Why Your Medicinal Herb Kit Should Have Yarrow

Click here to view the original post.

‘Tis the season to gather up some yarrow. Yes, Ready Nutrition Readers! Let’s delve into it and see what this article’s herbal focus has to offer. Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) is an aromatic perennial herb found primarily in Western North America. If you can’t find it in your home state, you can easily obtain it in a store selling herbs or naturopathic supplements.

If you can find it in your state, you’re in luck! You’ll be able to gather it for free. Yarrow is a multipurpose medicinal herb and has been used for many thousands of years. Yarrow can be used to treat:

  • burns
  • boils
  • blisters
  • ear infections
  • sores
  • bug bites

Yarrow treatments can be made in the form of a tea and then wiped on as an astringent or applying the leaves directly to the afflicted area.

Taken internally as a tea, it can be used against fever, diarrhea, and colds. The herb should not be used in people subject to excessive clotting in the blood, or with pregnant women and nursing mothers. The really great value in yarrow, however, is not with all of these, but with its styptic properties: it stops bleeding.

It derives its name from the Greek warrior-hero Achilles, who it was said stopped bleeding of fellow warriors and saved many lives with the application of this plant to the wound. Yarrow contains an alkaloid that is named achilleine that has been proven in lab experiments to reduce clotting time in blood.

The leaves resemble ferns. When it is in the flower, the flowers are small and white-petaled with a yellow center that grows in clusters. So, here’s what you do:

Gather your herb, taking care to not take everything from a given area…leave the hardiest plants to propagate and replenish the area. You can string them together in the manner of a “bouquet” of about 3 to 5 plants, either tied off or rubber-banded together. It’s the leaves you’re after. Take these bunches, and hang them in the sun from a wire coat hanger.

In this manner, it’s easy to string about 4 to 5 bundles on a coat hanger. Then just wait to dry the herb, and “screed” the leaves or pluck them off and store them in a jar, plastic bag, or whatever you choose. Voila! Instant first-aid quick clot right from the ground! Learn to spot it, harvest it, and use it. This is not to say abandon the quick clot or any of your first-aid gear. On the contrary: this supplements that gear. It is also excellent training for the time when there may not be a happy Wal-Mart or other smiling, overpriced survival store to buy happy quick clot.

Tote some of this with you and learn to use it as both a first-aid measure for bleeding, and do some research on the other items it covers. In this manner, you well round yourself and improve your capabilities in the field. Practice makes perfect, and you should always study to improve your knowledge and skills for yourself and others.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Junctional Tourniquets Can Be a Lifesaver. Here’s How They Work

Click here to view the original post.

ambulanceLearning how to apply a tourniquet and when it is appropriate to do so, is one of the first things taught to anyone who is trying to learn first aid. It’s a pretty simple procedure, and is extremely effective at stopping traumatic blood loss. But unfortunately it doesn’t work in all cases. There are certain parts of the body that you simply can’t apply an ordinary tourniquet to.

For instance, you can’t use a tourniquet on a wound in the gut or in the chest. You also can’t use a tourniquet on a wound that is located too far up on a limb, near the pelvis or the shoulder.

When that happens, in most cases you’ll have to apply pressure to the wound with one or both of your hands, which isn’t always ideal. If you or someone you’re with is suffering from a grievous injury, chances are you’re in a survival situation of some kind, and you’ll need your hands free for other tasks. Or if it’s going to be a long time before help arrives, your hands could get tired.

Fortunately there’s a fairly new invention that tackles this problem. It’s called a junctional tourniquet, which is capable of cutting off circulation in places that an ordinary tourniquet can’t reach. It’s so effective that even the US Army is giving these devices to their medics. Here’s how the junctional tourniquet works, according to the manufacturer:

Unfortunately, the junctional tourniquet is quite expensive at the moment. It can be bought new for around $350, but these devices can also be found slightly used on ebay for around $100.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Book review: The Survival Medicine Handbook – what to do when help isn’t on the way

Click here to view the original post.

What happens during a medical emergency when dialing 911 is not an option? What is your next move?

by Leon Pantenburg

Most first aid and medical manuals will tell you to seek a medical clinic or hospital as quickly as possible when an emergency occurs. It’s sound advice.

But what happens when 911 isn’t an option? Maybe there has been a major earthquake, tsunami or natural disaster, and the roads are out, and Life Flight helicopters are grounded. The cavalry isn’t coming.

The survival medicine handbookThis is when reality hits with a resounding thump, and you realize the only person available to deal with the medical emergency is you. And you will have to rely on whatever training you had.

This is the concept behind “The Survival Medicine Handbook,” Third Edition, revised and expanded by Joseph Alton, MD and Amy Alton ARNP.

Better known as Doctor Bones and Nurse Amy, the duo is widely known in the preparedness industry as the go-to couple for all things medical. Their stated goal is: “To put a medically prepared person in every family for any disaster.”

First aid manuals are a dime a dozen, and come in all shapes, configurations and sizes. There is a plethora of information about taking care of injuries on the trail. But most of the ones I’ve seen, including those designed for Third World areas, always end up recommending the readers to seek modern medical help.

That’s where this manual is different. What happens if a disaster overwhelms emergency responders? Or if a catastrophe, such as a flood or earthquake, prevents entrance into an area?

The Survival Medicine Handbook is based on the assumption that outside help won’t be available.

Read it from that standpoint.

I found the book to be a wealth of information and a treasure trove of simple tips for improvising. The reader will learn such tips as:

Improvisation may be key in dealing with a medical emergency.

Improvisation may be key in dealing with a medical emergency.

Improvise butterfly and wound closure bandages – from duct tape. I knew how to use butterfly bandages from a first aid class I took. I carry duct tape in every emergency kit I have, and tried this technique as soon as I read about it. The concept works really well.

Make a water filter out of a plastic soft drink bottle.

Items to include in a survival dental kit.

How to handle a mass casualty event when medical personnel are overwhelmed.

Essential oils and herbal teas: In a long term survival scenario, nature may be your only pharmacy. It is imperative to learn the medical benefits of plants that may grow in your garden. A whole section is devoted to identifying and discussing some of these plants.

Allergic to bee and/or wasp stings? You probably won’t know until one stings you. Learn how to identify and treat anaphylactic shock.

Q: So how would this book fit into your preparedness planning?

A: By starting you thinking about survival scenarios where there is no outside help.

Dr. John Leach wrote in his groundbreaking “Survival Psychology” book, that  in any emergency, 80 percent of the people present won’t have any idea what to do, 10 to 15 percent will do the wrong thing, and 10 to 15 percent will act appropriately. This small group will react, based on what training they have had.

You want to be in the group which is in the know.  A good place to start is by reading this book. It is full of practical, sound advice on how to handle many basic medical emergencies.

But no book is a substitute for a first aid class. The best investment in your family’s well-being is to have several members trained in basic first aid. One is not enough. The trained person might be the one needing help.

The next investment should be in some medical books – not downloads – that can be used as reference materials when the electricity goes down and the batteries run out.

I review a lot of preparedness books, and my wife generally peruses them, too. After the publication has been read and reviewed, it is generally donated to the local library.

But, at my wife’s suggestion, we’re keeping “The Survival Medical Handbook, Third edition,” and it will go into our survival/preparedness library. We’ll be ordering another as a gift to friends who live part-time on an isolated ranch in the Oregon high desert.

That’s the highest recommendation I can give a book. Get one.

Please click here to check out and subscribe to the SurvivalCommonSense.com YouTube channel, and here to subscribe to our weekly email update – thanks!

Amazon.com Widgets