The Government Knows Something We Don’t

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By The Survival Place Blog

After some digging around the political archives, we have discovered that almost all governments have some form of strategy for surviving a zombie apocalypse. Now they clearly know something we don’t, what with all of their intelligence agencies and secret sources, and that means we have to seriously consider how we would survive a sudden – and unprecedented – rise of the dead.

But don’t worry, we’re not going to be selfish with this one because, should the day come where a zombie plague spreads like wildfire – we’re going to need to civilization to stand tall. As such, we have come up with a list of equipment you’ll need if you’re planning on being around to see the new world.

 

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Food & Water

Sustenance is going to be your best friend here. When a zombie apocalypse happens, you’re going to need to get used to life on the road for a while. That is where food and water come in. As long as you are able to look after your body, you will be able to outrun a herd of zombies. As such, make sure you know where fresh water supplies are before heading anywhere, make sure you know how to store it properly and make sure you have plenty of non-perishable foods with you. Zombies don’t die unless killed, so stock up as good as possible because the waiting game is not an option.

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First Aid

Unfortunately, your current first aid kit will need to be seriously ramped up in order to meet the demands of a zombie outbreak. The reason for this is, the injuries are likely to be more severe. As such, it is important you have certain things like bandages, possibly a casting kit, a defibrillator, oxygen masks and morphine, as well as the more regular things like plasters and insect repellent.

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Get Yourself A Vehicle

Of course, the more multi-purpose your vehicle is because, well, roads won’t always be an option. As is often the case, roads tend to fall prey to blockades, or even a hoard of zombies. As such, you will need a vehicle that is capable of going off-road, and capable of carrying multiple people and things. That is where an RV will come in handy. It will give you somewhere to sleep, as well as somewhere to store bigger pieces of equipment, such as an inflatable fishing boat, which would not only serve as a secondary getaway vehicle but grant you a source of protein. A place to call home that will allow you to keep moving, and keep scavenging, will help as much with your sanity as it will with your survival.

Image Source: Pixabay.com

Load Up and Load Out

You’re going to need a gun, and the more guns you have the better. It is as simple as that. As a standard piece of equipment, we suggest you have a handgun and holster. It may not be your first choice in a weapon, but it doesn’t hurt to have an easy to access a good backup option. After that, we suggest you get your hands on a shotgun, simply because ammunition is easy to come by. But, as a rule, don’t turn your nose up at anything, especially not a sniper rifle.

Originally published at The Survival Place Blog: The Government Knows Something We Don’t

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

Try making hardtack: A great, cheap addition to your survival gear

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Looking for a way to use up surplus flour, or make a cheap trail food or durable survival ration? One answer may be hardtack, a baked, unleavened wheat cracker. As a survival food, hardtack has a proven track record.

by Leon Pantenburg

Vicksburg, MS: My gray-clad brothers-in-arms and I  hunkered down to eat. In the morning, we would do battle with those “heathen Yankee horde” Civil War re-enactors at Champions Hill, between Jackson and Vicksburg,  Mississippi.

I was “under cover” on assignment for the Vicksburg Post to photograph the battle, one of the biggest re-enactments of the year. Except for the Nikon safely hidden  in my haversack, my gear, weapons and accouterments were authentic in every way.

Hardtack can have different ingredients to make it more flavorable.

Hardtack can have different ingredients to make it more flavorable.

Since I was working for the Post, I had to represent the home team and be a Confederate. (This probably caused a minor earth tremor in Ruthven, Iowa, as my great-great-grandfather, James Hallowell,  92th Illinois Infantry, rolled in his grave!)

My only excuse was that like most Confederate soldiers, I had been drafted, thought “The Cause” was illogical, had no choice about being there, and wanted to go home!

I ‘d learned a lot about being a Civil War infantryman in one short, sweltering afternoon: the food was absolutely awful; our wool uniforms were too hot, and felt like you were wearing a sweatsuit: the Kepi-style caps provided no sun protection and the canteens were too small.

The Sargent, sensing my discontent (because of  my constant whining and complaining) picked on me.  He proclaimed to all within hearing distance that I was a “slacker,” and called me a “baboon” when I dropped my canteen during drill. As darkness fell, the re-enactors would sleep under wool blankets, not to stay warm, but to fight off mosquitoes.

But the food was the worst. Dinner was a piece of hardtack, a fatty piece of bacon toasted on a bayonet over a campfire;  horrible boiled coffee brewed in my tin cup and a wormy-looking apple. After eating my meager meal, I was ready to either desert or form a raiding party to attack  the Yankees and get some real food!

A hardtack biscuit

A modern hardtack biscuit

Hardtack is one of the original trail and emergency foods, and it is worth considering if you are a prepper or are interested in wilderness or urban survival.

The advantage is that hardtack is easy to make, transports easily and will last a reasonably long time if stored in appropriate containers. The disadvantage is the bland taste, and traditional toughness.

Even after yeast was discovered by the Egyptians, there was a purpose for unleavened breads. It was easy to carry and durable, so it was standard fare for hunters and warriors.  Centuries later, Christopher Columbus took unleavened bread on his journeys.

Hardtack remained a staple in the New World. During the early settlement of North America, the exploration of the continent, the American Revolution, and on through the American

Hardtack was a durable, if bland-tasting, field ration.

Civil War, armies were kept alive with hardtack.  A basic concept in war is that the side that keeps its soldiers from going hungry will probably win.

Hardtack is also reasonably nutritious. Wheat flour is more than 10% protein and includes Vitamin B. During emergencies, people can live for quite a while on just bread and water.  Although raw flour is hard to digest, in the form of hard bread, it is edible.

No one has determined just when, or how, during the American Civil War, hard bread began to be referred to as hardtack. Apparently,  it was first called hardtack by the Union Army of the Potomac; although the name spread to other units, it was generally referred to as hard bread by the armies of the West.

Regardless of the time frame, if you’re a history buff, prepper or hard-core survivalist, you should consider including hardtack in your emergency food supplies or survival kit. A guaranteed conversation starter at any campfire, campout or outdoor event, hardtack can have a useful place  in today’s survival kit.

(It only takes a few additional ingredients to turbocharge  the nutritional value of hardtack. To each cup of flour in the recipe, add one tablespoon of soy flour, one teaspoon of wheat germ and one teaspoon of powdered milk. There is no difference in the taste, and these ingredients combine to make the bread a complete protein.)

There are many versions and varieties of hardtack recipes: Try some of these to start out.

Army Hardtack Recipe
  • 4 cups flour (preferably whole wheat)
  • 4 teaspoons salt
  • Water (about 2 cups)
  • Pre-heat oven to 375° F
  • Makes about 10 pieces

 

After cutting the squares, press a pattern of four rows of four holes into each square, using a nail or other such object. Do not punch through the dough.  The appearance you want is similar to that of a modern saltine cracker.  Turn each square over and do the same thing to the other side.

Place the squares on an ungreased cookie sheet in the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Turn each piece over and bake for another 30 minutes. The crackers should be slightly brown on both sides.

The fresh crackers are easily broken, but as they dry, they harden and assume the consistency of fired brick.

Swedish Hardtack

I cup water

3 tbsp. vegetable oil

3 tbsp. honey

3 cups rye flour (or 1 1/2 cups rye & 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour)

1  1/2 tbsp. brewer’s yeast (optional)

1/4 tsp. salt

Mix liquids together.  In a separate bowl, mix dry ingredients.  Combine the mixtures, stirring to moisten throughout.  Form a ball.  On a floured surface, flatten the dough, and roll out thinly. Cut into squares and prick each cracker with the tines of a fork a couple of times.  Transfer to lightly greased baking sheets. Bake at 425° F for around 8 minutes, checking to be sure not to over-brown.  It is best served warm.

Mix: two cups of all-purpose flour and a half teaspoon of salt.  Use more salt for authenticity. Mix by hand. Add a teaspoon of shortening and a half cup of water, stirred in a little at a time to form a very stiff dough.  Beat the dough to a half inch thickness with a clean top mallet or rifle butt.  Fold the sheet of dough into six layers. Continue to beat and to fold the dough a half dozen times until it is elastic. Roll the dough out to a half-inch thickness before cutting it with a floured biscuit cutter or bayonet. Bake for about a half hour in a 325° F oven.

The basic ingredients are flour, salt and water. General directions are also similar: Dissolve the salt in water and work it into flour using your hands.  The dough should be firm and pliable but not sticky or dry. Flatten the dough onto a cookie sheet to about 1/4 inch thick, and cut into squares 3 inches by 3 inches.  Pierce each square with 16 holes about ½ inch apart.  Bake in oven until edges are brown or dough is hard.

Preheat the oven to 400° F For each cup of flour add 1 teaspoon of salt. Mix salt and flour with just enough water to bind. Bake 20-25 minutes.  The longer you bake the hardtack, the more authentic it will appear.

A Sailor’s Diet

In a separate container, mix:

  • 1 1/2 cups buttermilk.
  • 3 tablespoons honey.
  • 1/2 cup melted bacon drippings or shortening.

Combine the two sets of ingredients. When the dough is thoroughly mixed, roll it out on a floured board to a thickness of about a quarter inch.  Cut out circles of dough with a large drinking glass dipped in flour and put them on a lightly greased cookie sheet.  Bake for about 5 1/2 minutes at 450° F.

Let the hardtack cool on a wire rack before serving with jam or jelly.

 

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Planning For A Zombie Apocalypse (And Other Bad Things)

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By The Survival Place Blog

The world is no longer a predictable place. There are a lot of things that can go wrong and a lot of reasons why they might. There is an uncertain political landscape, natural disaster, the possibility of super-flue’s becoming too much for antibiotics, global warming and terrorism (in whatever form that may come in). And we haven’t even mentioned the possibility of a zombie outbreak, which may be unlikely but doesn’t mean it isn’t entirely impossible. But as far apart as these threats may be from one another, there is one common interest that links them all: the need for a survival strategy. So, here is a list of things you should prepare.

  1. Escape Route

Don’t just rely on one option. Have a Plan A, Plan B, Plan C and D,E,F if possible. This requires a lot of consideration. You’ll need to consider what transport will be available (given a lot of public services won’t be operating anymore). Will it be a car or a truck, or a boat, or maybe you have a plane tucked away. We recommend a boat (if you live near a river, lake or sea) or a economic 4×4 if you live on land. The other thing to remember is not to take major roads. These will be everyone’s first thought, so plan an alternative route that doesn’t rely on main roads. Oh, and take a handheld GPS with you.

  1. Your Pack

These are also called ‘Bug Out Bags’ and are becoming increasingly popular, you know, just in case. You never know when an earthquake may hit, or a flood, or riots, or zombies; so have a bug out bag prepared and left near an exit from your home or in your car or at work. Somewhere you can grab it easily as you go to leave. When it comes to rules, make sure your survival pack is easy and comfortable to carry. Make sure its contents are simple. Make sure everything in their is needed, no luxuries. Make sure the contents allow you to become totally self-sufficient. And plan for how long you want your back to last you, for example 72 to 96 hours will be great. Click here to see what we’re talking about.  

  1. Food and Water

It is crucial you take into consideration routes that take you to or near a natural source of clean water, such as a river or lake. These will allow you to replenish your supplies of water, which will be critical in your attempts to survive. It could also be a good idea to make sure you know where certain crop farms are, especially things like potato farms. Being able to collect a food supply of slow-release energy will help your bid.

  1. Choose Your Destination

This shouldn’t be one single point, but a selection of options. Options are going to be your best friend. The other thing to consider is having options in multiple different directions. There is no point in having two options both in the same town, and on the same street. Tips to consider are once again local water supplies, food supplies, vegetation and minimally populated areas. If you need to lock down for a long time, consider places like supermarkets where the security is strong and supplies are plentiful, including any first aid supplies you may need.

This article published by The Survival Place Blog: Planning For A Zombie Apocalypse (And Other Bad Things)

Filed under: Prepping

Survival Expert Warns Americans to ‘Double Down’ on Survival Supplies in Preparation for a 2017 Engineered Crisis

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Image: Survival expert warns Americans to ‘double down’ on survival supplies in preparation for a 2017 engineered crisis

By  – Natural News

(NaturalNews) According to survival expert James Wesley Rawles, a former Army intelligence officer who operates Survivalblog.com, Hillary Clinton’s loss is a win for common sense in America. But he also cautions that Trump’s victory has opened a door for globalist provocateur George Soros to continue to fund opposition groups and protests. Some anti-Trump activists have plans to force shut downs of transportation networks on Inauguration Day.

The entire year of 2017, according to Rawles, could be one of upheaval as globalist forces fight against Trump and his vision for a renewed America. As reported by Allnewspipeline.com, even though America just “dodged a serious bullet,” deep concerns remain about social unrest, banking, economic collapse, inflation and the potential for a Venezuelan-like starvation scenario. Rawles urges those listening to “double down” all preparations in 2017.

Continue reading at Natural News: Survival Expert Warns Americans to ‘Double Down’ on Survival Supplies in Preparation for a 2017 Engineered Crisis

Filed under: Civil Unrest / War, News/ Current Events, Prepping

When The Day Comes, You Best Know How To Get Your Own Food

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By The Survival Place Blog

We’ve been talking about how frequent unrest is becoming nowadays. The silent majority has spoken and maybe those above don’t like it all that much. We don’t know when it’ll happen, but we’re edging closer to collapse. If that happens, then you need to be prepared. Not only to fend for yourself but to feed yourself. Here, we’ll look at some of the essentials you’re going to need to sustain yourself when all the stores are shut.

Access drinking water

The very first thing you need to do is learn how to get your drinking water when the pipes go off. We can’t survive very long without water. There are a few steps to it. In the short term, build up your stock of water purifying tablets. Bear in the mind that you need a water filter system before you use these tablets. They can’t get rid of large impurities. But you need to prepare for when your stock of those run out, too. Do that by learning how to build a well on your very own property.

Getting your catch

Hunting and fishing are going to become some of the most valuable skills to have when the time comes. Don’t treat it as a hobby, treat it as practice. Take lessons if you have to. Make sure you know your equipment and stock up on things like the best trolling motor battery. The tools that make hunting and fishing easier might seem like a convenience now. But when fishing becomes your primary source of food, you better believe they’ll be some of the most valuable tools in your arsenal.

Identifying safe foraging food

Back in the day, before life got comfortable, foraging was how we spent our time. We found the food most convenient for us and we learned which ones we could eat. Practicing that skill now is going to help you in the near future, too. It’s not enough to learn as you go. If you want to survive, do your studying on which foods are safe to forage now. Learn and practice while you still have access to the internet and books on the matter. Above all else, don’t try to eat any foods unless you’re 100% sure that they’re safe.

Storing food the manual way

A smart hunter-gatherer doesn’t just find food, of course. They also know how to keep as much of it in surplus as they can. If you prove good at your skills, then you might have extra that you don’t want to spoil. So you have to start learning the skills of preparing long lasting foods now. From turning those berries into jams to learning how to dehydrate and keep long-lasting chicken. Food storage is what separated the ruling class from the ruled back when civilization started. If you’re living from hand-to-mouth, it makes you an easier target.

Learning these tips isn’t just good for dealing with a potential collapse. It makes you a survivor in any environment. There are few things as rewarding as being able to provide for yourself.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: When The Day Comes, You Best Know How To Get Your Own Food

Filed under: Emergency Survival Tips, Food, Prepping

To Be A Survivor You Need To Be Self-Sufficient

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By The Survival Place Blog

So, what does it take to survive a disaster? It takes a lot to survive a disaster, but there are two crucial things that significantly improve your chances of survival. These are having an action plan and being self-sufficient. The action plan is important because, in an emergency situation, you don’t have time to mess around, you need to know what you’re going to do and do it. Being self-sufficient is important because often, disasters mean that local services aren’t accessible. So, for instance, your local supermarket may be shut for months.

Of these two crucial things, today we’re going to focus on self-sufficiency. And how you can ensure that you and your family are as self-sufficient as possible. So that, no matter what happens, you have what you need to survive.

Build a well

Instead of getting your water from a local water supplier, build a well in your yard. By doing this, you give yourself free water for life and don’t have to worry about the quality of the water that your local water company is supplying. Plus, all your water will be free. Having a well means that should a disaster impact your local water company, you wouldn’t need to worry.

Invest in solar panels

If a disaster of some sort were to occur, there’s a high chance that the power would be cut off at some point. For this reason, investing in solar panels for your home is a must. Solar panels make you fully self-sufficient when it comes to energy. This means that no matter what happens, as long as there is sunlight, your home would have power. Obviously, it’s still important to be prepared in case, for some reason, power was lost. But the chances of that happening are much lower if you are self-sufficient and use solar power.

Have a supply of tools on hand

To ensure that should any part of your home break down, you can fix it; it’s important to have a supply of tools on hand. Invest in quality tools, such as a Mitler saw from StraightKerfs, to ensure that you have what you need to deal with any problem. If you’re going to be self-sufficient, you need to be able to mend any areas of your home that breakdown, so having the tools on hand to do so is important. It’s also a good idea to have access to the blueprints to your home, so that you are aware of where the supporting areas are.

Ensure you have access to food

Often, in disasters, there’s a shortage of food. So it pays to ensure that you and your family will always have access to enough food. This means taking the time to grow your own produce, and also, ensuring that you have food with a long shelf life stored in your home. While you can buy tinned food for this, you can also opt to make your own food. Believe it or not, you can dehydrate or freeze dry food yourself, to store in your home for emergencies.

In an emergency situation, the truth is it’s every person for themselves. That’s why you need to ensure that should an emergency arise, that you are prepared and able to survive with what you have.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: To Be A Survivor You Need To Be Self-Sufficient

Filed under: Prepping

Are You Guilty Of Making These Fishing Faux Pas?

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By The Survival Place Blog

When things go south in the world, you need to know that you can survive. One of the obvious things you’ll need to do is catch or grow your own food. Fishing is one way to keep yourself fed, and it’s something even children can do.

The trouble is, many anglers make all kinds of rookie mistakes. Even if they have several years of fishing experience! If you plan on catching fish to survive, it’s essential you know what you’re doing. Are you guilty of making any of these fishing faux pas?

You use a worn line

I think one of the things most of us are guilty of is using a worn line! Sometimes you might do so because you haven’t got any new lines with you (or you’ve forgotten them at home). Perhaps you just want to spend as little as possible on fishing equipment.

The biggest problem with using a worn line is that feisty fish can break away! And that means you’ll end up staying hungry because you haven’t caught anything! The simple solution to this problem is just to use a new line!

You change your lures too often

Some anglers have a tackle box full of different lures. Some folks believe they should change their lures often to catch different fish. That might sound like a good idea in theory, but, in reality, it doesn’t work.

As you know, you have to take your line out of the water to change your lure. If you do that, you might make the fish in the water suspicious about what’s going on. And that can cause them to swim away from you and your line.

 

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Image Source: Pixabay.com

You haven’t learned from the experts

Fishing isn’t a pastime that you can just pick up. You need to have expert tuition before

you attempt to catch fish on your own. It’s important to learn the tips and techniques of fishing, and the methods to catch certain fish.

Apart from reading past articles here, you should check out other sites like fishingsun.com. YouTube is also another place to learn from the fishing masters. Finally, don’t forget to consider one-to-one tuition from local experts.

You don’t follow the advice of local guides

When you go fishing somewhere new, it’s vital to listen to what the locals tell you. Why? Because they recommend good spots to catch some juicy fish! They can also tell you the places to avoid so that you don’t waste your time.

Don’t be one of those guys (or gals) that think they know everything about fishing. Each day that dawns can teach us something new about fishing that we don’t already know. Be smart – not stupid!

You don’t wear some hand protection

Gloves aren’t just for keeping your hands warm. Their job is to protect your hands from harm. They are important to wear when handling fish just as they are if you were pruning a rose-bush in your garden.

Fins, scales and attacks by fish can make your experience painful if you don’t wear gloves! Check out an article on emedicinehealth.com to learn more about “marine bite.”

So, if you’re guilty of making any of those rookie mistakes, now you know why (and how) to avoid them in the future!

 

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Are You Guilty Of Making These Fishing Faux Pas?

Filed under: Emergency Survival Tips, Food, Prepping

Bug Out Bag List – The Essentials You Need in Your Bug Out Bag

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Bug Out Bag List (essentials + more!)

By The Bug Out Bag Guide

We’ve put together a list of essential bug out bag items so that you don’t have to.

With our handy bug out bag list, you’ll be packed in no time.

Of course, this is just a starting point, and you can customize your bag further so that it is tailored to your individual needs.

As a good rule of thumb, a well designed Bug Out Bag should weigh no more than 30% of your body weight. Any more than this will be highly strenuous and will limit a person’s ability to hike over long distances as may be required by your survival situation.

This means you’ll want to mostly limit what’s in your bug out bag to the essentials: items that have a high probability of helping you survive a disaster scenario.

Continue reading at The Bug Out Bag Guide: Bug Out Bag List – The Essentials You Need in Your Bug Out Bag

Filed under: Bug Out Bags

The Preparedness Wheel: At-A-Glance Balance Check for Readiness

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The Prepper Journal

There’s a little tool called a health wheel I learned about as a victim’s advocate forever ago. Another variant is called a wellness wheel. They’re not complete and total bunk since they can help keep our lives more balanced, but the real reason I bring them up is that as soon as I saw one, I immediately thought of the preparedness application. It’s not about the mental and emotional health. It’s about the balance. When wheels are balanced, we roll much more smoothly through life’s up and downs. Converting a wellness wheel to a preparedness wheel gives us an easy visual of where we’ve concentrated our efforts and if the rest of our preparedness needs and goals are in balance.

Anybody who’s dealt with a broken wagon wheel or a bent or flat bike, cart, or dolly tire can tell you how much harder they are to deal with. In preparedness, leaving one wedge of our wheel empty while another bulges can have serious implications – like watching crops and gardens we were counting on fail for lack of the pest control we usually buy, or having whole bedrooms of firearms and ammo but watching them disappear because we had a lack of smoke detectors and fire control mechanisms.

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: The Preparedness Wheel: At-A-Glance Balance Check for Readiness

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

What You Need to Know About Mountain House

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What You Need to Know About Mountain House | Backdoor Survival

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

A few months ago, Mountain House sponsored a freeze dried food giveaway and the giveaway question asked you to submit a question to Mountain House.  Today, Mountain House is back to answer a number of your questions, and, no surprise, offer another giveaway to Backdoor Survival readers.

This time around, the giveaway will be for their “Just In Case 4 Day Emergency Food Kit“.

Before we get started, though, I want to share with you two of their newest products: Chicken and Dumplings with Vegetables and Cheesecake bites.

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: What You Need to Know About Mountain House

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

Filed under: Food, Prepping

How To Make Pemmican, The Ultimate Survival Food (Video)

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By SurvivoPedia

I’ve got a confession: I’ve wanted to make Pemmican ever since I found the recipe for it in The Lost Ways, an awesome compilation of survival information edited and published by Claude Davis.

Invented by the natives of North America, pemmican was used by Indian scouts as well as early western explorers. These people spent a great deal of time on the go and depended on having portable, high-energy, highly nutritious, and filling foods that would last for long periods of time.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: How To Make Pemmican, The Ultimate Survival Food (Video)

Filed under: Prepping, Recipes

Five Alternatives to the Most Overrated Survival Items

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By Joshua Krause – The Daily Sheeple

If you’re new to the prepping scene, you should probably know right off the bat that you’re about to waste a lot of money. I’m so sorry to break it to you, but it’s true. We’ve all done it. It’s practically a right of passage by now.

You’ve just become aware of how fragile our society really is, and all the horrifying ways the shit can hit the fan, and you think you have to rush out and buy a bunch of supplies and gear to survive the inevitable looting spree. There’s something you should know first though. If there is one thing that is practically guaranteed to part an otherwise smart person from their money, it is fear.

So stop, take a deep breath, and realize that in all likelihood the world is not going to end tomorrow. There may not be any serious crises for months or years. I know this (as do many other preppers) because I couldn’t possibly count the number of times I’ve heard someone I would consider reputable, sound the alarm on a possible threat.

Don’t get me wrong I’m glad they do, because it’s good that we have people who are dedicated to looking for these threats, but you should know that most of them never come to fruition. If anything, they are usually signs that our society is in a slow decline towards oblivion, rather than an explosive last hurrah. There’s still danger ahead, but when it’s all said and done, there may never be a single day that will go down in history as the day the world ended.

So now that I’ve assuaged your fears, hopefully you’re gripping your wallet a little tighter than you were before. That state of mind you’re experiencing, the one that isn’t an anxiety riddled mess, is the correct state of mind you should be in for prepping. It’s time to take a critical look at that list of supplies and gear you’re thinking of purchasing, and be prepared to cross a few items off, because some of them are highly overrated.

Canned Food and MRE’s

I don’t want to completely bash canned food. It certainly has its merits. In most cases it will last a very long time, longer than the expiration date in fact, but most canned foods aren’t very healthy. The whole canning process tends to degrade the nutritional value of the food, and most cans are laced with toxic preservatives and BPA. They’re also heavy and somewhat awkward to store. If you want to can your own food, that’s a worthy endeavor for other reasons, but to go to the store and max out your credit card on canned food is a terrible idea.

After realizing the folly of cans many preppers turn to MRE’s, but they also come with their own set of problems. For me personally, I find them to be utterly disgusting and unhealthy. They usually taste great when you’ve been hiking all day and you’re starving, but in that condition anything can taste good. I remember the first time I tried an MRE. I thought, “wow, this tastes familiar.” After looking over the ingredients, I realized that I was basically eating the same stuff that is served at McDonald’s and 7/11.

What Should You Get Instead?

mountain house

Freeze dried food. Mountain House brand is the most popular, but there are several other good brands out there. It’s arguably healthier than most packaged food, and has a shelf life of 10 years or so. It’s small and lightweight, and to me at least, has an excellent flavor. The only downside is that it’s not perfectly edible out of the package. You have to add water (preferably hot), but I consider that a fair trade-off compared to the downsides of the other options. If you live in an area that would have a severe lack of water after the collapse, then maybe canned food is for you. Otherwise, freeze dried is the way to go.

Generator

This is a tough one, because I have to admit that generators can be useful for many short-term disasters. If you need to keep the lights on for a couple of days it’s a viable option, but generators may be completely useless during any long-term disaster. In that case, they become a logistical nightmare. Since it’s safe to assume that there will be gas shortages during any major disaster, do you really want to store enough gasoline to last you six months? And keep in mind that gas has a limited shelf life, and generators are usually really noisy.

Another thing to consider is energy efficiency. The majority of the electricity you use in your home goes toward appliances that provide heat. But the process of turning the combustion from your generator into electricity, and then back into heat, is incredibly inefficient. We don’t normally think about this because the power grid provides electricity at such a low-cost, (relative to a generator) so it’s not a big deal.

What Should You Get Instead?

propane stove

If you live in a rural area, you might be able source wood from your environment. Otherwise, You should probably use propane for all your heating needs. There are portable stoves, lanterns, and space heaters that all run on propane. You can buy those tiny Coleman tanks for your stove, or you can buy an adapter to connect it to a larger tank. Most of the lanterns have to take the Coleman tanks, but many of the space heaters are designed for the 20lb tanks as well. It’s a pretty versatile option, and best of all, propane has a much longer shelf life than gasoline. If you have to stock up on fuel, this is definitely the superior option.

The rest of your energy needs will probably go to electronics, which will be minuscule compared to your heating needs. For that, I would take a thin and flexible 100 watt solar panel over a generator any day.

Camelbak Canteens

I’m an avid backpacker, so I think I have more experience with this than any other item on this list. For such a simple task, there is a wide variety of ways to carry water. Nowadays the most popular way is with any kind of soft, flexible canteen. They’re lightweight, easy to store, and since you can squeeze the air out of them the water doesn’t slosh around and make a lot of noise.

Over the past 10 years it seems that the Camelback and the Platypus canteens have come to dominate the market. But frankly, I’ve never been a big fan of those drink tube apparatuses, due to their maintenance needs. You have to keep the tube and the drink valve very clean if you don’t want to get any mold. It doesn’t take a whole lot of effort, but personally, I don’t want to put any more work than I have to into my canteen, and I don’t see the Camelbak giving me a huge advantage in any way.

What Should You Get Instead?

canteen

For a while I tried using bota bags, but honestly I don’t think they make them like they used to. Maybe I’m just unlucky, but I’ve tried using three different bota bags over the years, and none of them worked very well (they always leak).

If you want a really simple soft-shelled water carrier, I’d recommend the military issue bladder canteen. It holds two quarts, and has all the advantages you’d come to expect from a flexible canteen, but without any of the fuss.

Camouflage

I’d have to say, the most overrated item a prepper could buy is military camouflage. There really isn’t a good reason for it unless you live way out in the sticks, in which case you probably don’t need a military pattern. A good hunting camouflage pattern should be sufficient. And since only 18 percent of the US population lives in a rural area, it’s safe to say that camouflage isn’t really that important for most preppers. If anything, that would just make you stand out in an urban or suburban area.

Even camouflage that is specifically designed for an urban area is a bad idea. Even if it helps to conceal you in a tactical situation, it will still make you stand out in literally every other situation.

What Should You Get Instead?

dickies shirt

Instead of camouflage, just get something that is durable, comfortable, and is dyed in solid, muted earth tones. I’m sure there’s more than one opinion on what that entails, but in this case I’m referring to brown, tan, olive drab, and gray, or at least something similar.

These colors have the advantage of being versatile. You can wear them on city streets or in suburban parks without standing out, but on the off-chance that you wind up in a rural area later on, you won’t be too obvious there either. Basically, it’s not the best you can use for any single environment, but it’s the best you can use in most environments without looking like a stereotypical survivalist.

Your best bet would probably be something made by Dickies. They make great civilian looking clothes that are just as durable as their military counterparts, and it’s not hard to find Dickies shirts and jeans that come in earth tone colors. Wrangler and Carhartt brands are also great choices.

Ballistic Plates

This one has a lot of the same problems as wearing camouflage. It’s pretty much impossible to wear these bullet proof plates without it being painfully obvious. They’re so big and heavy, that every soldier who wears them looks like some kind of sci-fi mashup with a Roman legionnaire.

That’s not to say it’s stupid. It’s probably just unnecessary. These plates are made for stopping rifle rounds, and considering the fact that only 2-3 percent of murders are committed with rifles, it’s safe to say that ballistic plates are overkill for civilians.

Keep in mind that the violent criminals you might face after the SHTF aren’t that different than the ones you might run into now. There will probably be an increase in murders committed by rifles since there would be no cops to stop people from carrying them openly, but I suspects that pistols, shotguns, bats, and knives will still be the most common murder weapons.

What Should You Get Instead?

kevlar vest

If you even need ballistic protection to begin with, which I don’t think most people will, just an ordinary kevlar vest will do. At most you won’t need anything that is rated above level IIIa, which should stop pretty much all handgun rounds, and some shotgun rounds. They’re also lighter, breathe better in hot weather, and some are designed to be concealable. There’s no need to overdo it with a hulking rig of ballistic plates.

Now I’m sure a lot of folks will disagree parts of this list, but does it sound reasonable to you? If not, then for the benefit of anyone reading this who is new to prepping, let’s hear your opinion in the comments. And if you have any overrated boondoggles from your early prepping days that you’d rather forget, now is a good time to get it off your chest!

Delivered by The Daily Sheeple: Five Alternatives to the Most Overrated Survival Items

About the author:

Joshua Krause is a reporter, writer and researcher at The Daily Sheeple. He was born and raised in the Bay Area and is a freelance writer and author. You can follow Joshua’s reports at Facebook or on his personal Twitter. Joshua’s website is Strange Danger .

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

What to Eat When the Power Goes Out

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By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

When the power goes out, my kids tend to think it’s party time.  They like it because it means that we are definitely going to play some games, do some arts and crafts, and eat some food we don’t normally indulge in.

Of course we have back-up cooking methods for heating food when the electricity goes out, We became accustomed to it, since it happens with relative frequency, but in our old house in the city it wasn’t so easy.  Still, in the summer, we don’t want to fire up the woodstove and during a storm, we don’t want to stand outside in the rain cooking on the barbecue.  So, during a short term power outage, it makes life easier in many cases to eat things that don’t require much in the way of preparation.  We have specific preps for this situation that require no cooking.  It’s probably the only time we regularly consume food that hasn’t been made from scratch, so for the girls, it’s a bit of a treat.

I like to keep the refrigerator door closed so it depends on the expected length of the outage whether or not we take things from there.  If we do get items from the refrigerator, I plan it out so I can quickly grab all the things and then close the door again, to help maintain the temperature.

At our cabin, the pump goes out when the power goes out, so we have no running water.  (I rent so this is not something I can upgrade at this time.)  To circumvent a few difficulties, we stock up on disposable goods to use during power outages:

  • Styrofoam plates
  • Paper towels and napkins
  • Plastic cutlery
  • Baby wipes
  • Disinfecting wipes
  • Plastic cups

In our cupboard, most of the following items are the organic version.  Some exceptions are graham crackers and saltines, which can’t be found organic in our rural area.  (I avoid purchasing non-organic items that contain corn, even for the “Lights Out” stockpile, since nearly all corn grown in North America is genetically modified.)

Following are some “recipes” for power outage food.  Okay, “recipe” is a stretch – perhaps just some “tasty combinations”.  :)

No-Power Nachos

Layer organic tortilla chips with canned cheese sauce, salsa, and canned jalepenos

‘Smores

Top graham crackers with chocolate-nut spread and marshmallow fluff

Wraps

Soft tortillas filled with canned meat, a touch of mustard or mayo, and veggies from the fridge

No-cook Soft Tacos

Soft tortillas with canned meat (we use our home canned chicken or taco meat for this), salsa, and canned cheese sauce

Main Dish Tuna Salad

Combine a can of tuna, a can of white beans, chopped onion, chopped peppers and chopped black olives (veggies are optional).  Top with Italian dressing mixed with dijon mustard to taste.

Pudding cones

Drain canned fruit of choice and stir it into vanilla pudding.  Serve in ice cream cones for a kid-friendly treat. (We do this with yogurt also.)

Mexican Bean Salad

Combine 1 can of black beans, drained and rinsed; with 1 can of organic corn, drained.  For the dressing mix 1/2 jar of salsa; 1/2 tsp each of chili powder, onion powder, and garlic powder; 3 tbsp of lemon juice.  Toss well.  Serve as a salad, in a soft tortilla or mixed with a pouch of pre-cooked rice.

 

 

Do you have any no-cook ideas for the stockpile?  Please share them in the comments section!

This article is an updated version of  one that was  originally published February 6, 2013.

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: What to Eat When the Power Goes Out

About the author:

Daisy Luther lives on a small organic homestead in Northern California.  She is the author of The Organic Canner,  The Pantry Primer: A Prepper’s Guide to Whole Food on a Half-Price Budget, and The Prepper’s Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health and preparedness, and offers a path of rational anarchy against a system that will leave us broke, unhealthy, and enslaved if we comply.  Daisy’s articles are widely republished throughout alternative media. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest,  and Twitter,.

Filed under: Emergency Survival Tips, Prepping

Why Every Prepper Needs A Reserve Of Raw, Natural Honey

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Organic honey

By Daniel Barker – Natural News

(NaturalNews) Honey is one of nature’s most amazing gifts. It’s a substance which offers dozens of useful and health-boosting properties aside from its wonderful, sweet flavor. All serious preppers should make sure to obtain a sizable quantity of raw, natural honey to add to their survival stockpiles.

It’s one of the few foods that has an unlimited shelf life; honey will never go bad due to its antibacterial properties, which are also part of what makes it so healthy. Considering its versatility in the kitchen, along with its medicinal value, honey is likely to prove to be an extremely valuable commodity to have on hand during a long-term survival situation.

One of the key things to remember when obtaining a quantity of honey is to make sure it is natural and unpasteurized. Most of the honey you’ll see on the shelf at the grocery store has been pasteurized, which robs it of many of its healthful properties.

Continue reading at Natural News: Why Every Prepper Needs A Reserve Of Raw, Natural Honey

Filed under: Food, Prepping

Shortcuts Can Kill: Learn How To Can Food Correctly For Healthy, Long-Term Food Storage

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Canning tips

By Daniel Barker – Natural News

(NaturalNews) Learning how to can foods is one of the foundations of prepping, but care must be taken during the process because improperly canned foods can cost you your life. Quite simply, when it comes to canning, there are no shortcuts.

If you don’t think improper canning can be dangerous, you haven’t heard Mike O’Connell’s story.

O’Connell, an attorney from Washington State, was recently admitted to the hospital with symptoms that resembled a stroke: dizziness, double vision and difficulty standing up.

Tests came back negative for a stroke and O’Connell was discharged. However, over the next 48 hours, his condition worsened; his speech became slurred, his eyelids drooped and he began having trouble swallowing. O’Connell had also become extremely weak and his breathing was shallow.

Continue reading at Natural News: Shortcuts Can Kill: Learn How To Can Food Correctly For Healthy, Long-Term Food Storage

Filed under: Food, Prepping

How to Dehydrate Foods for Long Term Storage

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dehydrated-fruits-teethers2

By Tess Pennington – Ready Nutrition

I wholeheartedly believe in layering your preparedness endeavors with both short and long-term food sources. That way, you can ensure that you have enough food to see you  through any type of event. Many turn to freeze-dried foods as the quintessential long-term food source. This can be both costly and cause problems with your health. Many freeze-dried foods are riddled with sodium, empty carbohydrates, and preservatives. This can cause your entire digestive system to back-up. Perhaps, the freeze-dried 10 year shelf life, isn’t worth the constipation. That said, there is another method that is both cost effective, and more nutritious.

For centuries, dehydrating food has been seen as a survival necessity. Many believe this preservation method is the safest, most affordable and best way to preserve flavors of foods. The dehydration process removes moisture from the food so that bacteria, yeast and mold cannot grow. The added benefit is the dehydration process minimally affects the nutritional content of food. In fact, when using an in-home dehydration unit, 3-5% of the nutritional content is lost compared to the canning method which losses 60-80% nutritional content. Additionally, important vitamins and nutrition such as: vitamin A and C, carbohydrates, fiber, potassium, magnesium, selenium and sodium are not altered or lost in the drying process. Therefore, the end result is nutrient packed food that can be stored long-term.

How Can a Person Use a Dehydrator

In the book, The Prepper’s Cookbook, I outline the multiple ways that one can use a dehydrator. They can dry vegetables, fruits, make jerky, make fruit or vegetable leather, dry herbs, make spices, dry soup mixes, noodles, and even make crafts. When I first began dehydrating foods, I purchased a modest dehydrator. Then, I realized how much I loved it and got a higher end model.

Dehydrating vegetables and fruits  to use for long-term storage is a great way of including needed nutrition into diets with minimal investment. When dehydrating food, one should use fresh produce or meat. Typically, when overly ripe fruits and vegetables are dehydrated, the texture is not as crisp. For example, if one were to dehydrate over ripe bananas, the end result would be a chewy banana chip as opposed to a crispy banana chip.  If a person were to use the ripe fruits or vegetables, they could puree the produce and make fruit or vegetable leather to use later.

How Long Does Dehydrated Food Last

In most cases, dehydrated food can be stored for up to a year. Once dehydrated, the food does not take up a lot of space, and can be stored in a more organized fashion.

  • Fruits and vegetables can last for up to 1 year, if properly stored.
  • Dried meats should be consumed within 2-3 months.  However, it is suggested that if dried meats have not been consumed after 1 month, they should be stored in the refrigerator to prolong the freshness.
  • Herbs can last for years.
  • Noodles should be eaten within 1 year in order to enjoy the freshness.

If a person wanted to rehydrate the food to use in cooking, add boiling water and cover with a lid for 20-30 minutes to expedite the process. Note: it is recommended to add salt after the rehydration process has been completed.

Storing Dry Foods

Once food has been dehydrated, it should be stored in an area not exposed to a lot of light, such as a pantry.  It is recommended that any food that contains vitamin A not be exposed to light.  According to James Talmage Stevens’ book, Making the Best of Basics, Stevens recommends these general storage suggestions:

  • Freezer zip-lock bags are excellent for packaging dried foods.  Force excess air from bags as they are sealed.
  • Procure heavy-duty, food-grade, storage-quality, sealable plastic bags from local commercial packaging wholesalers.
  • Store dried food products in a cool, dry location out of direct sunlight. Use a craft paper inside larger plastic bags to shield dried foods from sunlight. Paper used outside the plastic bags provides a nesting place for bugs or spiders.
  • Store only one kind of food in each individual package to avoid mixing flavors and possible cross-contamination should molds or spoilage occur.
  • Another method for storing dried products is to place dried food in a food-quality, plastic bag, then put it in an airtight glass or metal container.
  • Discard moldy food. Don’t take chances on botulism or a debilitating sickness over a few pennies or dollars. Don’t feed mold foods to pets, either!
  • The problem of a few bugs in dried foods may be solved by spreading the infested dried food on a cookie pan, placing in tn a 300 degree oven for 25-30 minutes.  Bugs and eggs die, and the food is edible again.

In planning for a long term disaster, people are always trying to find foods they can look forward to that will give them optimum nutrition.  Having the necessary vitamins and nutrition will give a person mental clarity, and strength to carry on during a disaster.  After all, surviving and being healthy is what matters.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: How to Dehydrate Foods for Long Term Storage

The Prepper's BlueprintTess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals.

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

 

 

Filed under: Food, How To Prepare, Prepping

Meet Your Emergency Food’s Worst Enemies

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By Tess Pennington – Ready Nutrition

If you plan on packaging your own food for the long term using any of the 11 food items that can last a lifetime, or other dry goods, knowing how to properly store these items will ensure their freshness and extend their lifespan.  If improperly stored, spoilage can occur at exactly the moment when you need your larder the most.

There is nothing more disappointing than seeing your food investment ruined by natural elements or bugs.  Knowing what your food’s worst enemies are, understanding how they can ruin your food,  and how to prevent their havoc will help you preserve your food investment for the long term.

Who Are The Enemies and What Do They Do?

The best course of action to preserve your food storage is using a multi-barrier system.  Using this method protects your food investment by reducing oxidation of foods, bug infestations, and exposure to increase temperature and moisture levels.  Protecting your future food supply can be achieved by simply investing in a few extra preventative tools such as Mylar bags, oxygen absorbers, and food grade containers.

Moisture

Foods can become contaminated by moisture through humidity, rain, and standing water.  As a result, molds, mildew and microbial infestation can form and rot stored food, thus making it inedible.  Since some foods draw in moisture, such as wheat, rice and grains, the best way to avoid moisture from coming in contact with stored food, is to store it properly.

Solution: Those that store food for long term, try to remedy this by using a multi-barrier approach and making sure the food items are away from any possible areas that can flood (laundry rooms, bathrooms, near water pipes, etc), and have been properly sealed to avoid moisture.  Additionally, storing your food grade buckets or round cans on shelves or stacked on wooden platforms 6 inches off the floor is another method of preventing decontamination of food.  Providing ventilation between the stored containers can also assist in preventing increased moisture levels.

Those that live in areas that are prone to high humidity may want to consider adding desiccant packets to their food storage.  Desiccant packets only moderate the moisture levels, they do not completely absorb moisture.  Being that desiccant is not edible, if the packet somehow breaks open and spills onto the stored food, the entire contents of the container must be thrown away.  Desiccant manufactures recommend adding two 1 ounce packets per 5 or 6 gallon pail, or two per large barrier bag.  There are certain food items that desiccant should not be added to – specifically:  flour, sugar and salt.  These items need a certain amount of moisture to stay activated, and if desiccant is added to it, they will  turn into a hard brick.  Note: make sure the desiccant packet is not touching the oxygen absorber.

Sunlight

When sunlight shines directly onto your food pantry or food storage area, photo-degradation (spoilage) occurs and results in losses of pigments, fats, proteins, and vitamins, as well as surface discoloration.

Solution: Storing food in Mylar bags is an easy solution to remedy this concern.  Mylar bags are metallized foil liners that prevent sunlight, moisture and bugs from ruining food. Investing in the thickest grade of Mylar would be a good investment for your food storage endeavors.  The thicker Mylar bags are more durable, and can be reused for future uses.  Mylar bags come in different sizes and can easily be rotated into your food pantry.  For those who are investing in a shorter term food supply, many simply pour the food contents into Mylar bags, add an oxygen absorber and properly seal the bag closed.  This will keep a short term food supply fresh over a given period of time.

Other solutions include storing your food items in a dark area not prone to sunlight or temperature fluctuations is the best course of action.  If you have to store your food supply in a room with a window, put up curtains or black out material over the window.  This is also a good security measure so that others do not see your stored food.

Oxygen

Oxygen is another force to reckon with when food storage is concerned.  Overtime, oxygen will break down food, cause discoloration, and create staleness in foods.

Solution: Using oxygen absorbers greatly prolongs the shelf life of stored food.  Because it absorbs the oxygen from the container, it inhibits the growth of aerobic pathogens and molds.

Oxygen absorbers come in vacuum sealed packs.  They begin working the moment they are exposed to oxygen.  Therefore, it is best to work as efficiently as possible.  Oxygen absorbers come in different sizes, so pay attention to the size needed for the container.  Manufacturers of this product suggest that, 2,000-4,000 cc’s of oxygen absorbers should be added in one #10 can, and roughly 15,000 – 20,000 cc’s for 5 gallon pails.  If working with smaller containers such as Bell jars, 50 cc’s of oxygen absorbers should be used.  When in doubt on how much oxygen absorbers to use, check with oxygen absorber manufactures.  However, it is best to add extra oxygen absorbers rather than not enough.  Oxygen absorbers are not edible, not toxic and do not effect the smell and taste of the product.

Temperature Fluctuations

Fluctuations in temperature create an imbalance in the environment that the food is stored in.  Ideal temperatures for stored food should be between 65-80 degrees F.

Solution: Typically, people store their food storage in unused closets or areas in the home that do not have large exposure to sunlight.  Ideally, the area where the food is stored should have access to air conditioning.  Those that do not have extra space in their homes have used their basements, root cellars and have even used temperature controlled storage warehouses.  To ensure the area where the food is stored is at adequate temperatures and moisture levels, install an indoor thermometer and humidity gauge.

Bugs

Bug infestations can also occur from improper storage methods.  Nearly all foods are susceptible to these pests.  Typically the stored food product becomes infested at the warehouse it was processed at.  Nearly all dried food products are susceptible to insect infestation, including cereal products (flour, cake mix, cornmeal, rice, spaghetti, crackers, and cookies); seeds such as dried beans and popcorn; nuts; chocolate; raisins and other dried fruits; spices; powdered milk; and cured meats. Insects will chew their way through cardboard, plastic or foil liners, or folds in the packaging system.  This is why a multi-barrier approach to food storage is suggested.

Solutions:  There are few different ways to prevent bug infestations.  Learning the different methods can help you choose which is right for you.

Freezing Method – freeze food that will be stored for 72 hours.  Freezing will kill any bug eggs.

Heating Method – Heating the food supplies is another option.  Heating the food to be stored at 150 degrees F for 15-20 minutes will kill any bugs or eggs as well.

Organic Option – Diatomaceous earth are the fossilized remains of diatoms.  They are organic and are safe to use on food.  Use 1 cup to each 25 pounds of food.

Dry Ice Method – This method can be done two different ways.  According to the Family Preparedness Handbook by James Talmage Stevens, the proper method for this techniques is:

Basic on-top method:

  • On top of almost-full 5 gallon container, place 1/4 lb. dry ice on non-conductive (insulating) material such as Kraft paper
  • Press lid down gently so some air can escape
  • After 20-30 minutes, check to see if dry ice has completely evaporated.
  • If not, wait another 5 minutes, then check again.
  • When dry ice has completely evaporated, remove material and seal container.

Basic on-bottom method:

  • on bottom of 5-gallon storage container, place 1/4 lb. of dry ice under non-conductive (insulating) material, such as Kraft paper.
  • Press lid down gently so some air can escape
  • After 20-30 minutes, check to see if dry ice has completely evaporated.
  • If not, wait another 5 minutes, then check again.
  • When dry ice has completely evaporated, remove material and seal container.

In Conclusion

A little preventative maintenance can go along way in terms of food storage.  Understanding the different methods for storing your food supply for short or long term storage will help you get the most out of your food investment.

 This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: Meet Your Emergency Food’s Worst Enemies

The Prepper's BlueprintTess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals.

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

 

 

Filed under: Food, Prepping

How to Seal Food in Mylar Bags

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How to Seal Bulk Foods in Mylar Bags BDS

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

One of the very first things I learned to do when I started to prep was seal food in Mylar bags.  As simple as this sounds, you would not believe the gyrations I went through to make this happen.  Holy moly, I used plastic tubing, a FoodSaver vacuum sealer, a yardstick, a straw, and iron and ironing board.

Yes, it all worked but it was a bit tedious in that four hands were required to get the job done.  I also have to tell you that there were a lot of laughs during the process as the pinto beans went flying everywhere!

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: How to Seal Food in Mylar Bags

About the Author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

Filed under: Food, Prepping

20 Items to Kick Start Your Food Storage Plan

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20 Items to Kick Start Your Food Storage Plan

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

No matter how many times I write about food, there is always something new to consider or a new and different way to present the same old information in a more useful manner.  With that in mind, today I would like to share a method for getting started with your food storage program in an easy, step by step, and cost effective manner.

To be truthful, my initial goal with this article was to respond to readers who were just getting started and wanted a shopping list of things to buy for their food storage pantry.  I also wanted to compile a checklist that more experienced preppers could use to compare what they had to what they needed.  My goal can pretty much be summed up by saying that I wanted to write about getting started with food storage the easy way.  No frills, no fluff – just a common sense list of food items to get you started.

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: 20 Items to Kick Start Your Food Storage Plan

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

Filed under: Food, How To Prepare, Prepping

What to Look for When Shopping for Food Storage

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What to Look For When Shopping for Food Storage - Backdoor Survival

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

With all of the varying complexities of food storage and food storage companies, it may be difficult to sort through and prioritize what is important and what is not.  I don’t know about you but with the dizzying array of things to take into consideration, you just might want to throw you hands up in dismay and yell “help me!!”.

I do not claim to be an expert but over the years, I have learned some things about food storage and food storage companies.  Setting aside the very real concern of where to store everything which is a separate topic altogether, today I want to break down what you should look for when shopping for food storage.

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: What to Look for When Shopping for Food Storage

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

Filed under: Food, Prepping

Canning Jars 101 – Everything You Need To Know and More!

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Canning Jars 101 - Everything You Need To Know and More! | via www.BackdoorSurvival.com

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

When I recently did some organizing of my supplies, I was a bit surprised at the sheer number of canning jars I had placed into boxes.  By the time I got to the 20th box, I admitted to myself that I am clearly a canning jar hoarder.  That said, I don’t think I am in need of an intervention. Yet.  On the contrary, I think everyone should own more versatile and beautiful canning jars.

Canning jars, also commonly referred to as Mason Jars, have a long and colorful history.

The History of Canning and Canning Jars

Canning as a method of preservation was first created during the time that Napoleon was in charge of the French Army. The army wanted a way to preserve food so that soldiers could be better nourished.  The military offered a prize of 12,000 francs to the person who could come up with a solution to this issue.

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: Canning Jars 101 – Everything You Need To Know and More!

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

Filed under: Food, Prepping

These Emergency Foods Have Helped Millions Survive Famine

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famine

(NaturalNews) As the saying goes: “Necessity is the mother of invention,” and the need to continue eating for survival’s sake during various historical famines has prompted people to come up with some interesting and innovative solutions for supplementing a meager diet.

C. Davis of AskaPrepper.com recently posted an article detailing some of the ingenious dishes created by survivors of several prolonged famine periods within the past few centuries.

Valuable lessons can be derived from reading about these survival strategies, particularly for those of us interested in preparing for a possible famine within our lifetimes — one that could be triggered by anything from a natural cataclysm to a societal collapse.

An important point Davis makes before listing these historical emergency foods is that, if even one vitamin is missing from the human diet, malnutrition may result in the long run. This is a key fact to acknowledge when preparing a food stockpile designed for long-term survival.

The major famines and the emergency foods used to survive them include:

Continue reading at Natural News: These Emergency Foods Have Helped Millions Survive Famine

Filed under: Food, Prepping