How To Use The Kelly Kettle Outside For Emergencies Or Camping

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This is for all my new readers, this is an awesome emergency stove or a great stove for camping! You probably know by now I have to know the ins and outs of everything that has to do with emergency preparedness. The Kelly Kettle can be used for camping, hiking and for an unforeseen emergency when we lose power.

Bingo…that works for me! It’s great when a product can be used in so many different situations.

Stainless Steel or Aluminum Kelly Kettle

The Kelly Kettle comes in aluminum or stainless steel. I decided on the stainless steel. I prefer to buy something right the first time and not have to replace it down the road. I also wanted one that would be larger and serve a few more people. I decided on the Ultimate Stainless Scout Camp Kit. I am going to share with you how each part works. This is really the most reliable ultra fast camping kettle for the outdoors. It’s very light and extremely durable and works even in extreme weather conditions. No batteries…love it!

Kelly Kettle

No Propane, Gas or Liquid Fuel

Oh my gosh, I love that this does not need any propane, gas or liquid fuel. Place a few wads of newspaper in the bottom of the base unit. Next, I can scrounge for twigs, pine cones, etc. and start a small fire in the base with a match or fire starter. I went over to the golf course near my home and gathered up some pine cones from the ground. Yep, FREE fuel for this unit! Now I will be gathering pine cones on a regular basis to store in my garage. We added some dry branches and small leaves and the fire started so quickly!

Kelly Kettle Base

Double Walled Kelly Kettle Stove

Next you place the main double walled stove on the base as shown above. Here’s the deal, I could not figure out how this unit worked because I did not realize it had a double walled pitcher built in, so to speak. Yep, I get it now. The flue/chimney top  is at the top where you can add more twigs and pine cones. You can see the opening on the right side where you can add water.

Boil Water In Kelly Kettle

Boil 37.2 ounces of liquid in minutes

This Scout Kelly Kettle boils 1.1 liters (37.2 oz) in minutes. You can see how to lift the Kelly Kettle off the base with the handle at a 90-degree angle. You then set the unit on a flat surface and use the attached orange stopper (which should always be removed before lighting the kettle) to pour water in a pan or cup.

Kelly Kettle Orange Stopper

Ready To Cook With The Kelly Kettle

Now we are ready to cook. Kelly Kettle has a pan bracket that has two pieces and you hook them together and insert them into the chimney flue to set your pans on the top to start cooking your food.

Cooking In A Kelly Kettle

Finish Cooking On Grill

Snack Ramen at its best…I had a package and added it to the boiling water in the pan. Easy, peasy. The large Kelly Kettle cook set comes with a grill, pan, lid and a handle to lift the pan when cooking. You will remove the top double walled unit and place your mugs or pan to finish cooking or reheat your drinks.

Kelly Kettle Grill

Kelly Kettle Hobo Stove Accessory

Hobo Stove Accessory

Hobo Stove On Base

Kelly Hobo Stove Accessory

The Best Stainless Steel Cups with Silicone Lip Saver

Okay, I have never seen a silicone lip saver…just saying, this is the best thing I have ever seen for a hot cup to save your lips!

Kelly Kettle Cups Silicone Lips

Everything Stores In This Bag

Kelly Kettle Bag

I highly recommend one of these stoves for several reasons. It is compact and can be used year round. The fact that I can gather pine cones, twigs and leaves and my newspapers for fuel is a HUGE plus for me. Here’s to being prepared for the unexpected.

Dinner rolls by Linda

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How To Be Prepared To Cook Emergency Meals

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Today’s post is to help people be prepared to cook emergency meals outside. If and when we have a power outage, and we will, we need to be able to cook emergency meals. Some of you may have purchased packages of food where you just add tepid or boiling water. Well, you will need a way to boil that water. I’m going to give you the choices I recommend because I have used all of these and have them stored ready to cook food for my family. Here’s the deal, you need fuel as well, so I will suggest some fuel options for you to use with your cooking devices.

I have taught classes for several years on how to use the following cooking devices. I will say this, I have cooked inside buildings (for classes) and my own home with a butane stove. I recently saw a box at a store containing a butane stove that stated: “designed to cook outside.” So, I will leave the decision to you whether you feel safe using one inside your home. I gave all four daughters a butane stove with butane canisters. Here’s the deal, you would never cook for several hours on a butane stove, it’s designed to boil water, make coffee, heat up a meal, make some hot chocolate or warm up a can of beans in a pan. Here’s my homemade hot chocolate post: Linda’s Hot Chocolate

Cook Emergency Meals

Butane Stove

Butane Stove

Pro: Inexpensive, uses very little fuel to boil water and you can cook emergency meals

Con: It can only hold a small pan or pot

Fuel: Uses butane fuel, once the fuel is gone it cannot be used with any other fuel Butane Canisters

Kelly Kettle

Here is my post on how to use a Kelly Kettle

Pro: Uses pine cones, leaves or dry twigs, basically free fuel

Con: You may say it’s a little pricey, but you can gather free fuel, in most cases, so for me, it is not pricey

Fuel: Pine cones, leaves or dry twigs

Dutch Oven

I prefer a 6-quart cast iron Dutch oven or smaller because of weight. I can’t handle the 8-quart size, but I know they are popular. I also like to buy the Dutch ovens with the lids with a lip like this one: Dutch Oven because you can stack them when cooking meals.

Pro: They will last forever if treated and stored properly, fairly inexpensive, you can cook emergency meals in these

Con: They will rust if not properly stored and cleaned (but you should be able to salvage any cast iron pot, within reason)

Fuel: Fire pit, wood stove if it has a cooking shelf, directly on charcoal briquettes, or lump charcoal or wood

Lodge Cast Iron gave me permission to print this cooking sheet for Dutch Ovens: Dutch Oven Chart

Volcano Stove

Here’s a post on how to use Volcano Stove: Volcano Stove Pictures by Linda

Pro: You can boil water, cook on a griddle, you can also cook emergency meals in one of these with a tent, if desired, you can use a medium size cast iron pot on this stove

Con: Fairly expensive but it uses three different fuels, wood, charcoal briquettes, propane (make sure you have the right adaptor for the small tanks of propane and/or the larger propane tanks

Camp Chef Stove/Oven Combo

This is a great one because I can bake a casserole or bread in the oven, if I remove one shelf for the bread, anyway. Camp Chef

Pro: You can bake, fry, boil, and make just about any meal on the top of the stove or inside the oven

Con: Uses propane, once the propane is gone you cannot use this stove with other fuels

Fuel: Propane only, make sure you have both adaptors for the large propane tanks or the small canisters

Camp Chef Two-Burner Stove

I love this one because you can cook with fairly large pans. I picture boiling water for spaghetti with this baby when we have a grid down in our neighborhood. Camp Chef two-burner stove

Pro: Extremely sturdy, and somewhat expensive but uses fairly large pans to cook emergency meals

Con: When you run out of propane this unit will not work, fairly expensive

Fuel: Propane only

Barbecue

I really don’t want to talk about the gas barbecues since they will waste so much fuel just to boil water. But it is an option.

Pro: Just about everyone has a gas barbecue

Con: Once you run out of fuel, the barbecue is less attractive for use, although briquettes can be used, just not as efficient for general use

Fuel: Propane and briquettes, unless you have a pellet one, but once the fuel is gone you’re out of luck

Fire Pit

I bought two different fire pits, one from Amazon and one from Lehman’s. Lehman’s had a great sale one and I had to wait to have it crafted and shipped, but it is so worth the wait.

Cook Emergency Meals

Pro: You can buy different sizes in so many different materials, I opted for a copper one and a steel one. You can build one fairly inexpensive with bricks and adding gravel inside the pit

Con: Expensive if you buy one premade

Fuel: Depending on the material, you can use wood, charcoal briquettes, and lump charcoal

Sun Oven

I actually have two Sun Ovens, I was given one for a review and then I purchased a second one because I love them so much. I live in Southern Utah so sunshine is pretty consistent in our area. Sun Oven 

Pro: Sunshine, if available, is free to cook emergency meals

Con: Fairly expensive and I do not recommend these if you have very little sunshine in your area

Fuel: Sunshine

I hope this post today gets you excited to be prepared to cook emergency meals when you need to after a disaster. Please practice now with any cooking device you may have purchased. Please get them out of the box and learn how to use them if you haven’t already. Practice cooking with them today before an unforeseen emergency hits your neighborhood. May God bless you for being prepared.

My Book: “Prepare Your Family for Survival” by Linda Loosli

Copyright Images:

Firepit: AdobeStock_11610595 by Acik

Dutch Oven: AdobeStock_57870160 by svetlankahappy

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7 Ways To Cook When You Lose Power

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Today it’s all about 7 ways to cook when you lose power. Yes, we will all lose power at some time or another. It may be a day, three days, three weeks or three months. I told you a few days ago I hired a professional photographer to take pictures of some of my preparedness items so I don’t have to haul them when I speak or teach classes. The pictures are large so people in the back of the room can see them. I also had her make a slide show. I’m not real keen on power point presentations, but one group requested one, so I will use that one this week. You may know September of every year is National Preparedness Month, so September is always a busy month for me. Please feel free to share these tips with other people so they can be prepared when they lose power.

Here’s the deal, there may some items today you can use and some you will not be able to use, for instance, the Sun Oven. If your location has limited sunshine you would not want to purchase a Sun Oven, it needs a lot of sunshine. Here in Southern Utah, I think we have close to 350 days of sunshine a year, it’s a perfect place to use one year-round. Here are my favorite cooking devices when we lose power.

Cooking Items When You Lose Power

Sun Oven

Pros:

No fuel required, only sunshine is needed. You can bake anything in a Sun Oven that you can bake in your conventional oven if you can get the Sun Oven up to the temperature required to bake your meal. I gauge my cooking around 10:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. I have the most consistent sunshine during this time period where I live. No special recipes are required, if the pan fits inside the Sun Oven, you can bake it. It will pay for itself very quickly because you need zero fuel to cook a meal.

Cons:

It won’t work without adequate sunshine. Make sure you use glass baking pans or dark pans. Shiny pans will reflect the heat away from the item being baked. It will not fry chicken, actually, it will only bake, it will not fry anything. You can use other cooking devices if you want to fry some food. Some may think it’s a bit pricey, but you may want to consider buying the Sun Oven without any accessories. If you have pans that fit inside the oven you don’t need to buy the package that includes baking pans.

Volcano Stove

Pros:

The great thing about a Volcano Stove is the fact that you can use wood, charcoal, and propane. Please check if you decide to buy one because there are two different adaptors for using the Volcano Stove. The unit will come with either the small propane canister adaptor or the large propane tank adaptor. I have both, but I prefer using the large adaptor. So, just check on the package to see which size comes with the one you are purchasing. I love buying things I can use for emergencies like when we lose power or if we go camping.

Mine came with a zippered bag and other handy items, but the fuel fits compactly inside the larger heavy duty bag if you want more options for transport and storage. This is a perfect camping item because you can cook on top of the picnic table if it’s sturdy. Adaptor for Volcano Stove

Cons:

The Volcano Stove must be used outside because it uses propane, wood, and charcoal.  I guess it’s really not a con, but I want to make sure you realize it’s perfect for cooking outside only. Some people may think they are a bit pricey, but I see it this way, it can use three different types of fuel. Until you run out of fuel this is a great stove.

Thermal Cooker

Pros:

It uses very little fuel, once you bring the food to a boil (I use a butane stove) using the inner pan for four full minutes, then quickly put it in the outside Thermal Cooker and lock it closed. It now becomes like a slow cooker. Please do not put frozen food in this gem, it will not defrost AND cook the food. You don’t need any particular recipe because it works similar to a slow cooker. It’s great for frying sloppy joes and it will keep them warm for 4-6 hours, after the four full minutes of boiling. You can make chili as you do now with cooked beans, fried meat and bring it to a boil for four full minutes. Place the inner pan inside the outer thermal cooker, set and forget. It will keep it warm for 4-6 hours.

Bonus, if you make a salad, place the salad inside the inner pan and place in the refrigerator overnight. The next morning, place the inner pan inside the thermal cooker and lock it closed. It will keep your food cold for 4-6 hours. Perfect for family reunions.

It’s perfect for ball games, busy families and traveling. It uses very little fuel. I love it for traveling and for those times we lose power.

Cons:

Do not use a tough piece of meat because it may still be tough after you use a thermal cooker. I have a friend, Kendra, who made a small pork roast that turned out delicious. But it was a small roast and she added potatoes, carrots, and onions. She covered it with liquid to within one-inch of the top of the thermal cooker. You need some type of stove (I use a butane one) to bring the roast, carrots, potatoes, and onions with some liquid to a boil for four full minutes. Then place the inner pan inside the outer thermal cooker and lock it shut. Buy tender meat, just giving you the heads-up here. It will be cooked in 4-6 hours.

Kelly Kettle

Pros:

I love my Kelly Kettle because you can use twigs, dry leaves or pine cones to cook with this awesome stove outside. The fuel is practically free if you have some pine cones near where you live. I store them in buckets. It boils water and food very quickly. Mine came with a bag that I can use to store it.

Cons:

I have to give a con only because you can only use it outside. It will not hold a heavy pan on top, it would be a little unstable. But, you can make small pans of soup or boil water within minutes, literally.

Butane Stove

Pros:

I like my Butane Stove because I use it indoors. I’m a Nervous Nellie, so I crack a window. Now, the box on some butane stoves says they must be used outside. Please refer to the instructions on the one you purchase. I taught so many classes inside stores with a butane stove and every thing was fine. Just use your own judgment. I gave all four of my daughters one of these so in case they lose power they can still boil water or cook a meal. Butane Fuel

Cons:

I love these so the only con I can give it is once you run out of fuel, you can no longer cook a meal. I used one canister of butane for six weeks, cooking one meal a day. Now I only cooked food for two, so keep that in mind.

Camp Chef Stove/Oven

Pros:

The positive thing for this stove/oven combo is I can make pancakes, bake bread and boil water all with one unit. Keep in mind I use only the large adaptor for the larger tanks of propane. The oven will hold a 9-inch by 13-inch baking pan, perfect for lasagna or your favorite casserole.

Cons:

The only con would be if you run out of propane you cannot use the stove/oven combination.  No fuel, no cooking or baking.

Lodge 6-quart Dutch Oven

Pros:

You can bake bread, biscuits or make just about any recipe you want if you have charcoal stored. You can boil water, make soups, and make a peach cobbler, to name a few of my favorites. I buy charcoal briquettes without lighter fluid because they will store indefinitely if stored in air tight containers. I prefer a Lodge 6-quart Dutch Oven because they are not as heavy for me to carry or move as an eight-quart Dutch oven.

Cons:

If you run out of fuel, you can’t bake or cook anything.

I hope today’s post gives you a few tips on how to cook when you lose power, there are many other ways as well. These are my favorites I wanted to show you today. May God bless you and your family to be prepared for the unexpected.

My favorite fuels by Linda

Survival food storage by Linda

Prepare Your Family For Survival by Linda

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Survival Books You Will Need In Hard Copies

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I recommend these survival books you will need in hard copies, not the e-book versions. If we lose power, and we will, we want a hard copy of certain books. I had a reader ask me to remind all of us to get hard copies of survival books. Now, as I’ve mentioned before I will not be hiking up into the mountains to flee my neighborhood. There again, if my house is flattened from an earthquake or flood, I will have to evacuate. I only buy hard copies of books that I need today, or possibly next year for knowledge to help me and my neighborhood get through just about any disaster, including an EMP. If you haven’t read Ted Koppel’s book as outlined below, I highly recommend it. I was actually interviewed and recorded for my thoughts about living without electricity. Although my thoughts were not included in the book it was a compliment to me to be asked for my ideas.

So let’s get started with some of the survival books I suggest you get. The word survival may sound a little strong, but let’s just say we may need some tools to get us all through rough times, and we will have rough times at some point in our lives if we haven’t already. My attitude has always been “buy right the first time”. Please keep in mind that some of these books are a bit pricey, but you get what you pay for in knowledge that is so beneficial.

Survival Books:

  1. I was honored to be asked to write this book by Page Street Publishing, it is family friendly and you can have your children and grandchildren read it. When I was asked to write the book, I mentioned I did not want to talk about weapons in my book. Period. If you are wondering if I have a weapon, yes I do. Mark and I both have our concealed weapons permits, and we both know how to shoot. Mark more than me. Weapons are a personal topic. I will leave it at that.Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation
  2. I have very little skills in the medical field, so I use this book all the time. Remember, if we lose power you will not be able to “Google” a question you are wondering about, just giving you the heads-up here. This book is user-friendly and has just about everything I have ever needed to look up as far as medical information. The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way
  3. I wish I could get more people to read this book. I bought the hard copy and I could only get one friend to read it. If you want to know the truth about our country’s power grid and how sadly it is unprotected against terrorist attacks and how it would be virtually impossible to repair, let alone replace, you need to read this book. Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath We will need far more than candles, my friends.
  4. This is my bible for essential oils. The FDA will not let us say much about essential oils because they have shut down websites for saying too much. First of all, I do not believe they cure anything, but they rock for other things. You can buy a pocket size book, or the larger one with tons of information, which is what I did. I actually purchased both. I have one in the car, one in my first aid kits, and one in the living room. Essential Oils Pocket Reference WOW, the larger one is so expensive now. When I bought it I choked over the $90.00 price. This book is packed with knowledge but is extremely costly. Essential Oils Desk Reference 6th Edition (6th Edition) (1905-07-21) [Spiral-bound] I have seen the prices of food storage and emergency preparedness items skyrocket over the last few years. Check out thrift stores whenever possible for books and equipment.
  5. Lisa Bedford from The Survival Mom is a friend of mine and she was actually one of the first preppers to write a book, as far I know. Survival Mom: How to Prepare Your Family for Everyday Disasters and Worst-Case Scenarios
  6. Bernie Carr is a friend of mine and I have all of her books, this one is great for kids: Jake and Miller’s Big Adventure: A Prepper’s Book for Kids and this is great one: The Prepper’s Pocket Guide: 101 Easy Things You Can Do to Ready Your Home for a Disaster
  7. I read this book and I was emotional the entire time reading about the truth of what happened at Memorial Hospital after Hurricane Katrina. Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital I REALLY want to put this book on my list because this book tells what happened at one of the main hospitals AFTER Hurricane Katrina. Please read and be prepared to take care of yourself and your family. These poor nurses and doctors, what they had to go through…………..and the patients. God bless all the families involved in that tragedy.

I’m sure there are other survival books, but these are my favorite ones and aren’t necessarily Doomsday type books. We need the knowledge before a disaster or unforeseen emergency hits our neighborhood. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. May God bless all of us.

American Red Cross

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I Recommend These Cooking Stoves For Survival

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I recommend these cooking stoves for survival, and I’ll tell you why. If and when we lose power I want you to think about how you would cook some meals, or boil some water for that matter. If you have a generator you will be set, until the fuel runs out if it’s gas powered. If you have a woodburning stove that’s awesome if it’s cold in your home, but not in the summer if it’s 100 degrees outside. I think most of us have a gas (propane) barbecue, or maybe one that uses charcoal briquettes. Those are great for short-term cooking only because they would use way too much fuel to boil a gallon or two of water.

We need to have a plan for cooking and boiling water for survival from a major disaster or even a minor power outage. Yes, we can go a few days without a hot meal, I get it. But, if we need to boil our water when the local water supply is contaminated we should be ready to boil water with a cooking device. Hopefully, every family has at least two to three days worth of water stored at their homes, but I’m afraid there a lot of people that don’t. It could be zero storage space, lack of money to buy the containers, etc. So, this is why I’m talking about cooking stoves today. If you have at least one of these you can cook a meal or boil water. There a few more ways to cook, but I’m just talking about these stoves today. Please remember to procure the fuel required for the stove you decide to purchase.

Cooking Stoves:

Here’s the deal, if you have very little sunshine in your community, a Sun Oven would be useless. I hate to use the word useless, but if you have overcast days 300 days of the year, you will not be able to count on the sunshine to bake meals or boil water. If you have several days of sunshine, like I do in Southern Utah, this is a perfect oven for you.

                                                                                                    SUN OVEN/SOLAR COOKING:

I just purchased a second Sun Oven because I LOVE them! All American Sun Oven- The Ultimate Solar Appliance It is approximately 19 inches square and about 11 inches high. It has a handle so you can carry it. It opens up with these sides to reflect the Sun!!! You can buy a Sun Oven with or without bread pans, cake pans, two cooking pots that stack and a set of three dehydrating racks, along with some parchment paper, and NOW a turkey roaster pan! You can “dehydrate” anything from fruits, veggies, and jerky. The instructions are quite simple. Please be sure and read ALL the instructions before use.  This is the condensed version of instructions:

1. Placement–place in a sunny location unobstructed by trees, etc.

2. Setup–lift and unfold the reflectors. Slide the slot in the bottom section of the reflectors over the thumbscrew, etc.

3. Focusing–aim the front of the Sun Oven towards the sun. You need to tilt the oven to eliminate the shadows. You will occasionally need to adjust the position.

4. Preheat–The Sun Oven should be preheated before cooking. It is recommended that you place the oven with the glass door closed and latched down in the sun to preheat. In the strong sun, the Sun Oven will reach 300 degrees F in about twenty minutes. This is awesome!

5. Cooking–Place food in the cooking pot or pan on the tray inside the oven. Close the door quickly, and latch it down, using both latches. Use potholders when removing the HOT cooked food after its finished cooking. Always cover the food being cooked, except bakery goods. Cut down a third of the liquid normally used for rice, stew or sauces. This does not apply to bakery products. You can use glass casserole dishes with a cover. It says do not use foil because the shiny foil would reflect the heat away from the food being cooked. Two pots can be stacked and cooked at the same time.

Since foods do not burn in the Sun Oven, it is not necessary to stir the foods after they are placed in the oven. Use a meat thermometer –place this in the meat BEFORE you put the meat in the oven. I highly recommend this solar oven. The All American Solar Sun Oven is the one I recommend!

VOLCANO II STOVE:

The Volcano II stove/oven is a really great stove to use in an emergency, at the park or when camping. I like this particular stove because you can use propane with an attachment (one for small bottles and a different one for large containers of propane). The Volcano II stove uses wood, propane or charcoal. I demonstrate this stove/oven at food storage/emergency preparedness classes I teach.  I recommend this stove because it can be used year round. Volcano Grills 3-Fuel Portable Camping Stove

                                                                                                     CAMP CHEF STOVE/OVEN:

The Camp Chef Stove/Oven show above is one I demonstrate at the same classes. I make homemade bread and bake two loaves in the oven after removing one of the oven racks. I bake the bread at 350 degrees for 27-30 minutes. I purchased a griddle to go with my Camp Chef Oven for pancakes, etc. I would highly recommend one of these. Camp Chef Camping Outdoor Oven with 2 Burner Camping Stove

                                                                                                            BUTANE STOVE/FUEL:

I have purchased both a Butane Stove and butane fuel. What I like about this little stove is you can use it year round. It’s great for camping, teaching classes, and of course to use in an emergency or natural disaster. It is also pretty inexpensive for approximately $25.00, give or take. Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and fuel: 12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves

I have purchased a butane stove for all four daughters of mine, I want to know they are prepared for the unexpected. Please let me know what cooking device you have now, or one you think would be perfect for your home, apartment or use after a disaster. May God bless you for being prepared.

 

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How To Bake Bread And Survive Any Disaster

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I will show you how to bake bread and survive any disaster today. Yes, you can make bread with my no-fail recipe. I promise. A few years ago I wrote a post showing how you can make bread three different ways. Well, since then I have learned to make bread in a Dutch oven so now I can show you how to make bread four ways. Now, not everyone has a wheat grinder so today it’s all about making white bread. After a disaster, white bread will fill the belly and you can serve it with soup. I hope people in your community are teaching each other how to make bread with or without a bread mixing machine. If it’s a freshly ground whole wheat bread class, you rock. I grew up making bread so it’s just a way of life for me and saves me lots of $$$ on my food budget.

I have taught several classes on how to make bread, in my home, in specialty kitchen stores, and in large groups in church kitchens. If you have fresh ingredients, you can make bread. I have a no-fail recipe anyone can succeed at making bread. When I say fresh ingredients, here’s the deal on this statement. I only buy this yeast: Saf Instant Yeast, 1-Pound Pouches (Pack of 4) if you don’t bake a lot just buy one: Saf Instant Yeast, 1 Pound Pouch. I store ONLY the amount of SAF Yeast in my refrigerator that I will use in a month. The open pouch that won’t fit in my refrigerator jars goes in an air-tight container in a quart mason jar in the freezer. The other unopened SAF yeast pouches go directly into my freezer. I always buy 4-6 pouches at a time. I cannot ever run out of yeast. Yes, I could make unleavened bread but I don’t want to for my weekly bread making. I shouldn’t say weekly, it’s actually about every two weeks because I only make eight loaves and freeze seven.

Which reminds me, these are the bags I use to freeze my bread: 100 Count Clear Bread Bags / Includes 100 Cable TiesThese are fairly cheap and include the ties. I never reuse the bags, but I do use these bags for other things besides bread. It’s just the shape of the bags are what I need to store and freeze my bread.

I also only recommend bread flour, I grew up using all-purpose white flour but it’s not the same, trust me on this one. I try always to buy unbleached bread flour, just giving you the heads up here. The flour must be less than 12 months old because it has bread spores leaching in the bucket after a year. I store my flour in 5-gallon buckets with Gamma lids. Gamma lids make the container air-tight and are easier to open and close the buckets: Gamma Seal Lid – Red – For 3.5 to 7 Gallon Buckets or Pails Gamma2

Bake Bread and Survive:

First of all here is my recipe for two loaves of bread: White-Bread-For-Two Recipe or Whole-Wheat-Bread-For-Two Recipe I have to laugh every time I share my two-loaf recipe. When I was asked to write my book “Prepare Your Family For Survival” my publisher said I had to cut my recipe down to two loaves. The editors mentioned no one makes more than one loaf at a time where we live. Well, in Utah most people make 4-8 loaves at a time, right? So, yes, I cut my recipe down and actually it’s been a favorite download for college students, two member families, etc.

Lodge Dutch oven:

If you have a 6-quart Dutch oven you can make bread perfectly by only using charcoal briquettes and a match. I just the rocks out in my front yard to start the small fire away from trees and of course, my house. Here’s a picture of my first loaf I made:

bake bread and survive

Here is my PRINTABLE Dutch oven chart: Dutch Oven Chart I called Lodge Manufacturing to see if I could make my own printable chart using their numbers and they gave me permission to do so. I love their products.

Here’s the picture of the first three loaves of bread using three different ovens a few years ago:

bake bread and survive

Sun Oven:

The one loaf on the left was baked in a Sun Oven using a non-reflective or non-shiny pan. If you use a stainless steel pan the sun will reflect the heat away from the items you are cooking. All American Sun Oven- The Ultimate Solar Appliance

bake bread and survive

Conventional Oven:

The two middle loaves were baked in my home in my own conventional oven.

Camp Chef Stove/Oven Combination:

The loaf of bread on the far right is was baked in my Camp Chef: Camp Chef Camping Outdoor Oven with 2 Burner Camping Stove

bake bread and survive

Thanks for being prepared for the unexpected, May God bless you for your efforts.

 

The post How To Bake Bread And Survive Any Disaster appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Cook After Disasters Hit

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Today it’s all about how to cook after disasters hit. And disasters will hit our neighborhood or community at least once in our lifetime. Sometimes they will hit more than once. If we are prepared we will not fear, I promise. Here’s the deal, you do not have to spend a lot of money on emergency cooking devices. I’m going to talk about all the ones I have used and recommend. Keep in mind some of my sponsors have given them to me to do a review. Let’s be real here, I will only write about the ones I love. The others I have refused to try because I saw how flimsy they were at the store. Some I have shipped back to the company and could not do a review for them. I’m here to teach the world what does work. Period. I’m always on the look out for new products, but the old standbys still work the best.

I have tried almost every emergency stove that’s available on the market. I use them often so my skills are current and I’m prepared right now to cook outside. I used to camp, but now that my girls have grown up and started their own families I have given up camping. I used to love to go camping with a trailer, and who doesn’t love the smell of bacon and eggs cooking outside in the fresh crisp air in the morning? I know I love it! So, now I cook outside in my yard and try to share the fruits of my labors, so to speak, with my neighbors. So, let’s get started with the items I use and highly recommend.

Cooking After Disasters:

Butane stoves:

I have used these to teach classes at stores, and I have one in my home that I have used many times. This is also the stove I gave all four of my daughters for Christmas one year. If you have some pans, you can boil water, cook some soup, fry eggs, and many more foods. You can’t do any canning like water bath canning or pressure canning on one of these. It would not be safe. Yes, I have my Master Preserver Canning Certificate from the state of Utah.

They use butane fuel like Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and: 12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves

Pros: very inexpensive

Cons: Once you run out of fuel you can no longer cook with it.

Lodge Dutch Oven:

If you have a 6-quart Dutch oven (the larger ones are too heavy for me to carry), you can boil water and cook just about every food you can fit in those babies with the lid on the top. You will need firewood, charcoal, or lump charcoal to cook with one of these. I am going to build a small fire-pit which I hope to show you next week. Please buy the non-starter fluid charcoal product to use because if you store those briquettes in an airtight container they will last indefinitely. Please make sure you buy this style Dutch Oven because you can stack cook with these lids. Plus, the charcoal doesn’t slide off the lid. Lodge L12CO3 Cast Iron Camp Dutch Oven, 6- quart and don’t forget to buy charcoal… I cook with my Dutch ovens on rocks in the front yard. I’m sure my HOA hates it. I’ll probably get a letter.

Pros: inexpensive if you get them on sale, well actually they are a bargain since they last a lifetime if you keep them seasoned and dry.

Cons: You must maintain them by seasoning them, which to me isn’t that big a deal. You need to store enough charcoal to use one of these. Once the charcoal or wood, lump charcoal is gone, you may have to look for alternative wood sources and hope you have enough to keep the temperature where you need them to properly cook the food. Here’s my PRINTABLE Dutch oven chart: Dutch Oven Chart I got permission from Lodge to incorporate a printable for you.

Volcano Stove:

Pros: What I like about the Volcano stove is the fact that you can use three fuels to start with: wood, charcoal, and propane. Just make sure before an unforeseen emergency you have the correct adaptors for the propane. Some Volcano stoves come with small adaptors for the tiny propane tanks and sometimes you have to purchase the large tank adaptors. Be sure and check the Volcano stove you purchased to see what kind of adaptor it has. I gave three of my daughters one of these. They are awesome. Watch for a sale at Costco. When they have them they are sold at a very good price. Volcano Grills 3-Fuel Portable Camping Stove and a griddle (Volcano sent me one of these): Volcano Grills Reversible Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Griddle/Skillet The griddle works great for pancakes, grilled cheese sandwiches, etc. You can flip it over and cook meats. It’s awesome! Thanks Volcano for letting me try one! I love it.

Cons: The baking tent makes my bread smell like smoke. That’s the only con I have.

Camp Chef Stove/Oven Combo:

Pros: I like this one because I can make pancakes on the griddle (purchased separately) and bake casserole and bread on the racks inside the oven. I do have to remove one rack. That’s easy to do. I can bake two loaves that use one-pound pans for each one. Please make sure you have two adaptors, one for the small propane tanks and one for the larger propane tanks. Here’s the one I purchased and I love it: Volcano Grills Reversible Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Griddle/Skillet

Cons: They only use propane

Barbeques:

Pros: Most everyone has one. Just keep lots of propane stored. Lots, yes lots.

Cons: They waste fuel, in other words, you will go through too much fuel just to boil water, or to cook a heavy duty pan with a casserole inside. I wouldn’t take my nice pans I use inside and use outside on the barbecue. They may never look the same. Picture BLACK pans, sometimes. Cast iron pans work well outside.

Kelly Kettle:

This is the one I was given by Kelly Kettle: Kelly Kettle Ultimate Stainless Steel Large Base Camp Kit

Here’s the deal on the Kelly Stove, I had been wanting one for about two years. I was so excited when the company contacted me to do a review on one. It was truly a cartwheel moment. I love, love, love it! You can see the post on how to use it here: Kelly Kettle Demonstration by Food Storage Moms

Pros: you can boil water, cook soup and make hot chocolate using only twigs, leaves, or pinecones. AWESOME!

Cons: I have no cons for it as long as you have pinecones stored in airtight containers or leaves and twigs in abundance around your home.

Camp Chef Two-Burner Stove:

Camp Chef was gracious enough to send me this beautiful stove to teach classes for emergency preparedness. It is awesome, and I thank them for it. Explorer 2-Burner Stove

Pros: It has two burners, you can cook two different pans of food and use a griddle on it as well. It requires propane (which lasts indefinitely-my favorite fuel), and you can cook for your entire street if you had to make some meals to sustain life.

Cons: It’s a little more expensive, but not enough to keep me from purchasing another one.

Sun Oven:

I am grateful that Paul Munsen sent me a Sun Oven 5 years ago so I could do a review. I thank him from the bottom of my heart. I promote these like crazy because IF you have sunshine, you will love one. Plus, save on utility bills! All American Sun Oven- The Ultimate Solar Appliance

Pros: Uses zero fuel, only the sun. For the price, it’s a bargain. You never need fuel to use it. If your food can fit inside the Sun Oven you can bake it.

Cons: If you have limited sunshine I would not recommend one of these. Here’s the deal, people use these all over the world. They are a blessing to everyone everywhere if they have sunshine.

Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. You can sleep at night knowing your family will be safe, well fed and more comfortable.

The post How To Cook After Disasters Hit appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Use A Lodge Dutch Oven And Love It

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Today, it’s all about how to use a Lodge Dutch Oven and love it! I mean really love using it. My husband received an email in a group message asking about Dutch ovens. The question she asked was “what Dutch oven brand should I buy and can I use it indoors as well as outdoors”? Here’s the deal, I grew up with Lodge cast iron products from the time I was very little. My mom always had the brand called Lodge. I was not paid or given any product from Lodge to write this post, just in case you were wondering. My mom fried eggs, bacon, cheese and so many things in her Lodge cast iron fry pans. You can actually cook with a Dutch oven outside with just charcoal, for instance. You can also bake something in your Dutch oven in your conventional oven inside your home.

I would not recommend cooking with cast iron on a glass top stove. I finally got a gas stove so I don’t have to worry about scratching the glass top anymore. I would love comments if any of you have used cast iron pans on your glass top stoves. I was always afraid it would damage it. I have used them for years until we bought this house and we have always had a gas stove. I love cooking with gas here in Southern Utah because our electric bill is outrageous!!! If you take care of your cast iron it will truly last a lifetime.

Let’s talk about the size of a Dutch oven to buy. I prefer the 6-quart because when the pot is full I can lift it very easily. The 4-quart a good size as well. The larger the capacity, the heavier they become. A really strong guy could prefer a larger 8-quart size. The lid is a 12-inch lid on both the six and eight-quart Lodge Dutch Ovens. The 8-quart is deeper and can cook more food for sure, but would be too heavy for me to handle.

Charcoal Starter Canister

Lodge Dutch Oven

I thought I would show you how I get my “charcoal” going with a little newspaper and this fire-starter canister. It costs under $20.00 and I have had it for years. You place it in a safe location. Next, you take some loosely made newspaper balls or small twigs and place in the bottom of the canister. Next, I place charcoal on top of the newspaper in the canister. Then I use a match or butane fire starter to light the newspaper on fire. I wait until the charcoal looks half black and half whitish….this means its almost ready to use on the top and bottom of the Dutch oven. I have a 12-inch Lodge Dutch oven with a lip on the lid and it’s my favorite for cooking with charcoal on the top and bottom. It’s great for stacking Dutch ovens as well. Weber 7416 Rapidfire Chimney Starter

Lodge Dutch Oven Stand

I recently showed the Dutch oven stand my brother-in-law, Duane S. made for me. Dutch Oven Stand post.

Tutorial On Using A Dutch Oven | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

I Counted Out Too Many Charcoal Pieces

Well, I got distracted, which I often do, and put more than 24 charcoal pieces in the fire-starter canister. So of course, we used all of the charcoal anyway. The rule of thumb is to put the same number of charcoal pieces under and on top of the Dutch oven as the size of the lid. So 10 pieces below and on top if using a 10-inch Dutch oven, 12 pieces below and on top if a 12-inch Dutch oven, etc.

Tutorial On Using A Dutch Oven | via www.foodstoragemoms.com
Here the charcoal is ready to put the Dutch oven on top of the hot charcoal.

Tutorial On Using A Dutch Oven | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

Melt Butter In The Hot Dutch Oven

I melted a half cube of butter in the bottom of the oven before placing these potatoes in the hot Dutch Oven. These are dehydrated potatoes that I soaked in tepid water for 45 minutes and drained off the water.

Tutorial On Using A Dutch Oven | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

Here I placed some pre-cooked bacon cut into pieces, some freeze dried onions (not reconstituted) and lots of freshly grated cheese.
Here is where I put the hot charcoal pieces on top of the lid. See the lid lip-I like these for this kind of meal. You can buy some LODGE Dutch ovens without the lip…but this one is my favorite oven. Remember, I lost count on the charcoal so I just threw the remaining charcoal on top. It still works.

Tutorial On Using A Dutch Oven | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

Here is the finished meal…fabulous…I think it took about 20-25 minutes.

Tutorial On Using A Dutch Oven | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

Dutch Ovens Last For Many Years-If Cleaned and Stored Properly

Dutch ovens can provide many years of reliable service if properly cared for.  This includes proper cleaning once the cooking is done. The best approach is to remove any food that may be stuck to the sides of the oven.  It may require putting some water in the oven while still on the heating source and heating the water until it is near the boiling point.  Using a sponge or plastic scrubber you scrape the food from the sides.  Try not to use anything that may scratch the surface. Always stay clear of using any kind of soap product since it can damage the special coating on the oven surface.  Rinse the oven with clean warm water.  Towel dry the oven and allow it to then air dry.  Once the oven is dry reheat it until it is hot to the touch and then remove it from the heat and apply a thin layer of vegetable oil to fill the pores.  Once cool enough, wipe the oil off with a towel.  It is also suggested to leave the lid slightly ajar so the Dutch oven is properly ventilated during storage.

You’ll find with continued use that over time the Dutch oven will need additional care which may include the stripping and re-curing process.  It could be that your Dutch oven actually gets rusty or takes on a rancid odor.  You will treat the oven as if you just purchased it and want to cure it for future use.  Many people find it most convenient to heat the oven over an outdoor propane stove.  Make sure that ALL the surfaces are given the opportunity to get hot.  Turn up the heat on the propane stove and then carefully reheat all the surfaces such that they are “smoked” for approximately five minutes.  Remove the oven from the heat and then rub all the surfaces with some steel wool until clean using hot running water at the same time.  Wipe the oven clean and dry with paper towels and then allow the oven to air dry.  Once totally dry,  you then will re-season the unit like you cured it prior to placing it in service the first time.

If you have access to a self-cleaning oven you could place the Dutch oven in the self-cleaning oven during a cleaning cycle in place of using the propane stove heating source.  The other steps would be the same.

Take good care of this unique cooking tool and enjoy those delicious meals for many years to come. I hope this tutorial on using a Dutch Oven makes you realize how easy these are to take care of. You can also purchase disposable liners for your Dutch Oven, or line them with aluminum foil to make them easier to clean.

PRINTABLE Lodge Dutch Oven time and temperature chart I put together after getting permission from the company: Dutch Oven Chart

I check out the Lodge website sometimes and just dream…… Lodge Manufacturing Company.

My favorite things:

Lodge L8SK3 Cast Iron Skillet, Pre-Seasoned, 10.25-inch

Lodge LPGI3 Cast Iron Reversible Grill/Griddle, 20-inch x 10.44-inch, Black

Lodge L12CO3 Camp Dutch Oven, 6-Quart

Lodge L10CO3 Cast Iron Camp Dutch Oven, 4-Quart

Lodge P14P3 Pro-Logic Cast Iron Pizza Pan, 14-inch, Black

The post How To Use A Lodge Dutch Oven And Love It appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Be Prepared With Dutch Ovens

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Today it’s a quick reminder on how to be prepared with Dutch ovens. You heard that right if you have a Dutch oven or two with some charcoal and a fire starter or match you are good to go. What I mean by this is that you can be prepared to survive by boiling water and making meals with them. I highly recommend this style because of the lid structure and size. Lodge Camp Dutch Oven, 6 Qt I can’t lift more than a 6-quart Dutch oven because of the weight. I like this style because you can use the lid to stack other Dutch ovens on top of each other and the lid can be used as a griddle. Very little fuel (charcoal or lump charcoal) is needed to use one of these cast iron gems.

Oh my goodness, can’t you just smell the charcoal…oh, and the bacon…gotta love it! I decided to just setup my Dutch oven stand and cook one of my favorite meals using a Dutch oven. This Lodge Dutch oven above comes pre-seasoned so it makes it ready to use after washing with some mild soap and hot water, then pat it dry. Keep it oiled, clean and dry and these babies last a lifetime. Keep in mind you can make so many food items in a Dutch oven. If you have some ideas on how to use a Dutch oven I will add yours to my list! Thank you in advance! If you start practicing NOW with your Dutch oven you will be so comfortable using one after a disaster hits your community. Or if you go camping…..all you do is use the recipes you already have in your cookbooks or have memorized. My Lodge Dutch oven cooking chart below shows you how many charcoal pieces you need to get the right temperature for the Lodge Dutch oven size you are using. Easy peasy, I promise.

Prepared With Dutch Ovens

  1. boil water
  2. bread
  3. beans
  4. chili
  5. make a casserole
  6. lasagna
  7. peach cobbler
  8. chicken pot pie
  9. pizza

Charcoal Starter Canister

I thought I would show you how I get my “charcoal” going with a little newspaper and this fire-starter canister. It costs about $20.00 Weber 7416 Rapidfire Chimney Starter and I have had it for years. To start out right you place it in a safe location. Next, you take some loosely made newspaper balls or small twigs and place them in the bottom of the canister. Next, I place charcoal on top of the newspaper in the canister. Then I use a match or butane fire starter to light the newspaper on fire. I wait until the charcoal looks half black and half whitish….this means it’s almost ready to use on the top and bottom of the Dutch oven. I have a 12-inch Lodge dutch oven with a lid that has a lip. It’s my favorite for cooking with charcoal on the top and bottom. It’s great for stacking Dutch ovens as well.

prepared with Dutch ovens

Dutch Oven Stand

I recently showed the Dutch oven stand my brother-in-law, Duane S. made for me. Dutch Oven Stand post.

prepared with Dutch ovens

I Counted Out Too Many Charcoal Pieces

Well, I got distracted, which I often do, and put more than 24 charcoal pieces in the fire-starter canister. So of course, we used all of the charcoal anyway. Here is my PRINTABLE Dutch oven chart that Lodge Manufacturing allowed me to make for you: Dutch Oven Chart

prepared with Dutch ovens
Here the charcoal is ready to put the Dutch oven on top to start this amazing meal.

prepared with Dutch ovens

I melted a half cube of butter in the bottom of the oven before placing these potatoes in the hot Dutch Oven. These are dehydrated potatoes that I soaked in tepid water for 45 minutes and then drained off the water.

prepared with Dutch ovens

Here I placed some pre-cooked bacon cut into pieces, some freeze dried onions (not reconstituted), and lots of freshly grated cheese.
Here is where I put the hot charcoal pieces on top of the lid. See the lid lip, I like these for this kind of meal. You can buy some LODGE Dutch ovens without the lip, but you cannot stack other ovens on top. Remember, I lost count on the charcoal so I just threw the remaining charcoal on top. It still works.

prepared with Dutch ovens

Here is the finished meal…fabulous…I think it took about 20-25 minutes.

prepared with Dutch ovens

Be Prepared with Dutch Ovens

Dutch ovens can provide many years of reliable service if properly cared for. This includes proper cleaning once the cooking is done. The best approach is to remove any food that may be stuck to the sides and bottom of the oven.  It may require putting some water in the oven while still on the heating source and heating the water until it is near the boiling point. Using a sponge or plastic scrubber you scrape the food from the sides. Try not to use anything that may scratch the surface. Always stay clear of using any kind of soap product since it can damage the special coating on the oven surface. Rinse the oven with clean warm water.  Towel dry the oven and allow it to then air dry. Once the oven is dry reheat it until it is hot to the touch and then remove it from the heat and apply a thin layer of vegetable oil to fill the pores. Once cool enough, wipe the oil off with a towel. It is also suggested to leave the lid slightly ajar so the Dutch oven is properly ventilated during storage.

You’ll find with continued use that over time the Dutch oven will need additional care which may include the stripping and re-curing process.  It could be that your Dutch oven actually gets rusty or takes on a rancid odor. You will want to treat the oven as if you just purchased it and cure it for future use. Many people find it most convenient to heat the oven over an outdoor propane stove. Make sure that ALL the surfaces are given the opportunity to get hot.  Turn up the heat on the propane stove and then carefully reheat all the surfaces such that they are “smoked” for approximately five minutes.  Remove the oven from the heat and then rub all the surfaces with some steel wool until clean using hot running water at the same time. Wipe the oven clean and dry with paper towels and then allow the oven to air dry. Once totally dry, you then will re-season the unit like you cured it prior to placing it in service the first time.

If you have access to a self-cleaning oven you could place the Dutch oven in the self-cleaning oven during a cleaning cycle in place of using the propane stove heating source. The other steps would be the same.

Take good care of this unique cooking tool and enjoy those delicious meals for many years to come. You can also purchase disposable liners for your Dutch ovens, or line them with aluminum foil to make them easier to clean.

I often check out the Lodge website and just dream…… Lodge Manufacturing Company.

My favorite things:

Lodge Cast-Iron Reversible Grill/Griddle, 20-Inch x 10.44-Inch, Black

Lodge L8SGP3 Pre-Seasoned Cast-Iron Square Grill Pan, 10.5-inch

Lodge ASHH41 Silicone Hot Handle Holder, Red

Lodge Camp Dutch Oven, 6 Qt

Lodge A5-3 Camp Dutch Oven Lid Stand

The post How To Be Prepared With Dutch Ovens appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Cook With Pine Cones And Twigs

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Today it’s all about how to cook with pine cones and twigs! This means you can gather pine cones at a golf course near your home, the mountains or parks close to where you live. I call it FREE fuel!  Mark and I harvested pine cones and filled three large black garbage bags, yes the 33-gallon size ones! I have had this Kelly Kettle for at least two years now. I wrote this post a few years ago, but I want to make sure everyone knows about this fabulous stove or kettle as it’s called.You probably know by now I have to know the ins and outs of everything that has to do with emergency preparedness. The Kelly Kettle can be used for camping, hiking and for any unforeseen emergency when we lose power. Bingo, that works for me! It’s great when a product can be used in so many different situations. You can boil some water, cook some meals with literally just pine cones and twigs.

The Kelly Kettle is available in aluminum or stainless steel. I decided on the stainless steel unit. I prefer to buy something right the first time and not have to replace it down the road. I also wanted one that would be larger and serve a few more people. I decided on the Ultimate Stainless Scout Camp Kit @Kelly Kettle USA. I am going to share with you how each part works. This is really the most reliable ultra-fast camping kettle for the outdoors. It’s very light and extremely durable and works even in extreme weather conditions. No batteries…love it!

Pine Cones and Twigs

Kelly Kettle

No Propane, Gas or Liquid Fuel

Oh my gosh, I love that this does not need any propane, gas or liquid fuel. Place a few wads of newspaper in the bottom of the base unit. Next, I can scrounge for twigs, pine cones, etc. and start a small fire in the base with a match or fire starter. I went over to the golf course near my home and gathered up some pine cones from the ground. Yep, FREE fuel for this unit! Now I will be gathering pine cones on a regular basis to store in my garage. We added some dry branches and small leaves and the fire started so quickly! Update, I now only use my pine cones and twigs! No newspaper needed! Make sure you don’t forget some matches to start the fire.

Kelly Kettle Base

Double Walled Kelly Kettle Stove

Next, you place the main double walled stove on the base as shown above. Here’s the deal, I couldn’t figure out how this unit worked because I didn’t realize it had a double walled pitcher built in, so to speak. Yep, I get it now. The flue/chimney top  is at the top where you can add more twigs and pine cones. You can see the opening on the right side where you can add water.

Boil Water In Kelly Kettle

Boil 37.2 ounces of liquid in minutes

This Scout Kelly Kettle boils 1.1 liters (37.2 oz) in minutes. You can see above how to lift the Kelly Kettle off the base with the handle at a 90 degree angle. You then set the unit on a flat surface and use the attached orange stopper (which should always be removed before lighting the kettle) to pour water in a pan or cup.

Kelly Kettle Orange Stopper

Ready To Cook With The Kelly Kettle

Now we are ready to cook. Kelly Kettle has a pan bracket that has two pieces and you hook them together and insert them into the chimney flue to set your pans on the top to start cooking your food.

Cooking In A Kelly Kettle

Finish Cooking On Grill

Snack Ramen at its best…I had a package and added it to the boiling water in the pan. Easy, peasy. The large Kelly Kettle cook set comes with a grill, pan, lid and a handle to lift the pan when cooking. You will remove the top double walled unit and place your mugs or pan to finish cooking or heat up your drinks.

Kelly Kettle Grill

Kelly Kettle Hobo Stove Accessory

Hobo Stove Accessory

Hobo Stove On Base

Kelly Hobo Stove Accessory

The Best Stainless Steel Cups with Silicone Lip Saver

Okay, I have never seen a silicone lip saver…just saying, this is the best thing I have ever seen for a hot cup to save your lips!

Kelly Kettle Cups Silicone Lips

Everything Stores In This Bag

Kelly Kettle Bag

I highly recommend one of these stoves for several reasons. It is compact and can be used year round. The fact that I can gather pine cones, twigs, and leaves for fuel is a HUGE plus for me. Here’s to being prepared for the unexpected.

My favorite things:

Kelly Kettle Ultimate Stainless Steel Large Base Camp Kit

Kelly Kettle Stainless Steel Large Hobo Stove – Fits Base Camp and Scout models

Camping Cups – Kelly Kettle – Packable – Stainless Steel – Large Cup is 17 oz. and Small Cup is 12 oz.

Kelly Kettle Small Stainless Steel Hobo Stove – Stick Stove for Backpacking

Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way

The post How To Cook With Pine Cones And Twigs appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

101 Reasons Why I Recommend A Sun Oven

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I have 101 reasons why I recommend a Sun Oven for you today! Just so you know, I live in Southern Utah where I have a lot of sunshine to heat my Sun Oven. I received an email yesterday from a reader asking me if we can use a Dutch oven in a Sun Oven. Here’s the deal with that idea, if your Dutch oven is large the weight alone would tip the inner “cradle” inside the Sun oven that holds the pans so they bake evenly. If you want to use a Dutch oven I suggest using rocks with charcoal in a protected area, or a firepit in the ground with charcoal or wood. Keep in mind that the Sun Oven is perfect for camping because you have zero fire issues with no flame, no fuel required to bake your meals.

I have written a post on how to open the box if you purchase a Sun Oven because people are sometimes afraid they won’t know how to use it. Here’s the link: How To Use A Sun Oven. Paul Munsen designed this genius machine. You open the box, remove the film on the shiny reflectors, and boil some vinegar water and wipe it out. The instructions are included in the box and are easy to follow. Paul sent me my first Sun Oven about 4 years ago so I could write a review. I loved it so much I bought a second one. Plus, I have been writing posts about them for four years now. It is not uncommon for me to have both of my ovens cooking outside in my backyard several days a week. Just think about this, once you purchase this baby you will never have to pay for fuel, charcoal, propane or electricity again! The old style is black like mine and the new ones are blue. All American Sun Oven- The Ultimate Solar Appliance

Your meals will never burn, yes you heard me right! I have to tell you a funny story. I put my whole wheat bread in both ovens one day and ran down the street to visit a friend and totally forgot my bread for two hours. It was perfectly fine even though it baked an extra hour and a half.

Whatever you bake in your conventional oven you can bake in your Sun Oven, if you have sunshine. You can start your meal before you go run errands and position the oven so it gets the best angle of sunshine while you are gone and it will be cooked when you get home. Of course, you can’t start the meal one hour before the sun goes down or the food will not be cooked. I typically start my bread, cookies, casseroles, corn or whatever between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. I have the older style Sun Oven but it works great for me. I learned how to position it for the sun. The new ones have a built in unit to help you turn it correctly to get the best angle of the sun. Here is how I position my Sun Oven, check out the squares on the sides of the oven:

sun oven

101 Reasons I Recommend A Sun Oven:

These are all the things I have cooked or baked in my Sun ovens. I want you to know how much I love these ovens because they save me money on utilities!! They are perfect for power outages, but also everyday use as well. I have actually cooked more than 101 items, but this just shows you all the stuff you can bake in one of these great cooking sources. If the pan or pans fit and you have the sunshine to keep the temperature correct you can bake anything. Remember, you use the recipes you have right now, no special recipes required. It’s an awesome oven, I promise.

  1. bake bread
  2. bake brownies
  3. make hard boiled eggs (I bake mine in a muffin tin)
  4. boil macaroni
  5. boil rice
  6. boil quinoa
  7. bake a cake
  8. bake a whole chicken
  9. cook corn on the cob in the husks
  10. bake potatoes
  11. bake yams or sweet potatoes
  12. make funeral potatoes (we call them cheesy potatoes in Utah)
  13. boil water
  14. bake cupcakes
  15. bake cookies
  16. bake chicken casseroles
  17. make macaroni and cheese
  18. make a green bean casserole
  19. bake a ham
  20. bake barbecued chicken
  21. dehydrate fruits with the racks
  22. dehydrate vegetables with the racks
  23. dehydrate herbs with the racks
  24. bake a quiche
  25. bake pork chops
  26. bake chopped onions
  27. bake cauliflower
  28. bake zucchini
  29. bake yellow crookneck squash
  30. bake sliced carrots
  31. bake pumpkin bread
  32. make soups
  33. make lasagna
  34. make beans (if you soak them overnight)
  35. make oatmeal
  36. make muffins
  37. baked beans
  38. bake sliced beets
  39. scrambled eggs
  40. pulled pork
  41. bake a pork shoulder roast
  42. make carnitas
  43. make shredded pork for burritos
  44. make shredded beef for tacos
  45. sun roasted cooked chickpeas drained with olive oil and a little chili powder added
  46. bake some salmon
  47. bake asparagus
  48. bake a turkey (up to 20 lbs.)
  49. make Spanish rice
  50. bake garlic cloves (peeled)
  51. peach cobbler
  52. apple pie
  53. flan cake
  54. cherry pie
  55. pumpkin pie
  56. pecan pie
  57. lamb chops
  58. meatballs
  59. good old Shepherd’s pie (cooked hamburger, tomato soup, and mashed potatoes)
  60. corn muffins
  61. bran muffins
  62. banana muffins
  63. pumpkin muffins
  64. apple crisp
  65. chicken noodle soup
  66. mini egg muffins
  67. bake chili with beans (I use precooked beans with my recipe)
  68. bake white chicken chili (I use canned chicken and white navy beans from a can)
  69. bake shredded carrots, shredded zucchini, and shredded yellow straight neck squash
  70. bake chicken legs with the skin on with olive oil drizzled on them with salt and pepper
  71. bake chicken thighs with the skin on with olive oil drizzled on them with salt and pepper
  72. bake chicken breasts with the skin on with olive oil drizzled on them with salt and pepper
  73. bake turkey breasts with the skin on with olive oil drizzled on them with salt and pepper
  74. bake chicken tenderloins and then shred the baked chicken and use it in recipes during the week
  75. bake some apples (remove the cores) with cinnamon and sugar
  76. bake peeled peaches with a little cinnamon and sugar
  77. make mashed potatoes with or without the peelings (place the one-inch cubes covered in a pan of water)
  78. boil spaghetti without having to watch it boil (set and forget it covered in water)
  79. make spaghetti sauce from scratch
  80. make lime cilantro rice
  81. make refried beans (I use canned pinto beans drained)
  82. boil Kamut (Trademarked)
  83. chicken and broccoli casserole
  84. chicken tetrazzini
  85. bake enchiladas
  86. make meat stuffed bell peppers
  87. make cooked quinoa stuffed bell peppers
  88. chicken and rice casserole
  89. scalloped potatoes
  90. bread pudding
  91. turkey dressing
  92. ham and bean soup
  93. taco soup
  94. cheesy cauliflower casserole
  95. rice pudding
  96. sweet and sour chicken
  97. baked short ribs
  98. spicy chicken wings
  99. poppy seed chicken
  100. chili macaroni
  101. hamburger layered dinner

Sometimes things just sound too good to be true.  How could one inexpensive Sun Oven possibly cook all these food options, just like a regular kitchen oven? Well, it is true because I’ve done it! I’m sure there are dozens of other things you can find to try in yours. Be creative and enjoy saving money at the same time. Happy cooking in your very own Sun Oven.

My favorite things:

All American Sun Oven- The Ultimate Solar Appliance

Silicone Oven Mitts – Commercial Grade, Extra Long Quilted Cotton Lining – Heat Resistant Kitchen Potholder Gloves – 1 Pair (Red) – Homwe®

The post 101 Reasons Why I Recommend A Sun Oven appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Make A Dutch Oven Stand On The Cheap

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Today I’m going to show you how to make a Dutch oven stand on the cheap! My awesome brother-in-law, Duane S. made this Dutch oven stand for Mark and I about 25-30 years ago. It is the perfect solution for cooking with Dutch ovens or even roasting marshmallows. I can add a grill to the to top and grill some hamburgers or hotdogs. Here’s the deal, I like being able to use this Dutch oven stand to cook meals with every one of my Dutch ovens (all different sizes). It’s the perfect height to stand and check the food that’s cooking without leaning over the rocks on the ground. Duane took a tire rim that is approximately 15 inches wide in diameter. He welded 3 short legs, about 6-inches tall and about 1-3/8 inches in diameter, inside the rim. The other three legs are 24-inches long and 1-1/4 inches in diameter and fit inside the longer ones.

Duane made it so we can take the three 24-inch legs out and travel easily with this little barbecue, or Dutch Oven Stand, in a car or truck. It’s really easy to store in the garage because it comes apart. It is extremely sturdy. He cut a metal grate and welded it so it is stationary inside the tire rim to hold briquettes or firewood. If you had another grate/grill for the top you could barbecue on it. We use this mainly for the Dutch Oven, or sometimes we roast marshmallows or hot dogs with a skewer over the flames.

Dutch Oven Stand On The Cheap:

Here is the list of the items you will need, check out car salvage companies and get the pipes at your local hardware store.

  1. tire rim about 15-inches in diameter
  2. 3 short legs about 6-inches by 1-3/8 inches in diameter
  3. three 24-inch long legs
  4. grate to fit inside (you will more than likely need someone to cut the right size)
  5. a welder to weld it together for you, at least the short legs

 

Dutch oven stand

What I really like about this unit is that you can use it with or without the 24-inch extended legs. Of course, you would need to know someone who knows how to weld and has welding tools. Thank you to my brilliant brother-in-law for coming up with this great idea! The extended legs are about 24 inches long by 1-1/4 inches in diameter. This makes me want to cook something this weekend in my Dutch Oven!

Here are some of my favorite Dutch oven recipes:

Dutch Oven Biscuits:

Ingredients:

4 teaspoons SAF yeast

1/4 cup sugar

1 teaspoon baking soda

2 cups buttermilk

5 cups flour (I can use white or freshly ground whole wheat)

1/2 cup warm water

1 cup butter softened

Instructions:

I dump everything in a large bowl in the order shown above and use a Danish whisk and then use my hands. I add more flour as needed. I sprinkle flour on the counter and knead the dough quickly and roll out to 1/2 inch thick. I use a cookie or biscuit cutter. Grease a cookie sheet or Dutch oven. Bake in the house at 425 degrees for 12-15 minutes. If you use a 6-quart Dutch oven outside to bake them use 10 briquettes on the bottom and 14 briquettes on the lid or top. Bake them for 10 minutes or until lightly browned.

PRINTABLE recipe: Dutch Oven Biscuits by Food Storage Moms

Dutch Oven Peach Cobbler by Food Storage Moms

Ingredients:

1-29 ounce can peaches (halved or sliced), liquid reserved in a bowl

1-21 ounce can peach pie filling

1 yellow cake mix (I prefer Duncan Hines)

Instructions:

Drain the juice as stated above and place the peaches in the Dutch oven (I used vegetable spray before adding the peaches). Put one peach sliced in the juice you set aside. Spoon the pie filling over the peaches in the Dutch oven.

Now you take the bowl with the juice with one sliced peach and add the cake mix. You follow the cake directions (but you don’t need the eggs). Spread the batter over the peaches evenly in the pan. By now the briquettes should be ready to bake our cobbler. Bake at 350 degrees for about 30-35 minutes or until the cake pulls away from the sides of the Dutch oven. If cooking outside with charcoal you will use 17 charcoals on the lid and 8 charcoals beneath the oven to make it 350 degrees if the pan is 12-inches in diameter.

PRINTABLE recipe: Dutch Oven Peach Cobbler by Food Storage Moms

My favorite things:

Lodge Camp Dutch Oven, 6 Qt

Lodge A5-3 Camp Dutch Oven Lid Stand

Lodge A5DLL Deluxe Lid Lifter

Lodge Pro-Logic P14P3 Cast Iron Pizza Pan, Black, 14-inch

Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

The post How To Make A Dutch Oven Stand On The Cheap appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Use A Sun Oven and Love it

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Would you like to learn how to use a Sun Oven and love it? The hardest part about setting up a Sun Oven is taking it out the box and getting it fully unpacked. People are sometimes afraid because they don’t know how to use the oven. The hardest part for me was taking the plastic wrapping off of the solar panels. I have two Sun Ovens, the first one was hard to peel off the wrapping. The second oven I purchased, the materials came right off without any trouble. I have the old style but it’s awesome! The new ones are blue on the outside, either one is fabulous!  You will never burn anything in these babies! Gotta love that! I forgot my bread one day and it was fine 30 minutes after the required baking time. Here’s the deal, you forget you are cooking outside because you can’t smell the food!

I bought a second Sun Oven because I use mine all the time to keep my kitchen cool and save money on my utility bills.

How To Use A Sun Oven-It’s Really Easy:

I want you to look at the shadow on the ground  in this first picture. The “points” do not line up so this means the Sun Oven is not pointing in the right direction to get the full sun reflection or heat. The newer ones have a positioning tool so these instructions are for this style only.

How To Use Your Sun Oven-It's Really Easy | by FoodStorageMoms.com

This second picture shows the “points” are still NOT “squared” or “even”  with all four sides of the shadow. I just keep turning the stove until I get it right.

How To Use Your Sun Oven-It's Really Easy | by FoodStorageMoms.com

Please notice the silver bar on the back of it. It depends on the Sun’s location as to whether or not that “leg” needs to be up or down 1 -9 inches or so. Okay check out this picture.

How To Use Your Sun Oven-It's Really Easy | by FoodStorageMoms.com

Can you see the shadow around the Sun Oven?  Look at the three squares (you can’t see the fourth one)  on the ground. If all 4 “squares” are equal all the way around you will get the BEST Sun exposure and heat. You can see I raised the leg on the back about 6 inches to get the “squares” to line up correctly towards the sun.

How To Use Your Sun Oven-It's Really Easy | by FoodStorageMoms.com

Here is the fourth picture showing another angle with the “squares”. I learned this “TIP” from a guy who works in a store in St. George, Utah called “Your Family Still Matters”. I love the people that work there. I learn something new every time I go in there! I hope I explained this so people can understand what the “squares” are.  I went to a friends house and I had to show her these squares. It will not work at 6:00 at night at least where I live. You need full sun. I like to use mine between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. I like to tell people to think about the time that is the least safe temperatures or time to swim for sunburns……yep 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Well, this is when you get the best SUN for cooking food!!! I have to tell you the temperature goes up so much faster now that I figured out how to get the best reflection from the Sun! Love it! You can bake anything in this Sun Oven that you can bake in a conventional oven if it will fit. You lock the lid closed with the wing nuts and you are good to go. Be sure and have good hot pads.

My favorite things:

Sun Oven: All American Sun Oven Dehydrating and Preparedness Accessory Package

Hot pads: Silicone Heat Resistant Cooking Gloves for BBQ, Grilling and Oven from Morgan Trading Co. Kitchen Mitts Offer Premium Quality, Maximum Protection, Versatility & Ease of Use. Enhance Your Cooking Experience Now!

My book: Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

 

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How To Use A Volcano Stove For Survival

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If you want to know how to use a Volcano Stove for survival I am going to show you how to use it today. It’s great for camping as well. Of course, if there are fire restrictions where you live we must all adhere to those rules. The thing I like about the Volcano II Stove is that you can take it camping, use it for emergency cooking and baking. The deal that nails this product for me is that you can use propane, wood or charcoal in this awesome cooking stove. This is an updated post because I was shopping at Costco and there was a roadshow with a great young man telling people how to use a Volcano Stove. I mentioned that I love their product and I would love to try the new grill they have designed. I told the fellow doing the demonstration that I published a book and recommended their stove. Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation I sent the owners of the company a book and they sent me the griddle outlined below.

This stove even has a tent to bake bread, muffins, cornbread, etc. I invited a few neighbors over to roast hot dogs tonight so you can see this Volcano Stove II in action. This stove is safe enough to use on top of your picnic table and folds down to about 5 inches tall when completely closed after using it. The included bag is perfect to store its propane hoses, connections, and its grills inside. I call it the Volcano II Stove bag. The stove is easy to open and close after it cools down, then store it on a shelf in the garage.

Volcano Stove:

Here’s the new Volcano griddle and grill pan. You will love this new accessory because both sides of the unit come pre-seasoned with a groved griddle on one side and grill pan with a pour spout on the other. It has two handles and a detachable grip. What I love about it is the fact that’s it ROUND and fits perfectly on the stove. Volcano Outdoors 40-013 Reversible Griddle

Volcano Stove

Here is what the inside of the Volcano II Stove looks like before we start to assemble it right out of the bag. There is very little assembly if you want to even call it that. Volcano Grills 3-Fuel Portable Camping Stove

Volcano II Stove

Here is the Volcano II Stove sitting flat on the concrete and ready to open by pulling straight up using the handle. The legs drop down and it is ready to start putting the grills in it.

Volcano Stove Handles

The picture below shows the unit ready to take fuel. Here is grill #1 you put inside the stove if you are using wood or charcoal to cook your meal.  You crumple newspaper and put a few small pieces of dry wood and then throw a few more pieces of scrap wood or charcoal on the newspaper. I lit the fire, and luckily my husband Mark came home and really got the fire going! I used a butane fire starter tool to light the fire. Once the fire is going, you place the grill # 2 on the ridge inside the stove. This grill # 2  is where you would cook with a pan, dutch oven or a wok that would fit inside this area. If you are going to barbecue you put the grill # 3 on the top (it doesn’t show up very well among the rocks in the bottom left of the picture). This top grill #3 is approximately 13 inches in diameter. The lever shown above on the left side is the vent to adjust the air flow.

Volcano Stove w/Three Grills

I was cooking hot dogs. I don’t usually buy hot dogs because I do not want to think about what is is them. I must say, I do eat an occasional kosher hot dog with mustard and relish at Costco’s. Yep, $1.50 with a drink, and people here line up to get that bargain.

Volcano Stove Set Up

Here are the hot dogs cooked and ready to serve. Yep, hot dog, mustard and relish with a bun!

Cooked Hot Dogs On A Volcano Stove

Here are the items needed for the stove if you are using propane. It has the center piece that the flame comes through with the connection on the lower left. The hose completes the connection for you to use your propane tank. When I bought my stove I had to purchase the larger hose connection for the large 20-pound propane tanks like you use with your barbecue. Be sure and check to see what you are buying because some of the stoves do not come with any propane accessories. Some come with a small attachment to go with the one pound propane containers. The companies sell different accessories like an extra handle, tent and propane attachments. This is the burner/cradle, 4″ nipple, hose, valve, and regulator.

Volcano Stove II Propane Gas Line

Here is a Tent you can buy as an accessory to bake bread, muffins, casseroles, etc. It makes the stove like an oven. Volcano Outdoors 30-700 Lid for Grilling

Volcano Stove Tent

Here is the awesome bag that the Volcano Stove II is stored in horizontally. You basically let the stove cool down and shake out the little residue that is left. Wipe it out and store everything back in the storage bag shown below.

Volcano Stove II Bag

Here’s the deal with the Volcano Stove, it’s awesome to use after a disaster, an unforeseen emergency and you can take it camping to cook your meals! Like I said before, it uses several fuel choices, wood, charcoal, lump charcoal, and propane. Thanks for being prepared for the unexpected.

The post How To Use A Volcano Stove For Survival appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Cook For Survival Without Power

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Today I’m sharing several ideas on how to cook for survival without power. If we lose power for a day or two we can eat peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, or chicken salad on crackers for that matter. We can eat some freeze dried veggies out of our #10 cans or open a can of green beans and eat them. Here’s how I see what will happen after a week of zero power or utility breakdown. Yes, we have flashlights and batteries to get us through the evenings of darkness. Maybe you have a lantern or two. I just finished reading Ted Koppel’s book, “Lights Out”. Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath We as prepared people already knew we will a power outage at some time or another. We preppers (I really don’t like that word anymore) continue to be prepared for the unexpected. Power grid down or not, our country is extremely unprepared for a grid down (power outage across the country) and we as individuals need to do all we can to prepare ourselves and families near us for the loss of power due to any cause.

You may have heard this statement from me before, the first day without power we will check with our neighbors to see if they have lost power too. Hopefully, we all have a way to charge our cell phones or laptops if the power outage is only in our neighborhood. If it’s only our neighborhood we can use our cell phones to see what’s going on in the world. If the cell phones don’t work then possibly it’s a total grid down. The second day without power we can still play cards, board games and visit with neighbors to see what plan B is if this power outage is longer than two days. Now, during this power outage, the supermarkets will probably be without power and therefore, they will be closed once the generator runs out of fuel. The third day and every day thereafter some people may become agitated. The gas stations will be shut down because of zero power. Uncertainty brings fear and emotions may be high. If you are prepared you will not be afraid.

I strongly suggest you buy the paperback copy of my book now before you need it. If you have zero power you can flip through the pages to be ready for what may be coming. Please study it and read it as a family. When I wrote the book I told my publisher I did not want to write about weapons in my book. I wanted my book to be family friendly so that a child old enough to read could study it and learn from it. It’s available in many stores and online. I feel blessed to have been asked to write my book to teach the world in paper form to be prepared for the unexpected. Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

We all know we need water to survive, so I highly recommend storing water first, then food. Now let’s get into cooking without power. We can eat cold meals out of cans or food from our gardens for a week if we had too, but if we are out of power for much longer than that we need to know how to cook outside. I have several options for how to cook for survival. These are the ones I highly recommend and use all the time.

Cook For Survival

Keep in mind you need to store some matches, a butane lighter or a fire starter tool for some of the cooking stoves below. I also recommend this tool: Lodge A5-1 Charcoal Chimney Starter

1. Dutch Ovens

If you can find one at a thrift store that would be awesome, although they are getting harder to find now. This is the one I recommend because it has a lid with a “lip” so you can not only place charcoal underneath the oven itself, but also on the lid. Another bonus is you can stack this style of Dutch oven. Lodge Camp Dutch Oven, 6 Qt. I prefer the six quart over the eight quart version due to the weight of the Dutch oven when empty or filled. If you find some rusty cast iron oven at a thrift store or garage sale, no worries. I have repaired/cleaned some Lodge cast iron ovens very easily this way: First get some fine steel wool and remove all the rust. Next you wash the cast iron skillet or Dutch oven with mild soap and warm water. Quickly dry it and oil it by rubbing the surface inside and outside and cook in a heated 350-degree stove/oven for about an hour turned upside down. I always put a sheet of aluminum foil on the rack right below the pans to collect drips. After one hour turn off the oven and let them cool overnight. They are then ready to store with a paper towel between the lid and the Dutch oven. I store most of my Dutch ovens in bags in the garage. The ones I use all the time I do not store in bags. Be aware, if the piece is really rusted you may have to take it to a machine shop to have it sandblasted and restored to raw cast iron. Then you would follow the steps above using oil and placing them in the oven as directed. Most people never let their cast iron near water, I do and then I dry it in the oven after I spray a little vegetable oil on it, if needed.

Fuel:

I am only talking about cooking outside today, so let’s talk about the fuel we can use outside with cast iron skillets, griddles or Dutch ovens. I have actually put charcoal on the ground and baked bread, casseroles, biscuits or whatever just on rocks with charcoal. I store my charcoal without the starter chemicals (plain charcoal will store indefinitely if kept airtight and dry) in 5-gallon buckets with Gamma Lids. Now, you can cook with cast iron on your gas barbecue or over a fire pit with a tripod like this one: Lodge 3TP2 Camp Dutch Oven Tripod Here is another thing I use: Lodge A5DLL Deluxe Lid Lifter

Charcoal, lump charcoal, and wood work great in a fire pit or on gravel.

Dutch Oven Stand Without Legs Attached

My awesome brother-in-law, Duane made for Mark and me this portable Dutch Oven stand so we can take the 24-inch legs out and travel in a car or truck easily with this little barbecue. It’s really easy to store in the garage because it comes apart. It is extremely sturdy. Duane took a tire rim that is approximately 15 inches wide in diameter. He welded 3 short legs, about 6 inches tall and about 1-3/8 inches in diameter, inside the rim. The other legs are 24 inches long and 1-1/4 inches in diameter and fit inside the welded ones attached to the tire rim. He cut a metal grate and welded it so it is stationary inside the tire rim to hold briquettes or firewood. If you had another grate/grill for the top you could barbecue on it. We use this mainly for the Dutch Oven, or sometimes we roast marshmallows or hot dogs with a skewer over the flames.

What I really like about this unit is that you can use it with or without the 24-inch extended legs. Of course, you would need to know someone who knows how to weld and has welding tools. Thank you to my brilliant brother-in-law for coming up with this great idea! The extended legs are about 24 inches long by 1-1/4 inches in diameter. This makes me want to cook something this weekend in my Dutch Oven!

How To Make A Dutch Oven Stand | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

2. Butane Stoves

I actually used one of these butane stoves for three months last year when I was waiting to have a gas line installed in my kitchen  Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and the fuel 12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves. I used one canister of fuel for 6 weeks so it will go pretty far unless you are boiling a large pot of soup every day. I prefer having several types of cooking stoves because they all use different types of fuel.

Fuel:

What’s the deal with butane canisters? You will read that you can only use these butane stoves outside, but I have used them in stores that provided them for me to show how to cook inside their facilities. If use them in my home I crack a window open. These are great to cook outside, but they are small and will work great for a few weeks.

3. Kelly Kettle

I love the Kelly Kettle because it’s fairly inexpensive and uses very little fuel. You can boil water to make soup in minutes. If you want to see how a Kelly Kettle works on a step by step basis here is a post where I show how to use it: Kelly Kettle by Food Storage Moms. I wanted one for several years and I was so grateful my friend Glen from Kelly Kettle asked me to show the world how to use one! These are great for camping and emergencies because they use very little fuel. Literally. This is the one I have: Kelly Kettle Ultimate Stainless Steel Small Trekker Camp Stove Kit. New Spot Welded Model. The Perfect Camp Stove for Cooking, Hiking, Camping, Kayaking, Fishing, and Hunting. Boil Water, Cook Fast, Survive.

Fuel:

Dry leaves or twigs, that’s it! I have used pine cones as well. I call this my FREE fuel stove because you can gather the dry leaves, pine cones or twigs around your yard, add a match and you have water boiling in no time at all.

4. Volcano Stove

Volcano stoves are awesome because you can use three types of fuel with them. The Volcano Stove collapses to about 5 inches and fits well in a car or on a shelf in your garage. I comes complete with a zippered bag.  Volcano 3 Collapsible Cook Stove You can bake, boil water or barbecue on them right on the table, outside of course. I have seen posts stating you can “can” foods on one of these. I strongly disagree with this idea as you cannot control the temperature of the flame/heat. National Center For Home Food Preservation  I quote ” At least one pressure canner manufacturer advises not to can on any outdoor heat source. Your pressure canner can be damaged if the gas burner puts out too much heat. Higher BTU burners could also produce so much heat that the recommended come-up time for canning could be altered, potentially producing an unsafe final product.” End of quote.

Fuel:

Wood, charcoal, lump charcoal and propane canisters, large and small are all great options. Please note not all Volcano stoves come with BOTH adapters for the small propane canisters AND large propane tanks. This is why it’s critical to practice and use our emergency or camping outdoor stoves before a disaster or unforeseen emergency.

5. Camp Chef-Stove/Oven Combo

I love this one because you can bake bread or casseroles in it, AND it has two burners on top. If you watch at your local Costco or Sam’s Club they usually have these for a good price right before Memorial Day or Father’s Day. Here’s the one I have: Camp Chef Camping Outdoor Oven with 2 Burner Camping Stove I did buy the griddle that goes with it so I can make pancakes, grilled cheese sandwiches or whatever on top.

Fuel:

Propane canisters or tanks. You will need BOTH the small propane canisters and large propane tank adapters to use them. I only use the large adapter because I prefer to use my propane tanks. I do have both adapters, though. Please be aware they do not always provide both adapters when purchased.

6. Camp Chef Double Burner Stove

This is the one I use all the time. It’s very sturdy and I can cook with my cast iron pans and Dutch ovens on it. Camp Chef Explorer Series EX-60LW 2-Burner Modular Cooking System, Black. I like this one because I have a griddle I use with it and I can cook for a lot of people very quickly, when needed. I also purchased the bag to store it safely in my garage. The carry bag has wheels and it’s easy to transport.

Fuel:

Propane.

Sun Oven:

If you purchase a Sun Oven I only recommend this brand: All American Sun Oven Dehydrating and Preparedness Accessory Package. I have two of these and I can bake pretty much anything in them, including my bread. Whatever you can bake in your conventional oven in your home you can bake in one of these ovens. The pans must not be shiny because they will reflect the heat AWAY from your food. If the pan fits you can bake almost anything in it.

Fuel:

Zero fuel, you only need sunshine. Here’s the deal, I recommend these only as a second choice for cooking. I have two of them and use them all the time. Where I live I get the best sunshine between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. I’m just giving you the heads up here, you can’t come home from work at 4:00 p,m. and still have enough sunshine to bake a meal or bread where I live. If we happen to be without sunshine for two or three weeks we will need an alternative way to cook or bake our meals. I must add something here that’s very important about the Sun Oven. We need ZERO fuel, that’s a big deal to me. I will prepare meals planned around use of the sun rather than use up my wood, charcoal, lump charcoal, pinecones, butane or propane fuel.

I hope that my post gives you several ideas that may work for your family. All you need to cook for survival is to have one or two types of stoves, or just charcoal with a Dutch oven. Easy peasy to be prepared for the unexpected.

 

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How To Prep Your Sun Oven Today Not Tomorrow

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I am going to show the world how to prep your Sun Oven today not tomorrow. Here’s the deal, I have two of these awesome Sun Ovens. I have a few friends that are a bit nervous about just opening the Sun Oven box and getting started. I got my first Sun Oven from Paul Munsen, the person who designed these awesome ovens. I was a new blogger and he was kind enough to send me one to try out and then show the world how to use it. I have been doing this for about 3-1/2 years now and really enjoy the freedom these ovens provide. I ended up buying a second one from a store here in St. George when they had an awesome sale going on. I figure in my neighborhood there are a few people that will be cooking for the entire neighborhood. Not feeding, mind you, everyone must contribute to the neighborhood food bank if it comes to that. Just giving you the heads up here, we must all contribute. I don’t think there is a nice way to say it, but everyone must be prepared for the unexpected. Some people may think the government will deliver food to your door, that’s not going to happen, not enough resources. At least for days, weeks or months if we had a grid down, no power, no refrigeration, etc.we will be on our own, prepared or not.

How To Prep Your Sun Oven

This box that may seem daunting to open or you may feel you don’t have time to tackle this project. I get it. But we need these boxes open and the ovens ready to use when we need them. I will show you how to do this step by step today. Get your box cutter or scissors and carefully open the box. I borrowed this unopened box from a friend this morning so I could demonstrate what is needed to be done. I’m glad she hadn’t had the time to get the box open. It’s important for me to show the world how easy it is to get this baby prepped and ready to go.

How To Prep Your Sun Oven Today Not Tomorrow by FoodStorageMoms

Inside the box you will find the Sun Oven and some awesome accessories. This particular package is from a few years ago so if you don’t see this package online that’s why. This package has two large bread pans which could also be used for casseroles, brownies, or cakes. I say large bread pans because I use smaller bread pans. These are 9.25in X 5.25in x 2.5in or 24cm X 13cm x 6.5cm. This package comes with two stackable pans with two different lids. One is enamel and the other is glass. You can bake with these stacked on top of each other with just one lid. I love the glass lid because I can watch how my food is baking. It also has three dehydrating racks with one roll of parchment baking paper. Please keep in mind, you can use your own pans as long as they fit in the area available inside the Sun Oven. This is the same model I have. I know the newer ones will hold a larger pan, but this model works great for me. Another tidbit you need to know is we cannot use stainless steel or light-colored metal pans as they will reflect the heat away from the food we are cooking. The darker the better. This package also comes with a WAPI: WAPI Information by Food Storage Moms

How To Prep Your Sun Oven Today Not Tomorrow by FoodStorageMoms

Can you see the blue film? We have to remove this before we can prep the Sun Oven to use outside. I had to use my fingers to pull the tiny pieces away from the rivets after removing the large blue sheets of film from the panels.

How To Prep Your Sun Oven Today Not Tomorrow by FoodStorageMoms

All of this blue film I had to remove. It only took me a few minutes.

How To Prep Your Sun Oven Today Not Tomorrow by FoodStorageMoms

Next I decided I needed to wash the bread pans, baking pans with lids, and dehydrator racks with hot soapy water. I then rinsed and dried them.

How To Prep Your Sun Oven Today Not Tomorrow by FoodStorageMoms

The next step was to set up the Sun Oven outside for about 30 minutes to start heating up so I could use it for the next step. You take 3 cups vinegar (I used white) and put it in one uncovered pan in the oven for 90-120 minutes.

How To Prep Your Sun Oven Today Not Tomorrow by FoodStorageMoms

You can see the uncovered pan with the vinegar inside this oven here. I had trouble today getting the temperature up to 350 degrees because the day was little overcast. When it hit 325 degrees I started my two-hour countdown to bring the vinegar to a boil. I patiently waited for the sunshine to peek through the clouds. This is another reason I recommend having more than one type of cooking device when we lose power.

How To Prep Your Sun Oven Today Not Tomorrow by FoodStorageMoms

This shows the little thumbscrew we use to secure the solar panels in place.

How To Prep Your Sun Oven Today Not Tomorrow by FoodStorageMoms

You can see this model has a “leg” on the back to raise or lower to catch the most sun rays at the correct angle. I used a permanent red magic marker so I can line up the button that pops through the holes on the bracket shown above the extension leg.

How To Prep Your Sun Oven Today Not Tomorrow by FoodStorageMoms

Now, I like everything organized, so of course I have to put all my friend’s accessories in this bag. I buy these bags: Set of 2 Medium Chests 12 Guage Vinyl 12x16x8 each I used these same bags to store my 72-hour kit food.

How To Prep Your Sun Oven Today Not Tomorrow by FoodStorageMoms

I hope this post today helps you get out your Sun Oven and get it ready if you have it sitting in your garage. Please do it today, you may need it tomorrow. Thanks for being prepared for the unexpected.

My biggest tip: Sun Oven Tips by Food Storage Moms

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How To Make The Best Dutch Oven Biscuits Ever

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It’s getting a little cooler outside so I want to show you how to make the best Dutch oven biscuits ever! This is my friend, Kathleen’s recipe with a little tweaking on my part. When we go to dinner at Kathleen and Brent’s, she will ask me if I want bread or biscuits. It’s hard because she makes the best artisan bread, but I usually say biscuits. These are so light, flaky and yet moist in the center. I have to say, you do not even need butter or jam with them. But of course, my husband always likes jam. He likes any and all berry jams to be exact. Oh my gosh, my mouth is watering for these as I write this post.

Dutch Oven Biscuits

Like I said above, these biscuits are so light, flaky and yet moist in the center!

Ingredients:

4 teaspoons SAF yeast

1/4 cup sugar

1 teaspoon baking soda

2 cups buttermilk

5 cups flour (I can use white or freshly ground whole wheat)

1/s cup warm water

1 cup butter softened

Instructions:

I dump everything in a large bowl in the order shown above and use a Danish whisk and then use my hands. I add more flour as needed. I sprinkle flour on the counter and knead the dough quickly and roll out to 1/2 inch thick. I use a cookie or biscuit cutter. Grease a cookie sheet or Dutch oven. Bake in the house at 425 degrees for 12-15 minutes. If you use a 6-quart Dutch oven outside to bake them use 10 briquettes on the bottom and 14 briquettes on the lid or top. Bake for 10 minutes or until lightly browned. Here’s the kind of Danish whisk I use: Danish Dough Hand Whisk / Mixer 11″ or 14″

How To Make The Best Dutch Oven Biscuits Ever by FoodStorageMoms.com
Ideas To Use With Baked Dutch Oven Biscuits:

      1. butter and jam
      2. butter and honey
      3. egg and bacon
      4. fried egg
      5. poached eggs
      6. pizza sauce, cheese and pepperoni
      7. sausage and gravy
      8. ham and cheese
      9. cheese
      10. sausage, egg and cheese
      11. egg and cheese

I would love to add more ideas on how to use Dutch oven biscuits if you have some tips. Let’s teach the world to cook from scratch and eat at home.

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