsaw daily, (which I wasn’t) a year of use & storage was enough to turn a $100 investment into a crank pulling, blister-raising, pain in the butt. It got so I had to spend a whole day just getting the chainsaw running, to spend another full day using it.
When the second gas chainsaw died, I had had it. Worse, I had a big Bradford Pear split in half on me, leaving me a backyard FULL of fallen timber to cut up. I needed a chainsaw, & needed it right NOW!
That’s when I decided to take a chance on this WORX 14″ Electric Chain Saw. I figured at half the price of a gas chainsaw, even if I only got a year’s use out of it, at least I’m not out all the aggravation AND cost of a gas powered saw. Besides, with most of the work I needed to do… small branches with some thicker timber up to 20″ thick… I figured I could knock out the small stuff, and even if the saw puked on the bigger stuff, at least most of the cutting got done pretty cheap.

Surprisingly, that was TWO YEARS & more than three TREES AGO!

The WORX 14″ saw is just as powerful, just as sharp, just as instant-on reliable as it was when I brought it home. No mixing gas, no priming, no choke, no yanking on a starter rope over & over & over. Lay out an extension cord, plug in & GO.

The WORX has an easy chain adjustment too. A twist of a knob snugs up the chain to proper tension, and just a top off of chain lube is all that’s necessary for a full day of cutting.

It certainly doesn’t beat you up like a gas saw will. The motor is far quieter, the lighter weight of the saw is far less strain on your arms & back. I was totally surprised with the saw’s cutting performance.
If your needs for a chainsaw is for light to medium yard work, mostly small diameter branches with the occasional larger log, the WORX 14″ saw will do you very well, better than what you’d expect. Although tied to a electric power source via a plug in cord, you can kiss bye-bye all the starter rope pulling, spark plug fowling, gas mixture mess & smoky engine exhaust & ear ringing noise of a gas powered saw.
This has turned out to be one of my SMARTER investments.

The post 2 Years with a WORX 14″ Electric Chain Saw appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Revealed: You Won’t Believe How Many Times Squirrels Have Caused Blackouts

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Revealed: You Won't Believe How Many Times Squirrels Have Taken Down The Grid

Image source: Pixabay.com

America’s electrical power grid is so fragile that even squirrels can knock it. Believe it or not, squirrels have caused 623 electrical outages in recent decades.

That’s according to a new website, CyberSquirrel1.com, that traces the number of times squirrels, birds, raccoons, rats, beavers and even snakes cause power outages. Although the map covers the entire world, the overwhelming majority of outages on the map took place in the United States.

A typical example of a squirrel-related outage occurred in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in January, when a squirrel on a live wire near a substation caused so much havoc that power was out for five hours. It was the second time since November that a squirrel prompted a blackout there.

Another blackout took place in Evansville, Indiana, on January 2. That blackout, described as a major outage, caused traffic to come to a standstill on a freeway and lasted nearly an hour. The squirrel knocked out power by jumping onto a transformer at a local substation.

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Still another example took place in Schuylkill Haven, Pennsylvania, in October 2013, where a squirrel knocked out power and caused at least $20,000 in damage.

squirrel map(Listen to Off The Grid Radio’s in-depth look at the vulnerability of the power grid here.)

In addition to squirrels, the website also lists:

  • Birds causing 214 blackouts.
  • Raccoons responsible for 52 power outages.
  • Snakes causing 47 outages.
  • Rats knocking out power 25 times.
  • Beavers blamed for nine blackouts.

The situation likely is far worse than the website indicates, as these figures are merely the outages that CyberSquirrel1’s writers could discover. The website says there also are “many more” that “remain classified.”

Animals usually knock out the grid by jumping or crawling onto transformers or wires and shorting them out. Since most powerlines sit out in the clear, there is little or no way to protect them from animals.

Peter Pry, the author of the new book Blackout Wars and the executive director of the EMP Task Force on National and Homeland Security, told Off The Grid Radio that Americans should take note of the grid’s vulnerability. He pointed out that the Northeast Blackout of 2003 that put 50 million Americans in the dark was called by a fallen tree branch in Ohio.

“Thousands of people living in New York City had to walk across the bridge because the subways wouldn’t run, when a fallen tree branch caused cascading failures that put the entire Northeast, including New York City, in a blackout,” Pry said. “… If a fallen tree branch in Ohio can black out the Northeastern United States, imagine what a nuclear EMP would do. You don’t have to be a physicist to understand these things.”

Do you believe the American government is doing enough to protect the grid? Share your views in the section below:

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Log Splitters 101: What You Should Know Before Shopping

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Image source: hydraulicspneumatics.com

Image source: hydraulicspneumatics.com

Temperatures are cold, and your stack of already-prepared logs is getting smaller and smaller. You find yourself dreading heading out to split more logs. Perhaps this year is the time to make that purchase — you know, that log splitter you’ve been dreaming about with every downswing of your splitting maul. Manually splitting logs burns about 440 calories an hour and, for some, causes back pain. Not light work. Before you go out and buy the first log splitter you set eyes on, let’s look at a few important elements of log splitters first.

First of all, there are three basic types of log splitters (although there are variations in each): manual, electric and gas-powered. Manual log splitters can provide more power for less up-front cost, although they can be slow and cumbersome to work with. They save your shoulders, but take about the same amount of time to split logs as it does to use a splitting maul. With a splitting maul, you can estimate to split 20 to 30 logs an hour. With a manual log splitter, you generally can split between 18 and 24 logs an hour.

Electric log splitters have several things going for them. First, depending on the type, they increase your log-splitting output to about 40 to 50 logs per hour. Since they don’t generate gas fumes and are quieter, they can work nicely indoors (in a barn or on a porch, for example). A quieter system can be an excellent choice if you have noise-sensitive neighbors.

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Along with being quieter, electric log splitters tend to be lighter in weight, which translates to greater portability. However, there are a few drawbacks. Electric log splitters are less powerful. They usually only go up to about 10 tons, although there are models that can do more. One other potential drawback is that they require electric power, and so splitting logs in a remote location

Along with being quieter, electric log splitters tend to be lighter in weight, which translates to greater portability. However, there are a few drawbacks. Electric log splitters are less powerful. They usually only go up to about 10 tons, although there are models that can do more. One other potential drawback is that they require electric power, and so splitting logs in a remote location is not possible unless you also have access to a generator.

Now let’s take a quick look at gas-powered log splitters. Gas-powered splitters pack a punch of power, going anywhere from eight tons up to 24 tons and beyond. They also come in a variety of kinds — hydraulic models, horizontal-vertical models, and fast kinetic models. Gas-powered log splitters increase your log output, as well. For example, a quality hydraulic model can split between 60 and 80 logs an hour, while a quality kinetic model will do much more. These are the splitters that you will need for the larger logs (anything beyond a 12-inch diameter by 20 inches in length). But more powerful doesn’t always mean better; gas splitters come with a few negatives. They’re louder, more expensive and heavier. You wouldn’t want to run a gas splitter indoors or near animals (for safety reasons), and just like other gas engines, gas-powered log splitters require maintenance, including oil changes, air filter changes, spark plug replacements, and fuel refills regularly. However, for processing the kind of large logs most home owners find themselves dealing with, the gas-powered splitter is probably the best choice.

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But more powerful doesn’t always mean better; gas splitters come with a few negatives. They’re louder, more expensive and heavier. You wouldn’t want to run a gas splitter indoors or near animals (for safety reasons), and just like other gas engines, gas-powered log splitters require maintenance, including oil changes, air filter changes, spark plug replacements, and fuel refills regularly. However, for processing the kind of large logs most home owners find themselves dealing with, the gas-powered splitter is probably the best choice.

So, evaluate your needs. If you are cutting logs that you just hauled out of the woods, then you’ll probably want to consider a gas-powered splitter. If, however, you have smaller logs or are looking to cut logs down for kindling, then an electric splitter may be perfect for you. Some people have found it helpful to have one of each kind of splitter, the gas-powered for the main log splitting in the fall, and the electric splitter for cutting down smaller logs and kindling at the house.

To sum everything up, there really isn’t one best type of log splitter. Each kind can be quite useful depending on where and how you want to use it. But most will admit that, apart from the calorie burning perk, any type of log splitter is better than the old splitting maul.

What are your favorite log splitters? Share your tips in the section below:

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