Understanding and Mastering the Bugout!

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Understanding and Mastering the Bugout!

Understanding and Mastering the Bugout Process
James Walton “I Am Liberty” Audio player below!

For a long time I have been looking for the best way to really dig into the bugout process. There is probably no other part of prepping that has more air time than the bugout. It’s a very popular topic and for good reason. The problem I find, most often, with the bugout is that it is rarely allotted the time it deserves.

Continue reading Understanding and Mastering the Bugout! at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

Tornado Survival: No Shelter, No Basement, No Problem

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For an entire week leading up to the April 2011 storms and tornados that devastated parts of my town and Northern Alabama in general, the local weather forecasters gave us warnings. We were told to be ready for tornado survival because they saw the emerging weather pattern as it travelled across the country and how dangerous it […]

Creating an Emergency Plan… Part 2

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Creating an Emergency Plan… Part 2
David Jones “Prepping Up with the Jones “Audio player provided!

Dave has Guy Snodgrass return to finish up how you can create an emergency plan. Guy answers key questions on how to pick a bugout location and more importantly when the right time to bugout is. What are the trigger points that would make you implement your bugout plan and haul butt to your place in the woods?

Continue reading Creating an Emergency Plan… Part 2 at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

Creating an Emergency Plan

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Creating an Emergency Plan
David Jones “Prepping Up with the Jones “Audio player provided!

Dave comes back from his traveling shows to have a very special guest Guy Snodgrass on this show. Guy is an author, a publisher and a retired US Army Warrant Office with plenty of time in combat zones and Special Forces. One of Guy’s Prepper endeavors is help people with their emergency plans and evaluating what they have in place.

Continue reading Creating an Emergency Plan at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

Survival Gear Dry Run: A Night in the Woods

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Your Gear Dry Run Might Be One of the

Most Important Things You Do!

 

One never knows when a crisis might strike. With all the time we spend in our vehicles, it could easily happen while you’re on the road and you’ll need your emergency gear. With that in mind, I decided to test the emergency backpack I keep in my truck with a survival gear dry run. The test yielded some success and some lessons learned.

Bad Stuff Happens

In the “Big Blizzard of ’78” thousands of people in the northeast were trapped in their cars on the Interstate, some for days. Some people died. Both my wife and I had lived in rural Minnesota in our younger years, so we were well aware of how easily a car can get stuck off the road, and how long it can take for help to arrive.

The Gear To Be Tested

Awhile back, I assembled emergency bags for both my truck and my wife’s car. These were not the classic “Bug Out Bags” designed for escaping the zombie apocalypse by fleeing into the hinterlands and living off the land. These were for less dramatic use in case of automotive stranding in adverse conditions. I should note here that the backpacks and contents were nothing special or “tacticool” that would impress gear aficionados.

Defining the Test

If stranded, one can (a) call for help or (b) sleep in the vehicle. But what if neither of those options was available? (phone dead, vehicle unsafe to stay in) Playing a game of ‘what if’, I wondered if I could use my Truck Bag to survive a night (or more?) in the woods? Did I have the right gear? Better to find out in practice than during the real thing.

Of Interest: What Do I Put In My Survival Kit Link Bomb?

Scheduling a Crisis

To test my Truck Bag, I picked a day a couple weeks in advance. Of course, no one gets two weeks advance warning of a real crisis. Even so, the mental exercise brought on two revelations before I had even begun.

Revelation One: I knew the date, but nothing else. Would it be sunny and warm? Cold, windy and rainy? We had temps down in the 30s already. Realizing the uncertainty of the future was a good mental experience. It prompted me to reassess my Truck Bag’s contents to cover a wider range of possibilities.

Revelation Two: My Truck Bag was not equipped for sleeping outside the truck, or wet weather. I needed a few more things to cover wet and cold.

Pre-Test Adjustments

I added (with my wife’s help) some straps to the bottom of my backpack so I could attach a sleeping bag. I also added a good military-style poncho and a couple small tarps, among other bits. Only a test run would tell if I had what I’d need, too much or too little. (BTW, the bag weighed in at 21 lbs.)

The Plan

After work, on that scheduled Friday, I would drive to our church after work. Behind the church is 13 acres of mixed forest and I had permission to make a small campfire there. I planned to arrive, scout out a good spot and set up camp. I planned to use a tarp to make a quick lean-to, and use a long-burning campfire. (more on that later) I would have to adapt to whatever the weather conditions were on the actual day.

Testing Day

When the day came, the forecast was for a mild day and evening, but rain to move in around midnight. That Friday’s commute home just happened to be a really bad one. Two separate crashes on the Interstate caused dozens of miles of backup. The second crash was unusual enough to nearly close the highway.

Instead of arriving with a couple hours of daylight remaining, I arrived with very little daylight left. This added realism to my test. Who gets stranded first thing in the morning with all day to set up camp?

Making Quick Choices

I arrived just as the sun was going down behind the tree-line. I put on my backpack and set off into the woods. The spot I had imagined being a good place proved too irregular and lower than I remembered. Not good. I had to spend precious waning daylight to find a better spot. The perfect setup I wanted was a gentle wind at my lean-to’s back, and just a bit higher than my fire, so logs would not come rolling in with me. With little light left, I did not have the time to be choosy. I had to gather firewood while I could see far enough to spot windfall.

No Wild Water

I had my Sawyer Mini along to filter water, but there wasn’t any. The swamp was dry. The little stream, which usually babbles, was also dry. I had about a liter with me.

Working Fast

After I found an adequate spot, I set about finding firewood while I could still see without flashlights. Within about a circle of about fifty yards, I located three fallen oaks that had been down long enough to be dry. My Sven-Saw was marvelous. In a half an hour, I had a half dozen 4-5” logs, each about a yard long, and numerous branches for kindling. I hoped it was enough to last the night. Even though the air was getting cool and damp, the exercise had me peeling off my jacket and sweater. I did not need a fire for awhile.

Headlamp Plus

The headlamp was invaluable for setting up my tarp and things in the failing light. I had a reflective tarp to maximize heat from a modest fire and hopefully, enough coverage for when it rained. I could tie knots, pound in stakes, break up kindling and array my gear all with both hands. The headlamp was a definite plus for such close-quarters work.

Finnish Fire

Lonnie of Far North Bushcraft has a YouTube video on the traditional two-log fire. It’s supposed to give a long slow burn. I knew I would not have time to find such large, dry logs, nor time to hew them flat on one side like he did. So, I set up a variation on the Finnish ‘gap fire’, but using three smaller-diameter logs.

They call it “pinotuli”, or a “pile fire”. The rule of thumb is that 1” of log diameter equals an hour of burn time in such a fire lay. If so, my 4” logs would give me four hours. I had enough other (somewhat smaller) logs to add another four hours — maybe.

Slow Start

I had matches and a little lighter, but just for the bushcraft sake of it, I lit my fire with a Ferro-rod and a quarter of a cotton ball soaked in Vaseline. Both worked great. From the little teepee fire, I fed burning sticks into my “pile fire” to light the kindling.

This turned out to be more maintenance-intense than I expected. Since real-life logs are more irregular than idealized YouTube logs, it took a half an hour of fussing and feeding in sticks to get the fire self-sustaining. I almost had flame-out a few times.

Settling In

Around 8:30, the fire had spread all along the “pile” and was radiating nicely. It was time to relax a bit, eat my supper (half a sandwich saved from work) and listen to my little AM/FM radio. Civilization was still out there.

The radiant heat was perfect — not too warm, nor too feeble. I crawled in my sleeping bag with my flashlight and knife arrayed in easy-to-grab locations. I felt like I was never sleeping, but whole hour chunks of time would go by, so I obviously was.

Slow Burn

Awake at 10:30 and the “pile fire” is in a perfect mid-burn.  The heat was just enough. I could see that the top log was about half burned through, so I pulled over its twin for easier deployment when the time came. The air outside of the lean-to was crisp. I could see my breath.

Midnight Refueling

I awoke at 12:15 feeling cold. The top log had split and fallen away. I had its replacement, and some kindling, ready at hand, so I was able to get the fire going again fairly quickly. After a bit of adjustment of the top log, it was time to doze off again.

Refueling Two

Around 3:30, I awoke again, feeling cold. The two bottom logs had burned through and my “pile” collapsed. I pulled my last fuel logs over and made an ad hoc pile over the coals. They did not take long to become engaged. I dozed off again.

Morning

A bit before 5:00, I awoke cold again. My ad hoc pile had burned down quickly. My light-duty sleeping bag was not enough. Since I was too cold to go back to sleep, I pulled over my unused kindling and branch-wood to make a quicker fire. A little strategic blowing on the coals and the new little fire was crackling nicely. It was surprising how great the radiant warmth of even a small fire felt on cold hands.

I set my little camp cup on some mini-logs, to make some hot water for instant coffee. This took about seven minutes to bubble. Meanwhile, I snacked on a package of trail mix as my breakfast. A hot cup of coffee does wonders too.

The woods were very quiet as the blue light of an overcast dawn grew. Around 6:00, the crows and chipmunks woke up and it was no longer quiet. Not too long after I had broken down my camp and repacked my gear, it started to sprinkle and later turned to rain. If I had been hard up for water, I could have collected rain. But, my test was complete.

Success

I realize that experienced campers will not be impressed that a guy ‘survived’ a night in the woods. What my test did prove, was that the minimal gear I had in my Truck Bag was sufficient to get me by if I were stranded far from civilization and I could not stay in my disabled truck. That’s good to know.

Lessons Learned

Have Appropriate Sleep Gear — Get something rated for the weather you’re likely to have to endure. A kids’ sleep-over sleeping bag (usually rated for 50 or 60 degrees) won’t help much when it’s below freezing. I’ll be replacing my old light-duty bag with a better one.

Gather Lots of Fuel — My rough rule of thumb was to gather three times what I thought I needed to make my initial fire. The “pile fire” technique worked great but still needs refueling. Better to gather extra early, than try to look for more in the dark and cold.

Bring Water — It’s a great idea to have the means to filter wild water, but you might get stuck where there isn’t any. You don’t need to haul around a three-day supply, necessarily, but a liter or so can tide you over until you locate more.

A Big Saw is Great — Wire saws are okay for kindling or tent poles. Little folding saws are nice for 2-inch branches. A bigger, aggressive saw like the Sven-Saw was fairly quick at producing bigger fuelwood. It can do all the little cutting too.

Headlights Rock — Flashlights are a must, but being able to work hands-free in the dark is great.

Make Adjustments — My homemade sleeping bag attachment worked but needs to be tweaked to cinch down tighter and make it easier put on and take off the backpack. The backpack also needs more inner bags for organizing gear. Loose stuff always falls down deep or is easily lost in leaf litter. I’ll also be looking to trim a couple pounds wherever I can.

With these and some other small adjustments, my Truck Bag and my wife’s Car Bag will be better set up to get us through a cold weather stranding. They aren’t perfect, but after my test, they will be better.

Articles of Interest:

The post Survival Gear Dry Run: A Night in the Woods appeared first on Ed That Matters.

What.If … There Was No More Oil (A What.If video)

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In this video, the posited question is what if there was no more oil?  What would happen if the world ran out of oil?  Well, here’s some good news.  The world will NEVER run out of oil.  However, the concept of peak oil is very real, as are the end of the world as we know it type consequences that would certainly follow on from peak oil.  The threat of terrorism that would create a “manufactured” peak oil scenario is also very real.  If there were an attack that took millions of barrels of oil out of the global market, due to supply interruption like a sunken tanker in the Strait of Hormuz (shorter term), or due to a disruption in production like an attack on the Abqaiq facility in Saudi Arabia (very long term), or on US refining capabilities (very long term), an $8 overnight price jump would be the least of our worries. At that point, the real question would be how long the hyper-complex systems that make the ‘American way of life’ possible could hold together before the whole thing came spinning apart and we were facing an actual cascading collapse scenario…failure of the just in time delivery system, failure of the municipal water treatment plants, economic collapse due to a crashing stock market, depression due to job lay offs and business closures, failure of the electric grid due to a collapse of coal deliveries, disintegration of the mega farms due to a lack of fuel to run the large machinery and a halt in feed deliveries. I could go on. Depending on the type of interruption of the liquid fuel supplies, it could very well mean ‘game over’ for our complex society. This is an absolutely, clear and present threat for every one of us that enjoys our current way of life.  With all of that in mind, here is What.If’s look at what that world without access to oil might look like.  Enjoy.

 

FIVE REASONS TO KEEP A BOLT KIT CACHED AT YOUR WORKPLACE

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You never know when or where you may find yourself in an emergency (or worse) situation, but the odds are that it won’t happen when you are comfortably at home with every member of your family in your line of sight and all of your gear and emergency supplies just feet away.  It is much more likely that you will be away from home, at work, or even in your vehicle when the balloon goes up.  The S could HTF at any time and we must remain ready to respond.  With that mind, here are five reasons to keep a BOLT (survival/preparedness) kit cached at your workplace.

 

CIVIL UNREST

We live in a fractured world these days.  A world in which any number of flashpoints could splinter the thin veneer of societal peace can instantly fall away like so many shards of broken glass.  You can never know exactly when, where, or how this unrest may manifest itself and it could even spill out into the streets around where you are located.  According to the 2010 census, 80% of the U.S. population now lives in urban areas.  It is a safe bet that at least that number or greater also work in an urban setting, and since we spend so many hours at work, or commuting to and from work, here in the United States, it’s a pretty safe bet that if you are going to encounter civil unrest or riots in your lifetime, it will be when you are at your workplace.

 

ACTIVE SHOOTER / TERRORISM

A few years ago my building was put on lock down when my workplace was turned into a crime scene because a domestic dispute turned into a murder when an angry male entered the building and shot a female employee several times, killing her instantly.  The murderer was then shot by security forces inside the building.  More recently, myself and my fellow employees were warned that there was a threat from a potential active shooter that lasted several months before he was finally apprehended by authorities.  Due to my chosen profession, journalism, my building will always be a target in today’s world and that is a reality that we must deal with daily.  Even with an armed security force on duty 24 hours a day, this is a very real threat.  Couple the reality that journalists and journalism has long been under attack from many angles with the fact that my workplace is located in the heart of a major metropolitan city, not only is my place of work a potential target for the every day active shooter threat that has now become commonplace in America, but it is also a target for domestic or international terrorism.  This scenario is one that virtually mandates that I have a plan, the skills, and the gear on hand that will give me the best chance to make it home safely to my family at the end of the day.

 

SEVERE WEATHER

Mother Nature plays no favorites as to where and when she will choose to unleash her wrath.  I know this from first hand experience, having survived a direct hit from a tornado while at work about a decade ago.  After this event, communications were down for several hours and vital infrastructure was heavily damaged.  Also, I have been “trapped” at work for several days over the years due to “ongoing” severe winter storms and wound up spending the night at the office with limited access to food.  Even if you do not take the direct hit from a severe storm, your local area may be impacted effectively stranding you at work.  A good example of this would be localized, or even widespread, flooding.  Flood waters can come up in a hurry and whether you recognize the obvious threat that presents as the streets outside your office flooded with feet of water, or the more less obvious danger as access to nearby travel routes prevent you from making it home, the threat is very real regardless.

 

STAGING AREA

You never know when disaster may strike and we must resolve to always be ready.  The situation may be that an emergency begins during your work day that doesn’t necessarily impact your workplace, but impacts the area around your home, in your community, or it may even be a crisis unfolding on a larger, regional or national level, and you have to leave work and head to your designated meeting place outside of work with no time or opportunity to return home.  Because of the built in flexibility offered to you through the tiered system we prescribe here at Practical Tactical will mean that the kit you have built to keep at your workplace is now available to you to use/combine with your Get Home Bag (GHB) and/or your vehicle kit to help you make your way back to your family and other members of your team.

 

EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR / CITIZENSHIP

By having a BOLT (preparedness/survival) kit at my workplace, not only have I given myself a better chance of making it through any emergency situation that may arise during my work day, I am in position to help my fellow employees or other civilians should the opportunity present itself.

Keep in mind that if you work out of your vehicle or you often travel away from the office during your work day, you can easily adjust your kit setup so that it can be kept in your vehicle at all times, in addition to your independent vehicle kit.

 

If you want to better understand my thoughts on personal preparedness, please check out my books HERE and HERE, or wander deeper into this blog.  I hope this website will help you along your way, especially if you’re just getting started.  Keep up with everything Practical Tactical by subscribing to our mailing list and be sure to LIKE, SHARE and FOLLOW us across all of our social media platforms as well.

www.practicaltactical4you.com

Practical Tactical

 

Eve Gonzales Trading Post in the Woods!

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Eve Gonzales Trading Post in the Woods!
David Jones “Prepping Up with the Jones “Audio player provided!

Dave continues to get the guest that really make a difference in the Prepper world and this week Eve Gonzales from Trading Post in the Woods comes on to talk about Lessons Learned a new book she has out. Eve is a disaster response professional that works for a nongovernmental agency (NGA) that helps disaster victims.

Continue reading Eve Gonzales Trading Post in the Woods! at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

How to Create a Family Preparedness-Emergency Plan!

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How to Create a Family Preparedness-Emergency Plan!

How to Create a Family Preparedness-Emergency Plan

The US witnessed one of the worst hurricane seasons in hundreds of years, and that was on top of the countrywide flooding and storms that inflicted parts of the country into panic. These kinds of weather situations aren’t uncommon and are happening around the world at an increasing rate.

As conditions and freak scenarios are becoming more and more common, more and more people are turning their attention to creating emergency plans.

Continue reading How to Create a Family Preparedness-Emergency Plan! at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

Free PDF: How to Make an Emergency Gas Mask

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While I don’t recommend macgyvering things like gas masks, this PDF on How to make an emergency gas mask is better than breathing in methal-ethyl-bad stuff because your mask is in a remote bug out location and not on your side during a terror attack or chemical spill. I still recommend buying a quality mask and good filters for the people you love, knowing how to make one in a pinch is also good to know. I like knowing how to do stuff, and I think this PDF is neat, but once again, have I said that it is much

The post Free PDF: How to Make an Emergency Gas Mask appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Using SDR for SHTF Information Gathering!

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Using SDR for SHTF Information Gathering
Micheal Kline “Reality Check” Audio player below

If the Internet crashed or was restricted due to FCC regulations and you wanted to get the news how would you do it? With small, $20 piece of hardware and a computer you can listen to police, fire, and EMS. Did you know that you can track aircraft flying in your area? SDR allows you to see any commercial and civilian aircraft within a very large area.

Continue reading Using SDR for SHTF Information Gathering! at Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

13 Food Storage Resolutions

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Storing food, say a month or two’s worth, is no longer the habit of a fringe group of Doomers. Everyday moms like me have an extra stash of food set away for those “just in case” events. After working on my own food storage pantry for about 9 years now, I’ve learned a lot and […]

A day in the emergency room

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I spent today in the emergency room, not for me, but for a friend. I had gone to church and found out my friend had slipped on ice on her way out and broke one knee cap (fully in half) and hurt her elbow. I left church and went to her house, the first responders were there, the ambulance wasn’t there yet. Where we live, there is lots of land between the houses, becoming injured when you are by yourself can turn into a death sentence, fortunately her neighbor was outside and heard her yelling for help. If it hadn’t happened that way, it would have been hours before anyone else would have found her, and she was laying on a wooden ramp, on ice and couldn’t pull herself up.

This makes me think about the risks of living by yourself in a rural, isolated area. Most of the time, it’s not a problem, but the day you fall or have some other medical emergency, if you can’t get to a phone or get someone to hear you, an otherwise minor issue can become life threatening.

I know many people who want to live off grid or homestead are going to tend to be in rural, isolated areas, places where your neighbors are few and far between. So, what do you do to balance your wanted isolation and your safety?

One thing you could do is to carry a phone, assuming you have a cell signal, a cell phone, or if not, then a wireless landline, as long as your phone works, you could at least call for help assuming you are conscious. Honestly, I don’t have a good answer if you don’t have a way to call for help, perhaps have a buddy system where a trusted neighbor checks on you from time to time. This would be especially helpful if you are older or in poor health.

Out where I live, cell phones don’t work in most areas where people live, fortunately for my friend, even though she is older (70 years old) she is in fairly decent health and was able to call out loud enough for the far away neighbor to hear. If she hadn’t been able to get the neighbor to come over, I would have gone over there after church to check on her, but that would have meant laying in pain, in the cold, on the ice, I suspect she would have survived, but would have been much worse for the wear.

My friend is going to be OK, she has a fully broken knee cap, something I think is better than injuring tendons or other soft tissues, bones can be pinned back together and heal well, soft tissue or connective tissue takes a lot longer to heal. She does have a hairline fracture near her elbow but that will heal itself, she is looking “forward” to an extended hospital stay and lots of physical therapy before she is able to come home. Our small community has pulled together to take care of her dogs and house until she returns. What is your backup plan?

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The post A day in the emergency room appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Emergency Numbers and Websites Everyone Should Know (Updated & Expanded)

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This article updates and greatly expands an article I originally published a few years ago.

Here is a list of Emergency Numbers and Contact Information you should have with you at all times. It contains four major sections: 1) Emergency, Crisis, and Helplines, 2) a list of personal and local numbers you may need in an emergency, 3) Mental Health Help, and 4) Legal Help with Homeschooling, Second Amendment/Self-Defense, and Freedom of Religion issues.

 9-1-1 = General Emergency Number in USA & Canada 

General Emergency Numbers Around the World

911 – Emergency Police/Fire/Ambulance in the USA & Canada
066 – Emergency in Mexico
112 – Emergency in most (not all) of Europe
000 – Emergency in Australia
111 – Emergency in New Zealand
999 – Hong Kong
117 – The Philippines

Some countries have specific numbers for the type of emergency:

Israel & India  = Police: 100   Ambulance: 101   Fire: 102
Japan = Police: 110   Ambulance/Fire: 119
South Korea = Police: 112   Ambulance/Fire: 119
China = Police: 100   Ambulance: 120   Fire: 119

South America and Africa: emergency numbers vary widely, check with the individual country. 

Other Emergency, Crisis and Helplines 

Poison Control Center: 1-800-222-1222
Website: http://www.aapcc.org/

Animal Poison Control Center: (888) 426-4435 [a fee may apply].
Website: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255
Website: www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

Veteran’s Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255
Website: https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI): 1-202 324-3000
Website:  https://www.fbi.gov/

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
General contact number: 1-202-646-2500
For disaster survivors: 1-800-621-3362
Website: https://www.fema.gov

American Red Cross
General contact number: 1-800-733-2767
For help contacting a service member during an emergency: 1-877-272-7337
Website: http://www.redcross.org/

Salvation Army
(The Salvation Army offers many services, including disaster relief, missing persons, and veterans’ assistance. Please see their website for additional information and contacts.)
Website: http://www.salvationarmyusa.org/

Other Numbers You May Want In an Emergency

You should put together a list of personal and local numbers that you may need in an emergency. Contact information you may wish to have include:

  • Your family, friends, neighbors, etc.
  • Your pastor/priest/rabbi, etc.
  • Your child’s school.
  • Your state’s Highway Patrol.
  • Local non-emergency fire and police numbers.
  • Various local government offices & services.
  • Your mechanic and local tow truck company.
  • Your local water, power, and gas companies.
  •  Local hospitals.
  • Your doctors, dentist, eye doctor, veterinarian, pharmacy, etc.
  • Your insurance companies (health, auto, property, life, etc.) – keep your account numbers with the contact info.
  • Your bank and other financial institutions.
  • Your work related numbers and contacts.

Mental Health Crisis / Issues

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255
Website: www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

Veteran’s Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255
Website: www.veteranscrisisline.net/

Anxiety and Depression Association of America
Website: https://adaa.org/

SAMHSA Treatment Referral Helpline – 1-877-726-4727
(Get general information on mental health and locate treatment services in your area. Speak to a live person, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST.)

Refer to the article Finding Help: When to Get It and Where to Go on the Mental Health America website.

Local clergy often will be able to refer you to local programs, support groups, and counselors that can help.

Addicted to Tobacco? See Quitting Smoking (on the American Cancer Society website)
 
Alcoholics Anonymous
Website: https://www.aa.org/pages/en_US
 

Narcotics Anonymous 
Website: http://www.nanj.org/

Legal Help with Homeschooling Issues

Home School Legal Defense Association
Website: https://www.hslda.org/
Telephone: 540-338-5600 / fax 2733 

Legal Help with Second Amendment Issues


The Shooter’s Bar — Pro Second-Amendment Attorneys
Website: http://www.theshootersbar.org/

JPFO Guide to 2A/CCW Oriented Attorneys 
Website:  http://jpfo.org/filegen-a-m/attorney.htm

Legal Help with Freedom of Religion Issues


American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ)
Legal helpline: 1-757-226-2489
Website: http://aclj.org/

Christian Law Association (ALC)
Telephone: 1-888-252-1969
Website: http://www.christianlaw.org/

Liberty Counsel
Telephone: 1-407-875-1776
Website: http://www.lc.org/

Liberty Institute
Telephone: 1-972-941-4444
Website: https://www.libertyinstitute.org

Alliance Defending Freedom
Toll Free: 1-800-835-5233
Website: http://www.adflegal.org

Emergency Numbers and Websites Everyone Should Know (Updated & Expanded)

Click here to view the original post.

This article updates and greatly expands an article I originally published a few years ago.

Here is a list of Emergency Numbers and Contact Information you should have with you at all times. It contains four major sections: 1) Emergency, Crisis, and Helplines, 2) a list of personal and local numbers you may need in an emergency, 3) Mental Health Help, and 4) Legal Help with Homeschooling, Second Amendment/Self-Defense, and Freedom of Religion issues.

 9-1-1 = General Emergency Number in USA & Canada 

General Emergency Numbers Around the World

911 – Emergency Police/Fire/Ambulance in the USA & Canada
066 – Emergency in Mexico
112 – Emergency in most (not all) of Europe
000 – Emergency in Australia
111 – Emergency in New Zealand
999 – Hong Kong
117 – The Philippines

Some countries have specific numbers for the type of emergency:

Israel & India  = Police: 100   Ambulance: 101   Fire: 102
Japan = Police: 110   Ambulance/Fire: 119
South Korea = Police: 112   Ambulance/Fire: 119
China = Police: 100   Ambulance: 120   Fire: 119

South America and Africa: emergency numbers vary widely, check with the individual country. 

Other Emergency, Crisis and Helplines 

Poison Control Center: 1-800-222-1222
Website: http://www.aapcc.org/

Animal Poison Control Center: (888) 426-4435 [a fee may apply].
Website: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255
Website: www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

Veteran’s Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255
Website: https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI): 1-202 324-3000
Website:  https://www.fbi.gov/

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
General contact number: 1-202-646-2500
For disaster survivors: 1-800-621-3362
Website: https://www.fema.gov

American Red Cross
General contact number: 1-800-733-2767
For help contacting a service member during an emergency: 1-877-272-7337
Website: http://www.redcross.org/

Salvation Army
(The Salvation Army offers many services, including disaster relief, missing persons, and veterans’ assistance. Please see their website for additional information and contacts.)
Website: http://www.salvationarmyusa.org/

Other Numbers You May Want In an Emergency

You should put together a list of personal and local numbers that you may need in an emergency. Contact information you may wish to have include:

  • Your family, friends, neighbors, etc.
  • Your pastor/priest/rabbi, etc.
  • Your child’s school.
  • Your state’s Highway Patrol.
  • Local non-emergency fire and police numbers.
  • Various local government offices & services.
  • Your mechanic and local tow truck company.
  • Your local water, power, and gas companies.
  •  Local hospitals.
  • Your doctors, dentist, eye doctor, veterinarian, pharmacy, etc.
  • Your insurance companies (health, auto, property, life, etc.) – keep your account numbers with the contact info.
  • Your bank and other financial institutions.
  • Your work related numbers and contacts.

Mental Health Crisis / Issues

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255
Website: www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

Veteran’s Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255
Website: www.veteranscrisisline.net/

Anxiety and Depression Association of America
Website: https://adaa.org/

SAMHSA Treatment Referral Helpline – 1-877-726-4727
(Get general information on mental health and locate treatment services in your area. Speak to a live person, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST.)

Refer to the article Finding Help: When to Get It and Where to Go on the Mental Health America website.

Local clergy often will be able to refer you to local programs, support groups, and counselors that can help.

Addicted to Tobacco? See Quitting Smoking (on the American Cancer Society website)
 
Alcoholics Anonymous
Website: https://www.aa.org/pages/en_US
 

Narcotics Anonymous 
Website: http://www.nanj.org/

Legal Help with Homeschooling Issues

Home School Legal Defense Association
Website: https://www.hslda.org/
Telephone: 540-338-5600 / fax 2733 

Legal Help with Second Amendment Issues


The Shooter’s Bar — Pro Second-Amendment Attorneys
Website: http://www.theshootersbar.org/

JPFO Guide to 2A/CCW Oriented Attorneys 
Website:  http://jpfo.org/filegen-a-m/attorney.htm

Legal Help with Freedom of Religion Issues


American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ)
Legal helpline: 1-757-226-2489
Website: http://aclj.org/

Christian Law Association (ALC)
Telephone: 1-888-252-1969
Website: http://www.christianlaw.org/

Liberty Counsel
Telephone: 1-407-875-1776
Website: http://www.lc.org/

Liberty Institute
Telephone: 1-972-941-4444
Website: https://www.libertyinstitute.org

Alliance Defending Freedom
Toll Free: 1-800-835-5233
Website: http://www.adflegal.org

Don’t Leave Home Without It: The Vehicle 72-Hour Kit

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vehicle emergency kitSoccer moms, football moms, cheerleading moms, whatever they call us, “chauffeur” better describes what we, Survival Moms, do every day. In my world, it’s not unusual to have a kid’s dentist appointment, a field trip, and a swim meet all on the same day, transported by our trusty Tahoe. Now, if that Tahoe ever broke down or for some reason we couldn’t get home as planned, what would we do?

My answer is the Vehicle 72 Hour Kit, or Emergency Kit. If you were well and truly stuck somewhere, this Kit could see you and your family through at least 72 hours. That’s three days. It wouldn’t be luxurious living, that’s for sure, but it would be survival, and that’s what we’re talking about here.

I consider the Vehicle 72 Hour Kit to be an essential part of being prepared for emergencies, and fortunately, it’s pretty easy to put together. In fact, you might have all the necessary, basic supplies in your home and garage right now.

Putting the vehicle 72 hour kit together

To get started on your own Vehicle 72 Hour Kit, you’ll need some type of container that will fit in the back of your  minivan, SUV, or in the trunk of your car. I chose a Rubbermaid clear plastic bin, the type that is designed to fit under beds. It’s the perfect width for our vehicle, and I like the fact that I can see what’s inside. It also holds a lot.

The typical 72 Hour Kit, also sometimes called a Bug-Out Bag, is stored at home and ready to grab as you run out the door in case of an evacuation. Since we’re building a Kit for the vehicle, we want it filled with items we’ll need if stranded somewhere. If you have more than one vehicle in the family, make a kit for the one you use most often and then add kits to the other vehicles as you have the time, supplies, and money.

You can find numerous lists online of what should be in a 72 Hour Kit, but since I’m a mom, and I pretty much always have the kids with me, my own list is a little different.  A lot of these items are available online, and I’ve included links. Anything to make shopping easier, right?

Here’s what I’ve packed.

Sanitation

(With kids, you just have to start here.)

  • A 4-pack of toilet paper, flattened  (Take the center cardboard tube out to make it as flat as possible. You can put these flattened rolls in a Food Saver bag and vacuum seal for even flatter toilet paper.)
  • Baby wipes
  • Small box of tissues
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Bar of soap
  • Clorox wipes (Germs never take a vacation.)
  • A few plastic grocery bags stuffed into another grocery bag.
  • Toothbrushes and toothpaste
  • Dental floss
  • Tampons/feminine protection. A menstrual cup is a great option. You can read more here to decide if this is something you might want to try.
  • Paper towels
  • Emesis bags for unpleasant car sickness incidents. These are so much easier to use than a random trash bag or, worse, your purse.

Sustenance

(Kids will quickly panic if they think you’re out of food, but whatever you pack, make sure it’s something your kids will eat.)

  • Beef jerky or something similar
  • Trail mix
  • Shelled sunflower seeds
  • Small cans of food, such as fruit, ravioli, tuna
  • Protein bars and granola bars
  • High calorie energy bars. This article compares several different brands.  (Handle these with care. High energy may be the last thing your kids need!)
  • Hard candies (Offer a prize for whoever can make their Lifesaver last the longest!)
  • Packets for flavoring water
  • Can opener, unless all your cans have a pop-top
  • Plastic forks, spoons and knives, one set per person. I like this set of sporks from Amazon.

Entertainment

(After everyone has eaten and gone to the bathroom, then what??)

  • A read-aloud book  (Should be something entertaining for the whole family with plenty of chapters. I packed Journey to the Center of the Earth and Charlotte’s Web.)
  • Small Bible  (This is more for my own sanity than that of the kids!)
  • Paper and pens/pencils
  • Deck of cards  (Think “War”, “Go Fish” and math flashcards. If you’re stranded for very long, your kids will invent their own games!)
  • Single-use digital camera  (Not only good for entertainment, but it might come in handy to document your emergency situation.)
  • Small binoculars
  • Sharpie  (Drawing fake mustaches on each other should keep the kids busy for a couple of minutes (make sure it’s a WASHABLE Sharpie!), and you’ll be grateful for this if you have to leave a note on your vehicle.)
  • Glo-sticks  (Great value:  entertainment and emergency light in one!)
  • Ibuprofen  (For me.)
  • Ear plugs  (Again, for me.)

Hard-Core Survival

  • Emergency blankets. These have multiple uses.
  • Fleece blankets  (Cheapest way to get these?  Buy two yards of any fleece print at a fabric store.  Instant blanket. Bulky, but can be stowed beneath a seat.)
  • Light sources  (Headlamps are worth their weight in gold, but also have a traditional flashlight or two.  These can be stored in a glove compartment or other niche in your vehicle.)
  • The Luci light. My current favorite solar lantern because not only does it charge quickly using sunlight, but it collapses to a thin disk, which is very easy to pack.
  • Rain ponchos
  • Duct tape
  • Hand and foot warmers  (Small, stashable)
  • Rope  (Check out paracord for top quality and versatility.)
  • Knife  (A cheapie pocket knife is better than nothing, but you’ll be grateful if you pack something sturdier.)
  • Battery/solar-powered emergency radio in case your car battery dies
  • Ground cover (I packed two large heavy-duty plastic tablecloths purchased at a dollar store.)
  • Work gloves
  • Extra batteries for anything battery powered in your Kit
  • Umbrella
  • Waterproof matches
  • Whistle
  • Water purification tablets
  • Small portable water filter
  • Mirror for signaling — this one comes with a whistle
  • Small, sturdy shovel  (Check out a collapsible shovel if space is tight.)
  • Two heavy duty black trash bags

Medical Emergencies

(With kids, need I say more?)

  • Basic First Aid Kit from Wal-Mart, price $9
  • Children’s pain relief medication and dispenser
  • Adult pain relief medication. Read more about pain relief choices in this article.
  • QuickClot (This product quickly stops bleeding in the case of a serious wound.)
  • Benadryl
  • Aspirin
  • Small bottle of bleach to use for water purification and sanitize medical supplies
  • Thermometer
  • Sunblock
  • Medical gloves and face masks
  • Tweezers
  • First Aid reference book. I own this one by Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy and this book by the Survival Doctor.
  • Super glue
  • Additional medical supplies according to the needs of your family, e.g. inhaler, a few doses of prescription meds

Miscellaneous

  • Ziploc-style bags  (Just store some of your items in different sized bags so you’ll have them already packed.)
  • Rubber bands
  • A bungee cord or two
  • A cell phone charger, unless you know that you know there’s one elsewhere in the car.
  • A charged battery pack for your small electronics
  • Comb/hairbrush
  • Small scissors
  • Sewing kit
  • Cloth sheet
  • A couple of compact nylon bags and a nylon backpack  (If we have to leave our vehicle, we’ll need something for carrying our supplies.)
  • Money in small bills, along with plenty of change  (If nothing else, this will help greatly with bribing your children to be nice to each other!)

In addition to storing things in the plastic bin, I took a long, hard look at the Tahoe to find other nooks and crannies where I could put additional supplies. A large city map book, along with maps of neighboring states, is in a back seat pocket, and there are two Gymboree baby blankets and a couple of beach towels rolled up and stored beneath the back seat.

I also have several 2-liter bottles filled with water stashed beneath the back seat. I’m not so sure the water/plastic bottle/heat is a good combination, so when we leave the house, I always make sure we have a handful of fresh water bottles with us. However, if the stored water was all we had, we’d drink it until we could get fresh water. Even if we don’t drink the stored water, it can be used for washing grubby hands and faces.

It’s recommended to have a gallon of water on hand per person, per day. It would be pretty difficult to keep that much water stored in your vehicle.   One option, in addition to the 2-liter bottles, is a 5-gallon collapsible water bottle or two. My family has used the inexpensive Coghlan brand for years and recommend it.

What about a change of clothing for each person? It depends on how much space you have in your Kit and in your vehicle, but a clean shirt, pants, underwear and socks shouldn’t take up too much space. If you have Space Bags, a Food Saver, or something similar, clothing and items like the fleece blankets will take up even less room and can be stored beneath the back seat.

For warmth in extreme cold condition, check out this homemade heater demonstrated by Erich over at Tactical Intelligence.  If you use this, be sure to roll down a window for ventilation. This article contains many more ideas for surviving cold weatherif you are ever stranded in your vehicle.

Finally, not to be a fear-monger, but there’s always the chance you’ll be stranded far from any bathroom facilities. A 5 or 6 gallon bucket, equipped with a portable potty lid is a big improvement over squatting by the side of the road.  Be sure to include toilet bags and there are even chemicals to have on hand that keep the odors down.

You’ll be surprised by how quickly your own Kit comes together once you get started.  I was able to finish mine in just a day or two.  I actually had most everything on hand already.  You may never need this Vehicle 72 Hour Kit, but I’ll bet it will bring you and your family peace of mind just knowing it’s there.

Get the printable list!

Click here to get a printable list for your own Vehicle 72 Hour Kit!

vehicle 72 hour kit

 

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Preparing for the Worst: Emergency Checklist

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H. Davis

Imagine waking up in the middle of the night hearing emergency sirens. In confusion, you get out of bed and peek out the window. You don’t see anything and brush it off as an emergency that’s taking place far away from the comfort of your home. So, you climb back in bed and boom! Your eyes open wide in disbelief as you start to feel your home move from side-to-side vigorously. The kids start to scream in panic, and you jump to your feet rushing to their bedrooms, grabbing them one-by-one. As you try to find a safe place for you and your kids to hide in your home, the residue from the ceiling starts to fall. To make matters worse, the windows begin to crack, and light structures outside of your home have gone out, leaving the neighborhood in complete darkness.

 

Aside from being woken up from your sleep in a panic, phone towers are down, so it’s nearly impossible to call for assistance. You finally manage to collect your thoughts and realize that this is an earthquake, a big one at that. Perhaps the worst part, however, is that you never thought this day would come, which is exactly why you never took the time to prepare for this natural disaster.

 

The truth is, we should all prepare for emergencies, especially families. Which is why creating a family emergency kit is essential to a successful emergency preparedness plan. Despite being highly emphasized by multiple organizations, most of us would agree that our homes aren’t equipped enough to survive a disaster; and because of this, people could suffer catastrophic losses and be totally blindsided by an unexpected earthquake, flood, hurricane, tornado, or man-made disaster.

 

Preparing for the Worst & Creating a Family Emergency Plan

 

Sign Yourself Up for Emergency Alerts: Although this would have been difficult task three decades ago, technology has made it a lot easier for us to prepare for disasters. This is due to the fact that technology has helped pave a way for users to communicate with one another easily and globally. Platforms like social media, the news, television, and blog post, are all great ways you can stay up to date before, during, and after a disaster strikes near you. Furthermore, public safety officials will also do their part in keeping you and your family up to date, alerting everyone when it’s safe to return home, and when it’s safe for residents to evacuate. You can typically count on constant news being reported every 3 to 5 minutes, depending on how serious the situation is.

 

Build a Kit & Know How to Properly Use It: According to Power Scout, the average daily electricity consumption of an American household is approximately 30 kilowatt-hours (kWh). Which means if your family’s left without power after a disaster and you aren’t prepared, trying to find an alternative power source likely won’t happen.

 

So, you see, being prepared for a disaster means having all the right tools near you just in case of an unexpected emergency. That’s why it’s important to keep your emergency supplies in an easy-to-carry supply kit. One that allows you and your family to use it at home or on the road in case you’re forced to leave the comfort of your living environment. The question, however, is “What all should be in an emergency kit?” and truthfully, it varies depending on the size of the family, special needs, accessibility and/or resources.

 

Generally speaking, though, a supply kit should have the following:

 

  • Flashlight
  • Water
  • Canned food
  • Medical supplies (Like extra asthma pump inhalers, bandages, alcohol wipes etc.).
  • Cash
  • Birth certificates, passports, and social security cards.
  • Radio
  • Games & fun activities

 

Make Sure Your Kids Are Well Informed: As parents, teachers, child caregivers, friends, and neighbors, you hope emergencies and disasters never happen, especially around little ones. But trying to shelter children from the world during a disaster could do more harm than good.

 

When it comes to natural disasters like earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, and wildfires, it’s important to remember that children handle each situation differently. In other words, they’re much more likely to get sick or injured during a disaster like earthquakes. Their bodies are smaller, thinner, and much more fragile, making them more susceptible to bodily harm after a disaster than most adults. That’s why it’s important to communicate to your child, and let them know what’s going in the world around them.

 

Take Emergency Training Classes (If Possible): Right now there are countless nurses out there in the world who are responding to crisis situations around the world. But what if there isn’t a nurse near you after an unexpected emergency? Well, that’s when your parenting expertise kicks in. Every parent fears the unknown when it comes to their child. That’s why being able to identify and treat certain injuries, symptoms, and markings is vital. Remember, kids don’t like to stay put and enjoy roaming around, even after a disaster hit. They’re essentially fearless, which means that they can come in contact with something deadly and think nothing of it. However, knowing how to treat minor injuries, and how to prepare your child for the world around them can make a difference in their judgment. If possible, consider getting CPR & First Aid certified.

 

In the end, you should include your neighbors and other relatives in your disaster plans. Let them all know what you’re doing to keep your family safe and show them certain designated meeting locations just in case communication fails and of course, encourage them to design their own plans. No matter what the emergency may be, it’s better to be an overachiever than underprepared.

 

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Thanks for the read! Did I miss anything important? What are some other important factors that go into family emergency preparedness? Feel free to leave a comment below.

Davis enjoys exploring the outdoors. If you can’t find him online, you might be able to catch him at the gym or watching sports (Go, Broncos!). Follow him on Twitter at @Davis241. Thanks!

Guest Author’s Website

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Multirole Armored Robot for Infantry Announced by BAE Systems

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Multirole Armored Robot for Infantry Announced by BAE Systems The age of robots is upon us. It didn’t come with a bang and it didn’t bring hordes of gun totting terminators to our ranks. Still, there is no denying that the age of robots is here. This article is just another example of how these robots …

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4 Quick Ways To Store A 3-Day Emergency Supply Of Water

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4 Quick Ways To Store A 3-Day Emergency Supply Of Water

What are your first steps when you hear that a storm is coming? Whether it’s a hurricane or a blizzard, do you have a supply of water available in the event that a storm knocks out the power or flooding contaminates your water source?

Even if you are fortunate enough to have your own water source, such as a well, it’s likely to run on an electric pump rather than gravity or a non-electric power source. Municipal water supplies also depend on power and supplies that may be affected by severe weather.

Each person needs a minimum of a gallon of water per day. Half, or two quarts of that gallon, are for drinking and the other half for cooking and personal hygiene. If you are active, working hard, or the weather is hot, you most likely need another two quarts of drinking water per person, for a total of one gallon just for drinking.

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However, this amount of water doesn’t really allow for additional basic water needs, like washing dishes or flushing the toilet. Realistically, you are very likely to want a bit more water to effectively clean, to supply water to your pets, or to be able to use a bucket of water to flush a toilet, for example. You need to store as much water as you can, and you need to be able to quickly do so before a storm or event knocks out or contaminates your water supply.

The Checklist

First, fill your mop pail with water to flush toilets. Total time: 2 minutes. Estimated gallons depends on the size of your pail: 2-5 gallons.

Second, fill your bathtub with water. We’d tell you to fill this first, but that makes filling any mop pail more difficult. Bathtub water can also be used to flush toilets and wash hands, and for cooking of drinking IF boiled for three minutes. (We do hope you keep your tub pretty clean, and if you don’t this is a good reason to start, right?). Total time: 5 minutes. Estimated gallons stored: 25 gallons for a standard size tub and up to 100 for larger tubs.

4 Quick Ways To Store A 3-Day Emergency Supply Of Water

Image source: Pixabay.com

Third, move to the kitchen and fill your largest clean and lidded pots with water. Kitchen pots provide a safe way of temporarily storing drinking water, as well as water you can use for cooking. Go for your largest pots, the stock pots and stew pots. Do you preserve by canning food? Haul out the hot water bath canning kettle, which should be big enough to hold four or five gallons. Total time: 3 minutes. Estimated gallons stored: 5 gallons.

Fourth, while still in the kitchen, fill one-gallon plastic storage or freezer bags with water and close them securely. Place them one at a time lined up vertically into a lasagna or baking pan (as if they were lined up like books on a shelf) and place them in your freezer, if possible. These plastic storage bags filled with water will freeze if given enough time. Frozen water will keep your freezer colder longer, and when thawed supply drinking water. Once frozen, they can be moved to the fridge to keep it cooler longer if needed, as well. Total time: 5 minutes. Estimated gallons stored: 10 gallons.

Total time: 15 minutes

Total gallons stored: 42-45 gallons (and even more if your tub is larger than standard size).

If each person uses a bare minimum of 1.5 gallons a day, your stored water of 42 gallons might actually supply enough water to survive for three days for up to nine people. That sounds like very little water for too many people, doesn’t it? While one or one and a half gallons a day per person may allow you to survive, you’re going to want to use more water per person in an emergency, even if that cuts the length your water supply will last.

Realistically, 42 gallons should be enough water to last three days for an average American family for drinking, personal hygiene, cooking, pets and flushing toilets. Also, you always want a portable water filter that will allow you to drink lake or river water (or even your bathtub water if it’s dirty).

Have a bit more time? Here are a few more ways to store water:

Look for 5-gallon pails around the house and clean and fill those. It would be smart to have a clean stack of lidded 5-gallon buckets in the pantry, garage or cellar available to fill with water if you are planning ahead. Look for food-grade buckets, or ask the local bakery for their used frosting and baking mix pails.

If you have more than one bathroom, take another five minutes to fill tubs in other bathrooms.

Scrub out a kitchen sink and fill the sink with water, but think twice if you only have a one-bowl sink, since you may need that sink to prepare food or wash items.

Fill your ice cube trays. You may need ice, not necessarily for cold drinks, but ice cubes or even a pack of frozen peas may come in handy for minor injuries. If your house is anything like mine, the ice cube trays are never entirely full.

Fill a top-loading washer for an extra supply of water to flush toilets or cook with. You may need a short length of hose as a siphon or a cup to measure out water into a pail.

What advice would you add? Share your tips in the section below:

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AMERICA’S NON-EXISTENT CULTURE OF PREPAREDNESS

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We absolutely agree with Federal Emergency Management Administrator (FEMA) Brock Long on America’s lack of and need for a real culture of preparedness. If you’re interested in learning more about how to develop a preparedness plan for you and your family we would love to help.

www.practicaltactical4you.com

Practical Tactical

Emergency Management: How Technology Can Impact the Way We Prepare for Disasters

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Emergency Management: How Technology Can Impact the Way We Prepare for Disasters By H. Davis Technology is starting to dominate many aspects of the emergency planning profession. This is particularly true during a disaster response. Since the dawn of man, there have been countless natural disasters responsible for taking lives and causing chaos throughout cities. … Continue reading Emergency Management: How Technology Can Impact the Way We Prepare for Disasters

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Wound Care Essentials!

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Wound Care Essentials Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Audio player below! Are you ready to act as your own emergency medic if you needed to? Even if you have taken a first aid certification class for work, you’re not really prepared for much beyond put pressure on the wound and call 911. But, what if … Continue reading Wound Care Essentials!

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10 Ways to Catch Fish in an Emergency

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10 Ways to Catch Fish in an Emergency Unwanted times can hit you at any time in the world. There are many cases where outdoorsmen faced the survival issues and they were unable to find the aid and their supplies also finished like water and food. We always pray that these incidents should not happen … Continue reading 10 Ways to Catch Fish in an Emergency

The post 10 Ways to Catch Fish in an Emergency appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

PREPARED. SPARED. SHARE.

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If you’re into preparedness, odds are you take a long(er) range view of world events than most, in preparation for a day when some disaster will darken your door in hopes of mitigating the impacts from said disaster on your family and friends.

But what about when you’re fortunate enough to be spared by disaster?  Do you just sit on your supplies and be thankful you were spared.  Or do you take a more sinister and darker view, growing paranoid assuming it’s just a matter of time and figure not having to use your supplies this time around just means you’re farther along in your preps for the next time disaster comes knocking?

Courtesy NBC News

 

Well, there is another option you may not have considered.  We have always said that being prepared puts you ahead of the game in most instances and this fact can prove beneficial in a number of ways.  Not only will you and your family suffer less from the impacts of any disaster, but by preparing you put yourself in position to possibly help others.  In turn, this will help community response efforts by taking some of the pressure off the system.

ROCKPORT, TX – AUGUST 26: Jessica Campbell hugs Jonathan Fitzgerald (L-R) after riding out Hurricane Harvey in an apartment on August 26, 2017 in Rockport, Texas. Jessica said is became very scary once Hurricane Harvey hit their town. Harvey made landfall shortly after 11 p.m. Friday, just north of Port Aransas as a Category 4 storm and is being reported as the strongest hurricane to hit the United States since Wilma in 2005. Forecasts call for as much as 30 inches of rain to fall by next Wednesday. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

 

One immediate action step you can take post disaster is to help strengthen your community’s resilience by choosing to share some of your supplies to help those in need that were not fortunate enough to be spared by the storm.  Do not fear violating your personal OPSEC (operational security) by stepping up to help others.  This can easily be done anonymously through community agencies such as churches or local governments.

Courtesy IBTimes UK

 

Rotating supplies is a must (FIFO) when you store preparedness supplies, especially food goods.  The easiest way to work through your stores is simply to rotate them into your everyday routine when everything is normal. This concept works for all of your supplies, but especially when it comes to food stuffs.  When a disaster rolls through your area, but you are not directly impacted, you have a tremendous opportunity to bless others by passing along a few of the supplies that you have been blessed enough to have had the opportunity to acquire ahead of time.

The easiest way to implement this positive action step is simply find some of the oldest items in your stored food supplies (and/or other goods if you choose) that you haven’t worked into your everyday meal plan and pull them out.  If possible, you may want to take just a moment to balance your gift with a little variety, but anything you can afford to spare will be a tremendous benefit to the recipient and will be very much appreciated.

Heroes do not always wear a uniform.  They reveal themselves in times of emergency and the reality is they come in all shapes and sizes.  We often call these unseen heroes Nation Makers.  People that saw a need in their community and have taken it upon themselves to do something and help to make the world, no matter how broken and lost, the type of world they want to see.

This is not a new concept, but rather a reminder of an option you may not have considered.  In fact, we have seen it recently following Hurricane Harvey’s disastrous impacts in Houston, Texas and all along the Gulf coast.  Here is a post I saw on Facebook in the days immediately after the category 4 storm made landfall:

 

This is just one example of a scene I am certain played out in many other prepper homes following that storm, and every other disaster too.  It shows the best of what the preparedness community can be in an emergency.

Despite what you may be told by the generic media or led to believe on internet forums, most preparedness minded folks do not view the world as a zero sum game and are not all just out for themselves.  We are normal people with big hearts that care about our families and our fellow citizens.

In a world where you do not have to look far to find the impacts of disaster or feel the anxiety and fear of crisis, there is no shortage of opportunities to step up and help someone.  If you are fortunate enough to be able to secure a comfortable level of preparedness for yourself and your family, I want to encourage you to reach out to help someone in need the next time disaster strikes your community.  In doing so you may find that you can increase your spheres of influence and maybe even introduce someone else to the idea of personal preparedness.  Who knows?  Down the road, they may be the one in position to help another person or family after the storm and in the end, we will all be better because of it.

If you want to better understand my thoughts on personal preparedness, please check out my books HERE and HERE, or wander deeper into this blog.  I hope this website will help you along your way, especially if you’re just getting started.  Keep up with everything Practical Tactical by subscribing to our mailing list and be sure to LIKE, SHARE and FOLLOW us across all of our social media platforms as well.

 

 

3 Essentials To Your Family Emergency Plan

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Preparation Planning 3 Essentials To Your Family Emergency Plan

You never know when an emergency situation may occur. According to FEMA, 80% of Americans live in a location that has been impacted by a disaster related to weather. However, you can do your best now to plan for as many types of disasters as possible. While there are several different components to an emergency plan, let’s take a look at a few universal items that everyone needs to be ready for the worst.

 

Make Sure That You Can Communicate

It is critical that you have the means to communicate with your family members in the event of a fire, flood or other emergency. Therefore, you should have a cell phone that is fully charged and has plenty of minutes on it. You may also want to have a set of walkie-talkies available in case the cell tower in your area is destroyed and calls cannot be made. Prepaid phone cards may also be ideal in the event that you have to make or receive calls from a public phone.

 

There Should Be A Designated Safe Zone

In the event of an emergency, there isn’t a lot of time to think about what it takes to get to safety. Therefore, you want to have a designated safe place where everyone can go to ride out the storm or until the fire can be put out. This could be a neighbor’s house, a relative’s house or a public place like a grocery store or bank that is easy to get to. As part of the plan, everyone should wait there until all family members are accounted for or until rescued by emergency personnel.

 

Make Use Of Your Medical Training

As part of an emergency plan, you should have some sort of first aid kit that can be used to heal cuts, scrapes or other minor wounds. However, it is also critical that you have the training necessary to treat injuries properly and safely. One way to improve your odds during an emergency situation is to receive basic first aid training. Training courses may be offered for free or at a discount, and they will also help you learn what to do in the event that trying to help on your own may actually make things worse. If you enjoy the healthcare world, you may also consider receiving additional medical training. Not only could it end up being a rewarding career, like a doctorate of nursing practice, but the additional lifelong skills you would gain would be invaluable.

 

There is nothing scarier than being put in a situation where you or your loved ones are in danger of being hurt or killed. However, with good preparation today, you may be able to take steps during a crisis to get yourself and your family out of harm’s way.

Guest Author’s Website

The post 3 Essentials To Your Family Emergency Plan appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Empty shelves

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What is the first thing to disappear off the shelves in an emergency? Water, that is the main thing I heard people on the news saying, everyone was out of water, and of course food is close behind of the things that will be stripped from the shelves. Fuel, batteries, paper plates and other things that don’t require washing. I have said it again and again, don’t wait until the emergency is on your doorstep to begin to prep, be ready long before that storm, hurricane, power outage or whatever might occur. It’s not a matter of IF, it’s a matter of WHEN, these things will happen and you can either be the folks standing in long lines, possibly leaving empty handed, or you can be the smart people who are ready for whatever may come.

It’s so much easier to prep ahead of time, you can do it little by little each week or payday, rather than worrying about how much money you will have to spend, that is IF the water, food and fuel are even available, you will be sitting at home, safe with your family, ready to ride out whatever is coming.

This is something I will never understand, people who live on the coast, they KNOW that each year there are possibilities of storms, hurricanes, cyclones, tropical storms, and yet when it happens, the news is full of stories of empty shelves at the grocery stores, long lines, running out of fuel at the gas stations, the hardware stores running out of plywood sheets to cover windows… this goes for people living in other areas that are prone to natural disasters, earthquakes, wildfires, storms, up north where they can get deep snow and ice, anyone who lives in a place that can have weather that can cause power outages or prevent you from getting out.

Even if you are on the thinnest of budgets, you can buy a few extra cans of food, things that don’t require heating, buy an inexpensive MANUAL can opener and make sure it works properly. You can buy up one or two gallons of water a week or payday, those only cost a dollar or so each, you don’t have to get the expensive H2O, get the cheapest you can find and stash it away. Buy up some cheap paper plates and plastic eating utensils, some wet wipes and hand sanitizer. Don’t forget about your pets, a few extra cans of food will not break the bank.

Try to have some comfort food, snacks that do not require refrigeration or heating. If you have children, it’s a good idea to have a few coloring books and crayons or colored pencils to help keep them occupied. Also you can invest in some board games, chess, checkers, Life, whatever you like, you can find these inexpensively in the dollar stores.

Depending on the time of the year, you will need to keep warm or cool, warm clothes and blankets will get you through a cold snap, if it’s summer, you will just have to open the windows (if you can), or sit outside, have some clean spray bottles filled with water to mist yourself and hand fans will help keep you cool until the power comes back on.

The important thing here is to have all or most of these things BEFORE the emergency hits. I sincerely hope everyone down in southern Texas on the coast and the other states on the gulf coast get through this OK, hopefully folks will learn from this and not be caught off guard next time.

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Should I Bug In or Out

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Should I Bug In or Out. Bob Hawkins “The APN Report“ Audio player provided! That statement is actually too simple to be accurate, there’s way too many variables that weigh in, but the gist of it rings true… If given a choice of bugging out or bugging in, I’d bug in, knowing I should go. … Continue reading Should I Bug In or Out

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20 Roadside Emergency Items You Better Store Your Car’s Trunk  

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20 Essential Emergency Items You Better Store Your Car’s Trunk  The trunk of my car is an amazing place. In it, you can find tools and equipment to deal with a variety of situations.

Most of what is there can and has helped me out in an emergency; but pretty much all of it has helped someone else, too, when they were facing problems of their own. I have found that helping others in a time of need is a great opportunity to share the message of preparedness and convert them to our way of looking at things.

I need to mention here that this is different than just being prepared to be caught in a blizzard, which I’ve written about previously. While many of the items overlap, there are things in my trunk which have nothing to do with surviving a blizzard. Besides, where I live, a blizzard could only happen if God gave us one by His miraculous power.

Goofy Gadget Can Recharge Your Laptop — And Jump-Start Your Car!

So, what sorts of things can be found in my trunk?

  1. Tools – While not huge, I have a fairly complete mechanics tool kit in the car. There are always situations where your car or the car of another needs to be repaired.
  2. Hose repair kit – While not the best repair kit in the world, this splicing kit will get you back on the road again if you have a hose that pops.
  3. Emergency belt kit – Once again, this isn’t the best repair going, but there’s a kit you can buy which allows you to put links together and make a belt of any length. While originally intended for V-belts, it works for multi-V, as well.
  4. Water (2 gallons) – Both for drinking and for overheated cars.
  5. Radiator seal – For the obvious reason.
  6. Oil, brake fluid and power steering fluid – Again, for the obvious reasons.
  7. Toilet paper – A life essential. It’s amazing how many times someone is caught in the middle of nowhere, without a bathroom in miles.
  8. Paper towels – Not quite as useful as TP, but a close second.
  9. Emergency food – High-energy bars, nuts and even some canned goods for emergency meals. If you find someone who is stranded, they’ll be hungry, as well.
  10. Blanket – For keeping them warm and dealing with shock. I have an old wool army blanket I use. Being wool, it still retains some insulating value, even when wet.
  11. Firstaid trauma kit – I carry a rather extensive first-aid kit, with enough in it to take care of fairly serious wounds. Car accidents, as well as accidents in the woods, generally require more than just an adhesive bandage. I have a tourniquet, large bandages and even butterfly closures as part of this kit. The water I carry is pure enough for irrigating a wound.
  12. Personal survival kit – My personal (large) EDC kit, which doubles as both a survival kit and a get-home bag, is always in the car. It also contains a number of useful items for everyday needs, ranging from a spork, through a rain poncho to a phone charger.
  13. Jumper cables – No matter how sophisticated cars get, these are still needed.
  14. Tow strap – For towing a vehicle off the highway or to the nearest service station.
  15. Flares and an emergency triangle – It’s always safer to let people know that there’s a reason why you’re pulled over to the side of the road.
  16. Rope and bungee cords – For my own use or the use of others.
  17. Duct tape – What emergency kit is complete without duct tape?
  18. Tire inflator and compressor – Few people’s spare tires actually have enough air in them.
  19. A good hydraulic jack – I don’t know about you, but I don’t trust those scissors jacks, and if you’ve never greased them, they’re hard to work with.
  20. Fire extinguisher – I haven’t needed this often, but when you need one, you need one.

As you can see, this list is rather extensive. Some of those items are actually kits that are sizeable in and of themselves, containing a number of items. All told, the contents of my trunk give me the capability of dealing with a variety of situations, as well as taking care of myself and my car, should the need arise.

I’d like to reiterate that just about everything in my trunk has been used multiple times. Life just seems to hand us a lot of situations which go beyond what would be considered “normal.” As we all know, being ready for these situations requires going beyond what others do. Carrying along some emergency equipment in my car is a small price to pay, for the security it gives me.

Oh, and, all that equipment fits in the space under the back shelf, leaving the majority of my trunk open for carrying food home from the supermarket or materials home from the hardware store. I can even fold the backseat down and carry lumber home, just by moving one box to the side. So, I’m really not losing anything by carrying all that along with me.

What items would you add to our list? Share your tips in the section below:

Melting Ice Cap Threatens To Release Trapped Ancient Viruses

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It’s official: scientists warn that we now are facing a pandemic SHTF. The deadly, frozen pathogens that have been sleeping for millions of years under the Arctic ice and deep

The post Melting Ice Cap Threatens To Release Trapped Ancient Viruses appeared first on Ask a Prepper.

Herbal First Aid Kit part 2

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Herbal First Aid Kit part 2 Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Audio player at bottom of this post! This is a “part two” of last week’s show on first aid kits. Last week’s guest, Chuck Hudson, had a lot of great resources (as he always does) for both ready-made first aid kits, as well as … Continue reading Herbal First Aid Kit part 2

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What Bushcraft Can Teach You about Surviving Emergencies

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What Bushcraft Can Teach You about Surviving Emergencies Pine needle tea, cooking potatoes in aluminum foil over hot coals, using the bow drill method… all of these sound exciting for those looking to get into bushcraft. But little do they know that these types of experiences can teach them some very important lessons about surviving … Continue reading What Bushcraft Can Teach You about Surviving Emergencies

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Emergency Communications

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Emergency Communications Ray Becker “Renaissance Man” Audio player provided! Way back when our prepping community was developing on YouTube, I had identified an important subject; Communications. In a grid down scenario or some other emergency, being able to communicate or at least listen, would be vital for information, Intel and would be a huge psychological … Continue reading Emergency Communications

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8 Alternative Ways to Cook without Power!

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8 Alternative Ways to Cook without Power Whether stranded in the wilderness by accident, or relaxing at your campsite on a weekend getaway, hunger will come calling – and without traditional cooking instruments or appliances readily accessible, keeping your party fed means trying new methods of cooking. Don’t wait to experiment in the woods; review … Continue reading 8 Alternative Ways to Cook without Power!

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Emergency Cell Phone For Bug Out Bag or Car Kit

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Emergency Cell Phone For Bug Out Bag or Car Kit Freed from the need of power outlets, you can use the amazing AA battery-powered SpareOne anywhere within range of a GSM cell tower. Even without a SIM card, SpareOne has one-button emergency dialing (911, etc.), and can be geo-located in an emergency. Waterproof bag is floatable and …

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How To Find Fresh Water When There’s Seemingly None Around

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How To Find Fresh Water When There’s Seemingly None Around

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All living creatures require water in order to survive. In fact, scientists who search for extraterrestrial life beyond our solar system consider the presence of liquid water to be an essential criterion for the possible presence of life on other planets.

Humans can survive weeks without food, but they only can survive about three days without water! Although many parts of the U.S. are blessed with an abundance of fresh, drinkable, surface water, there are many arid regions where this essential element of life is far more difficult to find. Thus, the ability to find fresh, drinkable water while adventuring in the wilderness is an essential skill.

The step to finding fresh water in the wilderness is to obtain, carry and learn how to read a topographic map; this handy tool will not only display the details of the terrain you are traveling in, but is also will reveal any sources of fresh water in the area. Thus, leaning to determine your approximate position on the map by using the surrounding terrain features is of paramount importance, because doing so will enable you to decide which direction you need to travel to reach water sources on your map.

How To Find Fresh Water When There’s Seemingly None Around

Image source: Pixabay.com

Of course, water always flows downhill, so you should always look for creeks, rivers, ponds and lakes in the valleys between mountains and in the lowest-lying areas in flatter terrain. Another trick for obtaining water in wooded terrain is either to dig up the roots or cut the branches from trees; then, cut them into short sections and stand them up vertically in some sort of pan or trough to allow the water to seep from them. In fact, some trees and vines contain a considerable amount of fresh water. Using this method can be very productive if the right plants are chosen.

The Life-Saving Water Filter That Purifies River Water!

But in more arid regions, surface water is often difficult or even impossible to find. If in such a location, you should look for the presence of water-loving plants and trees such as birches, alders, cottonwoods and willows, since these are good indications of subsurface water sources. Also, another good place to look for subsurface water sources in arid regions is in the outside of a bend in a dry creek bed. Thus, by digging a hole or ditch in these areas and allowing the water to seep into them from below ground, you often can obtain drinkable water in areas where there are no sources of surface water.

Yet another method for obtaining fresh water in arid terrain is to build a “solar still” by first digging a hole in the ground deep enough to encounter moist soil and then placing a catch basin such as a cup in the bottom of the hole before covering it with a sheet of plastic, such as a garbage bag; then, secure the sheet with rocks to hold it in place. After that, place a small rock on top of the plastic sheet, directly above the catch basin, so that as the water condenses on the underside of the plastic sheet, it will then run downhill and drip into the catch basin.

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If this isn’t possible and you’re traveling in barren, rocky terrain, then the best place to look for water is in depressions, caves or crevices in the rock, where water can accumulate. Last but not least, you can sometimes use animals to find sources of fresh drinking water. For instance, some animal species, such as grazing animals and especially feral or wild pigs, never stray far from a source of fresh drinking water since they require large amounts of this precious resource to digest their food. In addition, many species of birds, such as pigeons and mourning doves, always visit fresh water sources after leaving their roosts in the morning and before returning to their roosts in the evening. By noting their direction of flight during these times of day and following them, you can find fresh water.

It should be noted that even the clearest mountain streams often contain harmful bacteria, and you should always carry some means of purifying any fresh water source. However, if such tools are unavailable, you can construct a crude water filter by pouring it through charcoal from a fire and then purifying it by boiling it.

What advice would you add on finding drinking water? Share your thoughts in the section below:

When Grocery Stores Go Empty, These Four Foods Will Help You Survive

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The only thing preppers fear more than masses of unprepared people during an emergency, is being one of those people. That’s why our ultimate nightmare scenario would be not having any non-perishable food on hand during a serious disaster. However, there’s plenty of reasons why an otherwise prepared person might not be prepared when the SHTF.

You could be out-of-town or out of the country, visiting family members who aren’t preppers. Or perhaps you’re having financial problems. So maybe you’ve had to dip into your food supply, or if you prefer buying canned food over freeze-dried food, you haven’t been able to restock items that have spoiled. Or perhaps you’re new to prepping, and you haven’t gotten around to building up a food supply.

Whatever the case may be, you should ask yourself, what would you do if you were one of those people who race to the grocery store at the last-minute during a disaster? Before you answer that, you have to consider the very real possibility that by the time you reach the grocery store, the shelves will be at least partially stripped.

The first food items that will sell out mostly consist of things that are already cooked or prepared in some way, including canned foods, frozen dishes, and bread. Fresh meat and eggs would also disappear pretty fast, despite the fact that they need to be cooked.

Ideally, you want to avoid this scenario altogether by prepping beforehand. In The Prepper’s Cookbook, Tess Pennington highlights key strategies for building an emergency pantry. This takes planning, so if you haven’t already done so, start today. Ideally, you want to store shelf stable foods that your family normally consumes, as well as find foods that are multi-dynamic and serve many purposes. These are the 25 foods she suggests that preppers should have in their pantries.

Have a Back-Up Plan For the Grocery Store

If you end up having to rush to the grocery store during an emergency, you should be prepared to employ a different strategy for finding food. If, when you arrive at the store, there are already a lot of people grabbing the low hanging fruit like canned foods, bread, etc., don’t join them. You’re probably only going to find the scraps that they haven’t gotten to yet. Instead, move immediately towards the food items that won’t disappear as quickly, and can substitute the foods that everyone is going to fight over first.

To employ this strategy properly, you only need one thing. Something to cook with that doesn’t require the grid, such as a camp stove with a few fuel canisters. You’ll need something like that, because many of the food items that disappear later in the game, tend to need some preparation.

These Four Emergency Food Alternatives Can Keep You Alive

So with that said, what kinds of foods should you go after when you arrive at a grocery store later than everyone else?

  • Instead of bread, go straight for the flour. Don’t worry if you can’t find any yeast. You can always make hardtack, tortillas or naan. You might also find that the sacks of dried rice and beans won’t disappear until after the canned foods go. When combined, these two make a complete protein and are perfect for emergency food meals. Keep cooking times in mind with the beans and go for small beans like navy or lentils.
  • If you find that the produce section is stripped bare, go to the supplement aisle instead. There you’ll find all of the vitamins and minerals that are normally found in fresh produce. Look for food based or whole food vitamins. You’ll also find protein powders that can at least partially substitute fresh meat. As well, look for seeds to sprout. Sprouts provide the highest amount of vitamins, minerals, proteins and enzymes of any of food per unit of calorie. Enzymes are essential because they heal the body, cleanse the body, prevent diseases, enhance the overall functioning of bodily organs, aids in digestion, and removes gas from the stomach.
  • If fresh meat or canned meat is gone from the shelves, a substitute for is dog food. Though this may disgust most people, desperate times call for desperate measures. It’s really cheap and packed with protein. The only downside, of course, is that pet food usually doesn’t face the same health standards as human food. If it can be helped, go for the wet food instead of the kibble. Though you’ll probably be fine eating any dog food for a couple of weeks, dry dog food isn’t as safe as wet food. Plus, the cans of wet food will be much more hydrating.
  • And finally, instead of trying to find butter, which will be one of the first food items to disappear, try looking for alternatives. Remember, you need fats in your diet. Healthy oils like coconut oil or avocado oil provide healthy nutrition and canI be used for cooking, added to coffee, oats, beverages, and other foods. In addition, one of the most nutrient dense foods that are often forgotten during emergency food planning is in the health aisle. Look for granola and nuts. Nuts are calorie dense and full of fiber to help you stay full longer. Due to the high protein count of this natural food, it can be an efficient meat replacement too. Look for non-salted nut varieties to keep you hydrated longer. It’s packed with calories and can go weeks without spoiling when it’s not refrigerated.  Read more about the ideal bug out meal plan here. Alternatively, if all the healthy oils and nuts have been taken, look for some lard. It’s sometimes labeled “manteca.” It will probably be overlooked, but has just as many calories as butter, and lasts a really long time.

Of course, many of these items aren’t the best tasting or the most healthy. They’re certainly not ideal. But then again, neither is being caught in a disaster without your food preps. If you arrive at the grocery store before everyone else, by all means, go after the good stuff. However, if you aren’t lucky enough to beat the crowds, now you know what kinds of foods you should grab first.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Fevers Post-SHTF

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Fevers Post-SHTF Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Audio in player below! What is your plan for fevers post-disaster? The scenario: no doctors and no pharmacies are available. You have no ibuprofen and no acetaminophen. Your child is sick, and the thermometer is reading 103°F. What do you do? The standard of care in the United … Continue reading Fevers Post-SHTF

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The First 24 Hours

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The First 24 Hours Forrest & Kyle “The Prepping Academy” Audio in player below! On this weeks episode of The Prepping Academy Forest and Kyle take a stab at the age old Prepper questions: when do I bug out and what happens in the first 24 hours. Let’s just say that you are in for a reality … Continue reading The First 24 Hours

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Preparing For Your Personal Disaster!

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Preparing for your personal disaster! Host: Austin Martin “Homesteady Live“ Audio in player below! Sometimes we find ourselves playing a game of “what if” in the world of homesteading and prepping. What if the grid went down or If there was another world war?  What if there was a pandemic? These games of what if can be … Continue reading Preparing For Your Personal Disaster!

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Preparing to Enjoy the Apocalypse

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Who says that the end of the world has to be boring? Before you start crying over zombies or giving up all of your earthly possessions for the rapture, here are just a few ways to make the most out of the apocalypse.

Eat Well

There are all kinds of survival and disaster books that will teach you about finding food in the wilderness. While most people assume that “foraging for food” means “chewing on squirrels,” the truth is that you can gather things like acorns, walnuts, berries, mushrooms and honeycombs for indulgent eating that wouldn’t be out of place on Chopped.

Generate Solar Power

This is a preparation that you’ll need to make in advance, but a little effort now can save you a lot of stress after civilization falls and electrical power becomes a luxury. Modern-day solar energy can be generated through everything from backpacks to floor tiles, so stock up on these goods while you still can. You might not be able to power buildings or cities, but you can at least get the microwave going again.

Listen to Music

Once you have power, it’ll be easy enough to charge your phone and re-discover your favorite songs. According to neurologists, music can have a tangible impact on brain chemistry, so it isn’t just a relaxation tool. It can promote actual, physical wellness too.

Bring Your Creature Comforts

There’s no reason to throw out your luxuries just because nuclear winter has fallen over the land. Whether it’s vape mods for recreational smoking or bubble bath for a decadent soak in the tub, there are many ways to kick back and enjoy your post-disaster life. If you keep your comforts light enough to fit into a bag, you can even transport them from wasteland to wasteland.

Play Games

Games will keep you alert and occupied during your long watches at the top of the tower as the ice-monsters march closer. Cards are a classic, of course, but you can also scavenge for puzzles, toys, crosswords, brain teasers and board games. If you’ve got solar power figured out, you might also be able to charge a hand-held video game console.

Find the Silver Lining

Has a flood swept over the tattered remains of your country? Learn how to scuba dive for hidden treasures! Have sharks joined tornadoes in an unholy matrimony of destruction? Now is your chance to practice your harpooning! There are always unexpected delights to be found in miserable scenarios, so don’t be afraid to look outside of the box and identify them.

Catch Up On Your Reading

You’ll have a lot of downtime during the apocalypse, so it’s a great opportunity to finally finish Gone Girl. Even if you weren’t a big reader before the locusts came, you’ll appreciate the rest and relaxation that a good book can bring. If nothing else, it’ll provide a sense of escapism.

Seek Out Other Survivors

Human beings are social animals. Studies have shown that our very brains have an “inherently social nature” that makes us seek out company and companionship. If you’re serious about surviving the apocalypse without becoming a grizzled and crazy-eyed loner, you’ll need to make some friends and ride out the end together.

Stay Healthy

There’s nothing like a bunch of open sores to ruin a perfectly good apocalypse. The good news is that you can stave off these injuries and illnesses with a little caution. Stay out of the sun until the machines have risen up and scorched it out of the sky, and use herbal remedies at the first sign of the uber-virus wiping out the rest of humanity.

These are just a few ways to enjoy the end of the world. Whether you’re looking to seriously prepare for a natural disaster or just construct a “fun kit” for a rainy-day zombie apocalypse, use these tips for surviving and thriving in a changed environment.

The post Preparing to Enjoy the Apocalypse appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Pack Your 72 Hour Emergency Kit by Category

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Pack Your 72 Hour Emergency Kit by Category This article is a list of the various categories that should be considered when you are building your 72 hour bag. The uses for a 72 hour bag are varied and the bag should be tailored to the specific task. Is this a camping bag, bug out …

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Could You Set Up a Post-Disaster Medical Lab?

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Could You Set Up a Post-Disaster Medical Lab? Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Audio in player below! After a disaster, we know to expect no grocery stores, no pharmacies, no running water, no electricity, and so on. Quite possibly, access to a hospital would be limited or non-existent too. Guess what every doctor and medical … Continue reading Could You Set Up a Post-Disaster Medical Lab?

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Jewelweed – the Natural Poison Ivy Remedy

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Jewelweed – the Natural Poison Ivy Remedy Knowing your plants in the wild can save your you-know-what, in more ways than one! When my son was at army cadet boot camp, his leaders put fear into their hearts about what to beware of in the woods when camping out. The leaders shared the story of …

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Preppers Medical Equipment

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Preppers Medical Equipment Highlander “Survival & Tech Preps “ Audio in player below! Well I’m back! I know it has been a while since I did a show because of a major medical problem. I will talk about this incident during this episode of Survival & Tech Preps in player below. This show will be appropriate, … Continue reading Preppers Medical Equipment

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Ask a Prepper Series: Desert Island Survival Scenario

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Ask a Prepper Series: Desert Island Survival Scenario Besides shooting the shit when we get together, we sometimes like to run through survival scenarios. One of us had caught that Tom Hanks Castaway movie showing on TV recently and another had stumbled on this online image. We pulled this up on a screen and got to …

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Interactive Bug Out Bag List

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Interactive Bug Out Bag List While you can purchase a premade bug out bag, creating a custom kit is the preferred option since it allows you to choose exactly what you want to pack in your bag. However, when assembling your kit you need to make sure not to overpack so that you remain mobile …

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7 Tips For Bugging Out Faster

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7 Tips For Bugging Out Faster If the SHTF no warning and you were forced to bug out, how long would it take you to get out of dodge? This is a very important question. You probably have lots of supplies you’d want to load into your bug out vehicle, but that takes time, and …

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Emergency Preparedness in the Big City

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Emergency Preparedness in the Big City It always pays to be prepared for an emergency situation, but sometimes being prepared for an emergency in the city can be different than being prepared for an emergency in more rural areas. Terrain is a huge factor with big cities, let alone the fact that you are in … Continue reading Emergency Preparedness in the Big City

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How To Use Zip-Ties in An Emergency Situation

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How To Use Zip-Ties in An Emergency Situation Your imagination is the key to survive an emergency situation. It doesn’t matter if you’re stranded in the woods or in the concrete jungle. Putting your mind to good use and using the items you have can save the day. Having a few simple zip-ties in your …

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Keeping Pack Weight Down If You Need To Bug-Out

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bug_out_open_roadYou’re at home one night and the power goes out.  Hackers have taken down the grid and you need to bug-out to your sister’s house a hundred and twenty miles away.  Traffic is gridlocked and no one is driving anywhere anytime soon.  You decide to bug-out on foot with your pack. Six miles down the road, you’re dying from the weight of the pack.  It feels like you’re carrying a Volkswagon on your back because you’ve got so much stuff in it. There’s a lot to be said for sticking to the basics when you build your bug-out bag.

By Jarhead Survivor, a Contributing Author of SurvivalCache and SHTFBlog

Back in the dark ages (early 1980’s) when I was in the Marine Corps, a full pack for a basic infantry man ran about sixty pounds.  That was the canvas shelter half, poles and stakes, sleeping bag, food, mess kit, clothes, etc.  Lord help you if you were the machine gunner or radio man because that added a lot more weight to what you had to carry.

Stick to Basics

bug_out_roman_legionaries_marchingI remember going on forced marches for ten or fifteen miles and suffering because of the weight.  You eventually get used to it, but I wouldn’t say I ever came to enjoy it.  I soon learned what was important and what wasn’t and ditched the excess stuff.  Apparently this has been a familiar theme through the ages because during the Civil War soldiers started out with haversacks weighing forty to fifty pounds, but soon learned to drop the excess weight and only get by with the essentials.  I’d be willing to bet the same has held true for soldiers going back to the Roman legions where they were sometimes estimated to carry up to eighty pounds – a ridiculous amount of weight.  But then again, they were professional warriors and when they signed up it was for a much longer tour than four years like the average tour today.  Roman soldiers underwent conditioning marches that were brutally hard.  Vegetius wrote in De Re Militari:

To accustom soldiers to carry burdens is also an essential part of
discipline. Recruits in particular should be obliged frequently to carry
a weight of not less than sixty pounds (exclusive of their arms), and
to march with it in the ranks. This is because on difficult expeditions
they often find themselves under the necessity of carrying their
provisions as well as their arms. Nor will they find this troublesome
when inured to it by custom, which makes everything easy.

Our troops in ancient times were a proof of this, and Virgil has remarked it in the following lines:

The Roman soldiers, bred in war’s alarms,
Bending with unjust loads and heavy arms,
Cheerful their toilsome marches undergo,
And pitch their sudden camp before the foe.

Lighten Your Pack

As you probably surmised from the title, this post isn’t about soldiers and their pack weight.  It’s about you carrying less weight so that you can bug-out effectively if it ever comes down to it.  Unless you spend every day hiking a sixty pound pack fifteen or twenty miles, the likelihood of being able to do so when the SHTF are slim to none.  From the section above I reiterate:

Nor will they find this troublesome when inured to it by custom, which makes everything easy.

Chances are good that you’d be stopping along the way and ditching gear, thus you really need to focus on packing just the essentials.  I’ve seen packs on Youtube and in blog posts that a Clydesdale couldn’t carry.  They’ve got everything in there from three changes of clothing to enough ammo to fight off the zombie apocalypse all by themselves.  And the kicker is that quite a few of those people are about fifty pounds overweight and the act of actually carrying it more than five miles would probably kill them.

The Essentials

So what exactly are the essentials?  This depends on you:  your skill level in the woods, your fitness level, your bug-out plans, your destination, and your mission plan.

hike_march_bug_outThe worst case scenario is a full scale bug-out, meaning that you’re taking off and you need to live out of your bag for a minimum of three days, but probably longer.  If you’re careful, you can probably get away with forty to forty-five pounds.   This includes a tent, sleeping bag, freeze dried food, a quart of water with water filter, spork, small cook pot and stove, fuel (unless you’re carrying a small woodstove like a Solo Stove), lightweight poncho, and other essential gear. If you buy the lightest gear (usually the most expensive too), you should be able to have a good kit that weighs in the forty pound area.  I hiked a piece of the 100 Mile Wilderness in Maine and my pack weighed forty-four pounds when I started.  I spent a lot of time getting that pack weight down, but it was worth it.  I also spent weeks leading up to that hike walking the road with the same boots I’d be wearing and carrying the pack to get used to the weight.

Read Also: Get Outdoors!

Rather than run through all the scenarios, I’ll list out some of the things I carry in my everyday woodsman kit and why I carry it.  I’ve managed to pare the weight down to about twenty to twenty-five pounds (depending on how much water I carry) and I’ve found this to be an acceptable weight as I’ve gotten older.

Then again, I also have a lot of experience in the woods and feel comfortable entering the forest with what some might consider minimal gear. I consider my kit to be a GHB or Get Home Bag, meaning I’ll only carry it about 30 miles in a worst case scenario, which for me is walking home from work.  I like to move fast and light and not be seen if at all possible.  So rather than carry weapons I choose to leave that weight behind and avoid confrontation.  I suppose the worst thing is someone steals my bag from me, which means I’ll be that much lighter on the way home.

Let me say up front that many of you won’t agree with my philosophy on firearms and that’s fine.  I live in Maine and in the area I’ll be walking through, people are unlikely to cause me problems.  If you live in the city and carrying a big pack loaded with shelter, water, and food makes you a fat target, then you’ll probably want to consider carrying a gun as protection.  Again, this all comes back to your situation and threat assessment.  But keep in mind that guns and ammo are heavy, so choose wisely.

To survive a night or two in the wild here’s what I carry for the basics:

  • Military Grade Poncho
  • Survival Knife
  • Firesteel and Lighter
  • Three Freeze Dried Meals (minimum)
  • Small Flashlight
  • 1 Quart Steel Water Bottle and Filter
  • Pot Set with Homemade Alcohol Stove and Four Oz of Fuel or Small Woodstove
  • Small Plastic Cup and Five Coffee Packets
  • Multitool
  • Map and Compass
  • Bandana
  • Titanium Spork
  • Gloves and Hat in Cold Weather
  • Sleeping bag/Wool Blanket
  • Notebook and Pen

This pack weighs between 20 and 23 pounds depending on the extras I put in.  If you’re going to rely on the above kit as your guide, other things you’ll  need to add to the list:

  • Experience in the wilderness/bushcraft skills
  • Much time spent evaluating and using each piece of equipment
  • Overall physically fit (weights and aerobics four to five times a week)
  • Skill with map and compass

Wilderness Survival Skills

packing_light_gear_minimumThe more you know about wilderness survival the less gear you have to carry; however, the longer it will take you when you have to set up camp.  It’s a trade off and you need to be able to judge yourself and the situation in order to make the best decisions.  A few days ago I took the following kit into the woods and made a shelter using no tools whatsoever.  I used two trees to break sticks to length and used fir boughs for insulation.  I used a lighter to get the fire going, but that was the only man made item I used.

Related: 15 Ways to Start a Fire

shelter_fire_camping_out-2It’s important that you tally up your knowledge, experience, and skills in addition to the gear you’ll carry. All of these things are important when trying to figure out the best way for you to bug-out. It’s also important to weigh your weaknesses.  For example:  if you’re overweight or otherwise not able to carry a pack for a long distance, you’ll need to make alternate plans.  Bugging in might be your best option, so instead of preparing to leave, you plan for an extended stay in your home or apartment.  But I digress.

Summary

In order to get your pack weight down you need to focus on the essentials.  My advice is to lay out everything you could want, put it in your pack (if it will fit) then take it for a walk.  If you can do three to five miles with that weight without much trouble, congratulations!  You’re probably going to be ok.

If you find yourself struggling after a mile or two, take your pack home and start going through your gear and eliminate stuff you don’t need.  Got a big flashlight that holds four D cell batteries?  Get rid of it and get a small halogen light that uses a couple of Triple A’s.  If you’re walking alone and have a three man tent, ditch it for an ultralight single man tent. That will save you five or ten pounds right there.  That’s the kind of mindset you need to bring to your gear.

Visualize what a camp out will look like and keep that thought in your head as you go through your stuff.  Always challenge a piece of gear.  Some of it will pass the test, but some of it won’t.  Don’t be afraid to cut back. I believe that speed in getting out of an area will be vital and it’s hard to do if you’re chained to a sixty pound pack.  After all, we’re not Roman soldiers!

Do you think a pack should have everything and the kitchen sink, or do you think a minimalist mindset is best? Let me know in the comments below. Questions?  Comments? Sound off below!

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You Can’t Be Serious About Prepping If You’re Not Serious About Your Health

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Image: You can’t be serious about prepping if you’re not serious about your health

By  – Natural News

(Natural News) While no one knows what life is going to throw at us, it is safe to say that it won’t hurt to be prepared for an emergency, disaster, or SHTF (S**t Hits The Fan) scenario. According to Back Door Survival, some three million Americans, or 1 percent of the total population, are making detailed plans and taking measures to prepare themselves for a major catastrophic event.

Many people still believe governments will step in when disaster strikes. However, when we look back at the horrible scenarios during Katrina and Super-storm Sandy, we know that that isn’t going to happen. Those affected had to wait days for aid or face hour-long lines to get some water. It has become apparent that the government isn’t prepared to handle massive rescue operations, nor can they provide for everybody during a disaster. (RELATED: Read more survival news at Survival.news.)

Whether it’s another economic collapse, natural disaster, or the end of the world, preparing yourself for opportunities so that you can take advantage of them when things turn for the worst are paramount during these uncertain times. As the world continues to spin out of control and people start to lose their confidence in governments it is very likely the number of preppers will grow in the coming years.

Survival of the fittest

Being prepared for an emergency is as simple as planning ahead. However, what many people often forget is that prepping is more than just stocking up on survival essentials. If you are going to take prepping serious, it is also time to start working on your health and fitness level.

Should the worst happen, chances are your life and environment aren’t going to look the same. In a world that has erupted into chaos, life will become more physically demanding. You might have to run, jump, climb, and fight your way through out-of-control situations. However, if you are out of shape or in bad health, chances of surviving out there can be pretty slim.

Continue reading at Natural News: You Can’t Be Serious About Prepping If You’re Not Serious About Your Health

Filed under: Prepping

$3 DIY Bamboo Longbow

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$3 DIY Bamboo Longbow The long bow! One of the earliest weapons made by man. You can make your own from Bamboo for around 3 bucks! This is pretty powerful and will be plenty adequate to hunt small game and maybe even mid size animals. I found a great tutorial that shows you how to …

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“THANKS, OBAMA!” THE 44TH PRESIDENT’S EXECUTIVE ORDER ON SPACE WEATHER

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You’ve probably heard of something called a coronal mass ejection (CME), otherwise known as a massive solar flare, and you probably know it could be very bad for the United States if the we happened to be facing the sun when it impacts earth. A large CME has the potential to have devastating impacts on everything from our global positioning systems (GPS), satellite operations, space operations, aviation and even our power grids, knocking them offline in an instant and destroying critical power grid infrastructure. A CME is one of several extra-terrestrial events that could possibly impact earth that are collectively referred to as space weather. Although much less likely, an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) can produce the same impacts, most commonly seen as a result of a nuclear explosion. In a world where international terrorism is a real threat, the possibility of an EMP weapon being used against the United States is a real concern. Experts agree that a direct impact from a large CME or a successful EMP attack is an existential threat to the United States that could instantly bring an end to our modern civilization.

 

A silhouette of the New Jersey.

 

On October 13, 2016, President Barack Obama signed an Executive Order — Coordinating Efforts to Prepare the Nation for Space Weather Events that outlined the country’s contingency plan in the event such weather events lead to significant disruption to systems like the electrical power grid, satellite operations or aviation, stating “It is the policy of the United States to prepare for space weather events to minimize the extent of economic loss and human hardship.”

 

 

With this EO, President Obama ordered that the federal government takes steps insure that the national infrastructure is secure in the event of a space weather event. The National Space Weather Strategy and Action Plan ( PDF ) was announced a few days later in conjunction with President Obama’s executive order, along with a PDF of The Implementation of the National Space Weather Action plan, complete with a White House official summary. The official pages aren’t up on WhiteHouse.gov, but here is the latest information I could find on those too.

 

 

After years of Congress knowing about the problem and failing to take action, I was pleased to learn that the President did what he could through the executive office to try and protect the critical infrastructure of our nation.  However it is still up to Congress to set aside the funds to follow through and take action in support of the specifics laid out in this order.

 

So what does this mean for me and every one of you concerned about national security and the protection of our extremely fragile power grid infrastructure? The phrase “Within 120 days of the date of this order…” is used repeatedly in this executive order. If you take a look at the calendar, we are at that point right now. I’ve read for years about how everyone knows this is a threat, yet no one is willing to take action. Well, the former President did what he could do in response to a lack of action by Congress and now it’s our turn. Call your United States Representatives and your United States Senators and ask them to take action on President Obama’s executive order to coordinate a national response and strengthen our national power grids against the possible catastrophic impacts of a massive CME or electromagnetic pulse attack. Find your US Representatives and your US Senators and urge them to take action on this very important initiative today.

 

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How to Create an Urban Emergency Evacuation Kit for Work

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How to Create an Urban Emergency Evacuation Kit for Work Natural and man made disasters can force offices full of workers to evacuate. In big cities a disaster may also affect public transportation. In an emergency, you may be on your own and forced to improvise. Here’s how to create an Urban Emergency Evacuation Kit …

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Why You May Need To Stockpile Supplements For SHTF

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Why You Need To Stockpile Supplements For SHTF I am not a doctor or a medical professional this is for information purposes only. Please consult with a medical professional if you have any questions or you start to take any supplements. Even in healthy people, multivitamins and other supplements may help to prevent vitamin and …

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How To Make Hot Ice Using Homemade Sodium Acetate

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How To Make Hot Ice Using Homemade Sodium Acetate Before you attempt this please do it with safety glasses on and be careful, as with any chemicals. You do this at your own risk please take the time to read our disclaimer Sodium acetate or hot ice is an amazing chemical you can prepare yourself from …

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Emergency Lighting Under 9 Bucks

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Emergency Lighting Under 9 Bucks Affordable emergency lighting is now at your fingertips! The Luna LED Light is an awesome, very cheap prepping item I would highly recommend to have not only for the home, in case of a power cut, but to keep in a bug out bag and for camping! As you can see …

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How to Make Stone Blades for Wilderness Survival

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How to Make Stone Blades for Wilderness Survival Knowing how to make a sharp edge or a knife in a survival situation is paramount when studying wilderness survival. I think I have just found the best website on the internet  that explains and shows you how to make a stone knife. The information on the …

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How to Safely Spend a Night in Your Car

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 How to Safely Spend a Night in Your Car Anyone who drives faces the possibility of spending an unplanned night in a vehicle.  Bad weather, breakdowns, running out of fuel, getting stuck are some of the more common reasons why a driver might have to bed down for the night (or perhaps for several nights) …

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Doomsday Preppers? You’ve GOT to be kidding me…

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This post was written exactly 4 years ago, on my Facebook page. I still stand by it. Rich Fleetwood – February 7, 2012 · Riverton · Watching “Doomsday Preppers” on NGC this evening, with an as objective as possible viewpoint. I’ve been doing this stuff myself for 20 years, and in my position and experience, with the […]

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Easy DIY Forge Out Of An Old Sink

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Easy DIY Forge Out Of An Old Sink Easy DIY project we all could at least try and get some sort of blacksmithing skills before SHTF. I love the simplicity of this forge set up.I think having a little knowledge of this old skill could come in very handy if SHTF. Not only is this …

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Ditch Medicine with The Herbal Prepper!

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Ditch Medicine Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Audio in player below! This episode is all about “ditch medicine”. Ditch medicine makes due with what you have on hand. The idea is to stay alive (or keep someone else alive) with whatever is available, until you reach help or help finds you. Sometimes this includes herbs, … Continue reading Ditch Medicine with The Herbal Prepper!

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Solavore Solar Oven – Pic Review

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One of the big topics that has been consistent in preparedness over the years that I have run Prepper Website, is food.  People know how important it is to eat!  A few days of going hungry and you start to really lose energy and even the ability to focus and think straight.  Couple that with stress and expended energy to deal with your situation, eating isn’t a want, it is a need!

When it comes to preparedness cooking, you need options!  There might be times when you don’t have time to build and maintain a fire.  There might be time when you need to conserve your fuel.  There might be time when an open flame gives away your activities and your position.

One option for preppers is a solar oven. Until recently, I had only read about them and seen videos.  However, I now have some experience using the Solavore Sport Solar Oven.

The Solavore Sport Oven was shipped neatly packaged with clear instructions for setup.  Make sure you do read the instructions carefully and just don’t go to town removing the film on the lid that kind of looks like an anti-scratch plastic for shipping! It’s there for a reason. I almost made the mistake of ripping it off!  The solar oven comes with the solar box, clear lid, reflectors, two black pots, a temperature gauge and a WAPI.

My main concern and real trial was if the solar oven would cook the “usual” stockpile of food that preppers would store.  For me, that would include rice and beans.

My first attempt failed!  I waited for a sunny day, according to weather.com.  I started early in the morning and set everything up.  However, I lost the sun halfway through the day.  So, this is something that needs to be kept in mind if you’re cooking during an emergency situation.  You will need a backup plan to possibly finish cooking your food if you lose the sun behind clouds.

My second attempt worked!  Again, I waited for a sunny day. I set the Solavore Sport out before I left for work.  The cool thing is that I didn’t get back home till after 7 p.m.  The sun was already setting and the box was cool (January in Houston, TX).  The temperature gauge didn’t even register!  I thought I had another fail on my hands.  When I lifted the lid, I could smell the rice and beans.  I brought the pots inside and took a bite!  Everything was done to my satisfaction.  I made a bowl of rice and beans, added a little  Tony’s to it and popped it in the microwave for 30 seconds to warm it up.

Solar ovens don’t burn food.  So, you can leave your food in your solar oven all day and not worry about it burning.  There are so many things that you can cook with a solar oven. Solavore has recipes you can try – savory and sweet.

My advice is that you experiment and try cooking with your solar oven when you don’t need it, so you will know how it works when you do need it!  The beauty of the Solavore is that it is so lightweight and sturdy.  You can use this all year long, just as long as you have sun.  And, you don’t have to wait for an emergency!

You can purchase the Solavore Sports Solar Oven on the Solavore site.

Check out my pics below as well as videos that I have linked to by my blogging friend, Anegela @ Food Storage and Survival.  Especially pay attention to her video on the WAPI.  I think this is a BIG selling point for solar ovens.

This is a pic from my first attempt. You can see I had a ton of sun, but I lost it 1/2 way through the day. I also think I put in a little too much water. You’re supposed to put in 25% less water than you normally use in a recipe.  I didn’t read that part during my first attempt!

Second attempt. Setting up the rice and beans.  A lot less water!

Pic of the Solavore Sport Solar Oven. This pic was taken early in the morning before I left for work.

Already cool because the sun was setting when I took the pots out of the oven, however, the rice and beans were fully cooked!

A little Tony’s! I was just missing some cornbread!

The Solavore Sports Oven comes with the oven and lid, reflectors, two pots, a temperature gauge and a WAPI.

WAPI = Water Pasteurization Indicator. If you haven’t seen one of these in action, check out the video below.

 

 

Do you have any experience with a solar oven?  What is it?  Would you consider purchasing one for your preps?

 

Peace,
Todd

Updated Top Barter List You May Want To Consider Stockpiling

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Updated Top Barter List You May Want To Consider Stockpiling Having extra supplies for bartering should be on every prepper’s plan. This enables you to barter for goods or services that you otherwise would be without! You don’t have to have a set list per-say, but think about what you would need if SHTF and …

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How To Build A Semi-Permanent Family Shelter

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How To Build A Semi-Permanent Family Shelter Shelter is one of the most important things you need to know how to make in an emergency situation. This awesome, family size shelter is just a large “debris shelter” for all intense and purposes but with the added protection from the rain because of the tarp or …

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Turn Your Smartphone Into A Satellite Phone

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Turn Your Smartphone Into A Satellite Phone We all know how cell phones can work on one street and then have no signal on another part of the same street. This makes cell phone not the best option for survival if you get lost in the desert or dense woods. I found a product that …

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The Importance Of A Get Home Bag And A Great Starting List

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The Importance Of A Get Home Bag And A Great Starting List I am sharing this article as I know a lot of you are new to prepping or just looking if it’s something you could do. This artcle is actually from a new prepper who shares her get home bag with us all and …

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How to Remove Rusted Nuts and Bolts

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How to Remove Rusted Nuts and Bolts You may just thank us one day for sharing this little secret, If SHTF and you need to remove rusted nuts or bolts, remember this! This is an old secret that a lot of us don’t know or forget! There are hundreds and hundreds of lotions and potions …

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5 Prepping Mistakes to Avoid

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5 Prepping Mistakes to Avoid I found a great article over at prepforshtf.com that goes over 5 prepping mistakes to avoid. We all make mistakes and I will be the first one to admit I have made many in my prepping journey. By making mistakes you learn from them and become a better prepper! The article …

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Buy an Ex-Ambulance for an Awesome SHTF Vehicle

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Buy an Ex-Ambulance for an Awesome SHTF Vehicle While it may not be an obvious choice, a decommissioned ambulance can be a great option for mobile housing for when SHTF. Preppers and travelers alike could make use of an old ambulance, as the cargo area is spacious enough to accommodate a sleeping and living area. …

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How Much Should You Plant In Your Garden To Provide A Year’s Worth Of Food?

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How Much Should You Plant In Your Garden To Provide A Year’s Worth Of Food? Not long ago, people had to think about how much to grow for the year. They had to plan ahead, save seeds, plant enough for their family and preserve enough to survive over the winter months! It wasn’t just a hobby. It didn’t take …

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Recipe: Emergency Food Bar

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Emergency food needs to be shelf stable and contain needed nutrients. It is a plus if the food tastes good, is light weight, and not very expensive. This is not the easiest project to achieve, and I had to test many different recipes until I settled on this particular one. This particular food bar recipe […]

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Six Planning Tips for Starting a Garden from Scratch

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Six Planning Tips for Starting a Garden from Scratch Spring will be here in a couple of months and if you are new to gardening this article may give you the upper hand, you may have tried before and had failed crops or the veggies didn’t grow well enough. I scoured the internet for hours looking …

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How To Make A Water Vessel Out Of A Log With Fire

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How To Make A Water Vessel Out Of A Log With Fire Did you know that you could use a log to store water in if SHTF? It’s a real easy project to do, it just takes time, that’s why I am calling it a weekend project. Whoever wrote the original article first language probably …

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10 Canning Tips for the Newbie Canner

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10 Canning Tips for the Newbie Canner My wife and I can all the time and love it. It gets us together as a family unit and after a good batch of canning you can sit back and look at them and say, “well dear, that’s us good for a week or so if SHTF” …

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DIY Large Mobile Solar Power System

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DIY Large Mobile Solar Power System I have covered a simple portable solar generator many times over the years.. They work great but what if you needed a bigger solar generator and still wanted it mobile enough to take it with you where ever you go, either camping or bugging out? I found a great …

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17 Great Ways to Utilize 2-Liter Soda Bottles for Survival

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17 Great Ways to Utilize 2-Liter Soda Bottles for Survival See how using old 2-liter bottles for survival could change your way of thinking about preparedness. Save you money and make you more self-reliant than ever before! I am sure many of you know that millions on millions of these little plastic gold mines gets …

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SURRENDER THE SUN

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SURRENDER THE SUN

I have a vast array of interests that add flavor and color to this wonderful life of mine. A few of those happen to be the idea of apocalypse and what impact it may have on the baseline human condition, our sometimes crazy weather and it’s impacts on this incredible world, and a deep rooted love of history, especially when either of my previous two mentions are somehow involved. In her recent work Surrender The Sun, author AR Shaw has offered up a shiny bobble that I simply could not ignore. So, the real question is would it live up to my wild imaginings of where it may take me?

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Full disclosure, AR Shaw is a friend, a very nice lady and I have read her work before. That is precisely the reason I want to be careful in this review to only speak to the work and my impressions of it.

Given the interests I listed above that originally secured my interests in the book, in Surrender The Sun, Shaw did not disappoint.

Want to end life as we know it?
Let’s do it.
How about a naturally occurring catastrophe?
Yes, please.
What if I told you it’s all happened before and it will happen again?
Awesome. Bring it on.

In this cataclysmic, blizzard driven romp of a story, Shaw does a wonderful job of world building. I could feel my lungs ache and burn in the frigid temperatures as I stood on the lake shore staring out as wisps of blowing snow spun out and across the body of water’s frozen surface. To further my immersion in this white-bleached, wintry wasteland, Shaw effectively weaves a sense of intimate foreboding throughout the tale as I witnessed Bishop standing like a granite mountain as he shepherds flame-haired, Maeve and her party through the seemingly never-ending storm. Both natural and man made.

In short, if you share any or all of the interests I mentioned earlier, take a chance on Surrender The Sun. The story and the world are engulfing and satisfying. The author also does a good job of touching on some of my other interests too like preparedness and just what it would feel like to realize that you cannot prepare your way out of a situation. After all, it seems that is where things would get really interesting anyway, right? There will come a point when reading this book where you will find yourself standing alongside Bishop and Maeve, each of you asking yourselves the same question. Now what?

Jump into the deep freeze and grab your copy of Surrender The Sun today. To keep up with everything going on with AR Shaw, be sure to check out her blog. You can also find her on Facebook and Twitter.

When the Grid Goes Down, You Better Be Ready!

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When the Grid Goes Down, You Better Be Ready! We all rely so much on the grid, from things as simple as charging our cell phones, to running our water heaters and cooking our food! Let’s think for a second, what have you got in place right this minute if the power went out you …

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How To Double Your Gas Mileage 2X

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How To Double Your Gas Mileage 2X Well I had always heard the rumors about doing this but never really seen any proof! After watching this video I really think this would work. For me, I would use this when bugging out. I have to go just a shade under 400 miles and I can …

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DIY Night Vision Powered By A 9v Battery

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DIY Night Vision Powered By A 9v Battery This blew me away and After seeing what it took to make this I may just have to rummage around my moms old stuff and get the old video camera. This is made very easily, just light soldering and gluing. I decided to post this because I …

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3 Emergency Heat Sources When The Power’s Out

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3 Emergency Heat Sources When The Power’s Out All homes nowadays have to stick to building code to heat houses, they have to all be able to keep a house above or at the comfort zone for living. There are a few problems with that however, most heaters need electricity to run. If you have …

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What Natural Disasters Are Covered By Insurance 101

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What Natural Disasters Are Covered By Insurance 101 Insurance is a win /lose kinda situation, it costs a fortune and usually if you have it nothing is ever damaged, but if you don’t have it your house gets destroyed. I found a great article on what is covered if a natural disaster ever happens and …

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How To Build And Why You Need A Ladybug Garden

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How To Build And Why You Need A Ladybug Garden I am glad I am sharing this with you today, I plan on starting my survival garden this spring and the one thing I have read about gardening is if you are not careful and do not use pesticides you can get a case of …

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