Colloidal Silver: Myths And Truths About Side Effects

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Colloidal silver is often a topic of controversy.  Mentioning it to those who are strict believers in only Western medicine can often make you feel like an insane witch doctor.  But we’ll break down the myths and deliver some truths about the side effects, so you can make an informed decision for yourself.

Colloidal silver has gotten a bad rap since the Food and Drug Administration made a claim in 1999 (almost 20 years ago) that there is no scientific evidence to support the use of colloidal silver. If one translates that from “government-speak,” it basically means the FDA has not used government funds to study something not recommended by the government because they haven’t been paid to do so.  They want you to use the medication and supplements lobbyists pay them to defend and promote.  The FDA also proceeds to warn potential users on their website (who are often simply looking for information) about the danger of colloidal silver and why consumers should steer clear before bragging about “taking down” certain companies for “making false claims” about colloidal silver – what most government agencies are declaring as “snake oil.”

The FDA also warns about a side effect called argyria, and herein, we’ll focus on the myths and truths of this well-known, but misunderstood side effect.

The most well-known, and extremely rare side effect of ingesting colloidal silver is argyria, a bluish-gray discoloration of the skin, which is usually permanent.  This occurs when a person ingests an excess amount of silver. Argyria results from the deposition of silver in the dermis and also from the silver-induced production of melanin. Although silver has been shown to be uniformly deposited in exposed and unexposed sections of the skin, the increased pigmentation becomes more pronounced in areas exposed to sunlight (such as the face and hands) due to the photoactivated reduction of the metal.

However, based on the government’s own studies, it would take a lot of silver to cause argyria.  The smallest amount of silver known to cause the condition in adults, according to a study done by the Environmental Protection Agency from the use of any silver compound (including silver salts) is 900 mg of silver taken orally in one year. According to the book, Colloidal Silver: A Literature Review: Medical Uses, Toxicology & Manufacture by John Hill, D.C., in order to reach an intake level of 900 mg of silver over the course of one year, an individual would have to consume a whopping 380 – 8 oz. bottles of 10 PPM colloidal silver product during the course of the year.  That’s a lot of silver chugging.

Since the suggested adult daily dosage on most commercial colloidal silver products is about 1 teaspoon daily, this means that an individual would have to consume nearly 48 times the normal adult dosage, each and every day for a year to reach the lowest level of silver intake ever known to cause argyria in an adult.  The EPA’s standards for the amount of silver that can be safely consumed in drinking water is .005 milligrams per kilogram of body weight per day (EPA RED document page 2, 4th paragraph).  The .005 milligrams per kilogram of body weight claimed in the EPA RED document to be a safe level of daily silver intake includes silver from all sources, including air, water, and food.

Since it’s almost impossible to tell how much silver is in your food and water supply, dosages should be adjusted accordingly and for your own personal size.  Fortunately, a company called Invision International Health Solutions has analyzed the EPA’s figures and has determined that they can be further broken down into “drops per day” formula. They’ve determined how to calculate the amount of colloidal silver you can take daily, based upon your body weight, using the EPA’s own figures. You can click here for a free dosage report.

By simply following recommended dosages, argyria is easily avoided. But what about other side effects? Well, there aren’t any, actually, according to doctors. So let’s focus on what problems can arise if one happens to ingest so much colloidal silver they actually get argyria -the side effects of the side effect if you will.

Although the deposition of silver is permanent, it is not associated with any adverse health effects. No pathologic changes or inflammatory reactions have been shown to result from the silver deposition in the dermis or argyria. In fact, in one case of argyria, medical researchers Hill and Pillsbury stated back in 1939, “The ordinary clinical use of colloidal silver compounds practically never gives rise to any gross untoward effect other than argyria.”  Meaning the one and only side effect of a colloidal silver overdose is purely cosmetic – a discoloration of the skin.  An excerpt from the aforementioned EPA study has also clearly stated in their document titled Silver (CASRN 7440-22-4): “The critical effect in humans ingesting silver is argyria, a medically benign but permanent bluish-gray discoloration of the skin.”  So argyria itself (the only side effect of ingesting colloidal silver) is “medically benign.”  This actually makes colloidal silver one of the safest supplements on shelves today, from a toxicological point of view.

But what’s important to remember about argyria, and all side effects is that ALL things are harmful to us when taken in doses above what the body can handle.  Antibiotics, water, and vitamins can be very beneficial to the human body and health. But crossing the line and overdosing on yes, even water, can have harmful and fatal effects.  Living life in a perpetual state of fear over something as innocent and mild as colloidal silver is a bit misguided.  It’s imperative for nutritional supplement users to understand the safe and responsible use of any nutritional supplement – including colloidal silver – so that obvious risks can be avoided while the full healthful benefits of the nutritional supplement are enjoyed.

 

*DISCLAIMER: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or be used as medical advice.

 

 

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

News, History, and Narrative Oh My!

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News, History, and Narrative Oh My!
Allen Getz ” Behind The Headlines ” Audio player below!

For the second broadcast of Behind the Lines, we will examine the concept called history. After a short review of the subject matter of the previous episode (The Entity Known as News), we will tie the concept of news into this idea/discipline known as history. The premise regarding the term will center upon its definition, its focus, and how the interpretation thereof influences society.

Continue reading News, History, and Narrative Oh My! at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

Inferno: Ten Facts You Should Know About Fire

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top_ten_facts_forest_fire

fire_flame_facts_top_tenFire can be a beautiful thing to behold; knowing how to make fire is an essential skill that kick-started the next phase of human evolution, and it’s been keeping us alive ever since. As majestic as it is, fire is equally dangerous and will become deadly if unprepared. Fire can cross your path in several forms: As a way to create warmth; to send a signal; to prepare food and boil water; it can be as simple as lighting a cigarette or a campfire, or you can be faced with the wrong end of a ranging forest fire.

By Alex Coyne, a contributing author of Survival Cache & SHTFBlog

Here’s what you should know about fire…

The three elements of fire.

This is basic high school science, yet something a lot of people discard when in an emergency. Fire needs heat, fuel and an oxidizing agent to burn. This is known as the Fire Triangle, and it’s vital when you’re making a fire or trying to kill one. (Fire needs 16% oxygen to burn; the air around us contains approximately 21%).

Have a fire starter kit.

Fire starter kits are cheap and there are thousands available for order on the internet; take a look at some of the options on Amazon.com and make sure that you have one as part of your survival kit. You’d rather have it and not need it, right?

If you make your own fire starters, do it carefully.

Many frugal survivalists prefer to make their own fire starter kits at home instead of buying them. That’s great, as long as you do it safely. (One of the most disastrous examples I’ve seen was an enthusiast who made his own portable kit in a small tin, then placed it next to the fire: It heated up, and the results should be relatively obvious. Store combustibles safely. It’s fire. Be careful).

Read Also: PureFire Tactical Survival Fire Starter

Don’t rely on matches.

Matches are a go-to for many avid campers, but it could also be their biggest mistake. Yes, there are ways to light wet matches – take a look at this article on WikiHow to see how – but that is not a chance you can afford to take when it’s your survival being put at risk. You’ll very likely be safer with a flint fire starter kit.

Certain woods are poisonous when burned.

poison_sumacKnow how to identify different types of woods, and know which are poisonous when burned. Novice fire starters often collect any wood they can find for their fire, only to be told by the locals later that they should have stayed away from it – or, in the worst-case scenario, serious illness or death occurs. Some include Elder wood, poison Sumac, and poison oak. Illness or death can occur from fumes, and any food prepared over a poison-wood fire could kill you.

Know how to treat a burn.

Common remedies for treating a burn include the application of some sort of fat or oil: Mayonnaise, butter, cooking oil or margarine. DON’T. This literally adds fuel to the burn, and it can lead to anything from infection to grilling your burn wound like a steak. Emergency guides generally recommend immediate cooling of the burn until help can be found – cold, sterile water. Have burn gel as part of your emergency kit, always.

Putting out fires are different.

Depending on what kind of fire you’re looking at, the way you put it out differs. Never grab the nearest thing and throw it on the fire; in many cases, that’s going to be an accelerant like alcohol, petrol or paraffin. (Also, never pour water on an oil fire. You’ll turn a fire into an inferno). Have a fire extinguisher handy, and keep baking soda and sand nearby. Remember how fire has three elements? Remove its oxygen.

Related: Six Steps to Harden Your Home Against Fire

Don’t forget smoke inhalation.

top_facts_smoke_fireIn most house and forest fires, the cause of death isn’t being burned alive, but smoke inhalation. Symptoms can include a dry cough, dizziness, nausea and potentially coughing up blood. Go down, because heat travels upwards and smoke tends to be less dense at the bottom. Fire can also be dangerous in other ways, like falling debris and burning embers.

Burnt food is carcinogenic; keep an eye on that fire!

Hone your barbeque skills at home when you’re not in a survival situation: Learn the tricks behind fish versus chicken versus beef; you can even bake on an open fire if you know how. Keep in mind that when food burns, acrylamide forms – this is a carcinogenic and obviously dangerous to your health.

Putting out camp and food fires are essential.

Put simply and in the words of an anthropomorphic bear, only you can prevent forest fires. Always make sure your fire is properly extinguished (and a fire that looks dead isn’t always), never leave a fire unattended and don’t put your tents, sleeping bags, gear or combustibles too close to the fire. Sand is your best friend for putting out smaller fires, so always keep a bucket or two nearby.

Send us your best fire starting tips for in the field (or at home) through the comments.

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