Lessons from the Roman Army for Post-SHTF Combat Operations

Click here to view the original post.

Alright, we have done a couple of articles on “Knowing Yourself,” and “Knowing Your Enemy.”  Now that everyone knows one another, let’s take it to another level.  As a single individual, as a family member, or operating in a group, after it hits the fan, you will have to fight eventually.  You will not be able to avoid it and hunker down until the cavalry comes, because it will be in your neighborhood and the cavalry isn’t coming to your rescue.

We’ve discussed Fabian Tactics in previous articles.  These were based on the exploits of Quintus Fabius Maximus in the First Punic War between Carthage and Rome. “Hit and Run” tactics exemplify their description: strike a numerically superior larger force at a time and place of your choosing, and then break contact.  Fade back into the forest, hide, and avoid further combat until the next engagement of your choice.

Lessons from the Roman Army for Post-SHTF Combat Operations

Let’s “fix” ‘em: set the enemy up and zap ‘em!  Let’s do a few things that the Romans were famous for…using these techniques here and now.

  1. Choose the Ground: Yes, you choose the place you will engage them.  Along with this, you pick the time of day, the formation of the attack, the objective, and the criteria for withdrawal.  You choose it.  As an individual, you would be sniping.  As a group (depending on your numbers and composition), you can engage in operations limited by your size.  Choosing the ground means also to actively recon the enemy and not allow him to choose it and catch you unawares.
  2. Prep the Ground: The Roman Army were masters of this task. They scouted the area and with thorough intel, they knew where their enemies were, actions these people planned on taking, and avenues of approach.  They cut timber and created obstacles of logs interlaced with natural “barbed wire” in the form of thorns and thistles…along with spikes and stakes, to limit enemy cavalry.  Long before William Wallace of “Braveheart” was ever a thought, the Roman legions spread out hay soaked with pitch and oil in areas where enemy foot soldiers would move, and applied flaming arrows when the time was right.  They always took the high ground when possible, and used the natural terrain features (cliffs, rivers, etc.) to form boundaries to help them channel the enemy.
  3. Always Fight with the Sun at your Back: The Romans positioned themselves and attacked to place the sun in the eyes of their enemies. I know, I know: the enemy has “Ray-Bans,” right?  No, it worked for the Viet Cong as well.  When they’re looking into the sun, they’re at a severe disadvantage.  Use the sun.  Use the terrain.  Live with the land and live.
  4. “SPECVLATORES”- the Speculatores…the deep-cover operatives…the Special Forces and Reconnaissance warriors of the Roman Empire. You need operatives in your “unit” with the ability to do “deep penetration” of an enemy’s defenses…whether in their midst unsuspectingly or observing them from a nearby locale…operating on their own ground unbeknownst to them.  You need one or two people who can get the job done…and provide you with the deep-cover intel you’ll need to make decisions.
  5. Alliances – “The enemy of my enemy is my friend.” Not always so, but you can use such rifts to your advantage…with other groups who your enemy is at odds with.  Here is where diplomacy, teamwork, and political acumen/savvy comes into play.  These “non-combat” skills are just as important to “fixing” your enemy as any of the actual missions you will undertake to defeat him.  Be skilled at making alliances, and do not make them just for the sake of socializing.  It is an art that we will cover more in-depth in future pieces.
  6. Feed Them Disinformation: Yes, the Romans were very adept at sending messages or planting information that was false. This regarded their strengths, their movements, supplies, and reinforcements.  Sun Tzu was not the only one with a knowledge of how to monopolize disinformation, and he wasn’t the first to employ it.
  7. Lure Them and “Stake” ‘Em – the Roman Army would plant different things out in front of an approaching enemy force in order to delay and distract them…making them ripe for an attack or ambush. You can do the same, and make it fall “in line” with the enemy you’ll be facing.  Quick question: How many of you have Russian or Chinese canned delicacies, such as Borscht or caviar for the former, or imported Chinese canned foods and fineries for the latter?  Because you may be able to use it to lure such if they ever come to this country…and set a trap on or in it, or place shooters in an overwatch position overlooking it.  Because you may need prisoners, and what better way to lure them in than with a carton of their own cigarettes, their own liquor that they would think to be safe?      Be advised: SAVE YOUR RECEIPTS FROM THE STORE YOU BOUGHT IT!  This is because in the times to come if anyone ever suspects you of collaborating with them…you can show the receipts that you bought it all long before the conflict began, and give them an explanation of why you bought it all.  This may keep you from being shot by your own countrymen.
  8. The Violence of Action in a Controlled Manner – the Romans did not win their mastery over all of Europe and most of the Middle East by conducting drill and ceremony. They were trained, skilled killers and understood that the thing that made the Empire possible was the discipline and aggression of the individual legionnaire.
  9. A Perfect Chain of Command – Modern militaries all have a chain of command and an order of succession for someone to fill the “vacancy” at all levels when a commander “buys the farm,” so to speak. You need to enable each member of your team to be able to step into the shoes and position of the leader and take charge to continue with the mission.
  10. Discipline: this encompasses all areas. A “guerrilla fighter,” whether fighting off marauders from a neighboring town post SHTF, or a tyrannical, oppressive government, or a foreign invader…the guerrilla needs to be disciplined.  Physical toughness, adherence to standard operating procedures (SOP’s), a cool head and iron nerves, and endurance…the ability to keep this up for years…to go the distance.  These are the things that the Romans kept focused upon and central to their legions for many centuries.

In conclusion, small unit tactics are more than just a matter of either superior arms or numerical advantages.  They are based on common sense and knowing how to plan out your objectives, as well as a plan of attack.  You will have to be the “David” going against the Goliath, and although not shirking from battle, picking the time and place of your engagement, and the conditions and standards you will set to achieve those objectives.  It is no guarantee of success, but you are guaranteed to perform better with the proper planning, training, and clarity of purpose prior to a battle.  It can mean the difference between success and failure, life or death.  In this vein, I highly encourage you to study more about the Roman Army and the warfare in ancient times.  Take the time to clean the tarnished pitcher and you may just find a silver piece made by Revere.  The knowledge is there: seek after it and make your future rather than just allowing it to happen to you.  That’s what it’s all about.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Survival Uses for Pine Tree Resin You Haven’t Thought Of

Click here to view the original post.

There are many uses for the resin that can be collected from pine trees.  Just what is the resin and how does the pine tree use it?  Well, it’s a substance that helps protect the tree from funguses and disease, as it is antimicrobial in nature.  Resin (commonly referred to as “sap”) also enables the tree to hold in water and protect it in times of drought.  It is used by the tree as a sort of natural “self-patching” kit to help it close a wound within it, such as a deep gouge in the bark.

People have been using resin for a long time.  It can be used to make wood stain and varnish.  Yeah, I know, that’s really exciting.  So, let’s cut to the chase and list what it can do.

  1. First Aid: The sap is antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory.  A hardened piece can be softened with heat and applied to a wound to help stop bleeding.  If you chew it (softer pieces), it can treat sore throats and help with a cold.
  2. For fire and light: the resin burns, and can be used to make torches, fire starters, and makeshift candles. Read more on how to acquire a supply of fat wood for lighting fires in a snap.
  3. Glue: for patching holes and tears…also in skin, akin to super-glue on a cut (double use as first-aid there). You can mount heads on blowgun-darts, spears, and arrows with it.

There’s plenty to go around.  You can gather it in the woods both hardened and soft.  Be sure and use a container, preferably glass and not plastic to carry your resin.  People harvest it by cutting v-shaped notches into the bark in rows parallel to one another.  The resin then collects in the lowest one…a bucket or vessel is needed to catch it.  Don’t go out and destroy or hurt live trees unless it’s a genuine survival situation.  If it kills you to think about it, know that those who harvest it do so for 20 years or more with no overall ill effects on the tree.

Fossilized resin is known as amber and has been fashioned into jewelry.  Many times, the amber trapped animals in it when it was still soft resin, such as bees, ants, and spiders…and they ended up being perfectly preserved…of great historical and scientific value.  Pine tar, pitch, rosin, and turpentine can be made from pine tree resin, and although they are beyond the scope of this article, they are worth mentioning for your further research.

I’ve written articles on pine pollen and pine needle tea in the past.  As you can see, the pine trees have many uses besides just building cabins and as fuel for fires that don’t immediately jump out at you.  Learn to find and gather the resin and try to practice using it in the ways we covered here.  This is good for your ongoing survival training and further sustaining yourself when the going gets tough and the only resources you have are what information you carry in your head and the skills to make it happen.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

Top 13 Uses for Pine Trees in Woodcraft and Self-Reliance

Did you know pine trees can be used as food, medicine and survival equipment?

16 Uses of Sticky Pine Sap for Wilderness Survival and Self-Reliance

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Start a Food Stockpile on the Cheap

Click here to view the original post.

As a homesteader, one of your strong points is, by far, the food you produce and stockpile. Should something major happen, you’ll be one of the “lucky” ones who will have food on your family’s table. But what if you’ll be unable to grow that food? Maybe a volcanic eruption will hinder your gardening endeavors. […]

The post How to Start a Food Stockpile on the Cheap appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Grid Down: How to Get Water From Your Well When There is No Power

Click here to view the original post.

One of the problems faced with an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) is that your well will not be pumping water into your home.  For those living in urban areas and are relying on municipal water, your water could also be short-lived and it’s important to have a backup plan.

Well water is a different matter entirely because it is your well and you are responsible for getting the water. There are several solutions to this problem, and we’re going to close the article with a “quick fix” to enable you to get to the water.  First, let’s cover Operational Security (or OPSEC) regarding your well.

Protect and Conceal Your Water

For starters, you’re not going to be the only one who is hungry or thirsty when it strikes.  You need to camouflage, hide, or protect your well.  A structure such as a small shed could come in handy in that regard, as well as providing a little bit of relief from the elements when you need to obtain the water.  Cut a hole in the floor of the shed, and then drop it down on top of the well.  Then it’s a simple matter to insulate the edges of where the ground and the hole meet with blow-in foam or such.

There are plenty of kits out on the market for you to be able to pump your own water out of the well by hand.  Most of them have a special pneumatic part that will enable the suction to occur through PVC pipes that you join up.  There are plenty of companies to offer such.  Another way is to pick up a small generator (especially a quiet one, such as a Honda that features maintaining silence).  Have a good electrician wire you up a connection on your electrical panel, so that you can just plug in the generator and run the pump.

If you pursue this option, ensure that the intake and the exhaust for your generator are sufficient to keep carbon monoxide and exhaust from going into the home.  This is why the good electrician is worth his weight in gold.  It will vary from state to state.  In Montana, you can get away with just about everything, whereas in other states, you need to deal with permits, inspections, and even certifications to accomplish a simple task.

An Affordable Option For Getting Well Water

Here is the last suggestion, the “affordable” one.  Measure the inside diameter of your well, and take a reading to find how deep it runs.  Next, you’ll need to cut a section of heavy PVC pipe and make it so there’s an inch on all sides when you place it into the well.  Drill two holes in the top of it and attach a line to it running across on both sides and then connecting as a triangle to provide support…I prefer aluminum cable-wire on this one if you can get it.  Next, run another stretch of aluminum wire through the center of your pipe-section.

The pipe should be cut to about 2 feet in length.  A rubber ball that does not float is necessary for this one.  The ball needs to completely cover one end of the pipe.  Thread the second cable through the top part of the ball and secure it so that if you pull up on it, the ball will rest.  You want the line to parallel the lifting line that you affixed to the top of the pipe.

You’ll lower the whole apparatus, and when the pipe fills with water, pull up the ball, “seating” it at the bottom, and then lift up the whole apparatus.  The ball will hold the water in at the bottom of the pipe, and then you just drain off the water you pull up.  I’m sure there are plenty of readers out there with good engineering experience, so your comments on improved design will be most welcome.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

These articles are worth the time to read and will catch you up on pertinent information and essential preps.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

SHTF Combat Operations and Fabian Tactics

Click here to view the original post.

In one of my previous articles, I referenced several resources for you to use, and I will repeat them here.  The Field Manual for the Infantry Rifle Platoon and Squad, FM 7-8 is the manual I used when I was in the service.  (The “modern” version is FM 3-21).  Another reference is SH 21-76, the Army Ranger HandbookThese three little books war a “gold mine” of information that you will need to organize yourselves (family, extended family-friends, and allies) into a cohesive force.  Notice how I did not say “effective,” and that adjective can only be obtained by practice and repetition.  It costs to become an effective fighting force.

The cost is paid through study, time, effort, and the allocation of resources; the cost is paid through practice and repetition.

That being mentioned, why am I writing about this?  Why write about such “military matters” as combat operations?

Because after the SHTF, the Army isn’t going to be sent in to do the “dirty work” for you while you dehydrate organic tomatoes: you’re going to have to do it yourself.

“Citizen-soldier” is a unique concept that perhaps is brought to the forefront of the imagination with the citizen-soldiers of the Revolutionary War…but its roots are much older than our transposed, Northern European form of society, culture, and government.  It has its roots in much older nations, such as the ancient city-states of Greece, and the Republic (then Empire) of Rome.

Citizens were not “encouraged” to serve: they were expected to be soldiers.

Fast-forward to now.  You can do the same: for your family, for your neighborhood, and for your community.  After it hits the fan, you may have to fight any number of enemies: marauding gangs, outlaws, foreign troops, and perhaps even those of your own government gone bad.

7 Tactical Topics You Must Master Before it Hits the Fan

You have a lot of studying to do that is beyond the scope of this article to cover, but we’re going to list some topics for you, and I will cover some of them later.  These topics are not merely subjects.  They are tasks, to learn how to do and execute as an individual and as a group.  Let’s list some:

  1. Traveling formations: File, Wedge, Diamond.
  2. React to near ambush.
  3. React to far ambush (sniper fire)
  4. Setting up an ambush (L, V, and so on)
  5. Fixing and Flanking (with an “A” team/squad as base and the “B” team as flanking element) This calls for a “lift and shift” of fires on an enemy.
  6. Strategic withdrawal/Orderly retreat
  7. Setting up a cigar-shaped perimeter at night, with security

My best advice for you to train your group: LINK UP WITH A VETERAN – AN EXPERIENCED ONE. A veteran will be your best bet for being able to bring all these tasks to bear and train to standards.

A War of Attritions

You also need to follow a doctrine, and that is one of Fabian Tactics.  What are they?  Well, Fabian Tactics are also referred to as “hit and run” tactics, and are usually thought of as “guerilla,” or unconventional warfare tactics.  They can be employed as such, and usually are; however, they are also used by conventional forces when arrayed against a much larger force.

The effects of these “hit and run” tactics are not to achieve an out-and-out victory, but to delay, to harass, and to dissuade a superior force from entering into an area and conducting regular combat operations that eventually lead to taking the ground and pacifying the resistance.

The term originated with the former Consul of Rome, Quintus Fabius Maximus, who utilized such “hit and run” tactics with the Roman legions when they fought the great Carthaginian General, Hannibal.  The measure was used successfully, in which the Romans wearied the men and forces of Hannibal and dragged out the conflict for so long that the battle in Italy was unsustainable.  It forced the Carthaginian withdrawal, and then later the Romans defeated them in North Africa.

Learn from experience.  Learn from those who did it before.  Read and study about the Viet Cong…how a third-world nation held out against the United States Military.  Do you want a good read?  Invest in The Tunnels of Cu-Chi,” for an in-depth view of how the North Vietnamese Army and the Viet Cong were so successful.  Watch films on resistance…by the fighters in the Warsaw ghetto during World War II.  Do you want to know how to do it from the ground up?  Pick up the book and the film, both entitled Defiance,” about the Bielski brothers in Belorussia during WWII…how they formed and trained an effective resistance force.

Start studying these things.  One by James Michener (and not a novel, but a documentary) is entitled The Bridge at Andau,” where you can read about teenage girls that had the guts to blow up Soviet tanks during the Hungarian resistance.  Study, task organize, and train.  Above all, find yourself a vet and learn from them.

And treat the vet as a hero: as the vet should have been treated by the nation.  It may just be that the vet will end up being a hero again…in your service when the “S” hits the fan. 

 

Fight that good fight, fight it well, and fight it smart.  Fight it to win.  JJ out!

 

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

FEMA: “Each Family Needs To Have a Central Rally Point”

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, this is going to take some planning on your part, as each person and family’s geographic location and other demographics (number of family members, etc.) are going to determine courses of action.

One of the problems that may be faced is that nobody will be home when the SHTF, and there may be a considerable distance for everyone to travel to reach home when that happens.

One way to lower your risks in traveling is to plan out and create rally points and hide sites.

FEMA also emphasizes the importance of having a family rally point.

“During many emergencies family members may be easily separated, and the confusion or chaos during any disaster often makes it more difficult for families members to find each other. Each family needs to have a central rally point that is reasonably secure and relatively easy for each family member to reach, adjusted for individual means of transportation. Such a rally point starts with a safe location near a family’s home or apartment … a location outside the residence where everyone agrees to meet in the event of fire or other threats. Think about other types of emergencies you might expect, and select the rally point providing the greatest safety during any one expected emergency. Families who have agreed, in advance, to help each other in time of major emergencies, also need to select secure rally points. I’m sure you may have heard all of this advise before, but too many of us forget survival essentials.”

When Comms are Down, Each Family Should Have a Rally Point

A rally point is nothing more than a predetermined location that you and all your family members agree to meet up or link up.  We will also address hasty rally points that can be used when you’re all together.  Hypothetically, let’s say that the Anderson family consists of Working Dad, Working Mom, 15-year-old Johnny and 19-year-old Susie.  Johnny is in high school, and Susie is a student with a part-time job in a drugstore right next to the school.  Here are the distances for all of them from home:

Dad – 10 miles       Mom – 8 miles       Johnny – 10 miles       Susie – 7 miles

Everyone is our hypothetical family is working and studying on the West Side of town, and home is to the East of town, for convenience’s sake.  Let us also say that the SHTF event is an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) attack.  The optimal location would be for the rally point to be established nearest to Susie, as she is the closest to home.  The others could make their way to this rally point…. let’s say it is a large oak tree in the park…where they would link up with one another and then attempt to reach home together.

Family’s Who Have a Hide Site Can Regroup More Efficiently

In addition to this, just in case things become too “hairy” you should establish a hide site.  A hide site is nothing more than a place to rest and regroup (possibly with some supplies that are hidden or cached) before continuing your movement home.

With everyone firmly rooted in the mentality of English property law, this may require you to establish a hide site that may be located on someone else’s property, such as a business or an abandoned/dilapidated structure.  You make the call and be the judge: when the SHTF, you can write a check to the property owner if you feel the need for sleeping in the abandoned barn with only three walls and half a roof.

The point being, if you’re going to use such things to facilitate your travel home, this means you will have to plan on them beforehand and perhaps conduct a rehearsal.  The more you practice, the better you will be.  You can then formulate a plan that will remove the uncertainties out of what all of you do.  What uncertainties can you avoid?  How about these, for starters:

“Oh, my word, where’s Johnny?” or “What about Susie?  My cell phone’s down…I can’t reach her!”

Mr. and Mrs. Anderson and family can take all the guesswork out of worrying for one another by having a premade plan that has been practiced.  A good deal of security and sense of confidence will come just from having a basic plan that each family member knows, and each family member knows that all of the other family members have the plan memorized and are going to carry out their parts.

You can aid each other in these plans with Motorola’s in the vehicles, shielded by a Faraday cage.  Turn on your agreed-upon preplanned family frequency when it’s safe to do so…and make communication when you’re able.  Now, back to a hasty rally point.  When you’re traveling toward the house?  A hasty rally point is a point that is identified by the group leader of your family as a fallback location while in the middle of movement/ traveling.

The hand-and-arm signal for “Rally” in the United States Army is to extend your right hand straight up, palm flattened, and make a circular motion above your head, fingers extended and joined.  Make sure all of your family members see it.  Then point to the exact location you have in mind: a small hollow at the base of a hill, a large boulder next to a creek, or whatever is decided upon.  Make sure each family member sees both the sign for “Rally” and you pointing to exactly where it is.

If trouble arises and everyone has to run, you will meet up at this rally point and then determine if you will proceed as you were going, or what alternate route you’ll take.  Planning is everything in this, and rehearsals will make it as perfect as it can be.  Help one another and take time to consider the best locations you can use, and give yourself a better chance.  Anything that will tip the scale in your favor even a few percentage points is worth your consideration.  Fight that good fight, every day.  JJ out!

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Yellowstone Officials: “Eruption from Supervolcano Imminent”

Click here to view the original post.

Underneath the quiet nature preserve of Yellowstone is the most powerful and largest supervolcano on the planet.  The fear of it erupting in our lifetime has put many on high alert, and recently, the Steamboat Geyser of Yellowstone gave another indication that the area is under strain.

MORE than 20 police, fire, and rescue vehicles descended upon the area around Yellowstone supervolcano this week to prepare for what could be a “life or death” emergency. It was reported that a series of potential eruption at the Steamboat Geyser, the worlds tallest and active geyser occurred earlier this week and they are expecting more minor eruptions.  Source

Steamboat Geyser, Yellowstone

Seismologists who have monitored the area have warned for years that the area is under strain and has observed deformation in rocks occurring under Yellowstone for years. This deformation causes a change in pressure and magma underneath the surface.

In fact, last month, the same geyser produced similar activity giving cause for concern. Dr. Wendy Stovall, the deputy scientist in charge at the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, a branch of the United States Geological Survey, said, “There is a lot of seismicity, or earthquake activity, and deformation around the geyser basin.” She also said, there is no cause for concern at this time. “Volcanoes all over the world have hydrothermal systems. “Because all the water goes away from the heat coming up. As long as there’s water and the geysers and hot springs and mud pots are still boiling, everything is fine.”

That said, Yellowstone National Park Public Affairs are not wasting any time and have begun preparations and training exercises. They confirmed that there could be a supervolcano eruption imminently and that they were putting themselves through their paces so that they were ready for any eventuality. In fact, the emergency services associated with the National Park are discreetly performing training exercises to minimize local disturbances and to ensure that if (and when) the volcano erupts, they will be able to act decisively.

What Would Happen if the Yellowstone Supervolcano Erupted?

  • An eruption would have 2,500 times the force of Mt. Saint Helens in 1980.
  • Would be larger than any nuclear bomb ever tested.
  • The eruption would blast 240 cubic miles of rock, dust and volcanic ash into the sky. This would spread throughout the world and lower global temperatures by up to 28 degrees for years.
  • 620 cubic miles of lava would flow out of the volcano. This is equivalent to coating the entire United States in 5 inches of lava.
  • Surrounding states would be wiped off the map (Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, and Utah).

Moreover, the amount of ash dispersed from the eruption could be so great that it could literally crush buildings, foul water supplies, clog electronics, ground airplanes, and irritate lungs. If that wasn’t enough to be bothersome, the toxic gases and chemicals would enter our atmosphere and cause toxic rain thus killing more humans, animals, and plants.

An example of what an ash cloud would look like after an eruption from a supervolcano.

Given these facts, it is understandable why so many are trying to prepare for this. Be it preparing for a quick getaway or sheltering in place, there is much to prepare for. Luckily, there is still time to get some reserves in order.

How Much Warning Would We Have?

So, will supervolcanoes give us any type of warning before they erupt? It turns out that supervolcanoes would provide a few warning signs that would give us a fairly definite timeline before they go off, but unfortunately, it’s not a very comforting timeline. According to a recent study, you’d have about a year or less to prepare.

Right before any super eruption though, there is one final stage — the decompression stage — characterized by the release of gas bubbles at the eruption site.

So, the study researchers decided to analyze quartz crystals at the site of one of these massive eruptions that erupted in California about 760,000 years ago, creating the Long Valley Caldera. Quartz crystals cover surface rims of eruption sites, so by analyzing them, the researchers were able to determine the rim growth rates times of the volcano based on the concentration of titanium in the crystals. By measuring the size and growth rates of these rims, they were able to determine the length of time it took for an explosion to happen once the decompression phase had begun.

Their analysis showed that more than 70% of rim growth occurred in less than a year, indicating that the quartz rims grow mostly in just the days or months prior to an eruption.

At first glance, most preppers would find that kind of warning to be a relief. After all, if someone told you that say, a nuclear war was going to happen in a year or that a tsunami was going to wipe out your home in a few months, you would have plenty of time to either get ready or get out of dodge.

But with a supervolcano, you’re dealing with a disaster that people and governments would need more time to prepare for.  That said, having these officials decide on when to sound the alarm will be the biggest struggle. “It’s going to be hard for scientists to convince themselves just because of our only partial understanding of the complexity of the processes that are taking place,” Jacob Lowenstern of the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, California, the scientist-in-charge of the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory says. Source

 How To Prepare for the Long-Term

How does one prepare for a supervolcano? Survivability in this type of disaster is slim if you live in the surrounding areas. Animals and plant life would die, there would be mass casualties. This is the type of disaster that would change the way we live life on this planet for years. It is essential to understand this before you begin prepping for long-term survival.

Areas to concentrate your efforts on are preparing your vehicle for a last minute evacuation, having supplies to shelter in place for up to a month or longer, having a way to protect yourself from breathing in toxic chemicals,

Based on research on your part, find out if your location will be immediately affected. At this time, you must make a decision whether to bug in or bug out. Because you never know when the supervolcano will erupt, it would be wise to have a bug out bags in multiple locations (the workplace, home, and the vehicle).

If you evacuate:

Depending on where the volcano is positioned, millions of people may need to be evacuated, which even with a year’s heads up could turn into a massive humanitarian disaster. Similar to how officials plan localized evacuations, they will likely zone out the affected area and allow certain zones to leave one at a time. When it is your time to leave, make sure you have a clear plan on where you are headed, included where you stay, etc. Moreover, make sure you keep your vehicle in evacuation-ready.  This includes ensuring the vehicle is well-maintained with a full tank of gas, has the essential bug out supplies, has essential maps and navigational items. Follow the designated evacuation route and expect heavy traffic and delays. It might also be prudent to have a fire extinguisher in the car in the case of magma being near.

Prepare your home by turning off the gas, electricity, and water. As well, disconnect appliances to reduce the likelihood of electrical shock when power is restored.

If you are out of immediate impact and plan to shelter in place:

To supply the home for a supervolcano disaster, you need to plan for the long-term. It’s not only essential to have long-term food reserves, but also how to pack your food properly for the long-term. Due to the toxic rain that would cause mass extinction in the area, you want to concentrate your efforts on storing as much water as possible, as well as, food and supplies to live off of for a long-term emergency. As a starting point, fill sinks and bathtubs with water as an extra supply for washing. This is a great week-by-week preparedness course you can use to get your supplies organized and prepped for the longevity.

You can also expect to be without power and alternative light sources will need to be prepared. To keep toxic dust from entering the home, ensure that any holes in windows are repairs and close off the fireplace and furnace dampers.

Communication will be limited, therefore add new batteries to your radio, contact family members and let them know your plans and backup plans. Remember that communication services may be overwhelmed or damaged during this type of emergency. Have medical supplies prepped and extra prescription medications, if possible.

Another concern you should consider is the toxic air that will be present after the eruption. Two years ago, after the volcano eruption in Indonesia, thousands complained of lung irritation shortly after the eruption. At the time, a local official urged the government to send out medical teams to areas most affected by volcanic ash, as the health awareness of local people is low and they might not consider coughing fits or flulike symptoms to be very serious. He added that ongoing exposure to the ash will destroy the lungs of people inhaling it.  Having a way to protect your airways will greatly improve your health during this disaster. If you do not have access to a gas mask, have extra respiratory masks, handkerchiefs or cloth to cover your nose and mouth.

 After the eruption:

Once the eruption has ceased, stay indoors until the ash has settled. There could be a danger of roof collapse due to excess ash. If this is the case, seek emergency shelter elsewhere. To prevent toxic dust and ash from entering the home, close and seal all windows with duct tape and keep all heating, and air conditioning units and fans turned off. As well, because volcanic ash can clog engines, avoid running your vehicle. Otherwise, you could damage moving parts and stall vehicles. During this time, you should avoid driving in heavy ash fall unless absolutely required. If you need to drive, keep the speed down to 50 km per hour or slower.

If you have proper body protection, begin clearing ash from flat or low-pitched roofs and rain gutters. Protect yourself from ash by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, using googles and a respiratory mask.

 

 

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Common Sports Items You Can Use to Protect Yourself in an Emergency

Click here to view the original post.

OK, I’m going to start this off with almost a “disclaimer,” of sorts.  Please do not think that I do not buy gear of top quality; however, I’m skeptical about much of the equipment out there on the market.  Just because something has a brand name attached to it doesn’t mean that it is quality.  Much of the stuff that is “garbage” and is passed off as being “quality” is manufactured on the cheap in China and other countries that are not trying to produce something that will last a long time.

That being mentioned, the article is specifically for people who don’t have $80 to “dump” into Oakley Tactical shooting gloves, or Tactical Military knee pads at $70 to $80 per pair.  And more.  While there are some great places to find quality tactical gear, this article can give you some ideas on how to build up a supply of reserves (or daily, whichever you prefer, with your “good” gear in reserve) for when times are tough.

You can find some good deals for used sporting equipment by simply doing a search on the internet. Ebay, Amazon are some big names that have used sporting equipment, but there are other websites that specialize in used sports gear. So, check it out in your free time. That said, let’s jump into it!

5 Types of Sports Equipment That Can Be Modified Into Protective Gear

Gloves: One of the things the Oakley’s have that attracts a lot of people are those hardened plastic “knuckles” on the outside.  That’s fine.  I personally feel that if you have the glove that covers the knuckle, you don’t need an “artificial” one: if you’re going to strike a blow, you’re not going to hit the individual on top of his helmet.  You’re going to pick a “soft” spot such as his jaw, his temple, his throat, etc.  There are some substitutes.  Weightlifting gloves, and motorcycle-riding gloves.  The tips of the fingers are removed, yet they’re padded on the palms.  Pick up the ones made of thick leather and maybe a Velcro strap to close around the wrist.  This will protect your palms, give your knuckles a shield, and still enable you to use your fingertips where gloves may (and often do) interfere.

Related Article: These Simple Training Techniques Will Prepare You For Emergency Hand-to-Hand Combat

Football and Rugby Shorts: These are great, made of nylon (Spandex-type) or polyester, stitched to take some punishment with padding on the hips and on the thighs usually sewn into the material.  When you’re lying in the prone, this is a great help.  Enables you to cushion those areas.  Helps to minimize bumps and bruises, as well.  Drawback: they don’t have “slots” to allow you to urinate easily.  Either make your own and emplace “button snaps” on them, or you’ll have to pull down on the waistband if you’re a guy.  If you’re a gal, well, it’s not a major concern.

Knee and Elbow Pads: As mentioned before, there is no need to go out and spend all that money on those pads.  There are plenty of rollerblading and skateboarding knee and elbow pads for half those prices that are just as durable, if not more so.  You should shop around to find the best deal and the best quality pieces.  Try to stick to earth tones or black in terms of color.  Used sporting goods all over the place will be able to get you a complete set of both for about $20 in total, and they work.

Wrist Guards: Now, on this one I’m partial…I like the ones that give you support and are made out of leather.  You may have to have these custom-ordered.  Reason for them?  Leather will protect the wrists from being slashed, either by a sharp edge or by a knife.  These, too, can be made for you at a leather-works shop.  Buckled ones are best.  If you’re not going to go with leather, then you can pick these up inexpensively for under $10 at Wal-Mart in the sporting goods section.

Shin Guards: The ones made for soccer players are the best.  Excellent to strap on the outside of your pants over your calves and tuck into your boots.  Protects you going through clear-cut, swamps, and other places that the shins are likely to take a beating.  Not hard to find and not expensive at all.

Not mentioned is the everyday baseball bat. I covered this in a different article on how this can be used in a self-defense manner and add any attention to yourself for having it in the vehicle.

We have covered a few things to give you some ideas.  Many of these pieces that are normally used in sporting events are designed specifically to take a beating, which is what you need for equipment in the first place.  It stands to reason that if you can save a few dollars and still get what you needed in the equipment?  More power to you.  Adapt and be versatile, and you’ll come to find the best deals often don’t just involve an outlay of cash but some scrutiny to see whether something more affordable will foot the bill.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Money Mondays: Will Your Preps Outlive You?

Click here to view the original post.

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com I was having a conversation with one of my elderly neighbors and the subject of downsizing and giving away their survival supplies came up.  She felt at her age she preferred to give some of her surplus emergency supplies to a younger family.  The conversation reminded me of an article I read a few months ago:  Survivalist spent decades stockpiling food then gave it to hungry hurricane victims  As you can see from the […]

The post Money Mondays: Will Your Preps Outlive You? appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

How To Escape Unseen and Cover Your Tracks in Winter

Click here to view the original post.

Let’s say the you-know-what hit the fan and you did everything right. You made short and long-term emergency plans, had multiple escape routes and somehow were still tracked down and captured. In a post-SHTF world, all bets are off. The world you would find yourself in is unpredictable at best. So what would you do if you were taken captive? Your only option would be to find a way to escape.

Related article: If You See These 14 Signs It’s Time to Bug Out

Timing is Crucial

So, when is the best time to run from pursuers?  Wintertime can often be unrelenting but could offer you an opportunity in this situation. If you know how to read the signs Mother Nature gives when a storm is about to hit, then you could time your escape perfectly. A snowstorm could be the best time to escape. The middle of a snowstorm will give you good cover and erase any tracks you make at the same time – especially with a good head start. That said, it is important for you to know beforehand and train how to navigate in the snow.

The pain is that the snow levels can be at a depth where you will need snowshoes. This video can show you how to use a knife to make snowshoes out of evergreens and cordage. (Your paracord bracelet would come in handy for this!) Now, with the head start, your snowshoes will leave tracks that will be almost indistinguishable in a few hours.

How To Cover Your Tracks

You can help it along.  Take a fallen branch…2 feet in length or more and drag this behind you over top of your tracks…smooths them out.  By the time the pursuers reach the area you’ve traversed, the falling snow will have done the trick.

Bear in mind this doesn’t beat the dogs, who track by both sight and scent.  We’ve discussed beating them in other articles.  This is for the two-legged “dogs” who pursue you.  Also, part of keeping your trail to a minimum is to look where you step.  With snow, to step on an embankment that may collapse on one side is a no-go.

Rule: Do your best to maintain the overall visual “continuity” of the terrain you’re traveling over.

This applies to any season, and it means to keep everything as natural looking as can be.  You can be aided in a snowstorm flight by high winds that will also help to blow the snow (especially if it’s a “dry” snowfall) across your trail.  If there’s a fallen log, don’t step on it or go over it…go around it if possible.  You want everything to appear au naturale to the pursuers…nothing out of place.  Take special care not break off any branches or step on any fallen timber and cause a fresh break.  Foliage that has snow on it?  If a man-sized patch of green shows through where small evergreen saplings are growing…they’ll know that a human passed through there.

Confuse the Trackers By Doubling Back

Doubling back is a good way to throw them off…if you do it right. You can reverse the snowshoes when you head back, as well…but you must make sure that you brushed over top of your first set of tracks before you double back.  A good tracker will also see more weight is distributed overtop of the toe area.  Lead it to the edge of a cliff and throw them off your trail if you can do it.  Want a good one?  Bring an extra jacket and an empty backpack with you.  Wrap boughs in it and throw it off the cliff, after filling the backpack with snow.

Your “dummy” will be partially covered with snow when they find it and they’ll waste time getting down below to check it out.  Time is what you want to buy yourself.  As many times as you can break off the main trail, throw a “division” and then double back, the better.  It is going to depend on how much time you have, and in how good a physical shape you’re in.

Covering Your Tracks in the Mud

During the warmer months, with the Spring Thaw, the first thing you’re going to have to deal with is the mud…and mud means a problem.  Mud means footprints, and mud that clings to your boots and is dragged with you…an exceptional problem when trying to cover your tracks. Due to the differing terrains, you will encounter this issue – especially in a rocky field with scrub grass.  Suddenly, tracks from “The Golem” are seen making a trail in the grass for about 50 meters.  Bad juju.

When transitioning from a muddy area to a terrain with little or no mud, you must have a way of taking care of this so that you don’t leave the tracks.  The answer: Teva’s.  Yes, the hardened-sole flip-flops that can take a rugged gravel creek bottom with sharp stones.  Pack these Teva’s and a sturdy plastic bag for when you’re changing the terrain.  Take off the muddy boots and throw them in the bag. Switch to the Teva’s for the entire time you cross the new terrain.  Switch back again when you come to more mud and slop to cross.

I’m a firm believer in using the creeks if the bottom is firm, as prints will be left in a muddy bottom.  For this, you’ll want to pick up some neoprene booties as well as some Rocky Gore-Tex socks.  Then you can protect your feet from the temperature of the creek.  Knowing the terrain beforehand is critical.  You can follow outcroppings of rock and submerged rock flats for a long way in a creek if the depth is below the knee without making any trail.  Bust up your travel of a trail and use both sides of the creek intermittently when you must emerge from it when possible.

One of the things you can do is to make yourself a pair of “boots” for the spring months…out of tough nylon or plastic bags.  Tie off four (4) pieces of broken branches to your boots, forming a “tic-tac-toe” arrangement of lines…making sure the ends don’t protrude too far from your boot edges.  Then pile some leaves and brush in your bags.  Step on this “mass” and then tie up the edges of the bag around your feet.  This will help you to keep from making tracks by removing your sole from the equation and giving you more surface area to distribute your weight.

You’ll have to repair or change it off every so often, so have an extra supply of bags you can switch off to.  The field expedient method is to do it with shirts or pieces of cloth taken from an article of clothing or from a sheet of material.  Just remember to tie up the corners, with the “biomass” of leaves and scrub beneath your feet.  Next installment, we’ll cover the dry summer and desert conditions, as well as some specialty information.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Post-Collapse Survival Bartering: 10 Items That Will Be Worth Their Weight in Gold

Click here to view the original post.

 

As a nation, we are faced with a host of different problems from many directions, both domestically and internationally.  The statistical improbability of a disaster occurring (such as war or economic collapse) decreases with the passage of time and the addition of other factors that lead into such.  For a couple of good “primers” on collapse and warfare (overall effects on societies and civilizations), I recommend two by Jared Diamond: Guns, Germs, and Steel,” and Collapse.”

When any kind of society or civilization becomes unraveled, usually the nation’s cash loses its value within days at the most.  We’re going to cover a few general categories of items to keep for barter (meaning “regular” or frequent trade), citing individual examples within each category.  In The Prepper’s Blueprint, the idea of bartering was covered extensively and it isn’t always acquiring tradable goods, but also tradable services.

If a long-term emergency causes and end to our existing monetary system and an end to the exchange of fiat currency that our world currently operates on, people will resort back to bartering for skills and services in order to make transactions.

Living in a bartering environment means one must possess certain goods or skills that others find value in. As Brandon Smith writes on the subject, ‘If you wish to survive after the destruction of the mainstream system that has babied us for so long, you must be able to either make a necessary product, repair a necessary product, or teach a necessary skill.’”

The Prepper’s Blueprint

Do Not Barter The Following Items:

Before I “hit the list,” I’m going to mention what I will not barter or only in an emergency, and why.

  • Ammunition, Firearms, or parts for firearms: The first two can be used against you, and the latter can be employed to fix something that can be used against you. [I will not barter with them ever]. That said, in a previous article, I mentioned the importance of knowing how to repair firearms. This is a barterable skill and one that will be of high importance in a post-collapse scenario.
  • Medicine: I need that for me and mine…and will not barter with it regularly [Only in an emergency…and never any antibiotics].
  • NBC gear and supplies: This takes the form of masks, suits, survey meters (Geiger counters), dosimeters, anti-rad tablets, and so forth [I will not barter with them ever]. To find these items for your preps, click here.

10 of the Best Items for Bartering

  1. Fire Starting Materials: Books of matches, disposable lighters, wicks and flints for Zippo’s. All these guys are worth their weight in gold in the event of a collapse.  Check out some of these fire starting materials for ideas. The great thing about this is they are always needed, simple to trade, and they don’t take up a lot of space to store.
  2. Over-the-Counter (OTC) First-Aid supplies: Small tins of band-aids, aspirin, Tylenol, antacid tablets, gauze bandages, first-aid tape, alcohol prep pads, cough and cold supplies. These are differentiated from “medicine” as I mentioned not to trade, in that they are small, sundry-type articles that are valuable and in short supply when times are tough.  They are also easily affordable and do not take up much storage space. Here are 50 of the most popular medical supplies that preppers put away for emergencies, and some of them can be bought for cheap at the Dollar Store.
  3. Multiple Toiletry Items: Hotel-types of small individual soap bars, shampoo bottles, towelettes, toothpaste, and shave cream. These you can ask a hotel or motel manager to order you an extra case: pay him beforehand and give him some extra.  In this way, they’ll all be in a big cardboard box and individually packaged up and ready to trade.
  4. Batteries: Will always be in short supply when you need them. It will be that way for others as well.  Just be careful to protect them from moisture when you store them and inspect them frequently to make sure there aren’t any leakages. There are certain batteries that are best for off-grid retreats. You can read about them here. Having an excess of these will be a good investment. As well, there are ways to make a battery last (practically) forever and this could be great knowledge to possess when TSHTF.
  5. Sewing supplies: Yes, needles, threads, thimbles, and safety pins. Sewing kits cost almost nothing when you buy one in the discount stores.  Clothing repair will be very important, as good serviceable clothing will be in short supply.
  6. Small tins and cans of meat: This is always usable as your own supply, of course, and can be bartered. 3 to 6-ounce cans of things such as sardines, herring, chicken, tuna fish, and the likes…they are small enough to be able to trade, and they’ll be worth their weight in gold for their portability.
  7. Candles: especially in the form of tea-lights, and small candles (of the types listed as “emergency” candles). They are inexpensive and easy to barter for when there’s no electricity.  Remember to store them vertically, as if you lay them on their side, the wick will gradually “migrate” toward the bottom…and then the candle will be messed up.
  8. Miniatures of alcohol: Alcohol has many, many uses in a long-term emergency and it is excellent for trading, whether someone wants a drink or wants it to tincture something. We’ve already had discussions on this “WCTU-sensitive” subject.  If you’re against alcohol, once again, that is for you to decide.  Others may need the alcohol to deal with the vehemence of the “righteous indignation” of others.  Whatever the case, they will be easy to trade and in a “controlled” fashion.
  9. Tobacco: Once again, to paraphrase “Alice ‘N Chains,” it’s your A couple of cartons of cigarettes are easy enough to store, as well as a box or two of good cigars.  Remember: they have anti-helminthic properties…they’ll fight intestinal worms.  They’ll definitely trade. Read more here.
  10. Sweets and other luxuries: This to include some chocolate, powdered cocoa, honey (I recommend a big box of the individual packets for personal use), packaged jellies and syrups. They’ll trade, and they’ll be more than sought after.

This list is not meant to be exhaustive.  For instance, seeds are not covered in this list but would make a good bartering item too. I gave you what my personal favorites are.  I didn’t include precious metals, small tool sets, and about a thousand items you can mention or list.  I listed the top ten that I would want to use to barter that will be in short supply.  Use your best judgment and set your own standards for yourself, and stock up on what you need for an economic collapse of its own or one that is subsequent to another thing such as a war.  Afterward, you may find that you’ve made some sound investments…and thought ahead.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Prep of the Week: Prepare for the Worst-Case with Top Tier Gear

Click here to view the original post.

It’s a cold, hard fact that we live in uncertain times and things don’t seem to be getting any better. For years I have urged you all to get preparations together for short and long-term situations, and all the while we continue sliding down the slippery slope of disaster.

Something Isn’t Right

We need only to look at the evening news to know that something isn’t right. Each night it seems we hear about another mass shooting, the latest riot, information censorship, and threats of impending war. I would be lying to you if I said I felt safe. But I will repeat what I’ve always told you, we must keep going and we must get prepared for whatever corner we turn. And if this is what our current state is, we must prepare accordingly.

Prep of the Week: 10% Off Your Top Tier Gear Order

The folks at Top Tier Gear believe in preparing for the absolute worst-case scenarios and have been stocking items to get preppers ready for nuclear and biological threats, active shooters, and off-grid scenarios.

Ed Thomas, owner of Top Tier Gear said over the last several months, they have seen a drastic increase in tactical body armor sales due to the mass casualties occurring.

“People are realizing that sometimes a gun may not be enough so they want to add force multipliers to their preps to give them an advantage in an emergency. “

Their products are either assembled and manufacured in the great U.S. of A and are the best quality around.

Get 10% your order for the rest of March and use the coupon code: READYNUTRITION

With all the unpredictability going on in public places, these items would come in handy and save lives!

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

“Nuclear Blast to your Front!  React!” – How the Army Trains to Survive an ‘Atomic Battlefield’

Click here to view the original post.

The title of this article is the exact preparatory command (situation), and the command of execution given to us in the Army to drill a nuclear attack.  Readers, we all hope every day that our “society does not come to a screeching halt via a nuclear attack.  But what if it does?  OK, we’ve “gamed” it from a perspective that you haven’t become a shadow-silhouette on a burned wall and been vaporized…that you’re not living in a “ground zero” targeted area.  If you are, then you have several options beforehand: if there’s warning, bug out and get out of the blast area, or move out of the area to a place that is not a target.

Their will be skeptics, and their ilk that will ask a litany of questions like: “How are you gonna save everyone?”, “What about those who can’t afford property…?”,  “Yeah, like we’re going to get warning!”

AD INFINITVM, AD NAVSEVM.

Survival is not a guarantee.

Are you’re willing to examine your lifestyle and do what it takes?  Make the necessary changes and act?  That is called “adaptation,” and it is what has enabled the species to survive…the minority who emerge from the rubble when the skeptical majority are dead.  We’re talking “hardball,” here, and it is “sink or swim,” although we don’t shoot for that…we want others to make it through…but there comes a time when you must cut your losses and take care of you and yours.

Related: 15 Priorities You Need to Follow In the Event of a Nuclear War

If you’re willing to do what it takes (sometimes in the face of skepticism and even ridicule) and go “against the grain,” you may give yourself the edge helping you survive.

Enough said there.  What if the worst does happen, and you happen to be five to ten miles away from a blast?  Skeptics, we do have information that will work besides the results of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: the “Atomic Soldiers” of the United States armed forces.  Yes, during the 1950’s, whole battalions were emplaced in the southwestern deserts of the U.S. and subjected to be the “test” subjects of nuclear explosions.  Those tests were real, and the results they generated were real.  We don’t want it to have been for nothing: take the knowledge they earned, and use it.

The U.S. Army Training Tips for Surviving an Atomic Battlefield

FM 21-75, a publication of the Department of the Army, entitled “Combat Training of the Individual Soldier and Patrolling” was released in June of 1957Chapter 7 is the point of focus, entitled “Survival on the Atomic Battlefield.”  This 10-page chapter enumerates many good techniques of what to do that can be adapted to civilian life and society when the split-second decision time comes down the pike.  Excellent diagrams relevant to situations: in the open, flat on the ground, behind a small rise, in a ditch, behind a wall, and in a prepared shelter of some kind.

We’ll condense some of it for those who may not be able to pick up one of these into some finer points, and add other:

  1. Think and act fast. Seek the closest available protection.  Do not try to reach distant shelter initially.
  2. Remain in that initial posture for protection for at least 10 seconds to avoid the blast, heat, and debris.
  3. If you’re in the open, flatten and face in the direction of the explosion with your face down against the ground and covering over your head and face with your hands/forearms
  4. You need to seek shelter within the first 12 to 24 hours, as radioactive particles in the form of dust will settle back down to earth in-line with wind and weather patterns.
  5. Radiation begins to deteriorate rapidly, however, you need to make plans of being in a permanent and shielded shelter with enough supplies to last for a month.
  6. The more shielding/earth/material between yourself and the detonation, the better a chance you will have to make it…and this also includes fallout…it is mass that blocks radiation from penetration.
  7. BIGGIE! Prior to anything happening during your routine/daily tasks, study everything around you before an attack!   This means to know where your fallout shelters (prior to Clinton nixing the Civil Defense program in ’96) are located in your area…know where strong basements and other areas to shelter in place are located.

Recommended Prep: Anti-Radiation Pills

Seem farfetched?  Rest assured, these steps are warranted.  Personally, I am not placing my fate or that of my family in the hands of politicians or attempting to court public favor or acceptance of what I have done…and my steps are all my own…not to be revealed to anyone.  You’ll have to weigh it in your own mind.  There’s plenty of literature out there.  We have mentioned Cresson Kearney’s Nuclear War Survival Skills plenty of times.  Another good resource is Bruce D. Clayton’s book “Life After Doomsday.”

The more you study and prepare, the better you’ll make the odds work for you…if you survive the initial attack.  In the end, the responsibility to act lies with you, and all the supplies, equipment, and even training in the world will not substitute for being able to make a timely decision and act upon it.  Should that fateful day arrive, the time to prepare for it is beforehand: don’t be left without a chair when the music stops.  Stay in that good fight.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Easiest Way To Create an Emergency Water Supply That Lasts All Winter

Click here to view the original post.

There are reasons that everyone disdains converting snow and ice to water, such as “it’s not cost or heat effective,” or “you can’t get much from it,” etc.  In a survival situation, though, you may not have that much of a choice and this could be your only long-term water supply.  With many surface water bodies freezing solid, it renders it difficult to remove the ice and then melt it down.  Snow is the most-maligned of the two, but you can still take water from it.  Let’s go over some of the numbers and explore a few methods to get some water in the wintertime when you’re out in the wilds.

Learn About Snow Water Equivalent

The volume of ice can be converted to the volume of water by multiplying the ice’s volume by 0.92 for water volume.  This can be helpful, especially if you have a way of measuring blocks of ice or ice that has been formed within a container where you know the dimensions.  Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) is the most common way to measure the amount of water that is in a given amount of snow.  The “magic” number here is 10% of the volume of the snow is equal to the volume of water.  Therefore, if you had a large container (such as a kid’s plastic swimming pool) filled with 2 feet of snow?  Your amount of water would equal 2.4 inches, for the remaining area and volume of the pool.

The Simplest Way to Harvest Water in Winter

I mentioned these just to give you an idea.  Naturally, you won’t be lugging around a Coleco plastic swimming pool in the woods with you.  You can, however, pack in gallon-sized Ziploc plastic bags, and here’s where your math comes into play to figure volume.  You also need something to heat it up in.  Barring stumbling across a sizeable container made of metal you can throw on the fire, you may just have to take your time and use a good military issue Army canteen cup, or a steel bottle or container of some kind that will tolerate a heating over/on an open flame.

Ice can be found and “harvested” in the form of icicles and then gathered in volume prior to heating it and converting it to water.  This conversion of snow and ice to water will be an ongoing thing while you’re out in the wild, as if you do not have a method to keep your water in a liquid state, then it will refreeze.  This is one area that a Camelbak can be useful.  The bladder can be kept against the skin or next to the body, wrapped up in layers of clothing and using your body heat to keep it liquid.

One of the problems with the winter is the reduced amount of direct sunlight.  There are not many sunny days (comparatively speaking), and the sunlight is not often strong enough or long-lasting enough to make good use of.  Another thing you may consider is an ice auger to be able to drill a hole in a lake and extract water for your use.  Of course, you’ll have to hurry, and you’ll have to purify that water either chemically, by boiling, or via filtration, but it will work.

Make sure your converting ice and snow to water complement your other activities, such as cooking or resting and warming yourself up by a campfire.  Don’t just allow those coals to warm you: put them to work!  Thaw out ice or snow for water each chance you have to build a fire.  This way you’ll stay one step ahead, and continually replenish your container.  Stay warm, melt that snow and ice, and remember it is important: most people tend to drink less in the winter because it’s cold.  Thirst is a late sign of dehydration.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Every Second Counts: Fire Preparedness Tips Every Homeowner Should Know

Click here to view the original post.

When it comes to wildfires, safety tips like evacuating in a timely manner and listening to individuals who are in charge during rescue efforts will without a doubt keep you and your family safe.   Wildfires may be natural or man-made, and can damage hundreds of acres of land, leaving behind a long trail of […]

The post Every Second Counts: Fire Preparedness Tips Every Homeowner Should Know appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Your Computer May Not Survive a Collapse But These Off-Grid Archiving Strategies Will

Click here to view the original post.

I will admit that I am not the most technologically “savvy” individual, and I’m certainly not armed with all the modern “conveniences” that most people take as a necessity.  Cell phones, Kindle devices, M-pad/I-pod/UFO-whatever-for-music…don’t use ‘em.  That being said, I know they have their merits, but it’s the same type of lesson I tried to impart to my son when he went into the service.

He picked up one of those high-speed wrist compasses…the digital kind…but I constantly remind him to use that “old-fashioned” lensatic compass as his mainstay.  He listens, although he prefers to use his gizmo.  I’m just happy he carries the lensatic with him and knows how to use it.  I made sure he knew how to use it.

Create a Survival Library with Hard-Copy Notes and Archives

In this light, remember that all of our technology can collapse in the blink of an eye.  The collapse can be precipitated by any number of things…grid failure/brownouts, an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) strike, a nuclear war, or just a societal collapse that has a “downtrickle” of losing critical infrastructure and modern power systems.  In that light, it is best to take your digital and electronic libraries and ensure they are duplicated into hard-copy.  Consider investing in a typewriter to pass this valuable information on. Let’s give some suggestions, and you can take them, and tailor them to suit your needs.

  1. Whenever you watch any kind of training video/DVD, you should always take notes and summarize it. Pick up the key points, supplementing them with your own notes and diagrams to help clarify the instruction.  A composition-type notebook works well for this.  I take rough notes on a sheet of paper, and then recopy them into the notebook.
  2. Summarize books and other works: Turn a 300-page book into 8-10 pages of intense notes…summarize and shoot for brevity and clarity in your notes. This is not to say, “don’t keep books,” but rather, read them and take good notes that you can glance at to glean any important information you may need to use.
  3. Print out the important how-to’s and “archive” notes: don’t just store it on hard drive or jump drive! Although that is important, you want to make sure your information is printed off.  Strive for accuracy, compactness, neatness, and organization in all of your notes.
  4. File similar subjects in a binder/common protector: This is especially important when you’re dealing with things such as first-aid and medicine. Protect the info., and keep it well-organized
  5. Military Med Chests: Yes, made out of strong aluminum, these stackable canisters are perfect to place your archives and books inside after wrapping them up in plastic…preferably contractor-grade bags around 6 mils in thickness.
  6. Durable plastic bins: These can work if they’re really tough and are water-tight. The biggest problems with notes, archives, and books are water, mildew, bugs, and fire, in that order.  You want to make sure everything is in plastic and sealed up tight.
  7. Duplicate everything…1-6 up there? You should have one copy out for your general use, and another sealed up in a safe place.

The last measure mentioned is not just for you and your family.  The last measure is to provide information for those not here with us yet, or those not old enough to use the information right now.  Think beyond yourself and your own lifetime, or even the lifetimes of your kids.  You want to leave a legacy?  Who cares if they know who you are?  There will still be those who will thank you for leaving records and how-to’s they can use.  Want a good example?  Read the book “Lucifer’s Hammer,” by Niven and Pournelle.  Be more than a student, or a secretary.  Be a custodian…of information…. a caretaker, taking care for future generations.  Hard copy for all information…to include books!…is the way to save the knowledge.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

3,000 Survival Books You Can Download for Free

10 Books That Could Actually Save Your Life

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How Horrific Will It Be For The Non-Prepper?

Click here to view the original post.

Article originally posted at SHTFPlan

Editor’s Note: You have no doubt had your own set of issues dealing with friends and family members that simply don’t see the writing on the wall. The following article may serve to assist you in convincing those who simply don’t know, don’t want to know, don’t care, or have never even thought to contemplate. Some of the scenarios outlined below may be frightening, as they should be because when it hits the fan millions of people will be thrown into desperation with no hope of a solution. Be Informed provides a variety of point-by-point details that may (and hopefully will) convince the non-prepared individual to at least insulate themselves with the basic necessities. The consequences of not doing so, as you’ll see, are severe and often deadly.


I have become personally so disenchanted with the way people fail to prep.  People still don’t understand how important it is to put away.  I have gotten into arguments over this and had cretins call me a fool because I put away food, water, and supplies.  I thought about this and the frustration that other preppers have with this laid-back idiotic attitude that there is no need for preparation.  There are good people that just can’t/won’t start preparing. They have the money to do so, but just don’t want to.  Many have only seen what happens to non-preppers on TV, but it still doesn’t make an impact.

In this article, I detail some hardcore realities to show just how awful it will be for those that don’t prep. Every one of these scenarios is something that has occurred to the non-prepper throughout history.  While strong images come to mind, the purpose is to jar some people out of their inaction and into action before it is too late.

Preppers are good people and care much about those around them, and unless something does jar those around them that choose not to prep, their own survival chances could be reduced.  For every bit of food, water, ammunition, or supplies you sacrifice to the non-prepper, the fewer irreplaceable supplies are left for you and your family in a crisis situation.  It is hoped that the following can help certain people put into TRUE perspective just how horrific it will be for those that don’t prepare.

Here are the awful consequences for those refusing to prep.

As the world continues to decay at multiple facets, the common person has and continues to be lulled into a sense that everything is improving and will continue to for the distant future.  After all, to them unemployment has peaked out and will drop until everyone that wants to work will easily be able to find good paying work,  North Korea is no threat because all their long range “bottle rockets” fizz out,  sanctions will eventually make Iran give up their nuclear program, oil prices will start going down after June or so,  Europe will bail out Greece and Spain and everyone else,  and U.S. debt will eventually come under control.

After 2012 everyone that has prepared themselves will go back to more “sensible” lives.  “Good times are coming”, baseball season is here, let’s get back to watching some more crackerjack news.

It is amazing how people become good conversationalists with most others discussing all the gossip related news while becoming mentally tranquilized into a totally deceptive state of denial of truly dangerous issues of the times.  It’s the blind leading the blind… right off the cliff.

Rather than dealing with harsh reality, people surround themselves with easy to digest material that can be talked about without directly influencing anyone’s lives.  Meaningless chatter.  Even for those unwilling to even think to prepare for a societal catastrophic event, there is also no desire to even face the extreme possibility of a sudden loss of one’s employment.  A personal SHTF.

Look at some of the terrible personal pain experienced in America right now – and it hasn’t even hit the fan on a grand scale. Those people who have lived it up on credit, who failed to put much of anything away for a rainy day, who’ve lost their job, and who eventually lost their unemployment benefits are experiencing the first level of collapse. This is happening to millions of people in our own country, all around us, as we speak.

These Americans, who once enjoyed the luxuries that modern living had to offer, are now at their wits end, with very little hope for a return to their previous lives. They are no longer able to pay most or any of their bills. Many have to humiliatingly turn to others for help to pay for food, or worse, to obtain old, unhealthy and poor tasting food from locally funded food banks. Their credit cards are totally worthless. Many have been evicted from their homes and have uprooted their families to live either on the street, in tent cities, with relatives, or have been forced to live at homeless shelters, They’ve have had their vehicles repossessed, or simply can’t afford the gasoline anymore. Their living conditions often make it difficult, if not impossible, to look presentable for job interviews. For many, the life of stability they knew just a short while ago is gone, replaced with fear and a constant stress to the point of nervous breakdown.

A personal economic meltdown is confined to the individual or family, or at worst a few families.  The human civilization remains intact and so do society’s safety nets.

With food assistance, rental assistance, homeless shelters, and family to turn to, even the most destitute are almost always able to find some sort of help – however menial.

It is no wonder with these known assistance programs, then, that people have forgotten or never thought to consider what happens IF and WHEN human civilization goes through a strong enough SHTF event.  If that happens on a mass scale what happens to everyone that needs help that has not prepared ahead of time?  What happens when governments are in such total disarray or destroyed altogether that they can’t help even if they wanted to?

The media and others have portrayed the good people that sacrifice much if not all “luxuries” of life to prepare themselves and their family and friends for extreme times, as chicken littles.  Those who have made the choice to store up emergency food, water, and other necessities to avoid extreme life-threatening risks, including suffering horribly during and after a widespread SHTF event, are laughed at and ridiculed often for “wasting” their lives on delusional paranoia.

But who is delusional? Those who see the signs around them and understand how vulnerable the system is, or those who believe that things never change, that politicians have their best interests at heart, and that if the worst happens the government will be there to provide everything they may need?

How many have considered the dire consequences of their failure to prepare in the event that the infrastructure and everything a country’s people depend on totally collapses?

The misery from long-term unemployment and lack of money is like a walk in the park compared to the severe anguish and dangerous conditions that await those who have failed to prepare for the aftermath of a large scale cataclysm.  The “minor” problems of unemployment that seem extremely major and painful to most today should serve as a wake-up call to what life will be like when something much, much worse happens – when those proverbial safety nets are no longer there to catch us.

Many preppers have become deeply frustrated at those around them, especially those that truly mean something to them because they simply refuse to put away anything at all for emergencies.  The prepper is usually a person that cares a lot and it is often difficult for them to take a tough stance towards the people that they care about.  However, unless someone changes the habits of those people that fail to get ready, decisions will need to be made, and they won’t be easy.

The choice of what the prepared prepper should do will boil down to either adding these people to their own circle or survival group and reduce the group’s safety, supplies and self-sufficiency, OR, they will have to let the non-prepper fend for themselves.  This is a very personal choice, and each of us will need to decide based on our own morals, ethics and personal relationships.

As a last-ditch effort, discussing the following scenarios with the non-prepper may help them understand what life will be like without what has sustained them so comfortably for so long.

This is the hard reality the non-prepper needs to understand:

  • Without power, the water company cannot get water to their faucets. Without water, dehydration occurs within 24 hours. Dehydration causes much suffering before death.
  • Toilets in homes, unless they have an incineration toilet that still needs power to work, don’t flush without water.  Where will they go to the bathroom and then where will they dispose of human waste?
  •  There will be no clean water available anywhere, especially in major cities, and they cannot live more than about three days without it.
  • Drinking dirty and polluted water will make them incredibly sick and accelerate the dehydration process.
  • Polluted water must be purified and that means having a good filter, bleach or other disinfectants, or fuel and something to boil water with.
  • Understand just how fragile the power and the infrastructure is that pumps water to the public. A breakdown in our power infrastructure or a cyber attack against utility systems will render them useless.
  • A single event can rapidly lead to a cascade of other events that would certainly collapse almost, if not, everything. This is why major snow storms, hurricanes or solar events in the past have affected millions of people in an entire region all at once.
  • A single, seemingly unimportant event may become quite terrible as its repercussions spread; this can include a far and away disaster.
  • Understand that the economies of the world are so interwoven that when one major economy falls it affects everyone.
  • Not having any food in the house means that if the stores are emptied suddenly in a bad enough situation that there will be no food available for a long period of time afterward. Recent history of disasters around the world has shown that stores can literally be emptied in minutes.
  • Think about how totally horrible the feeling of being very hungry is and what circumstances would cause one to be desperate enough to eat anything.
  • ALL stores can be closed instantly under martial law.
  • Understand that you may not be able to purchase anything after it starts, especially with any credit cards.
  • Understand the complexity of food and water distribution; breaks in these chains can stop anything from getting to the people.
  • What life will be like if no toilet paper is stored?
  • Understand that without light sources, the night will be pitch black, often with zero visibility.
  • There will be no communications, other than probably martial law type of instructions over the radio, that is if they have batteries for the radio.
  • Other than ham and shortwave radio, any information that is available will be sent out by the government as filtered propaganda that “they” want everyone to hear.
  • Without power consider what it will be like to not have any heat to stay warm, or air conditioned air to stay cooler – with no way of alleviating the situation.
  • Travelling will likely be by foot or bicycle, as there will be no fuel and roadways may be blocked.
  • Realize that ANY travel outside of the home or neighborhood will be extremely dangerous as ANYONE who moves becomes a target
  • Non-preppers will be pushed way beyond their limit because of lack of supplies.
  • The non-prepper must realize their government does not really care about them individually, that they are a mere number and help will likely not come from them.
  • They have to figure out somewhere to get food. This can mean wild plants which they must know how to identify as safe, or risk poisoning themselves.
  • They have to understand that when we refer to “having no food” it doesn’t mean not having the food they are used to enjoying, it means no food to eat at all.
  • They have to understand that if they are fortunate enough to have any running water, they will probably have to bathe in cold water for lack of stored fuel to heat water.
  •  They have to realize that the very strange and totally unexpected is going to be all around them, made that much worse because of lack of any reliable self-defense stores or skills.
  • They might have to remain on the run constantly because of looking for water and food.
  • They must understand that bad will be magnified magnitudes to living misery because of lack of food, water, and other necessary items that they took for granted for so long.

Okay, now comes the “truly ugly and unthinkable” life that most, if not all, people that have failed and refused to prepare themselves will deal with.  Clear vivid visualization is key here for anyone that ho-hums the idea of prepping.

What horrors will they likely face after a cave-in of their nation’s economy, war, geophysical upheaval, or whatever crisis is bad enough to disturb or stop their nation from working and functioning?  There are plenty of very potential SHTF events that are simply awaiting a catalyst to trigger them.

  •  The Non-Prepper (NP) has to realize right off the bat that 911 and other emergency calls in will be met with silence or some recording telling the caller not to panic.
  • The (NP) that has no reliable self-defense that can stop an attacker, will not get help from public services and will become a victim of rape, assault, torture, or murder.
  • The (NP) that has no reliable self-defense and will not only be at the mercy of criminal elements but also have to contend with many desperate animals, some with rabies.
  • The (NP) that has no food will either have to find food or be ready to beg for food or worse, like sacrificing their bodies or other horrible acts or things to get a bite of food.
  • The (NP) will have to go through the worst, most rancid conditions of garbage to just maybe find what they should have stored up.
  • The (NP) will go through panic and near if not total psychosis looking for any water source right before their bodies begin shutting down during advanced stages of dehydration.
  • The (NP) will go through unbearable trauma when their children and other people around them are crying, screaming, and suffering from intense hunger pains in their stomachs.
  •  The (NP) will have to deal with the awful stench of rotting wastes from many sources because they have not taken the effort to even store up waste disposal plastic bags.
  • The (NP) will have disease and pathogens everywhere, not only because they have no trash disposal means, but because they haven’t prepared how to deal with trash and waste.
  • The (NP) will have to live in very primitive conditions after things around them deteriorate rapidly because they have neglected to put away anything to make life more bearable.
  • The (NP) and those around them will likely develop all sorts of infective skin rashes from the lack of insight of storing up toilet paper.  Imagine the smell for a moment.
  • The (NP) will have to handle biting insects and other vermin that will collect amongst the filth that will pile up.  No pest control stored up along with no other supplies.
  • The (NP) will have no way of treating sickness certain to follow a SHTF event, no first aid and likely no training or knowledge about how to treat the ill on top of this.
  • The (NP) will have sick and dying people around them because of not being able to treat minor injuries.  Didn’t even stock up on disinfectives.  Unsanitary conditions lead to infection.
  • The (NP) and others around them will experience much grief as they watch helplessly as their family members literally die of starvation right in front of their eyes.
  • The (NP) won’t believe how desperate hunger drives them and those that mean everything to them to “trying” to eat food that tastes so bad it gags them and comes back up.
  • The (NP) will likely have family and friends around them that have also not prepared committing suicide because they can’t take it any longer.
  • The (NP) will witness some of those people around them lose any sense of civilized humanity in them and behave like wild animals after some time from lack of necessities.
  • The (NP) and family members, maybe friends also, will at some point end up barbecuing or eating raw the family dog, cat, bird, any pet dear to everyone for food.
  • The (NP) will likely get into physical fights with other family members over any scrap of food available as rational thoughts are lost to wanton hunger.
  • The (NP) as many other (NP’s) will eventually go out of any safety of their home looking for food and or water, become disorientated and lost, and die a hard death somewhere.
  • The (NP) that is “lucky” enough to find some government help will likely have to almost sell their soul, probably all their freedom, to get tiny rations – just enough to keep them alive.
  • The (NP) will see widespread violence and barbarism that will shock them to the core and will wish that they had purchased some form of firearm and stocked up on ammunition.
  • The (NP) better get used to attempting to explain the children and other adults why they wasted all that money on junk and didn’t buy any emergency food and other supplies.
  • The (NP), no matter how positive they are will drop quickly into depression and lose willpower as having nothing to hold on to does this, along with lack of any nutrition.
  • The (NP) will feel the worst guilt imaginable as they hear their family moaning in anguish from lack of anything to eat, knowing they could have done something to prepare.
  • The (NP) will most likely not see the rebuilding and recovery after A SHTF event. They will, like almost all NP’s, be statistics.  Some will die hours or a day before help arrives.
  • The (NP) from lack of food, drinking bad water, no light at night, the horrid smells, no good self-defense, the overall horror, will often be paralyzed with fear and despair, blank stare.
  • The (NP) is totally helpless after SHTF, will have to rely totally on charity of those prepared to live.  They will take all sorts of desperate measures likely to get them shot.  They’ll attempt to eat hazardous foods like an animal trapped in a house will do, and get sick and suffer much before dying.  The (NP) will likely die (ugly and hard) as they lived, unprepared for anything.

If we were to use one single word to describe the torments that someone who “chooses” not to prepare will go through after a true you know what hits the fan it would be “PREVENTABLE”.

Almost every single person, even a very poor person, has the capacity to put away emergency food and supplies.  Even homeless people have stashes of something just in case things become so bad that the normal handouts and thrown-away items dry up.  Many people with good sources of income don’t even have an extra can of food or any water put away at all. This is stupidity beyond words.

Every day lightweight disasters happen in all parts of the world that disturb services enough that people are confined to their homes for a certain amount of time.  While recovery is short, people are still uncomfortable during these times.  Look what happens after a power outage at night and you will be mystified at how many homes are completely dark for hours.  People have not even bought an extra couple of candles or any battery operated light sources.  Even in well-to-do neighborhoods, you may hear only a lone generator going after a blackout.  This lack of preparedness is truly frightening and plays itself out again, again, and again every time services are disrupted for minor to major reasons.  It’s as if there is something wrong with storing extra food, water, and supplies.

Even after “lessons” played out to what happens to those non-prepared, most people still feel that it just cannot happen to them, or won’t ever happen to them again.  It should be proof enough to people what happens to those unprepared after disasters simply by looking at those that have gone through it firsthand.  The difference, though, comes in that these disasters have had recovery periods and help from others. Even Haiti received some help and conditions remain putrid over there.

After a TRUE SHTF, it is presumable that government help and others coming to the aid of those in need WON’T happen for long periods of time. During that time those that have chosen to not put food, water, and necessities away are going to be in life-threatening positions.  Most people just don’t get that when the supermarket shelves are empty they will stay that way for an extended period.  When the utilities go down, especially water, it may be weeks, months, or longer before they come back, if ever.  Without what someone needs to survive each day, it is not going to magically appear, and depending on the goodwill of others to feed them and sacrifice their own family’s survival chances is a terrible choice.

People MUST know what life will be like after SHTF in mega fashion if they refuse to prepare.  This is NOT new. Terrible events have plunged people into the deepest levels of desperation and hopelessness, and they will happen again and again.

While the above consequences to the non-prepper are extremely abysmal for anyone to read, the simple fact of the matter is they have already happened time and time again to those that have nothing put away.  People have resorted to cannibalism and gone to levels of primitive savage behavior out of sheer desperation and out of literally losing their minds to the physical depletion of food and water that keeps the physical body operating.  Sometimes showing the extreme severity and results of a person’s lack of action, such as failure of the simple act of putting away extra food, water, and supplies, can be the kick in the complacency that they need.

It’s really easy to put away food and supplies. All one has to do is add a little bit of extra food to the grocery cart for long-term storage. Over time this adds up to a well-stocked pantry of supplies.

There is something that is in a can of food that everyone can eat and enjoy the taste of, so talk to family members about their nutritional preferences and start stocking up.  Toilet paper and other supplies that really don’t have any expiration date can be put away and forgotten about ’til needed.

There MUST be common sense and intelligence to see what happens IF they don’t stock up for the future.  There has to be the DESIRE to get started, and this is the real problem with so many.

Once started, however, prepping becomes a type of life-saving routine or positive lifestyle habit.   It is easy and can and will save one from misery. It may save their life and the lives of their family from ruin when SHTF, which is almost inevitably going to happen someday.  Every month and year that goes by without a true SHTF event, makes it more likely that it will happen.  Basic statistical chance shows this to be the case, but people continue the same pattern of behavior that has led them to the same devastation countless time before.

For those preppers that have people around them that refuse to prepare, you can at least have some degree of solace knowing that you tried to show the non-prepping person(s) what not having anything will mean to them and their families.

All we can do is try. Once we’ve given it our best shot, all we can do is let those who have been warned about the direness of the possibilities live their lives the way that want to. They will, unfortunately, live in a world of regret and suffering if the nation and the world fall apart around them.

To every action, there is an opposite equal reaction. Preppers will see their efforts have been more than worth it.  Objects that are motionless tend to remain motionless and non-preppers will find there are horrific consequences for their lack of effort and motion to put away “life insurance” preps for themselves and their families.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Worried about Finances?

Click here to view the original post.

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com As I write this, the stock market has just experienced its largest sell-off in history.   The negative sentiment was echoed around the world, and today the market is in for a wild ride, according to market analysts.  The experts are saying it due to worries about rising interest rates, inflation, and should stabilize.  People can’t help but feel jittery.   Though there is nothing we can do about the markets, we can focus on […]

The post Worried about Finances? appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

NASA Admits Pole Shift is Close: Here’s What You Can Do to Prepare

Click here to view the original post.

With all of the horrific weather anomalies, and the increase in earthquakes and volcanoes over the past six months…pronouncing themselves especially just in the past week…there is a cause for concern.  In the article, Earth’s Magnetic Poles Show Signs They’re About to Flip – Exposing Humans to Radiation and Planet-Wide Blackouts,” written by Kastalia Medrano of Newsweek, NASA finally admits to a long-time fear – the Earth’s poles are close to shifting.

Here is an excerpt from that article:

“Historically, Earth’s North and South magnetic poles have flipped every 200,000 or 300,000 years—except right now, they haven’t flipped successfully for about 780,000 years. But the planet’s magnetic field is at long last showing signs of shifting. NASA”

“That devastation could arrive through multiple avenues. The combination of powerful space particles, like unfiltered solar rays, cosmic rays and ultraviolet B rays (the stuff your sunscreen bottle warns you about), would smash through our battered ozone layer and lead us the way of the dinosaurs.”

Why Is This Happening?

As you will read, the earth’s molten core of iron and nickel is beginning to leach out, affecting the magnetism of the entire earth.  Nothing about wildlife was mentioned in the article, but I point out this could very well explain some of the strange and bizarre behavior we have been witnessing regarding animals worldwide.

So, what can we do about such a thing?  I highly recommend reading the article.  It explains that with a magnetic shift we could see radiation levels increase around the globe, and several scientific firms suggest that parts of the planet could become uninhabitable, and at least inhospitable.

How to Prepare

I suggest visiting Cresson Kearney’s site that I have recommended repeatedly, for the book Nuclear War Survival Skills.”  You will be killing two birds with one stone: you should already be taking steps in case a nuclear war breaks out, as tensions with North Korea are high, and Russia and China are not our buddies, either.  Kearney diagrammed and detailed the levels of thickness and materials used for shelters, both home-expedient and those constructed for the specific purpose.  It also gives all the information you’ll need on radiation itself.

I also did a few articles in the past on radiation-removing supplements and herbs, such as zeolite clay, chlorella, and spirulina.  Along with Potassium Iodide supplies, it would behoove you to stock up on these materials.  A survey meter (Geiger counter) would be invaluable, as well as individual dosimeters.  Don’t smirk: you can still obtain them, and you should.  Also, while there’s still the time, I advise building a Kearney Fallout Meter from materials you can pick up at the grocery store and hardware store.  The complete plans for it are available on the site I mentioned above.

Advanced Tactical Gas Mask – Are You Ready for a Biological, Nuclear or Chemical Attack?

The NOAA and NASA websites are excellent sites for gathering information about what is currently happening.  In addition, as I have mentioned before in other articles, that military Lensatic compass would be a plus.  If and/or when the poles do shift, electronic equipment such as digital compasses and wrist computers might not function, but the Lensatic compass will be going wild.  As a forethought to such, I strongly advise obtaining maps of your immediate area…good terrain-featured, topographical maps…the kind that gives landmarks you can find with your eyes.  Terrain association is an important skill.  If you’ve ever busted a compass and cannot verify the azimuth you’re walking on…the ability to see the terrain and match it to what you see on the map is invaluable.

That will get you started if you haven’t already begun.  In this case, an ounce of prevention is worth more than a pound of cure…it can be worth much more than that.  Remember Aesop’s fable of “The Grasshopper and the Ant,” and if you have never read it, now would be a good time to print a copy and keep it where you can read it from time to time.  Herein lies the conundrum, for only the wicked flee when none pursue…but also, the wise saw trouble and took cover, while the foolish went on and was destroyed.  There is a balance for both, and (to paraphrase the Rolling Stones) time is on your side.  For now, if you make the most of it.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

10 Prepper Uses for Safety Pins

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, Skeptics, and Skeptical Readers, greetings!  Let’s explain reasoning a little bit more in detail than regards the simple subject of this article.  My intent as a writer has never been to delve into the “High-Tech” and pricey solutions to things that you may face.

Many survival magazines offer “Sales” rather than “Solutions” to your needs to prepare.  In too many articles, people have lambasted me for suggesting low-cost solutions that are both “doable” and within the budget.

If you want secure communications, go ahead and suggest a SEAL Magnaphone with built-in scrambler, or a $15,000 current-gen pair of NVG (Night Vision Goggles), then go ahead and buy it.  If your main goal with any article is to suggest something “better” than the advised thing, that’s great.  The majority of the readers, however, are looking for simplicity combined with affordability.

Anyone can buy $100K worth of gear.  Now, what does that person do when the gear is either defunct, “appropriated,” or unusable for one reason or another?

My work attempts to propose solutions that can be employed without bankrupting a person, and also some knowledge of what can be used when all of the laser sights, night vision devices, ATV’s, cameras, reticle-dot sights, and all else are just useless circuitry.  Those days are coming: mark my words.  In the meantime, we have to develop our skills and win with the tools that we have at hand.

10 Prepper Uses for Safety Pins

Safety pins.  Simple little things, yet so much can be done with them.  I highly recommend toting at least a half dozen with you of various sizes, large to small.  They cost practically nothing.  Here’s the tip: Take the safety pins: learn and practice what you can do with them.

We’re going to run a condensed, hardly-exhaustive list of uses for the safety pins.  Here we go:

  1. Temporary repair fasteners for clothing
  2. Fishhooks
  3. Probe-tool (medical use)
  4. Lockpick
  5. Suture substitute
  6. Lance
  7. Support (individual or as a chain)
  8. Bandage/dressing support
  9. Cleaning tool
  10. Toothpick/minor dental first-aid tool

The list could go on and on.  Tear open a swatch in your pants leg while you’re out in the woods?  If you don’t have time to sew it up, use the safety pins.  Fishhooks.  All you need do is notch a couple of notches for barbs (when you do, notch “upward” in the direction of the safety pin’s point) for improvised fishhooks.  Tie off your line through the top-notch of the safety pin.

For use in removing metal or wood splinters or foreign debris: make sure you sterilize the end of the safety pin prior to use as a probe.  Burn the end of it for about ten seconds with a lighter or match, and then dip in alcohol if you can.  You can also use this technique for lancing a bad wound to allow pus to escape.

As a suture substitute, you can approximate the edges of the wound if it’s a bad bleeder with the safety pins.  This is temporary!  Seek medical attention immediately to prevent infection and further complications.  You can make a chain of them to hang an IV bag if necessary, or to close up and secure bandages and dressings.

Pin them where you can get to them easily.  If you wear a hat, then pin 4 to 6 of various sizes in your hatband.  You won’t even notice they’re there.  When some kind of need arises, though, you’ll remember that you have them.  Taking common, everyday items and making more out of them than their original intent is the kind of adaptive ingenuity you’ll need when the SHTF and an emergency arises.

And (not completely knocking your high-tech gadgets) when you pick up a piece of equipment, know two things: complete mastery of its capabilities and functions, and what you will replace it with when you no longer have it to use.  Always train from low-tech to high-tech, and you won’t be caught with your pants down.  And if that happens?  You may have busted a button; therefore, a safety pin will help…if you have it.  Fight that good fight.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Family Preparedness Essentials: Assessing Your Emergency Medicine Supply For the Home

Click here to view the original post.

 

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, it doesn’t take a stretch of the imagination to see that we’re living in perilous times and on the brink of a slew of problems.  There are several flashpoints throughout the world that can translate into war at any time, such as Ukraine, Syria, and North Korea. Knowing these things, your preparations and training need to continue.  You can continue this preparation by conducting a home assessment regarding medicines and supplies you will need.

What do I mean by this?  I mean for you to specifically identify all the needs of each of your family members and begin acquiring them.  Family members have varying needs depending on age and physical condition.  Now is the time to ensure you have all the meds you need and the vitamins you will need when the SHTF.  Allow me to sound the personal “trumpet” that I have been sounding throughout the years and in many articles:

You guys and gals need to get into good physical shape: it cannot be overemphasized.

Assessing Your Emergency Medicine Supply For the Home

That being said, how do you start?  It is simple enough if you just insert a measure of organization and preparedness planning into it.  Let’s do it, shall we?

  1. Start by identifying family members who have special needs and/or ongoing, long-term treatment in terms of medication.  Examples of conditions can be Type I Diabetics, Blood Pressure/Circulatory patients (meds such as Calcium Channel blockers, etc.), and family members with respiratory compromise (such as COPD, or severe, chronic asthma).
  2. Make a chart/sheet for each family member and identify what they need: The correct medicine, the amount needed/dosage, the quantity that is on hand, and a plan to attain more of it.  BE SPECIFIC!  Accuracy is critical: you cannot afford a “transposition error” either in dosage or in the name of the med.  “Flexiril” and “Flagyl” should never be confused, for example.  One extra “zero” at the end of a dosage could mean death; one zero “short” could mean substandard, inadequate dosage.
  3. Shop the sources: yes, the price is almost as important as quality…because you will need quantities. Check out all the discount pharmacies or even the Dollar store that you can, and do your research.  Also, convince your happy, Hallmark-Card family physician to write these extra prescriptions for you.  If he or she won’t do it?  DX’em.  That’s an Army term: meaning dump/discard them.  If you don’t use the stones now, you won’t use them when the SHTF.
  4. Pet Antibiotics: yes, “protect the pets,” as I’ve explained in other articles. Pet amoxicillin, pet erythromycin, pet Praziquantel (Biltricide).  All of these “goodies” and more are available…to keep those “pets” readily supplied with medicine.  ‘Nuff said there. Read more here.
  5. Vitamins/supplements: Concentrate on the multi-vitamins, and others that are crucial, such as Vitamin C. Again, you need to be sharp when it comes to quality and quantity.  Never sacrifice quality for quantity, except if the comparable product is so close to the “top dog” that the difference is negligible. As well, consider purchasing seeds for sprouting so you get vital nutrition during emergencies.
  6. Herbal/Naturopathic supplies: Here is where your research is going to be critical. DO NOT EXPECT TO BE “SPOON-FED” INFORMATION, especially by your photo-frame-phony-photo family physician.  You have to assess on your own what herbs will do the backup for your family member’s (or your) needs if the med supply dries up or is unavailable.  There’s a secondary reason: you need to learn and memorize these herbs “cold,” because you may have to scrounge for them as well…in a ruined, burned-out health food concern, or out in the wild with wild-crafting.
  7. OPSEC: yes, the last thing. Don’t allow anyone outside of the immediate family (and even with them…screen ‘em!) to know about your medicines.  You need to safeguard them in protective containers that will safeguard them from elements and secret them from the eyes of marauders or other jerks that will pillage them.

Now is the time to get all of this stuff done.  You are responsible in the end for taking care of yourself and your family.  Do not procrastinate!  You may not have a perfect example to follow, but you can allow common sense, savvy, and street smarts to guide you on the path you need to pursue.  Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today.  The “bad days” will come upon us in an instant.  Less than an instant.  Fight that good fight, and stock up on those supplies you’ll need to take care of your family now…because you won’t be able to on the day after it hits!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

What the Prepper Needs to Know about Emergency Caches and How to Protect Them From the Hordes

Click here to view the original post.

What to do when the world comes apart?  Well, you’re going to do as well as you prepared for it.  One of the things that should be taken into consideration is either a BO (Bug-Out) location or a temporary hide site.  Either way, for the winter months there are some preparations that need to be taken, and in a certain way.

Combine Cache Points for the SHTF Retreat

The most important point that the reader must understand is DO NOT CACHE ALL OF THIS IN ONE PLACE! Everybody wants that “central location,” because everything is “there,” and it takes less time than making three or four different points.  No, belay that thought, helmsman!  Staggering it makes it more likely that some creeps will not get the whole treasure-trove.  Same with all of the cached stuff such as food, medicine, etc.  Bust it up into “thirds” and put it in three different places that you can find, but are not equidistant from one another.  If you place all three in an equilateral triangle configuration, the way man’s mind thinks when he’s searching is to look along those “organized” lines.

Protect Your Caches from the Hordes with These 8 Considerations

Whatever your BO location is (a cabin, shack, or semi-permanent structure) there are some factors that need to be considered, especially for these winter months.  Be it a cabin, tepee, or permanent lean-to on someone’s land with permission…whatever the scenario, here’s what you need:

  1. The Perfect Spot: Because caches are the ultimate backup plan, you want to find an ideal location before you begin hiding your gear. Keep OPSEC in mind when you are finding your cache sight.
  2. Wood: A good supply of wood, that is not in the structure…off the ground (palletized), covered, and camouflaged. There are reasons for all of this, and we’re going to go with a cabin, just to simplify things.  Have a wood supply in there already?  You can bank on the fact that anyone who may get there before you will burn it…and fight to keep it.
  3. Hide the essentials: “Disable” the woodstove or remove it. Remove a section of the chimney pipe and close the hole in the ceiling.  Wrap the pipe up in plastic and stash it where it can be accessed without being covered with ice and frozen over.  Then (if you can) remove that woodstove and/or camouflage it.  Make it inaccessible and disguise it.  Those that find the cabin and think there’s no woodstove will probably leave.
  4. Food: Floorboard cache is the best way here, as it can’t be frozen over by the ground.  It’s hard to “thaw out” an underground cache during the wintertime that has no fixed hatch to enter. Consider these must-have survival foods.
  5. Keep it bare: Keep that cabin “stripped” in terms of any creature-comforts…only a modicum of cooking utensils and supplies. You want it to “appear” as threadbare and uninviting as possible.
  6. “Secret Squirrel” cache: This is going to take some planning, some effort, and some funds.  Remember the “bunker” the father and son found in the movie “The Road” in that backyard?  You want something maybe not quite as large, but an excavated area with walls, a floor, and a roof/top/door to be able to enter during the wintertime after you dig away the snow and a few inches of dirt.  Load it up with anything that can take a freeze…perhaps some MRE’s, dried foods, sturdier canned goods, ammo, medical supplies and medicines, and a weapon or two….and make sure it’s away from the cabin.
  7. Lean-To’s: all the items can be cached, including a “rocket” stove or a portable wood-burner. The lean-to (more akin to a shack) you can preposition pressure treated plywood and 4” x 4” s as well as 2” x 4” s with pre-marked and pre-drilled holes that you put it all together with lag screws and bolts.  Make sure you keep a wrench and socket set on the site!  Stick with pressure-treated only, as it will take the elements and the changes in temperature and moisture better.  Make sure you have all the pieces clearly marked, a “blueprint” on a laminated sheet of paper, and that you have put it together.  Practice makes perfect and can save you a lot of time and cut the stress down.  These supplies you want to palletize and keep covered up and protected from moisture, bugs, thieves, etc.
  8. Tools: This may seem small, but it’s not. You want to preposition a chainsaw with extra chains, fuel, and oil, and a chain sharpener (yeah, after the SHTF, you’ll have time to sharpen those chains!).  Pack up a good ax, a bowsaw and extra blades, a hammer, extra nails, a good hatchet, and digging tools (shovel, pickaxe, digging bar).  It’s an extra expense, yes, but you won’t have to tote a set of all of these up there with you if you have to run.  Have a set with you?  So what?  They’ll be worth their weight in gold when it all comes apart, and you’ll always have a use for a backup, as nothing lasts forever. As well, consider adding these items to your caches.

The only limits here are those set by your own imagination and desire to succeed.

Make no mistake: those who prepare this kind of thing beforehand are going to have it a lot easier than those who wait until the last minute or try to do it “post-collapse.”  Having a place you can run to…and not just one, but several…follows the Army’s “PACE” concept…. Primary, Alternate, Contingency, and Emergency.  Multiple layers of backup in everything you do…a “forced” redundancy…will carry you over and prevent losses, mistakes, and leave you with something if it all goes down.  Don’t be left holding the bag…have a bag of “something” you stock up with before it all goes down the drain.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

How To Build A Survival Cache

What’s Missing From Your Survival Cache Could Be Your Greatest Mistake

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Hawaii’s False Alarm: 10 Ways to Prepare for WWIII

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, by now you’re poignantly aware of the false-alarm that was raised in Hawaii on Saturday 1/13/18.  For 38 minutes there was wholesale panic and alarm after the following message alert was sent out to cell phones and over the TV and radio throughout the state:

“BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”  (Hawaii Emergency Management Agency)

This message was later rescinded as a false-alarm.  Great, huh?  In the meantime, people panicked.  News reports told of people gathered in hotel lobbies in a state of semi-paralysis, wondering what to do.  One woman (a schoolteacher) attempted to enter a shelter only to find that it was locked.  A professional golfer and his family hid beneath a mattress in the bathroom of a hotel, hoping the attack was not happening.  Other people placed their children inside of storm drains, and still others called authorities with no answer.

Preparing Falls to You

The bottom line: the government was not prepared to deal with it had it been an actual emergency, and individuals were next to helpless in the face of the threat.

The government will not be able to help you, even if they wanted to.  That leaves you, Mr. John Q. Public or Mrs. Mary Public to inform, prepare, and act with your family should an event such as this become reality.  Are you prepared?  Do you have a plan in order?

Inform yourself:

The Family Preparedness Guide to Surviving a Nuclear Disaster

15 Priorities You Need to Follow In the Event of a Nuclear War

What You Need to Know About Nuclear Attacks

An Urban Guide to Surviving a Nuclear Attack

Naysayers and skeptics would have you say there’s no need.  So, the government of Russia holds yearly drills to shelter all Muscovites in the subway system and in municipal shelters.  China has been building community shelters in rural areas. But there’s no need, right?

10 Ways You Need to Prepare for WWIII

Skeptics will tell you it won’t happen, but they’ll be pounding down your door to take supplies from you and yours…maybe more…when it comes and catches them unprepared.  How about getting a plan together beforehand?  Emergency actions.  You’ll have problems if you’re in the city…any city that may be a target.  You must try, though…there will be a lot of people who will not…until the last minute, and then they’ll just be reacting in a frenzy.  Let’s make a basic, starter plan.

  1. Research existing fallout shelters: Under the Clinton presidency, the civil defense system was shut down in 1996. Go to your local municipal government building and you may be able to find lists or plans of older buildings that have a fallout shelter rating…and then locate the one nearest your home. Here is information from FEMA on emergency shelters and safe rooms.
  2. Food: you’ll need a substantial supply, and be able to transport that supply if you’re in an urban area, or in an area that is likely to receive either a direct strike or some fallout. MRE’s, freeze-dried food, canned goods, dried food…these for starters.
  3. Water: this is tougher, as it is no light matter to transport several hundred gallons of water anywhere. You want a method for purifying it, concentrating on drawing no supply from a radioactive source, and then taking care of any toxins, by germs or the products or waste of man.  Filters and chemical purifiers are warranted here.
  4. Medical supplies/tools/ weapons/ communications gear: the latter may be no good to you after a strike (because of the EMP, or Electromagnetic Pulse effects of either an EMP weapon or a nuke discharged in the atmosphere for such a purpose)
  5. Each Family member needs an individual plan: when it happens, everyone needs to know where to go and what to do…a linkup point to meet one another and rally.
  6. A hide location out of the blast area safe from fallout: yes, a prepared bug out location that is ready for all of you to make your way there either together or separately. Note: this last one is the “biggie” for the naysayers…yet this is the way it is.  There are all kinds of “moaning” comments, such as “Well, who can afford a place in the mountains?” or “You’ll never be able to travel when it hits,” yada, yada, ad infinitum.  In the end, it’s on you, and it’s tough if you don’t, but it is not anyone’s responsibility but your own.  Nobody is obligated to ensure that you survive, or take the necessary measures to help you do so.  If you can afford the property, you better buy it in advance or structure your lifestyle to enable you to live in an area that meets the requirements for survival.  If not, you do what you can.  The skeptics can stay where they are, physically and mentally.  Be under no illusion, though, that if they need to depart their area, they’ll come to yours and take what you have: their needs “justifying” their actions.
  7. You need to have a primary and alternate route to reach haven, and the means to make it there:  As I mentioned, this is all on you: ultimately you are responsible for the steps you need to take
  8. Definitive Action: When the alarm goes off? Better to be “wrong” one thousand times and in your shelter, executing your plan safe and sound, than for the real thing to occur and you disregard it, and stay in the backyard on the lawn chair guarding the barbeque grill.
  9. Remain in that shelter for a sufficient amount of time: this is where a Faraday cage-protected radio or scanner may come in handy. Remember that the Compton Effect from an EMP lasts for a while, so don’t pull those devices out immediately…or have several cages with duplicate radios in it so you can afford to lose one if necessary.  Monitor to see if any “all clear” is given, or if it’s safe to emerge.  If it’s real?  Oh, you’ll know, all right.
  10. Use your instincts, as well as your knowledge: We’re “hard-wired” for this. If it feels “wrong,” it probably is wrong.  If the guy running up to you with a smile is offering his help?  He probably wants to do something the opposite of friendly.  If it feels as if you’re walking into a trap if you’re sheltering somewhere, then it probably is.  Murphy’s Law: what can go wrong, will go wrong.  Use your instincts and trust in them.

These are suggestions, and you’re not obligated to follow them.  They may be able to provide you with a framework if you don’t already have a plan in place.  You’re not obligated to enable the rest of the world to survive it: just those who are dependent on you.  A strength of mind, body, and heart, and the ability to make a quick decision based on common sense are what will give you an advantage when others are panicking.  Those who are wise will see trouble and take cover beforehand…and the foolish will go on and be destroyed.  One final thing: OPSEC (Operational Security) is paramount.  Don’t let anyone know what you have and where you have it…keep your plans to yourself.  Good luck, and stay in that good fight.  JJ out!

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Avoid Germs on a Plane

Click here to view the original post.

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com The cold and flu season is already in full swing, and everyone around me seems to be sick.  With so many states hard hit by the flu, air travel may contribute to the spread of germs.  Many people are already fearful of flying, and the added threat of picking up germs does not help. Because of close quarters on a plane, it is easy to pick up germs while flying.  I am not […]

The post How to Avoid Germs on a Plane appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

4 Food Sources You Can Find in the Dead of Winter

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, this article is a down-and-dirty guide to finding food for yourself during the wintertime.  Most people view winter as a cold, bleak, and lifeless period of the year.  In actuality, it is just a state of dormancy: everything is not really dead, just slowed down and slumbering as a part of the natural cycle and order of things.  During the wintertime, it’s not that there isn’t any food: there is not as much of it available, yet it is still there if you know how to look for it.  Let’s get started!

Wild Game

Firstly, let’s cover wild game.  Most hunting seasons are over with, so the info we’re covering here has to do with a survival situation and a “grid-down, collapse” scenario.  Keeping that in mind, there is quite a good deal of animals that do not hibernate.  Deer, elk, rabbits/hares, the migratory birds (ducks and geese), wild boar/pig.  I’m not advising eating the wild cats: the bobcat, lynx, or mountain lion, as they have a host of different parasites and not much yield on the meat.  Stick with your herbivores, unless you have no other way.

Migratory Birds

Migratory birds (believe it or not) still hold a high number that do not leave and migrate with the rest.  Besides shooting them with a shotgun or rifle, there are other methods to get them if you have no firearm…not nice or socially-acceptable, but we’re going to list them: snares, nets, and the fishhook method.  This one involves taking a fishhook and tying it off with nylon line and covering the hook with a ball of bread.  I think you can get the picture, and as I mentioned, it’s not the preferred method but it works.  You or them: you’ll have to weigh it for yourself.

Snares do work with snow covering the ground.  You have to check them periodically, as many times the top layer of snow can melt a bit and form a layer of glazed ice.  When you set the snare with snow present, don’t go all the way to the ground: set it about 2” down in the snow.  The snowshoe hare is just as his name implies: he hops across the snow with feet that have a surface area to keep him from sinking in the snow…all the way.  Two inches?  He’ll be in it: and in your snare, he’ll end up across your fire.  Secure the snare, and don’t put a “drag” on it.  He can get out of it.  You want it to lift him off the ground.

Here’s a quick video to demonstrate snaring in winter:

Back to firearms: this is a good reason for shotshells for your sidearms, such as .45 ACP, .357 Magnum, and .44 Magnum for starters.  These shotshells are great for bagging small game, especially things such a quail or grouse.  It takes practice to be able to nail them, and they’re a small target, but the shotshell loads in these won’t tear the daylights out of the meat.  You also need to practice loading those shotshells quickly.  Don’t walk around with one of them either chambered or leading off your mag in bear country…that could be a fatal error on your part.

Fish

Ice augurs are worth their weight in gold when the ponds and slow-moving streams are iced over.  Once again, everything is slowed down, but there will still be fish…just very sluggish with the cold water and the more scarce nature of food.  Make sure of your footing before you use the augur, as well as the thickness of the ice to stand.  Once through work fast, and pick up your catch with a straight pole or your ice-fishing rig if you’re a regular.  To “tent” the enclosure helps to heat your surroundings a big.  There are bass, crappie, northern pike (chain pickerel), and catfish, although these latter are truly sluggish.  Still, they’re hungry.  If you’ve taken any game before fishing, be sure and use scrap meats and entrails for bait.

On the banks of streams and rivers that do not freeze over, search for the pools and you’ll still find crayfish beneath rocks.  You need a lot of them for a meal, but they can also be used for bait, and to pick up the bass, use a weight below the crayfish and set them about 6” above it with the hook reverse-bitten through the front of the carapace.  Remove the claws, or they’ll hold onto the line.  The reverse-bite of the hook is to keep them rightside up…bass are sight-feeders.  The backwards movement of the crayfish will attract them and make them strike…they’re hungry and feeding on the bottom during the winter.

A lot of people advocate eating worms, grubs, and other vermin in a survival situation.  I don’t advocate it or agree with it.  If you find them, use them as bait for something substantial.  The protein you derive from a few worms are not going to do the trick.  Go for protein that really counts.

Other Vitamin Sources

Vitamin C will pose a big problem with scurvy for a long-term deficiency…under normal conditions.  Grid-down and under-the-gun you’ll burn off more energy and nutrients than normal.  Pine needles are your answer.  About a pound of them, and boil them in a canteen cup or a pot with about a quart of water.  This canteen will more than give you your RDA of vitamin C (amounts aren’t exact, because conifers vary) and avoid the scurvy.  Also, make sure you cook your wild game really well.  Rabbits and hares have tularemia, and there are many wild game animals (such as wild pig) that carry such microorganisms that thorough cooking will rid you of.

As far as plants are concerned, you’re limited to lichens and some mosses.  Pick up a good field guide (Peterson’s guides are the best) to identify the types per your geographical area that are edible.  Cattail roots may still be able to be taken: these are best boiled and eaten in the manner of potatoes…starchy but palatable.  In dire straits, you can remove the bark of trees and eat the inner cambium layer, rich in carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals.  Be advised: it seriously injures or kills the tree, so take this as a last resort when you need it.

The obtaining of winter food will depend on your skills as a hunter, a fisherman, and one who will live off the land.  It is not an easy task, and yes, you can practice and refine it.  Proper study and preparation will yield results.  Tear yourself away from your pumpkin pie and shopping, and get out to observe the way things are in the woods this time of the year.  Chances are you’ll learn a few things…that just may help you make it through when it hits the fan.  JJ out!

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

6 Critical Tips You Need to Know In Order To Survive Being Stranded in Your Car in Freezing Temperatures

Click here to view the original post.

With the unusual winter weather that many parts of the country are experiencing, driving conditions will be harsh and potentially dangerous. Moreover, getting stranded in your vehicle could become a very real threat, especially if you are traveling in isolated parts of the country. If this happens, you have a potentially dangerous survival situation on your hands.

Most people’s instinct will tell them to leave the car and go for help. If you are in a desolate area, you may not know how far help is and leaving your car will expose you and could get you lost in the wilderness if you don’t know where you are going.

6 Critical Tips You Need to Know In Order To Survive Being Stranded in Your Car in Freezing Temperatures


OK, let’s put your survival know-how to the test. Here’s the scenario:

At 3 p.m., a last minute work order has requested you to deliver some equipment but you must drive through a remote area where the road’s elevation is between 4,000 and 4,500 feet. The road is infamous for people who don’t know the area to take in the wintertime and get stuck, but you’ve driven it a few times and feel confident you can make it before dark. Before you set out, you turn on your GPS on your cell phone just in case. You’ve also checked the weather station, which turns out is calling for unexpected snow flurries in the area, but you’re on a deadline and will drive very carefully. 

Not a lot of people are driving on the road and you wish you could be at home too. The snow has been coming down for most of the trip making the roads slick. An hour into driving, you unknowingly make a wrong turn and end up on a remote logging road. The snow is really coming down making it difficult to see and you are losing daylight fast.

You curse your GPS for not telling you where to turn but realize you’ve lost signal and have no idea where you are. You decide to turn the car around and go out the way you came. As you get to the edge of the road, you lose traction and slide into a snow bank. 

As you try to free the car from the snow bank, the car won’t budge. You feel yourself panicking as you weigh all the problems – you’ve taken a wrong turn and are on a remote logging road, no one is in sight, you’re stuck in a snow bank and it’s dark outside. 


How to Survive Being Stranded in Your Car in Winter

So, what would you do if you were in this situation? Do you have the skills to get out alive?

Let’s look at some considerations to keep in mind:

  1. Keep calm. In this type of situation, you could be stranded for hours or in some cases, days. Mental preparedness is key and you must think rationally and logically. This is easier said than done when you’re in a survival situation.
  2. Stay in your car. Above all, exposure will be your greatest threat. Survival experts stress that it is easier for authorities to find you in your car than find you wandering in unknown territory.
  3. Have a vehicle preparedness kit. This emergency kit should reflect the season your area is experiencing and the terrain you are driving through. In winter, you want to have preps on hand to keep the core body warm. Items like a whistle, brightly colored rag or ribbon, thermos, hand warmers, emergency blankets, emergency beacon, a first aid kit, and flashlight. For a more in-depth article on critical items to carry in your vehicle, click here.
  4. Have survival food and water in the car at all times. Keep the basics in mind for food and water. Snow can be melted for water (have a portable water filter in your preparedness car kit. Protein bars, MRE’s or easy survival foods can be utilized for this emergency situation.
  5. Make your car visible. Have a bright colored rag or ribbon and tie it onto your car so that search parties can find you. Even using a reflective sun shade could help alert authorities to your whereabouts.
  6. Run your vehicle every 10 minutes. If your gasoline amount allows, run your vehicle to stay warm. You can bring heat to the interior of the car and charge your cell phone at the same time. Note: Make sure the exhaust pipe of the car is unobstructed from snow. If snow is covering the pipe, this could cause exhaust fumes to enter your car and cause health issues.

To survive this type of emergency, you must fight your instinct to leave. Staying with the vehicle will provide you shelter, warmth and if you have emergency supplies, you could have all you need to survive. No doubt that these life-saving tips will help you keep calm, think rationally and, ultimately, survive.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

If You See These 14 Signs It’s Time to Bug Out

Click here to view the original post.

 ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this article is presented by request of one of the readers.  Here is the requesting comment, as posted to the recent METL (Mission Essential Task List) article of mine:

RedClay: “How about a list of circumstances for when it’s time to bug out. I’m amazed on prepper discussion boards about bugging out, at how many people are going to hit the road to bug out BEFORE the crowds mob the roads. But how will people know when to bug out? What combination of signs or circumstances will one depend on, in that decision? If one waits until it’s obvious, then everyone will know & be on the roads.”

So, as you can see, this is a common question in everyone’s mind, and not unusual by any means.  We have presented articles in the past to help you gauge by different sources how to prepare and when something is likely to happen.  Let’s jump into this in-depth!

One of the problems with preparation is the desire for an exact forecast of when the end of the world is going to occur.  First, allow me to state I’m Jeremiah Johnson, not the Prophet Jeremiah.  Secondly, anyone who claims to be a Prophet (not to delve into didactics) may not necessarily be one.  So, what to do?

If You See These 14 Signs It’s Time to Bug Out

What you do is observe what is happening and estimate…comparing possible with probable and coming up with the best course of action…and act when you know and feel it is the time to do so.

There are keys to show you that everything is going down.  The more that occur simultaneously, the higher the probability that it’s time to get out of town.  Let’s list some of them (and some of these may surprise you):

  1. A complete collapse of the markets (a lagging indicator, but hitting rock bottom is a sign that it is gone), to include the Baltic Dry Index, and all commodities markets.
  2. The President, Vice-President, and members of Congress and the Pentagon “disappear” very suddenly and noticeably… (probably heading to a bunker on your taxed dime)
  3. National Guard and Active Duty troops and vehicles are out on the highways all of a sudden, moving out of cities and off of military establishments.
  4. A nationwide bank “holiday” for all banks occurs, with all accounts frozen…this would be very bad.
  5. Foreign military forces on the move either in the vicinity of or to the United States
  6. Outright declaration of either hostilities or an emergency condition by the MSM (mainstream media)
  7. Over a course of time: key members of industry, banking, and the government take “extended vacations” and disappear from the public eye.
  8. Sudden shortages or halts in the shipments of food, medicines, fuel, or any other necessary item…without any warning. Think Venezuela.
  9. Heavy troop and police movements and coordinating activities in major metropolitan areas
  10. Hospitals tasked with any kind of mass-casualty emergency preparations
  11. Numbers 1-10 happening simultaneously in foreign nations along with the U.S.
  12. Increased police and military checkpoints and restrictions on travel domestically or internationally
  13. Decoupling of financial markets and banks overseas and in foreign nations.
  14. Recall of any and all ambassadors and staff back to the United States on short notice.

We have mentioned a list of things here, but the list is not extensive.  I moved to Montana years ago and have taken necessary steps that my preparations are now in place.  This is key: to accomplish these objectives long before any of those listed items materialize, as those are “late” signs that something will occur.

If people all paid attention to things, then perhaps we would have a Civil Defense system in place.  The truth of the matter, to respectfully address RedClay’s concerns, is that even at the penultimate moment of truth, most will ignore the signs.  It’s not that everyone cannot be saved or alerted: it is that they will not pay attention to the signs even when it’s all coming down around them.

Best advice: have your plans in place long before all of this happens, be prepared to depend on yourself and your family alone, prepare today as if disaster will strike tomorrow, and don’t let anyone know your business.  Keep in that good fight.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading Material:

How To Create a Coordinated Bug Out Plan

The Prepper’s Conundrum: To Bug in or Bug Out? Part 1, Part 2, Part 3

What If Your Preparedness Plan Isn’t As Sound As You Think

Using Layers to Build Your Preparedness Supply

Bugging Out: Preparing Multiple Escape Routes and Vehicles for a Major Emergency

Every Prepper Should Have Multiple Bug-Out Bags. Here’s Why.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Top 10 Prepper Articles of 2017

Click here to view the original post.

This time of year takes me into deep contemplation. Have I accomplished all that I set out to do this year? Was I the best person and example I could be? Was I a good friend? How can I strive to be a better in the coming year? While I know the answer to some of these questions, I can honestly say that I did not accomplish all that I set out to do.

A friend wrote to me the other day saying that “2017 was quite the year, almost impossible to summarize and filled with many successes and many challenges.” I can so relate! In the blink of an eye, 2017 went by and although I had goals of my own, there were times they had to be put on the back burner so that my family could grow into better versions of themselves.

My Greatest Blessings

One of my greatest blessings is my sweet husband, Mac. While many of you know him as the man behind SHTFPlan who gives his take on economic and financial happenings, he’s my amazing husband (of almost 15 years!) who works tirelessly and will bend over backward to make sure his family is cared for. I gotta say, I’m such a lucky lady!

My children are also counted as some of my greatest blessings. I am so lucky to have these little kids in my life. I have overwhelming pride in the individuals they are growing up to be and thank God for blessing me with them.

I am also blessed that my dear friend, Jeremiah Johnson has been writing so much for Ready Nutrition this year. As a veteran and long-time prepper, he offered valuable, out-of-the-box wisdom that no doubt helped you in your prepping endeavors. The time he spent sharing his indispensable knowledge freed up time for me to focus on the backend of Ready Nutrition and allowed me to launch a long-time dream of starting an heirloom seed company, Ready Gardens.

What’s New for 2018?

What I want to focus on, and something I believe that many of you are interested in is finding more sustainable ways of living. I live on a small homestead with a garden and acreage – everything we preppers say we must have to thrive in long-term disasters. But it takes a lot of planning and energy to get your land to work for you. A big success I had this year was my garden. After years of working the soil and finding the right areas to plant, we had an amazing summer harvest and our chickens laid so many eggs we didn’t know what to with them. It’s nice to be able to gift produce from your homestead to friends. That said, I’m still learning, still growing and still searching for living a self-reliant lifestyle.

I want to take the things that thrived this year and make them better. Some things I want to accomplish in 2018 is more success with our homestead, expanding our medicinal garden, fortifying the livestock area so that it is more protected (If you haven’t seen on my Facebook page, we’ve had a bear visit us) and spending more time training with my firearm and continuing on with self-defense classes. As I’m writing this, I’m wondering how in the world there will be enough hours in the day of finish everything in a year’s time, but, like I always say, focus on one small area until you’re proficient and move on to another. Small steps!

Top 10 Articles in 2017

I’ll be writing about what I’ve learned along the way, so keep visiting Ready Nutrition. In the meantime, here are Ready Nutrition’s Top 10 Articles of 2017:

  1. 10 Foods You Should Not Feed Your Chickens
  2. When Grocery Stores Go Empty, These Four Foods Will Help You Survive
  3. 5 Ways to Make Candles From Household Items
  4. Vacuum Sealing Could Be Hazardous to Your Health
  5. 25 Must Have Survival Foods: Put Them In Your Pantry Now
  6. It Ain’t Just For Smoking: Known But Beneficial Uses For Tobacco
  7. 6 Critical Items That Have Disappeared in the Immediate Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey
  8. Never Drop Your Guard: 7 Tips To Improve Your Situational Awareness
  9. Survival Food Series: 3 Ways To Naturally Make Yeast
  10. 15 Tips to Get Safely Home Following an EMP

I wish all of you a very blessed and happy new year. Thank you all for allowing me to keep you informed and for visiting Ready Nutrition. You are all wonderful and it gives me peace of mind knowing how many good-hearted people are out there.

Tess

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Post-EMP: How to Get Out of Dodge in the Snow

Click here to view the original post.

 Evacuating during the harsh winter elements is already a difficult feat, but what if you find yourself in a post-EMP environment while driving and have to bug out in the snow? There is no vehicle to comfortably take you to your bug out location. For many, you will be on foot and all you have to get you through this disaster is what is in your car. Do you have the preps and the skills to make this icy trek?

Honestly, ask yourself, what will you do?  Well, there are some options, and we’re going to cover them.  Naturally, many of these will not apply if you live in a state that doesn’t receive much snow, such as in the deserts or the more “balmy” states.  Still, you may be able to take a few things away from this.  Let’s do it!

How to Get Out of Dodge in the Snow

First, are your “Go/Bug-Out” bags ready?  If you’re traveling somewhere together as a family and the distance is more than a few miles, emergency bags and gear should be in the vehicle for every member of the family: no exceptions!  We’ve covered bags until we’re blue in the face.  Here are some essential gear must-haves (just to “refresh” your memory):

Protecting Your Feet is a Top Priority for Winter Survival

Remember, your basic survival needs are your top priority when the conditions are harsh. Now, the snow!  Myself?  I cannot (repeat, cannot) go anywhere at all unless I have my snowshoes with me. Another option and one that I mentioned before is to find the kind of snowshoes made of durable plastic and either orange or yellow, used by the utility and electric companies for a song.  Yeah, they’re not exactly “tactical” in color, but if you desire, you can paint them with spray paint.  They’re that color to enable guys who are working to be able to find them after their lunch break is over, not to run with…but they work and are strong.

There are plenty of other “high-end” snowshoes, and you’ll have to shop the market.  You want a pair that can carry your weight and at least 20 lbs.  The contractor ones will do this, and they’re not very large or cumbersome.  Keep them together with 2 D-hooks, and throw them in the back of the vehicle.  Next, you need to practice on them.  If you’ve never done it, walking on the snow is a different task, especially if you’re carrying gear.

Winter Clothing

Gore-Tex is ideal for shielding your body from the relentless winter weather. A word to the wise – if you can cover yourself in Gore-Tex – do it! Just one below freezing night out in the backyard without it, and you’ll run to the store when the day comes.  That Gore-Tex enables you to stay warm and dry, and it “breathes,” keeping you from being a humidifier and soaked to the skin.  You need good, thick socks and quality boots…I recommend Rocky Gore-Tex boots with at least 1000 grams of Thinsulate, for starters.

On a side note, make sure a good ground pad is with you.  In the wintertime, you’ll need all the insulation that you can get from the ground.  I jump back to the toboggans again: if you have a light rucksack as a “go” bag, you may be able to tote it…and haul other stuff in the toboggan, such as tools, clothes, and have space for extra food and supplies you may pick up on the way.

Bug Out Considerations

There are a lot of considerations before you head out on foot. What’s your plan? First of all, keep a map of the area you’re driving, and have it handy before you go.  If things go south and the “S” hits the fan, you need all the intel you can get on site…where you’re located at the time it happens.  Knowing where malls, stores, gas stations, pharmacies and the like are will help, and you can mark them on the map.  Depending on where you are, you may choose to stay with the vehicle for a while, but if this is done?  You may want to get it off the main road and camouflage it somewhat.

We talked about a Toboggan before for a load around the house…but what about the vehicle?  Well, how about a kid’s sled/toboggan?  You can find some sturdy ones that can take a beating…use your own judgment.  If you have a big family, you may wish the one I recommended from Wal-Mart that is about $50 and can haul about 500 to 600 lbs.  This one is where you can put the gear inside and drag it behind you on a nylon tow rope that comes with it.  Strap it to the top of your vehicle, or throw it on the bed of the pickup.  The kid’s toboggan would be of use for 1 person or one for each.  The sides would enable the gear to be stowed without slipping off.  Drill holes in the sides and use bungee cords to strap the gear down all the same.  Better safe than sorry.

If you stay with the vehicle, make sure you have a plan: you can’t stay with it forever.  It may be good for a night or two to come up with a plan (especially if you have kids, to help them get over the initial shock and disorientation).  The “end of the world” is usually bad on the nerves.  Use that time to focus the family on what you will do.  You may have to leave the vehicle immediately, as you want to return home as quickly as possible.  The situation is going to be your call, and what you believe your family can handle…and how you function as a group.

Finally, don’t forget “Yak-Trak’s” or some other type of devices to slip over your boots to enable you to walk or run on ice.  They range in price and quality, but you should be able to find them in your sporting goods or big-box stores.  So, plan ahead, make evac from your vehicle in the winter a training priority, and stay frosty!  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

The Green Beret’s Winter Survival Guide

Winter Wilderness Survival: Take Care of Your Feet and Your Odds of Survival Increase

15 Items That Should Be In Your Vehicle During the Winter

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To House the Whole Family in a SHTF-Emergency

Click here to view the original post.

 One of the complications of a major disaster event taking place (with or without warning) is not having supplies and equipment before the event takes place.  In line with this dearth is the shortage of preparations for members of the family who live in other locations who may wish to band together.  I’m going to propose a solution here that is slightly “unconventional,” so try to remove your mind from the constructs imposed upon it by your entire life spent from the army of skeptics and closed-minded establishment mindsets.

The imposition is that we all are channeled to live in “cookie-cutter” houses, plopped down akin to so many Hershey kisses in a row: identical construction in an approved, regulated, homeowner’s association-sanctioned manner.

We’re referring to the end of the society, and if you’re a multi-millionaire and you want a house for each member of the family retreating to your location, more power to you.  We do what we can in life, and do the best we can.  In the absence of millions, there is another route.  Let’s go over the basics first.

The principle is for all the family members (and anyone close to that family) having a place to meet up and reside together when it all falls apart.  From a logistics perspective, unless you have a gigantic manorial-type residence, your space and resources will be stretched thin.  What I propose here are sheds…cabins, if you prefer.  You can build them yourself or you can buy them.

Once again, much of this is going to depend on the geographic location you reside, and the social and legal impositions placed upon you.  Only you know them.  Armies of bureaucrats who want to tax you into insolvency are behind the hordes of conformists (commonly labeled as homeowners’ associations) and “friendly” neighbors who wish to impose their wills upon you.

To succeed in this endeavor, you’re going to need to have a tight family that will help one another, even if many live in different states with their immediate families.  You can stick-build these sheds out of plywood and lumber, roof them with steel roofs, insulate them, and throw them up on top of footers to prevent them from becoming “permanent structures” and taxed by your happy community.

Each shed can be fitted with an aperture to run a stovepipe to the outside, and the stove and pipe can be placed into each cabin/shed.  Each shed can contain several mattresses and sets of linen and blankets, as well as bed frames.  You can place into the sheds a few folding chairs and tables, and a cupboard or two.  To the untrained eye, it will all appear to be storage.  And add to the camouflage!  Place some tools and supplies in each one…different stuff…that can easily be removed if need be.  Give the appearance of storage sheds.  Then your family members can arrive and set up shop.

If you have, for example, two brothers and a sister…then each family group can use a shed or double up with two families to a shed.  To be on the safe side, as many family groups as possible should set up sheds on their own property to enable the whole family to flee to their property if the need arises.  Situations change, and what may be the optimal location today may not be when everything occurs.  By duplicating this “template,” you up the chances to enable your family to have a retreat in at least one safe area.

Sheds can be purchased that are already fully constructed, but if you do, you’ll need to insulate them and modify them in to have a wood stove in each of them.  Bathroom considerations are another factor.  One shed can be built or purchased and converted into a water storage facility that can be used for bathing, showering, and the like.  I strongly recommend investing in several (or building several) composting toilets to save the water and have something that will yield a beneficial supply of fertilizer when the warm weather returns.

If these are not within your budget, the only tents I would recommend are either Wall tents used for expeditions and/or hunting, or military-issue GP mediums or GP large made of canvas that can resist all the elements.  In the end, it’s your decision that you’ll have to weigh in your own mind and heart.  Food for thought, in the perilous times in which we live.  We’d like to hear any questions or thoughts on the matter.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Preparedness Activities You Can Do during the Holidays

Click here to view the original post.

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com With many people taking a break to enjoy the holidays, prepping takes a back seat to all the hustle and bustle of the season.  This is understandable.  But there are also opportunities to get a few things done. Discover old recipes and back them up I was looking through my recipe binder while choosing menu items and came across some very old recipes hand-written by friends and family members whom I haven’t seen […]

The post Preparedness Activities You Can Do during the Holidays appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

Winter Survival: Practical Preps for an Emergency Bug Out

Click here to view the original post.

            

“I got to, got to, got to, get away…turn me loose, baby.” –  Jimi Hendrix, “Stone Free”

Yes, ReadyNutrition guys and gals, there comes a time when you just “got to get away,” so to speak.  This doesn’t mean to the sands of (what used to be) St. Bart’s.  This means “E&E,” or “Escape and Evasion,” as we used to call it in the Army.  But what if your car is not working because of an EMP…and you have two feet of snow on the ground?  What if you have a sheet of ice so thick on the ground that the Olympic Hockey Team could practice on it?  The “suck” factor will be high, and the adrenaline will be pumping.  You have to get out of there.  Are you prepared?

You can be.  Firstly, let’s refresh a few things that have been mentioned already.  You have your BOB (your happy “Bug-Out Bag”) if you wish to call it that.  It should be packed and ready in your vehicle.

And at this stage of the game, you should have already switched off for your winter needs, as we covered in numerous articles before.

You need both a Gore-Tex top and bottom for extreme cold weather.  First things first!  What are you facing?  If it’s the ice, you need a pair of Yak-Trak’s or Crepons (like these) to place upon your feet with metal spikes on the bottom to give you some traction.  Yes, these guys will run you about 30 to 40 bucks, and it’s well worth it.  The rubber harness that holds either springs or spikes/metal cleats are durable and will last you for more than a couple seasons if you use them regularly.

Remember JJ’s principle of redundancy: You use one pair for daily use, and the other pair you “squirrel” away for an emergency.

You don’t want to have that everyday pair break down right at the critical moment.  According to Murphy’s Law, what can go wrong will go wrong.  You can even the odds if you buy two of each item…one for regular use and one for emergency/backup.  OK, so you have just emerged from the car and ran across a large deserted parking lot full of ice to the woods.  At the tree line, you notice that the snow has drifted to a depth of a foot and a half.

Next on the agenda is a pair of snowshoes.  Now, depending on where you live, you may need a really good pair…the kind that is about 32-36” in length.  For your immediate getaway and for lightness and convenience, there is an alternative to carry with your backpack.  Snowshoes used by utility men and electrical linemen.

These guys are made out of really durable plastic…the kind that a nuclear weapon might have a hard time melting.  Just joking, there, but you see the point.  These snowshoes are more compact and are usually a bright orange color.  Some plastic surface bonding spray paint will take care of that.  They make them orange so that in the course of their work when they set them down they won’t lose them.  It makes sense.  Now you’ll have to adapt them to your use and purpose.

They’ll slip over the top of your shoes/boots, and can be adjusted with straps.  They work.  There’s a lot of different kinds.  I prefer the ones that are a little more “rounded” than the rest, so they resemble a large tennis racket head.  This gives you plenty of surface area.  Throw them on and take them off later with ease.  These will run you about $30, but you can find them in your second-hand stores if you search hard enough.

Lastly, how about a toboggan?  Yeah, sounds stupid, I know…until you realize you would like to haul some stuff with you away from your now-worthless SUV that the EMP has fried.  The toboggan I’m referring to is basically a plastic sheet (the tougher the better) with two holes located at the top…yeah, a kid’s toy.

Until you have jerks shooting at you and you need to go down a long stretch of hill.  Or until you have about 50 lbs. of stuff you don’t want to leave with the vehicle.

Do yourself a favor and make sure you have about a 10 to 15-foot section of rope with you, burned on both ends that can haul or lift a couple of hundred pounds.  This will make life easier for you to drag that toboggan with you.  The toboggan can also be used as a ground cover or as a wind barrier if you have to start a fire.  Your only limit is your imagination.

So, these are some simple and cost-effective methods to help you E&E in the Great Winter Wonderland!  Make sure you test your equipment and practice with it.  If you’ve never used it before, you’ll be at a disadvantage when the SHTF and you have to do it for real.  Practice makes perfect, and there’s no better time to start than the present.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Emergency SHTF Packing: How To Efficiently Pack a Bug-Out Bag

Click here to view the original post.

This article is a continuation and the second part of the load management series written at the request of Mr. Brent Westbrook, a ReadyNutrition Reader.  In the first part, we covered how to stagger a load by weight and pack it according to function for a vehicle.  Guess what?  Many of the basics used to emplace that load are followed here, in how to pack a rucksack (another word for a backpack).  Let’s get right down to it!

Packing a Bug-Out Bag + Gear Suggestions

For those who have been reading my articles for a while, you know that my personal preference is the large-frame Army Rucksack (also called a Large “Alice” pack) …the one from the turn of the century and thirty years before.  It has an aluminum frame, it’s made of nylon, and it can take a lot of punishment.  That being said, the mechanics and reasoning for packing it are still the same.

You must ensure with a ruck that the load is balanced, as high as possible to keep pressure and weight off your back and that you can get to your equipment in a hurry.

Items on the bottom are those rarely used

I pack at the bottom of mine stuff that I do not intend to use at all or very seldom, such as extra clothes and extra food.  Pack your clothes in a wet-weather bag ( the military issue is preferable to me, although I’m aware there are many civilian firms that follow the premise of waterproof bags).  In the middle of the ruck, you want some ammo, more clothes, and some specialty equipment that doesn’t see immediate use.  You be the judge of that.  Toward the top, I keep Gore-Tex pants and jacket, as well as an issue sleeping bag with a Gore-Tex cover in a compression bag and then in a wet-weather bag.

Keep your basic needs in mind when packing bug-out equipment

Food in various forms is “nested around the outside edges, and then the drawstring is cinched down.  At the very top, I have a poncho and a poncho liner (that I can reach and remove easily).  Over this is my ground pad (I use a thick Coleman that is good with or without inflating it), and I have a bivouac hammock in a waterproof bag.  Those are all cinched down with the straps.  In my outside pockets (and waterproofed) I have ammo, food that I can eat quickly, fire-starting equipment, and my water supply.  I use stainless steel one-quart canteens.

This with the canteens is for several reasons.  I don’t tote more than a gallon at a time.  I leave some “headspace” so if the canteens freeze and expand, they aren’t ruined.  I can place the steel ones on a fire and thaw them out to get to the water.  They also take a beating.  For myself, I don’t mind the extra pressure on my back, as (in the wintertime) my jacket and the kidney pad take care of that.  I prefer a low silhouette.  I won’t get into how much mine weighs, but you should be comfortable taking a “squat” with it, and it should not take you to the ground.

The really important thing is that you want everything as secure as much as possible.  When the load shifts, it becomes unbalanced, and the distribution of weight is uneven, making for unequal steps and an unequal load-burden on your body parts.  You also have to take into consideration all of the other stuff you’re going to tote beside the rucksack, such as a load-carrying vest, a rifle, and extra water and ammo.  This adds to the weight, as well as being necessary to have adjusted and fitted to your body correctly to facilitate a smooth, noiseless movement through the brush.

Practice packing your bags so that it becomes second nature

This is something that will require practice and experimentation on your part, as there are not too many cut-and-dry rules to follow.  You should make sure your first-aid gear, ammo, and fire-starting equipment are the most readily available items…water and food notwithstanding.  You can tailor your pack, by the way, I explained it either with more or less of the items I mentioned in an order that is at least similar to the one I present here.  Good luck, and take the time to perfect it, as it is your “home away from home” and you’ll rely on what you carry.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Ancient Weapons and their SHTF Uses

Click here to view the original post.

                          

This article dedicated to A Arizonian: 360 24/7!

ReadyNutrition Readers, we wrote a piece on the warrior mentality in a previous article, and this was to return you to the basics that covered skills and a mindset that has enabled our species to survive throughout the ages.  We’re going to add onto that by mentioning there is a time for technology and a time for the primitive.  Well, there have been a number of comments suggesting such weapons, and we’re going to run with the ball here – mentioning a few weapons besides the standard bow and arrow, and the knife – and then suggesting how to go about using them in your arsenal.  Let’s do it!

5 Ancient Weapons and their SHTF Uses

Spears

Yes, a spear.  There are several different kinds, depending on the function you want to use it for.  My personal preference is to make your own or have it forged to your specifications.  You want to be sure of a head that is sharply-pointed and well-bladed, preferably three or four blades, and the base is about twice as wide as the shaft.  This will permit the head to penetrate with a larger hole than the shaft.  What use, you may ask?  Hunting on the QT, and also defense in like manner.  A heavy spear will penetrate deeper brush than an arrow shaft.

These had heads that tapered to a point, as you can see, but a middle grip with two formidable ends that enabled it to be thrown or used here in close-quarters.  Watch the movie, and you’ll see how effectively it was employed.

Sword

A matter of preference here.  The Scottish Claymore, the German or Viking Broadsword, the Arab Scimitar, or the Roman Gladius.  All swords have different techniques for their use.  Someone is bristling at my leaving out the Japanese Katana.  There it is.  Each sword must be trained with differently, as they perform quite differently in battle and require practice in varied methods to be effective.  If you’re going to pick up a sword, you need one that is fully-functional and either comes edged or can take an edge.  Pay particular attention to the type of steel offered in it and research it for its hardness and tempering.  Such weapons can be worn strapped to the back, to the belt, or carried in its sheath and attached to a rucksack or backpack.  Remember this: cheap you buy, cheap you get, to coin a tried and true phrase in the vernacular.  If you’re going to a Halloween party, then it’s your call, but if you may use it to fight?  You don’t want one manufactured in Pakistan for $20.

Morningstar, or Mace

The ones attached to a continuous handle are a little easier to use than the ones on a chain.  Yes, these are the weapons you saw on Bugs Bunny as a kid employed by Yosemite Sam and friends.  The ones on the chain can propel and swing the actual ball of the mace with great force; however, you need to practice with them, as you can seriously injure yourself if you don’t have control over the swing and arc.  Purchase the ones with the spikes, made out of steel or heavy iron…they leave a lasting impression!

Boomerang

The “Feral Boy” in the movie “The Road Warrior” used one made out of metal.  Once again, you need to practice with this to be effective, and in this, you need two of them…one for practice and one to use when the “S” hits the fan that is in mint condition.  Give yourself a wide open area such as an uninhabited field as a practice ground.

Throwing Knives

Throwing knives are also considered an ancient weapon and if your accuracy is on point, they can be deadly. As well, the Chinese throwing star, also known as “Shuriken” are a part of any Oriental Ninja’s weaponry…a must-have for villains and heroes alike!  Seriously, these things can be highly effective…if you practice with them and make yourself an expert in their use.  I’ve heard plenty of comments about “How are you going to use that if you come under fire?” or “You’ll never be able to use that to hit a moving target in combat conditions,” yada, yada.

You are the warrior: you pick the time and circumstances of the encounter, and employ a weapon in the manner you’ve trained with it at the optimal time.

What we’re talking about here is the use of weapons after the complete breakdown of society, the complete collapse.  You’ll want to save that ammo unless you know how to make your own smokeless powder, your own primers, mold your bullets and have a lifetime supply of brass.  Even then, you’ll want to use weapons such as these in times that their silent employ could very well mean the difference between life and death.

Please keep this in mind: They can be just as dangerous to you (and others whom you do not intend them to use against) if you do not know how to use them properly and practice with them to acquire expertise in their employ.

Just a few suggestions, here, to get you started.  There are plenty of armorers and arms manufacturers that specialize in authentic, fully-functional ancient and medieval weaponry.  Do your research and find quality weapons and equipment, and train.  Don’t buy that mace for $20 and then be surprised when the spiked ball comes off and goes through the windshield of a parked car.  Don’t buy the $1,000 Katana, on the opposite end of the spectrum, and succeed only in cutting off one of your own feet while practicing.  If you can, practice with “dummy” weapons until you have the motions and fluidity down, and master the weapon fully before employing it in a real-world situation.  Be safe, stay in that good fight, and embrace “I can” as your core focus.

Oftentimes, the “I can’t/naysaying” crowd are telling you that you can’t do it…but they themselves have already done it…they just don’t want you to succeed with it.  Or, they tried it and didn’t succeed, and therefore don’t want you succeeding when they failed.  Either way, they’re not contributing to your success or survival.

The “I can,” is stronger than their “you can’t.”  The “I can” will enable you to survive and succeed where others fail.  If you conceive of it, study it, practice it, master it, and believe in yourself, you can do it: in anything in life.  You can!

Train intelligently, and train without ceasing.  Fight that good fight, and win it.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Think Before You Speak: Daily Situational Training

Click here to view the original post.

 

Survival and preparedness entail a lot more than just acquiring a whole bunch of supplies.  You need to be in good physical condition, have some training under your belt, and be ready to use all your training, education, and experience at a moment’s notice when the balloon goes up.  One of the things we take for granted, however, is that daily situations can be used to our advantage and test how we respond.  Let’s start with this:

  1. Situations arise that require tact, diplomacy, and the ability to keep a cool head, and
  2. It is more than just a “test,” as it can train you to better respond to people and situations that arise.
  3. The situation can also let you assess how you did, and give you the basis to make an improvement in the future.
  4. There is an art of camouflage daily to be used prior to the “S” hitting the fan.

Let’s get started!  I want to give you an illustration of something that happened to yours truly.

I have an “out of the way” place in one of the local towns that I frequent to write.  On this day (no different than any other), I set up my laptop and materials in a quiet area.  I went out to my vehicle to grab my coffee.  As I came back, the person who owned this facility motioned me to come over.

“I just wanted to talk to you.  We have tenants who just took an office in this facility.  They see you writing and they’re afraid of you.  They think you’re homeless, and they’re scared of you.”

Shocked, I said, “Did I do anything that upset any of these people?”

“No, not at all,” said the facility owner, “it’s just that they see you sitting close to the entrance and they feel nervous.  We know you here, and I’m not asking you to leave: just to sit in that area over there where most of the other people sit,” the person said, indicating a common area with tables and chairs.

I was pretty ticked off, but I smiled on the outside and took in a deep breath on the inside.

“So, you just want me to sit over there?  Sure.  Anything else I can do?”

“Well,” said the owner, “we all know here that you’re a writer, but these people don’t know that, so in a few days when you’re set up, I’ll bring some of the supervisors around to meet you…you know, and then they’ll know that everything is all right.”

I smiled, and said, “No problem.”  I mentioned a thing I had done a week before to help this owner, and the owner acknowledged it.  “I’ll always be part of the solution, not the problem.  I’ll be more than happy to allay their fears.”

The owner beamed, thanking me and assuring me that it was nothing that I had done and nothing personal or against me.  The owner then mentioned a few other tenants in the facility that had spoken up on my behalf (since they had known me for quite some time), and then the owner thanked me once more.

As yet, I haven’t met any of these people, but it is business as usual, with me not making a big deal out of it (even though some of the people who had spoken on my behalf were mortified at what the owner had said…all of that in front of them.

Here is this for you as well:

“If you have overcome your inclination and not been overcome by it, you have reason to rejoice.” – Titus Maccius Plautus, Roman playwright

My initial reaction was one of anger.  Once again, a prime example of the superficial nature of our society manifested itself.  Not only that, but I am clean-cut, dress neatly and conservatively, and am quieter than quiet in my public endeavors.  I am not ever a “stand-out” in a crowd.  There was no reason for anyone to feel any “angst” with my presence, as the only thing I do when I’m writing is drinking coffee and pound the keys.  Yet they did.  Chalk it up to another stultifying experience that leaves one feeling as if they are shell-shocked when they did absolutely nothing.  Chalk one up to the way the “herd” mentality is of humanity.

What I did that kept the anger under control was that I thought of the situation, and I thought of the other people in the area.  I did not want to make them look bad because I was not in control of my anger.  As it stands, by listening to the owner, keeping my mouth shut, and agreeing to do what it took to make the situation right…. these were the elements that saw me through.

Camouflage yourself in your everyday life: anything “different” can be perceived as a threat against the herd, and the herd is not a herd of cattle but a pack of wolves.

There are not many places to work undisturbed if you come into any town for the day to do some work here in Montana…they’re few and far in between.  What’s more: why make an enemy or a malcontent?  I could stand up and protest, use the “First Amendment” clause, and still lose the battle.  But a little bit of diplomacy, tact, and discretion enabled me to not go around the problem, but work through it.

What we do in situations determines the shape of things that happen to us in the future.  I wished to share this example not to present myself as the “apex” of control, but to show that control of oneself can be maintained with effort, and it’s good training.  It is far better to be disciplined in this regard than allow things to fall apart in between the ears.  I leave you with this last thing, and bid you “good luck” in situations you face that are as mine.  Make them training events, and you’ll benefit from the challenge.  JJ out!

“Say not always what you know, but always know what you say.” – Roman Emperor Claudius

 

 

Additional Reading:

8 Prepper Principles For a Prepared Mind

How Do People Really Behave When Disaster Strikes?

Never Drop Your Guard: 7 Tips To Improve Your Situational Awareness

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

These Prepper Essentials Are What You Need to Continue Training After the SHTF

Click here to view the original post.

Here’s the bottom line – never stop the training.  Even after the world comes to a screeching halt, do not stop.  That may sound inane but there are several reasons behind it and several purposes in front of it.  There needs (as in all things) some structure to provide an organizational framework, so first let us define training after the “S” hits the fan.

You’ll have more time, and you’ll have less time.  You will not be held by specific time constraints, such as the 9-5 “rat-race” from Monday to Friday; however, you will still need to budget your time.  Necessities such as food (obtaining it, growing it, storing/preserving it), water, protection from the elements (wood for heat, for example), and protection from disaster-related factors (ex: radiation from a nuclear exchange, or tektites from an asteroid/comet impact) will occupy a great deal of time.

For a step-by-step guide to planning for short and long-term emergencies, click here.

You will need to train and study more than ever.

  1. First-Line Materials: These would be your books and physical archives set in paper and in notebooks.  All your printouts and information…you will be relying on these for all subjects from farming to defensive tactics. Here are some basics for creating a preparedness binder.
  2. Videos (Instructional): These DVD’s and films will be invaluable for refresher training, as well as introducing the youth to things they might have to have a “crash course” in a video to learn. The portable battery-powered DVD player is a must…ensure it works, has extra batteries and a charging system, and stick it in a Faraday cage until it is needed.
  3. SME (the Subject-Matter Expert): individuals who are experts in a field who are willing to teach the basics to students, whether adult or youth. Becoming a member of local groups in your area and even attending local classes before a SHTF event will help you find these invaluable people to learn from.
  4. Downloaded Material and a Computer in a Faraday Cage: scan everything you can possibly cover, and store the information on jump drives, external hard drives or pick up a computer with enough hard drive and wherewithal to handle it and the “strain” of periodically being used.

There are many categories to train upon, and the training isn’t ever complete: you’ll always need a refresher.  Physical training is paramount.  This includes exercise, such as weightlifting and calisthenics, as well as combat training and instruction with weapons and their employ.  Understand: when I was in the Army, we conducted PT (physical training) in the field.  You need it.

Exercise reduces the triglycerides in the bloodstream, and it also is responsible for a good portion of osteogenesis.  This last term is a formation of healthy bone tissue.  I’m not going to cover the subject entirely: the physical training stimulates the formation of new bone tissue and the “recirculation” of “recycled” material at the end of the cycle of ossification.  Exercise prevents the muscles from atrophying, and it is an excellent way to relieve stress.

Hand-in-hand is recovery, and this is a critical component of physical training that is mostly overlooked.  The importance of it cannot be understated and it must be instructed as part of a course.  After it hits, should our society (whoever has survived the initial destruction and shocks) revert and return to what made our society weak and ineffective, or should we chart a new course?

Many will take a “devil may care” attitude, and this is not what is needed to survive.  Freedom from the constraints imposed by a superficial “phony” society based on the material and superficial instead of value and substance may have been granted…but self-awareness and self-discipline must be followed at the individual and group level.  Many are the communities that emerge from a tyranny to merely replace it with another, or leave a failed society to continue it elsewhere and fail subsequently.

Training needs to incorporate history, science, and self-sustaining arts (farming, metallurgy, construction), as well as training to address the immediate and pressing issues faced by the family and/or community.  Why would anyone halt what they’ve already begun?  A training program doesn’t need (and shouldn’t!) come to a halt because the wheels of society do so.  The training serves a purpose:

Ongoing training in critical subjects sustains individuals and groups for continuity and it enables people to thrive.

That last word: thrive – is an important word, indeed.  It means more than just survival.  It means going beyond the bare needs of the physical and continuing in the quality of life…to build a future.  Many civilizations have built upon the ruins of an older society.  Look at the fall of the Roman Empire for a prime example…and the Dark Ages that ensued.  Eventually, our adaptive species began to adapt and “rewire” itself into formats that enabled progress and continuity.

Your challenge as part of a family or a group is to determine the critical areas and train in them without ceasing.  Train each available moment, taking the failures and experiences of the past to formulate something new that may work for the future.  Stay in that good fight.  How you train in peace is how you fight in war.  Do not stop the training, and keep with it fervently even after the SHTF.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Operational Essential Task Lists for When the “S” Hits the Fan

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, this is “Part 2” of our METL series.  To refresh, METL is a military acronym that translates into “Mission Essential Task List.”  Part 1 covered a METL for training and how to prepare yourself and your family in terms of what to study and practice.  This second part gives the tasks you will all need to be proficient in when the “S” hits the fan and everything comes unglued.

Try and understand that this list can be changed and modified to fit the needs of a family and their idiosyncrasies.  Each family is different and unique in terms of physical conditioning, skill-sets, geographic location, and family demographics, there will be different challenges facing each family even in the same disaster.

These are tasks that all the family members…the ones able physically, mentally, and chronologically…should be proficient in.  Let’s do it!

  1. First Aid: Everyone in the family should learn about bandaging and splinting (termed “sticks and rags” in the Army). How to dress a wound, run a simple set of sutures, clear and maintain an airway, perform CPR, treat for heat and cold weather injuries.  About a year ago, we did a series on Field First Aid that you may wish to refer to for a refresher on these tasks.  Also: if you have any family members who have special medical needs…all the rest of your family needs to know how to take care of them…from injections to the administration of oxygen.
  2. Essential Outdoor Survival Skills: Building a Fire, Disinfecting/Treating Water, Construct a Lean-to or Erecting a Tent, Cleaning and Cooking Wild game, fowl, or fish. These are some of the tasks.  Depending on your geographic locale and the season of the year, there may be a substantial number of tasks added that require proficiency.
  3. NBC (Nuclear, Biological, Chemical): training for each member of the family of how to properly seat and use a protective (gas) mask, how to decontaminate skin, clothing, and vehicles, how to read a dosimeter, how to construct and use a Kearney Fallout meter, how to use and read a Radiological Survey Meter (aka: Geiger Counter), how to find and take shelter from fallout, how to protect your equipment from an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse).
  4. Defensive Measures: Complete proficiency with firearms (field stripping, cleaning, zeroing, and marksmanship), how to patrol your property (we just covered that in a recent article), how to perform guard duty, radio watch, and gather local intelligence. How to work as a team with your family members in a defensive perimeter, with clearing a room or building, and how to make an orderly retreat/withdrawal while covering one another.  Emphasis needs to be placed on communications (both radio and visual, such as hand and arm signals).
  5. Map Reading and Land Navigation: Everyone who is able needs to learn to use a compass and read a map. Short and long land navigation exercises (on foot and vehicular) need to be trained.  Day and night land navigation need to be studied and practiced.  The field expedient methods of direction need to be known to all family members, such as finding north with the sun and the shadow-tip method and using the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia at night to find the North Star.  We have covered this information in previous articles at ReadyNutrition.  Everyone needs to know their pace count with and without gear.
  6. Physical Training: The family needs to be physically fit and healthy. Emphasis needs to be placed on calisthenics and/or weightlifting.  A family that is fit is a family that can fight.  Martial skills such as boxing or the oriental fighting arts need to be pursued.  Proper diet, nutrition, and study of both subjects need to be undertaken regularly.
  7. Specialty Skills: include (but aren’t limited to) how to hotwire a vehicle, how to drive a semi/motorcycle/snowmobile/pilot a boat, how to move cross-country in the snow with snowshoes/skis/sleds/toboggans, etc. The specialty skill can pertain to a peculiarity of your geographical region, or it can be a common task you all agree that it would behoove you to learn.

These are your tasks for starters.  These are tasks that everyone needs to know how to do when everything comes apart…to be able to operate as a family and as individuals working for the good of your family.  It is up to you to examine these tasks and build on them as you see fit.  Once they are identified, you can incorporate these tasks that need to be worked on into your Training METL given in the last article.  Keep fighting that good fight, and stay organized with a METL for yourself and your family!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Staying Safe Online: Five Cyber Safety Tips Every Parent Should Teach Their Kids

Click here to view the original post.

Years ago, when my kids were in elementary school, I let one of them play a kid’s game on my computer. Hours later, when I got back on the computer, I had a virus. This was our first of many discussions about cyber safety.

It’s safe to say that the internet is increasingly becoming more of an unsafe place thanks to new cyber threats coming out and child predators finding more sophisticated ways of accessing our children’s accounts. While this frightens parents, it doesn’t seem to stop children from wanting to get online to play games, hang out with friends, or research. Parents must stay ever vigilant in making sure children know the threats that are out there.

As a parent, I have explained the dangers on the internet and what they need to avoid, but is this enough? We say our “Stay Safe Online and Keep Away From Perverts” lecture and send them on their merry way? There is much more that we must explain to them!

Part of having the responsibility of being on the internet is using it safely. These tips are musts for ensuring your kids are staying safe online.

  1. What you put out into the internet stays there even if you delete it. It is important to understand this and avoid making off-hand comments, bullying statements to other kids, etc. What you put on the internet now will stay on the internet. That means your future boss could read it, your children’s children could read it, so be aware of this.
  2. Check your basic security to see what is showing up on search engines. Doing a simple Google search on your name, address, etc. to see if your personal information is protected is a great start in making sure your kids are staying safe. Moreover, teach them to keep this information off the internet. That means not adding this to social media accounts. To be clear, kids and teens should not post their email address, physical home address, phone numbers or any information that compromises the safety of the family.
  3. Use the strictest privacy settings for social media accounts. With 73% of teens and 68% of young adults on social media, it’s hard to avoid. You still have a say in where they “socialize” online, so be present when they are setting up their accounts to ensure their privacy is protected. As well, instruct them not to put personal information out there. For instance, a teen posts a message on Facebook indicating the family is leaving for the weekend and the house will be vacant. If the teen has posted their address at any time on their account, then they have painted a target on themselves and exposed that family to a possible break-in. Asking a trusted friend to see what personal information they can find on your social media accounts can also give you a different perspective and see what others are seeing on your account.
  4. Change your passwords. Keep your accounts safe from hacking by regularly changing the password. And no matter what you do, don’t use “password” or “12345” as your password. Make your password unpredictable using alphanumeric phrases. Here are some tips for creating an unhackable password.
  5. Check your computer regularly and search for viruses. Part of being on the internet is ensuring the computer you are using isn’t infected with virus software.

For added safety, use these same tips for cellular phone and text message safety as well. Instruct children not to accept unknown phone numbers. Kids should only answer phone calls and text messages from their contact list.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Essential Skills, Tasks, and Training for Preppers and Survivalists: Part 1

Click here to view the original post.

For this article, we’re going to go into “basic focus” mode: you start out with the basics and build upon them.  This is the type of mindset and foundation that work for everything in life (basically).  You use it as a format in everything you do, such as building a home or when you begin an exercise program.  In this vein, we’re going to create a Training METL: A Mission-Essential Task List for your Training as a basis for well-rounding yourself.  This is Part 1 of a 2-part series.

What is your focus?  What type of work do you do?  How do you allocate your time?  A short time ago, I wrote a piece on the importance of self-analysis: creating a true picture of yourself, your strengths, and areas that you need to improve in.  This holds true here, as you identify and prioritize your goals, with an overall objective in mind.  Here is an overall objective for you:

To survive and thrive as you and your family develop physically, mentally, and spiritually to well-round yourselves and prepare for any disaster that arises.

Simple enough.  The Mission-Essential Task List for Training can become a big part in actually realizing that objective and maintaining it.  This METL (called “Metal” in the Army) for your use will use broad categories to train and prepare that you can refine as your needs change and your skills improve.  Let’s start it off!

  1. Physical Training: It all starts here, with whatever you do to be able to “hang with the big dogs!”  Whether you’re a Triathlete, a weightlifter, a boxer, or a swimmer, you need to take your personal forte and tailor it to the maximum productive capacity.  Outline your training schedule, plan short and long-term goals for improvement, and take copious notes!  If you’re a swimmer, do you want to swim the English Channel?  If you’re a marathon runner, do you want to set a personal record for yourself?  Want to “up your max” on the bench press by 50 lbs.?  Part of your training is to identify your goals, and work up to them.  Tie in what you can do with the tasks you will need to accomplish as a survivor.  This also has to do with your overall body fat content (what is your goal?) and your measurements of weight, and tape.  Physical training is not an accessory: it is a priority!
  2. Martial/Fighting Arts Training: this is in the form of self-defense, such as Karate or the Martial Arts, or Boxing.  This also takes the form of skill with weapons and firearms.  We’re talking about combat with knives, with a staff, with PR-24’s or batons.  We’re mentioning rifle and pistol marksmanship and proficiency with every aspect of them…field stripping and cleaning, small repairs, maintenance, zeroing those weapons and scopes…the whole picture.  Your gym should also have a heavy bag (as mentioned in past articles).  You should have a definitive training plan with goals to meet.  An example could be to go a whole 3-round “bout” against your heavy bag, with 3-minute rounds and 30 seconds of rest in between.  An example with firearms could be to pick up any weapon…disassemble it blindfolded, identify the component parts and parts groups, reassemble it, perform functions check, and then drop the blindfold and put three rounds in the bull at 25 meters (75 feet) with iron sights at a one-inch shot group.  Sound tough?  High goals will yield high performance.  You can do it.
  3. New Skills: Work on one per 2 weeks or one per month.  Whatever you can handle.  Electricity, mechanics, home canning, medicine.  Take your pick.  Give yourself courses of instruction both on your own and with someone if possible.  You can never study enough, and as mentioned earlier, a good training calendar will really help you iron out the rough spots.
  4. Cross-Training the Family: Many people concentrate so much on individual tasks and studies that they neglect the group.  The training for a group and preparation can be just as important to you as an individual.  If you are the leader of your group and/or family, it will make your job that much easier if you know that your family members know what to do in an emergency and can help you.
  5. Book Learnin’!  Yes indeed, Study:  You need to well-round yourself and also to concentrate on the specifics of your specialties.  Know those ballistic tables for your reloading of your firearms…and know them cold.  Attention to detail.  Get the rest of the family involved.  Study to show yourself approved, a workman worthy of his craft.  Your goal is to survive.  You need to study and become a professional in all of these areas.
  6. Tying in the tasks and Practicum: Yes, outlining all of the functions of the family’s training and preparation…and then you need to come up with a realistic and safe training exercise for yourself.  Regularly.  This doesn’t necessarily mean under “ideal” or “Holly Hobby” conditions…but when it’s raining outside, and 40 degrees, and getting dark.  The more realistic you make your training, the more effective you’ll be when the time comes to do it for “real.”
  7. Meditation and Faith: whatever it is that you follow after, make it a core of your activities.  Learn to develop inner peace and strength by rooting yourself in whatever you follow after.  Be the best that you can be, and face life without fear in your heart and the courage to face it head-on.

These are general categories for you to follow: essential skills, essential tasks, and essential training.  You can refine them with time and practice.  Weigh your priorities, and honestly assess yourself and your abilities.  You will see improvement in areas only if you take action in those areas.  Part 2 will cover the actual “tasks” that you need to focus on (METL) when the “S” hits the fan.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Know Your Enemy: 9 Prepper Truths You Need for Defense Preparations

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, we just covered a segment on self-assessment and knowing yourself.  I had mentioned a paraphrase from Sun Tzu’s “The Art of War” that covered that segment as well as this current article: “Know yourself and know your enemy.”  We are focusing on the latter part of that one: the enemy.  There are several subtleties attached to that short phrase.

9 Prepper Truths You Need to Prepare a Mental Foundation

1. As men are almost identical in many respects, if you know what you are, then you will know what your enemy is.

We’re going to really get into this one in a second.  Here is another subtlety:

2. By knowing your own weaknesses and shortcomings, you recognize things that can stop you in your tracks…where you become your own worst enemy!

We covered most of the thought of that in the first article.  But wait!  There’s more!

3. By knowing your weaknesses, you also understand weaknesses and shortcomings that other men are subjected to and suffer, just as you.

Oh, that’s a deep one!  The “drives” that you may have are the same weaknesses and drives that hamper other people…the ones you will have to face on the Day of Collapse.  Let’s summarize this and not “blow away” the English-speaking minds:

  1. By knowing your own qualities and capabilities, you can surmise those of others…for we are men (human beings).
  2. Recognizing your own qualities that are negative helps you to prevent them from making you your own worst enemy.
  3. Recognizing that where you are weak and fall short…others suffer from the same shortcomings.

Perhaps this sounds as if it’s a psychological treatise.  Perhaps.  Consider this: there’s a great deal that can be learned and accomplished in the application of this “pseudo-science,” as most people consider it…although many behavioral patterns and actions are spot on.  Know yourself, and know your enemy.  What are you?  What is your enemy?  Well, there was a psychologist by the name of Abraham Maslow.  He came up with a “needs pyramid” with the “hierarchy of needs” as human beings run.  Here it is:

There is a lot of truth to this.  Analyze the pyramid.  Here is the key:  You need all of these things, and so does the enemy.

4. The true challenge is to identify the enemy…when he is not you.  What will we face?  A foreign invasion?  A government that lapses into total tyranny?  A band of marauders?  Or will we simply be faced with neighbors that band together to kill us and take our supplies?

In any of those cases, all of the men and women you face have those needs outlined in that pyramid.  It is not so much an “oversimplification,” as it is examining humans from an anthropological perspective and trying to determine what drives them.

5. If you have anything you can use (foodstuffs, medicine, tools, clothing, or weapons, among other things), then you can bank on the fact that others will want it, as well.

I will give you some of my personal stances.  I don’t believe in a policy of appeasement.  What this means is (if you’ve ever watched the movie “The Postman,” for example) you can’t give an aggressor something to “buy off” his or her aggression and think you’re done there.  If anything, it will just be the beginning.  It didn’t work too well for the allies prior to WWII kicking off.  It never works.  It may buy you a little time, but the raiders will be back, to demand more and more from you, until eventually they’ll just swoop in and take it all away.

6. Appeasement is a weakness that leads to conquest, enslavement, and death.

This is why you must follow Sun Tzu’s “The Art of War!”  It gives the answer (albeit I paraphrase, and from different sections):

7. “Where strong in numbers, appear weak.  Where weak, feign strength.  All of warfare is based on deception.”

These are true.  They work if you will employ them.  Part of knowing your enemy takes another form, an aspect that is just as much a key to your victory as knowing the general makeup of man/humanity:

8. You must conduct proper reconnaissance and know your enemy specifically.

What are his numbers?  What are his strengths?  What are his limitations?  What weapons is he carrying, how mobile is he, and can he call on any allies for support?  What drives him?  Is he driven as a wandering Vandal or Visigoth, simply plundering and stealing at will, or does he have greater organizational capabilities and some kind of “vision” for himself and his marauding band?  How committed is he?  How experienced is he?  How strong is his personal leadership?  Is it augmented by cadre, by “officers” as committed to his cause and to him as he, the leader is?

Do you see how much detail there is to this?  You can’t just go through the motions: you must follow through!  I emphasize this because I know from experience.

9. I emphasize these matters because you’re my countrymen, and when the battle comes to you, your homes, and your families… I want you to win it, and live.

If you don’t have all of these bases covered, these strategies and approaches worked out before you engage, then you’ll have your “fourth point of contact” handed to you on a platter.  Trust me: I was instructed how to do all of this, and I truly learned these things by making the mistakes.

To summarize, know how we are as men/human beings.  Know the things that drive us (from positive and negative drives), and understand these inherent weaknesses and drives are common to all mankind.  When you have that base covered, conduct good intelligence…it is not found…it is made.  Make good intelligence out of recon conducted on your enemy…those that threaten your home and family.  Know everything about them, and then know when to engage and when not to.  When to hold ‘em, fold ‘em, walk away, and run…as Kenny Rogers would state it.  Fight that good fight, know your enemy, and most of all make sure you know the one who can be the greatest enemy: know yourself.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

Adaptability: the Key to Ongoing Survival when the SHTF

Little Victories: Lessons in Mental Preparedness from SERE School

Hardcore Walking Dead Survival Tips for Preppers

The Warrior Mentality: Controlled and Purposed Action in a Post Collapse Combat Situation

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Prepper Strategy: Vital Considerations When Planning a Bug-Out Location

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this piece is meant to stimulate thought and action toward having a place to retreat to if the time comes.  I know, everybody is going to defend their piece of land to the death when the SHTF.  How about when the SHTF in another matter…akin to our fellow citizens with Hurricane Harvey?  Stands to reason that the numbers of the displaced and homeless are starting to mount.  Whatever the “end event” may be, there always exists the possibility that you must flee.  Let’s explore some criteria and options.

By this time (long in the tooth/late in the game) you should have already formulated a plan…a “Plan B” if you wish for where to run.  If you have not, you need to consider these criteria.  Many of you (especially the naysayers, skeptics, and trolls) will “what if” these criteria to death.  Use the basics and apply them to the situation that arises.

  1. How far away is either national forest or woods to retreat into?
  2. Does the area you plan on fleeing to have a water supply, food (in the form of game or forage), isolated from groups of people, and out of the radius of the initial event (hurricane, nuclear attack, etc.)?
  3. Can you reach it? This takes into consideration your route planning…using the road, waterways, or possibly an air escape.  Traffic patterns, viable roads, and gridlock must be factored into your planning.
  4. Will you be alone or will other families be with you, and/or waiting for your arrival?

This last part is very important.  It is one thing to plan on going to a safer area, but it is quite another to have one prepared and waiting for you.  Now is the time to act on things.  Now is the time to formulate a good, solid plan of action and stick to it when the time arrives.  Do not suffer from the “paralysis of analysis,” because you can plan for years and then fail when the time comes to make a decision to act.

There are too many factors to be able to list in under ten pages single-spaced.  We’re trying to generate some ideas and also to stimulate thought toward a viable plan.  When the SHTF arrives?  Here’s a good rule of thumb to follow: Everybody will be “needy” and need what you have, and you will need the things that others have.

That house out in the country by the Everglades where your cousin lives?  Maybe a good time to see what you can contribute to it and what kind of alliance you can form.  You need to do your research and find out about uninhabited cabins in parks and recreational areas.  Do your research and find out about hotels or travel lodges that are beginning to shut down with the close of the summer.  As survivalists, you understand the physical needs of material support and safety for your families.  Now is the time to research a place to flee to if need be.

Here’s a “spark” for the mind: What if more than one thing happens?

Chances are one thing may spark other things, such as a nuclear war may trigger large fires of the likes of which we’re experiencing currently in the northwest.  You may have multiple problems to deal with, and if you have to abandon ship (your home) you want to have a place to go, already planned out if not stocked up and prepared.

Planning promotes a good follow-through.  Formulate that plan and inventory your equipment.  Don’t just plan on one location to flee to: you should have multiple locations.  You may flee your town to avoid a nuclear war, only to find you end up in an area where forest fires have been raging for months.  Game it out at every angle, and start gaming it now.  I can’t even tell you how many people e-mail me their desires to leave their home state.  I make a suggestion, and they say, “Well, we’ll have to wait and see.”  Then they give me their reasons.

When a disaster happens, the reasons for not preparing for it will not be good enough and do not provide for the bottom lines…what you and your family need to survive.  Having a place set up to run to is prudent, plain and simple.  Now is the time to put that backup retreat location in order, not after the SHTF.  In the end, when the music stops playing, you’ll want a chair to sit down in.  Keep fighting that good fight.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

A Prepper’s Guide to Cold Weather Gear: 10 Must-Haves to Stay Warm in the Harshest of Conditions

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this piece is akin to a checklist with a few extra suggestions you can use to prepare for the coming of the cold weather before it arrives.  In past articles, we talked about the necessity of having go/GOOD/Bug-out bags packed seasonally.  Those preps for the seasonal changes are critical and can mean the difference between life and death when the need arises.

Read The Green Beret’s Winter Survival Training Guide for more information on surviving in extreme weather conditions.

A Prepper’s Guide to Cold Weather Gear

Let’s cover some of the important concepts of gearing up for the Fall and winter.

Proper sleeping bag: remember to switch off those lighter summer bags for a winter-weather/extreme cold weather sleeping bag, preferably with a Gore-Tex cover. Don’t forget a good, reliable ground pad to rest on…remembering the importance in preventing conduction (the passage of body heat into the ground, and cold from the ground into the body).

Gore-Tex “Monster”: That’s right! Become the Gore-Tex Monster!  You need a good Gore-Tex top and pants to protect you from the cold and the moisture.  Gore-Tex breathes and it is reliable. They have Gore-Tex jackets too. Just remember not to lean too close to the stove or the fire and melt it. Read more on what to wear in the harshest of environments.

Footgear/Thermals/Socks: All of these are vital to winter weather preparedness. Make sure that you pack heavy socks and have at least one change of each packed in a waterproof bag and stuffed in your pack. Read more about protecting your feet and how important it is.

Foods to pack: Stick with dried and dehydrated stuff, such as jerky, dehydrated vegetables, and fruits. The canned stuff is tough to protect from a freeze.  The dehydrated stuff can be reconstituted easily enough with water.  If you have snow, you have water.  Don’t forget “Vitamin R” …that’s Ramen!  Pasta is great stuff for a base and some carbs.  Load up also on vitamin c and multivitamins in your pack.

ORS: Oral Rehydration Solutions. I wrote a good bit about them in past pieces.  These guys are the next best thing to an IV and you don’t even need a catheter.  Dehydration is a biggie in the cold months…this is because people become cold and they naturally shy away from drinking water.  Remember: thirst is a late sign of dehydration.

Fire starting equipment: waterproof matches, lighters, and material to start it with. Another option is to buy a “fire log” and saw it/cut it down into manageable pieces.  That’s what Firestarter is that you buy from all these “pioneers” such as Coleman for 3 or 4 dollars.  The Fire-log costs you a little more and then supplies you with enough material for 100 of those Coleman packages.

First Aid supplies: remember that things freeze. Not alcohol!  There are your disinfectant pad and any kind of stuff for sanitation.  Also, pack some hand warmers to warm up IV fluids if you ever give one in the fall or winter.  It’ll take away the shock of that cold fluid hitting into your patient.  Also for thawing out water or IV bags if needed. Read more on requirements for cold weather injuries.

For water, if you’re going to be out for extended periods of time, you may wish to empty some of the water out of your canteens for if it freezes to prevent canteens from splitting (although I’ve never seen this with military issue canteens. During the winter months, I carry stainless steel canteens from WWII and fill them up ¾ of the way.  Should it freeze, then I’d just set it on the coals and thaw it out.

Radios: check out your commo gear and make sure your batteries are fresh with spares packed.

Ammo, knives, and weapons: safeguard and make sure (the former) is packed with protection from plastic bags. The latter two: ensure they’re cleaned and coated with a good coating of oil and fully operational.

Prepare all your gear now, while the weather is still fairly warm because you should always plan ahead and take care of things sooner instead of later.  Take the time to do this, because it is an investment in your well-being that could mean the difference in your survival.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Ask Tess: Are military personnel who were vaccinated against the plague protected from the airborne strain of the plague?

Click here to view the original post.

Hi Tess,

For those of us who served in the military & received vaccinations for plague I & II, are we covered for this???

A Reader

Answer:

Hello,

What a relevant question you asked. I realize with the current state of the airborne transmission of the plague, many are concerned. Vaccinations are a way of life in the U.S. Military. While service members are vaccinated against various plagues, the vaccine administered may not be effective in the prevention of airborne infection. The addition of antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for such situations.

Many of the antibiotics suggested in the article can be purchased online or through pet stores. If you are concerned with coming in contact with this outbreak, I would also gather some supplies listed in this article.

Following is a list of pandemic supplies for your home:

In the event of a pandemic, because of anticipated shortages of supplies, health care professionals and widespread implementation of social distancing techniques, it is expected that the large majority of individuals infected with the pandemic illness will be cared for in the home by family members, friends, and other members of the community – not by trained healthcare professionals. Bear in mind that persons who are more prone to contracting illnesses include people 65 years and older, children younger than five years old, pregnant women, and people of any age with certain chronic medical conditions.

I hope this helps!

Tess

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Warrior Mentality: Controlled and Purposed Action in a Post Collapse Combat Situation

Click here to view the original post.

This article is not for the faint of heart, but there is an important point to it that needs to be the central focus.  The focus is simple: We are a nation founded by citizen-soldiers who did not win freedom or liberty playing Yahtzee.  They won it by fighting.  When the time comes, the citizens of this country will need to fight again.  If you don’t believe that, then you don’t believe that there is nothing new under the sun…and you don’t believe that what happened before will happen again.

I have written many articles on a wide variety of subjects from woodcutting to weightlifting, from herbal remedies to first aid.  Many times, I wished to go into greater detail regarding subjects of a military nature or pertinent to combat, but I am limited by the amount I can write: books can be written on the subjects, and we’re trying to introduce readers to concepts.  These will get you started…if you do something with them after reading them.

It is what you do with these concepts and articles that will determine how successful they will be in your employ. 

That being said, there will be a time to fight.  I want to emphasize a concept known in the Army as “Violence of Action.”  This covers precise, measured action…not a berserk, uncontrolled frenzy…but a purposed delivering of the most hurtful response you can muster in a home defense.

Your culture…our culture…is based on authoritarian rules of conformity that (at times) instigate complacency during an emergency.  “Wait on the authorities,” or “call the police,” or that ambiguous “someone will take care of it.”  No.  That “someone,” when the SHTF, will be you.  Successful actions depend on a good follow-through.

All of the articles I have written on physical conditioning, weight training and basics on combat both with a weapon and unarmed…. all of these are your “basics” to build off.  I have suggested different works to read to learn about the warrior mentality and ethos.  Why?  Why all of this preparation and development of the warrior mentality?

Because it is the warrior mentality that you will need to make it through, and protect you and yours.

Let’s cover a few concepts that can further your preparations…thoughts to consider.

  1. You are going to be faced with a deliberate decision: to act or not to act when it hits the fan. This may take several forms: escape from a large city or suburb and fleeing to somewhere out of a target zone…with dangers along the way.
  2. In a SHTF situation, the resultant frenzy that begins 24-48 hours later (or even sooner) may force you to fight…and “Marquis of Queensbury Rules” will not be honored by those storming your house and front lawn.
  3. Fight or Flight: you must weigh the threats and see which are viable…that you will have to confront immediately, or that it is best to withdraw from. Discretion is the better part of valor.
  4. Are you “finger-drilling it,” or is it for real? Are you ready…really prepared physically, mentally, and yes, spiritually…to act?  On behalf of you and your family?  There: it’s the next door neighbor trying to jimmy your back door open with a crowbar, and his two sons with rifles behind him.  Are you ready for them?  Or are you going to “offer some of them your canned jellies, preserves, and fruity treats” from your larder?

“Finger Drilling” is a term we had in the Special Forces Medical Course.  One of the instructors was a skinny black guy who had served in Vietnam named Mr. R.V. Johnson.  He was a stickler for taking real pulses and really assessing the patient in a primary survey…not just playing the scenario with taking a “fake” pulse or seeing clear breathing when the patient was told to simulate sonorous breath sounds.  “Finger Drilling” was just going through the motions.

Are you going through the motions, or are you really preparing for what you’ll have to do…fight to protect your home and family?

  1. Take action on your training program…of marksmanship, of hand-to-hand combat, of physical conditioning. Take the action now.  Train with the heavy bag, train with family members.  Resolve yourself to carry out the defense of your family…in a controlled, purposed manner…with the violence of action and follow-through.  No finger drilling.  Resolve yourself to prepare.

Resolve yourself to fight, and when you do?  Resolve yourself to win.  Mentally preparing yourself to face the challenge is just as big a part of it as the actual engagement is.  Review all of your materials, find a good instructor or training partner and get to work.  We’re getting “long in the tooth,” and winter is getting ready to arrive in a short time.  Utilize every task of physical labor to prepare you physically and mentally.  We have a fight coming in the United States.  It won’t be in a foreign land on CNN.  It will be in our backyards and at our front doors.  Now is the time to prepare…so that you can fight that good fight well…and win.

“Winning isn’t everything…it’s the only thing.” – Vince Lombardi

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

This Archaic Bug Out Location Could Be Your Only Option

Click here to view the original post.

Yes, ReadyNutrition Readers, I am advocating the possibility of finding yourself a nice cave to shelter within when the SHTF.  This primarily as a backup location, but as a primary location if your house is either in a target area for a disaster or if it is not constructed sturdily enough.  Uncle Caveman would surely shed a tear in his eye just thinking of the exodus…back to the caves.  Let’s discuss some of the advantages to being able to find a suitable cave…right after we define what is suitable.

For starters, the ideal cave would be formed from rock, such as granite or a similarly “hard” stone.  This is mentioned because many “caves” are in fact just deep fissures and are made out of ice or comprised partially of ice.  This poses a problem of both cave-ins and also floods.  Many “caves” on the slopes of mountains are just fissures with ice surrounding the walls…and not a true cave with a floor, ceiling, and walls that will not dissolve with higher temperatures.

First suggestion: find your state’s BLM (Bureau of Land Management) to learn of resources that will locate and map the known caves in your area/vicinity of your home.  I stressed the word “known” because for every cave that has been mapped there are at least 10 that have not been.  The ones made of rock/stone are usually more stable.  Chances are there is nothing being done in the caves that are on federal or state property.  Perhaps there will even be “no trespassing” signs, or they’ll try to keep you from going in the cave.

Your job is to find them and learn about them as much as possible, even if you can’t enter into them.  After the SHTF, I seriously doubt the “friendly” park ranger will be concerned with keeping you out of the government-owned cave.  The advantages to a cave (besides the obvious of keeping the elements off of you) are worth considering.  Caves stay cooler in the summertime, and if you manage to occupy one in the winter, can maintain an even temperature that may be less than what is outside by a substantial degree.

Caves can be readily defensible depending on their layout.  Many caves have a large, anterior chamber with smaller chambers to the rear or sides.  These smaller chambers can be used as storage rooms, and also for a retreat or a hide if for some reason it becomes necessary to vacate the larger chamber.  The disadvantage is that few caves have an exit, so if it becomes necessary to defend yourselves, you do not have a recourse but to win.

You also need to find out what “roommates” may be in the cave, such as bats or bears, the latter of which tend to be very defensive of the territory.  Also, if you live in grizzly country, the fall months are the time the bears feed before bedding down at the end of the year.  You don’t want them coming in while they’re still awake, or moving into the cave when they’re in there asleep.

Keep your plans to yourself.  Plenty of others will have the same idea.  Ensure there is a water supply nearby the cave, as well as adequate game and also wood for fires.  Most of all, learn as much as possible about the cave(s) you are considering, not just geographically but from a geological perspective.  A cave may be something to use as a fallback retreat that may provide you and your family just what you need from either a temporary or a permanent perspective after the SHTF.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Quick Emergency Foods for All Situations

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, we have been covering a host of different disasters and scenarios for preps.  One thing we have not mentioned is the need for food in these situations that meet the challenge of the disaster.  What are we talking about here?  For starters, we need food that we can bust open and eat immediately…that will give us some kind of energy with nutritional value…but that we can eat without needing to go off somewhere and sit down.  Even more: food that we can eat without taking a break in stride.

This poses the following conditions for the food: it must be pre-cooked or prepared previously so that no heating or preparation is required.  The biggest problem with this is in the winter months, but we’ll address that issue later.  Let’s look at some foods that it would not be an inconvenience to tote around, either on your person or in a small bag or even a briefcase.  Remember, we’re looking for high protein, medium carbs, and low fat.  Here we go:

5 Quick Emergency Foods

  1. Beef Jerky/Smoked, Cured Jerky and meats: In general, you receive a lot with jerky and beef sticks…on average a 1-ounce portion or piece/stick is about 10-12 g of protein. Considering that it keeps for a long time and doesn’t need to be cooked, with just about a quarter of a pound, you are taking in 40-48 g of protein.  This is very good, especially in a high-stress environment where you’re burning up a lot of energy.  Please go back and refer to some of my articles on protein intake and how “cannibalism” (during the catabolic phase) to break down muscle tissue and use it for energy works.
  2. Nuts: Peanuts, almonds, sunflower seeds, and so forth, usually run about 7-8 grams of protein, about the same in carbohydrates, and double the amount in fat. They have a high-fat content; however, nuts are packed with resveratrol, a chemical that is a vasodilator that improves circulation.  In addition, during a disaster, the extra fat content will not be harmful, as it provides satiety (feeling of fullness), as well as giving you some valuable electrolytes, such as sodium and potassium.  These, too are readily available and easily “munched” down on the go.  Dry-roasted, shelled pistachios are a good one with high protein and high Omega’s, as well as the minerals and electrolytes.
  3. Dried Fruits: will give you some simple sugars and carbohydrates for the body. Long-term benefits will be to provide some fiber.  This is very important in a disaster, as peristaltic activity (the activity of the bowels in digestion) tends to slow down and become depressed substantially with stress.  This results in constipation and hardened stools that can cause cramps and discomfort and even lead to a major problem, such as a blockage, as in the condition called obstructed ileus.  Some examples of dried fruits good to pack with you are figs, apricots, raisins, cranberries, and prunes…the latter being the best for prevention of constipation when used in moderate amounts.  Prunes are also extremely high in Potassium, a vital electrolyte.
  4. Fruit/Granola/Power “Bars”: These can be pretty good for quick energy and some carbohydrates and fiber. They are not necessarily high in the protein department, except if they’re specified for such.  Keep in mind: they’re not meant to serve as long-term meal substitutes, but instead are for a quick energy food for convenience.
  5. Protein Powders – Milk and eggs are a few of the first foods to disappear before and following a disaster. We need supplements to make up for the lack of nutrients in our diets and also to “boost” our intake of needed materials.  Nutrients such as amino acids and protein, which I have written extensively about in previous articles. These are critical for our upkeep, and they must be obtained from our food.  A protein powder may or may not (or may partially) provide these amino acids.  Of particular importance are BCAA’s (Branched-Chain Amino Acids), such as L-Isoleucine, L-Leucine, and L-Valine.  These guys are very important for tissue repair. Read more on protein powders here.

It is critical to remember that you must drink water if you’re going to eat all these things.  Dried foods (and any food, for that matter) will suck the fluids right out of you if you don’t take in liquid.  These foods just mentioned can come in their own wrappers, or you can buy them in bulk and transfer them to plastic bags to tote with you for when the need arises.  It’s a simple thing to be able to throw them down without any effort, whether you’re in a fighting position overlooking a section of your property or in a pouring rainstorm trudging up a hill.  Apportion them accordingly, and take some of each item for a well-balanced meal that will do in a pinch.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

15 Priorities You Need to Follow In the Event of a Nuclear War

Click here to view the original post.

One of the most important characteristics of survivalists, preppers, and their ilk is the ability to concede that no matter how improbable it may be for a situation to arise, it is still possible.  With the current state of affairs of the world being the way they are, there is nothing in the news that can truly dissuade a prepper from this concept.  That being said, what if a nuclear war occurs?  No, really: what will you do, and what actions will you take when it begins?

We have covered the topic of preparedness for a nuclear war before, but we have not discussed immediate actions to take within the first hours that such a nightmare becomes a reality.  First, let us mention again Cresson Kearney’s work Nuclear War Survival Skills,” and downloadable from the internet.  It is the end-all, be-all for information on preparedness for a nuclear war.

Learn How Tactical Gas Masks Can Save Your Life

The topic for this article is immediate actions to be taken when nuclear war presents itself; however, stress and emphasis must be made on preparations beforehand.  You want to garner all of the supplies possible beforehand and prepare a fallout shelter before the football game kicks off.  This will cut down on the scrambling when it all comes about.  There will be enough confusion in the works, and you don’t need to make any more for yourself through a lack of readiness by not having supplies you need in place.  Let’s cover some basics questions you need to answer for yourself and your family.

  1. A Plan: you need a plan to “kick into action” immediately, depending on where you are…at home, at work, or traveling. This plan needs to take into account what you’ll do if your engine dies (from the EMP, or Electromagnetic Pulse), for example, and you’re still five miles from home.
  2. “Rounding Up the Tribe”: How will you gather your family together? Do they know the plan and are they both on board with it and prepared to act in accordance with it?  You need an ORP (Objective Rally Point), so to speak: a place to meet together in one location, if for the purpose of consolidating and traveling back home together. This family preparedness guide for nuclear disasters is a great primer to get started.
  3. Assessing the Targeted Areas: this must be done beforehand, and if you are in a targeted area susceptible to attack, you better be prepared to move out of it.
  4. Personal Protection from Radiation: (in accordance with your assessment of how much radiation there will be) Do you have Geiger Counters (radiological survey meters), dosimeters, and a suit and mask to protect you from the radiation? If so, how will you get to them/into them when it occurs? What about supplements for radiation poisoning if you are exposed?
  5. [We’re using a “Shelter in the Home” Scenario]: OK, you made it home. Now, do you have backup measures in place for the loss of electricity that will occur?  Do you have a shelter where you can “hole up” for at least the next three weeks to a month?  Is it defensible?  Can you effect such a defense while radiation is still at a dangerous level?  Let’s review what needs to be in the shelter:
  6. Food and water supply for all members…at least six months’ worth
  7. Medical supplies and equipment
  8. Shielded electronic supplies (radio, night vision devices, etc., shielded until it is safe to expose them with no threat of EMP) in Faraday cages.
  9. Weapons and ammunition to defend yourselves
  10. Tools and materials to repair or replace components of the shelter
  11. Equipment to monitor radiation levels inside and outside of the shelter
  12. Sanitation and hygiene measures (people don’t stop going to the bathroom or needing to clean themselves regularly)
  13. Books and reading material: survival oriented, and also for a diversion
  14. After the exchange has halted: What will you and your family do then?  Remain in place, or head for new ground?
  15. Stay alert: Keeping a watchful eye on the news and any threats on the horizon will keep you ready to react at a moment’s notice.

There won’t be a lot of time for action.  Hopefully, you’ll be at home, and able to take steps from there.  Such steps can include (but are not limited to): covering all of the basement windows with dirt, and if you have a basement or sub-basement shelter, securing all parts of it prior to relocating into it with your family.  You’ll already (hopefully) have your supplies ready and in position, but you can also run the water and fill up as many containers as possible to take down with you.  Same with food: any canned or dried goods that you can move from the upstairs into the shelter will be money in the bank for you later.

There’s never enough blankets and clothes: stock some of these down in your shelter.  Pets are a big consideration that we’ve covered in a previous article.  You’ll have to provide for them if you do indeed intend to save them.  Special needs members of your family, such as infants and toddlers, the elderly, and any family member with a medical condition…you need to provide for those needs well in advance.

Especially for them, you want to load up on whatever supplies you need to take care of them and move any equipment or supplies that you can manage for them into that shelter.  After the war commences, there won’t be any more deliveries of those necessities.  Research Cresson Kearney’s work and put these measures into place…stocking up on the supplies you need and coordinating all of your initial actions with your family prior to the arrival of that fateful day.  Hopefully, none of these measures will be needed, but if they are, it will give you a better chance if you determine them and implement them beforehand.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Last Minute Preparedness: How To Prep For Sheltering in Place

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, this article is not a substitute for common sense, nor is it a “betting slip” of things to do to beat the odds.  With Hurricane Harvey dealing our beloved states of Texas and Louisiana a crippling blow and with Hurricane Irma devastating the state of Florida, one thing is for sure – the nation needs to focus on preparedness…in all departments and for all disasters.  We’re going to run with this ball to give a checklist of things to do if there is a need to stay at home.

Sometimes it’s not just a matter of being either “hard-headed,” or rooted within the home and sentimentalities.  Sometimes there are things that force a family to stay in place and try to face what is coming, regardless of what the rest of the people in the area are doing.  Examples of this would be when a family member cannot be transported or moved, or when the family is unable to do it logistically for fear of losing everything or the great hardships imposed by fleeing.

Undoubtedly the army of skeptics is ready to call for fire on my position.  Before “Splash out,” sounds on the radio, however, the last sentence is the reality.  It happened that way in New Orleans with Katrina.  Whatever the situation or the reasons, it is not the focus of this piece to argue with Ned the Naysayer, but to provide something to help those who need it.  First advice:

If you can leave the area before the disaster strikes, then do so, and seek shelter elsewhere.

Now to the business at hand.  The more able-bodied people you have in the family to help you, the quicker you can expedite these basic tasks.  Review my articles on Katrina, and much of this ties into what my family and I did there.  We’re going to focus on stuff for a hurricane primarily, and then tailor-make it into advice to suit other disasters as well.

  1. Precut and preposition materials to close the “soft” spots of the house: plywood, 2” x 4” s, nails, screws, and plastic sheeting…these can be used to close off sliding glass doors, board up windows, and shore up spots that can be entered. If you have the time, then measure everything and cut pieces beforehand to set in place and then attach when the emergency is nearing.  Make sure there are extras of these materials in case there’s a breach of some kind.
  2. Bins and Bags: Place all your food (canned, dry goods, freeze-dried, dehydrated) into bins, and (depending on what floor you live on) raise them up so they’re above ground and secure. The reason is twofold: to protect from water, and so that you can grab them and move out with the food supply.  If you don’t have bins, use cardboard boxes and then place them into thick garbage bags.  Think on your feet.
  3. Tools: Centralize the tools you need (any kind of cordless drills or saws will be worth their weight in gold if they’re all charged up. Be able to do their function manually, just in case an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) attack or a Solar Flare occurs.  Make sure they’re protected from water or the elements and that everyone knows where they are and how to use them.  Don’t forget tools that you can use to get out, as well, if need be, such as a crowbar and an 8-lb. maul.
  4. Light: In the form of flashlights, battery-powered lanterns, and chem lights, for starters. Kerosene and white gas lanterns are nice, but be sure to use them after the initial consternation is over, such as the raging winds and so forth.  You don’t want to add fire to the list of complications that will present itself.  Make sure each family member has their own flashlight!  This seems a small thing, but it’s not.  Get a good one, such as a Maglite pen-light for $7 or $8.  You’d be surprised how much confusion results when the lights go out.  If it’s an EMP or war that brings about the power loss?  You better have blackout curtains or blankets to hang up and block out any light from escaping out of your windows.  Be sure: step outside (if there’s no radiation, of course) and make sure no light is coming out of those edges.
  5. Medical Equipment and Supplies: any family member who has special needs, such as medication must have access to that medication at all times unless they cannot administer it to themselves for any reason. All first aid equipment should be in a central location where everyone knows where the supplies are.  Each family member should have a small kit for themselves, as well, in case they are separated from the group.
  6. Water: Fill every container that can be filled and closed with a secure/tight lid. Fill all bathtubs, sinks, buckets, and so on.  You’re going to need water…on average at least two gallons per person per day.  Don’t forget the pets!  You’re responsible for them, and if you take care of them they may return the favor when it’s needed.
  7. Pet needs: we just mentioned it with the water. Make sure anything they need is in a bin…food, medical supplies, and materials to keep them clean and comfortable.
  8. The toilet: If you haven’t taken my advice from earlier articles, now is the time to pick up a toilet with a bucket that you can line with a plastic bag. Even if you do have municipal sewage, there’s the chance it may back up.  In addition, you can’t afford to use the water.  Tie it up in the bag and store this in a big bin for burning or disposal later.  Make sure you have enough bags to line it and plenty of toilet paper protected in plastic bags.
  9. Weapons: this one is going to draw the most criticism, but in the end, the decision rests with you and your balance between what is needed and your “love” for the law. Remember: the lawmakers of your state are already evacuated on your tax dime.  Every member of the family who is mature and responsible needs to be armed or have a firearm available if defense becomes an issue.  The “leaders” of the household need to carry, night and day.  Ammo and cleaning equipment needs to be safeguarded from the elements and readily available.
  10. Assign Tasks: Yes, that’s right. Everyone in the family needs a task assigned.  The younger members will feel a strong sense of participation and be both valued and needed.  Keep it simple for them, but they can do things, too, such as look after the pets and help take care of grand mom, who is bedridden, for example.  Tasking everyone also helps to reduce stress by giving a point of focus to concentrate on.  Assign someone (maybe grand mom, if she can do it) to monitor the radio or a small portable TV for news.
  11. Heads up with “Safe” Neighbors: this is a truly decisive issue and a judgment call. Only who you trust and trust absolutely!  You may be able to make a “heads up” with a close neighbor and family to help one another in time of need.
  12. Last Minute Pickups before the Midnight Hour: Fuel, canned food, as much cash as you can afford to withdraw, any last-minute medical supplies, batteries, extra radios, automotive equipment…anything you might need last minute…buy it. [especially ice and some Styrofoam coolers if it’s summertime…this for #14 below!  I did it, and you can, too]
  13. Vehicles: read what we did in my articles about Katrina. Flooding expected?  Stash the vehicle on high, as in a parking garage.  They’ll fine or ticket you?    They won’t have time to tow you, and guess what?  Your vehicle will be working when the time comes. As well, consider adding a 3-day supply of emergency items to the car in the instance that you have to bug out.
  14. Perishable food: cook it all as quickly as you can, and then refrigerate it. Better to have it cooked and then eat it than have it go bad.  When the time comes, throw it on the ice, as I mentioned above.  This will both save some of your perishables and also keep you from going into your longer-term/stable supplies.
  15. Firefighting gear: a couple of ABC-rated fire extinguishers may be a good investment. Keep them handy, charged up, and make sure all your family members know how to use them.

These tips will get you started.  We’ll cover more and be more specific for different types of disasters.  The important thing is to get these preps done and in place, and to think outside of the box.  In the end, you are responsible for your own preparedness, and to adjust accordingly for each specific type of disaster you face.  Fight that good fight, and fight it to win.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

A Green Beret’s Guide to Hurricane Season Preparedness

Checklist for Exterior Home Preparation For Natural Disasters

How To Escape a Sinking Vehicle

Tips On How To Fortify And Prep Your Home Or Apartment

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Why Good Hygiene and Sanitation Keeps You Safer After an Emergency

Click here to view the original post.

 

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, the “Grand Funk” we’re going to be speaking about today is not that of the Grand Funk Railroad, the Band.  Rather it is the funk of sweat, dirt, and grime that all of us experience firsthand throughout our existence.  I am relating it to the “bush,” or the outdoors/forest/jungle when you are out and about in a survival situation.  There are a few pointers here that would be good to observe, especially considering the world situation and how close we are to a war with China or North Korea.

Hygiene in the field.  So, what?  So, it may be the difference between life and death.  Everyone will recognize and concede the point that hygiene helps protect you from germs and diseases, as well as preventing the body from falling apart.  This is common sense.  But there are other reasons to keep clean that might not be clear.

When you sweat, your body uses apocrine and eccrine glands.  The eccrine secrete primarily water and salt.  The apocrine glands, on the other hand, are mostly found in the hairy areas of the body…and these throw out (in addition to water and salt), oily secretions that have pheromones in them.  The secretions from the apocrine glands tend to be eaten and metabolized by bacterial flora on the skin…and produce a hideous odor.

I’m here to tell you…you can smell a “stinky man” a long way off…several hundred feet when the wind is right.  Be advised: in an SHTF/collapse scenario, whether it’s foreign troops or neighborhood marauders…if you can smell them, they can smell you.  It is very important to clean the heaviest apocrine gland-laden areas of your body…your groin, armpits, buttocks.  You should wash them (a sponge bath at the minimum) at least once a day, especially after much work or physical exertion.

Deodorant is fine…but not an antiperspirant.  The antiperspirants have Aluminum and Magnesium in them to keep you from perspiring.  This is not good.  You need to perspire, as the sweat removes toxins from your body, as well as cooling you off (thermoregulation).  For this reason, a mild deodorant will work well, one with some alcohol in it to help kill the germs that feed upon your sweat.  For soaps, use a clean, non-fragranced soap in the field.  I always used Ivory when I was in the service.  It is effective and doesn’t stick out with a fragrance.

That last part can be detrimental, especially for you guys and gals that like to use cologne or perfume.  That stuff really carries a long way to the human nose, let alone an animal’s such as a dog’s (tracking you) or a bear (that may hunt you).  In addition, when you touch something…a leaf or a tree branch…you just left a scent mark.  A good human tracker will pick it up quickly.

The feet…it can never be overemphasized just how much they can stink, and also how detrimental it can be for you to walk long distances with rotten, filthy feet.  You should change socks at least once per day.  Wash them out too…soap and water will do.  Wring them out and hang them from the back of your rucksack while you’re walking.  They’ll dry out.  You should powder your feet (the “dogs” as we called them in the Army), and take good care that they remain clean and dry.  An extra pair of insoles you should always have so that at the end of a day, you can switch out with the ones in your boots and let the pair that was inside “breathe” and dry out.

Maintain the nails, maintain the teeth…all of these preventative actions will keep you from getting ingrown toenails and having your teeth fall out…all of which contribute to an increase in the misery factor, as well as leaving you vulnerable to sickness and injury.  Smoking?  No way.  Not in the bush.  Give it up for your health, and also for your safety.  We could smell cigarettes hundreds of feet from us when we were out and about.  Plus, it is better to keep you from giving off an odor in your clothing and on your skin.

Good hygiene is part of your camouflage: to keep others from knowing where you are.  You’ll be watching out for your health and preventing bad guys from finding out where you are.  Granted, you don’t have time for a bath with Mr. Bubble, but at least you can keep from smelling bad as Oscar the Grouch or Pigpen off of the Peanuts.  It’ll more than pay for itself when you follow that routine.  If it keeps you hidden just one time when the SHTF when they’re after you, it will have been worth it.  Stay clean, be fit, drink coffee, and keep in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

A Crash Course in Preparedness – Week 2 – Medicine, Sanitation, and Surviving Disaster Diseases

Click here to view the original post.

 

Welcome back to week 2 in our Crash Course into Preparedness. Last week we discussed the basics of survival and gear needed for a short-lived event. One of the comments from last week’s class mentioned that it isn’t hard to prepare, you just have to start. I couldn’t agree more! My only addition I would make to this comment is in order to start you must prioritize your needs and know what you’re planning for. This week, we are taking the same concept from last week – prioritizing, planning and preparing to another facet of disaster planning and highlighting the more dirty side of preparedness – medical and sanitation needs.

Some of the greatest threats in an emergency occur after the disaster. Lack of accessible clean water following major disasters can quickly escalate and create secondary problems in a post SHTF situation. Additionally, those unsanitary conditions can exacerbate the spreading of diseases, infections and health risks. In this preparedness course, we will cover the most common issues that occur following a disaster that relates to hygiene, sanitary and medical condition.

Sanitation, good hygiene, and medical preparedness all go hand-in-hand. But as you will see after reading this guide, it takes a lot of planning and a lot of preparation. Simply put, there are many wrong turns a person could take in the aftermath of a storm and their health could suffer as a result. Therefore it is paramount that you understand the magnitude of these types of disasters and how to avoid them. As Ready Nutrition writer, Jeremiah Johnson noted in a recent article, “hygiene protects you from germs and diseases, as well as preventing the body from falling apart.” In the aftermath of disasters, this needs to stay at the forefront of our priorities.

In this week’s course, I have compiled lists of preparedness items you may need for these types of disasters, but in no way is this list comprehensive. There is always some other items that someone will need. Therefore, remember to prioritize your household’s needs! If someone in your home has a preexisting condition – prepare for that. If someone in the household has mobility issues – make sure they have supplies to help them get around, or if someone has a suppressed immune system – prepare accordingly.

We have a lot of ground to cover, and a lot of prepper lists to review, so let’s get started.

Why your water sources become contaminated after a disaster and why you should avoid them

Water is one of the most necessary elements to sustain life, but when that water is dirty, it can quickly become one of the most dangerous. Following a disaster, municipal water lines will more than likely be damaged and can become contaminated with sewage, chemicals and, in particular, may also contain a number of pathogens that can cause illness. These contaminated waters harbor bacteria, different viruses, and fungi – all of which can make people very sick.

Diseases can be present in the water. Most notably, cholera, hepatitis A, typhoid fever, and Leptospirosis. If massive flooding occurs in the area and homes are damaged as a result, mold could also pose a serious health problem and exacerbate asthma, allergies, or other respiratory diseases like COPD. Mold can appear in as little as 24 to 48 hours after flood waters recede. Experts suggest not to touch it. Wear rubber gloves, wear a mask when handling it and if you are in a dwelling where there is mold, you should leave.

Those who have open wounds or rashes should also avoid the flood waters as they can quickly become infected. If the water lines are damaged, or if the damage is suspected, do not use municipal water sources for cleaning or drinking. Likewise, throw out any food that has come in contact with contaminated water.  Avoiding contaminated water is your best bet, but at times unavoidable. Maintaining proper sanitation and hygiene will ensure your overall health and safety.

Fly infestations also pose a problem, and if the waste is left out in the open, then it will only lead to the susceptibility of epidemics such as Hepatitis A, cholera, typhoid or diphtheria. Having a means dispersing of human waste will ensure that in times of disaster, your family and neighbors will stay healthy.

As well, mosquitoes are notorious for harboring diseases. Some of which are:

  • Dengue
  • West Nile
  • Zika
  • Chikungunya
  • St. Louis Encephalitis
  • La Crosse Encephalitis

As well as a few others that mainly affect animals:

  • Western Equine Encephalitis
  • Dog Heartworm

So it’s important for homeowners in disaster affected regions to take certain measures to prevent the proliferation of mosquitoes. This requires keeping an eye out for things on your property that might contain even the smallest puddles of water. As well, experts are recommending that homeowners drain pools and if you see mosquitoes in larger areas of standing water to alert authorities.

Make sure you clear any trash or debris in your yards such as tires or cans and don’t leave any water out in flower pots or water bowls. It’s also a good idea to secure any leaky pipes you might have outside of your home, and clear out any leaves in your gutters. In some cases, you may need to fill or drain spots that tend to collect water on your property.  As an added defense, build traps that will cull the local mosquito population.

If you are cleaning your home after a flood, make sure you follow these steps from the EPA on flood-related cleaning.


Sanitation

No one really wants to discuss sanitation because it’s… well, an unpleasant and dirty subject. However, it is one of the most important areas to focus on when preparing for a disaster.

Most disasters cause sanitation nightmares simply because following a disaster, there is a lack of sanitation facilities or water lines have been damaged or crossed with sewage lines. This can bring on serious health risks.

Here are a couple of necessary facts you need to keep in mind.

  • In the aftermath of a disaster where water sources are compromised, people within a 50-mile radius could be adversely impacted by illness and disease just if one person handled the trash improperly. Let that sink in.
  • If the you-know-what has hit the fan, you must be aware that more people die after a disaster due to poor sanitation than from the disaster itself. This is due to individuals not knowing where or how to properly expel waste.
  • Infectious diseases from contaminated water can make certain groups very vulnerable – the very young, the elderly and people suffering from diseases that lower their immune resistance.

How to prepare for sanitation disruptions

When the trash cannot be picked up, it must be burned or buried by you; however, municipalities cannot risk contamination to the water source or soil from people who incorrectly bury their debris, so it is important to know how to properly dispose of your waste products and stay clean, as well. Typically, city officials will provide information on this after a disaster occurs.

One of your first lines of defense is to keep hands clean during an emergency to prevent the spread of germs. If your tap water is not safe to use, wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected. If needed, a temporary hand washing station can be created by using a large water jug that contains clean water.

How to clean water

Bring your drinking water to a rolling boil for 15 to 20 minutes before consumption or for cleaning purposes. At altitudes above one mile or 2,000 meters, you should increase the rolling time to three minutes. For an added measure, after boiling, you can chemically disinfect the water with chlorine bleach (minus additives). Use 16 drops of chlorine bleach per gallon, or 4 drops per quart of water.

The reason for taking added measures after you boil your water is that many water-borne diseases like giardia and cryptosporidium tend to encyst and can survive a chemical disinfection, especially with chlorine.  Most of your one-celled creepy-crawlies will bite the big one with it, but boiling is the only surefire method when you don’t have an advanced water filtration system available.

Calcium hypochlorite (HTH, also known as “pool shock”) is another method to use.  The concentrations are different per the manufacturer, but you can reconstitute it and make a slurry with a one-liter bottle and a teaspoon of the HTH. Then you follow the ratio for chlorine drops as provided above, keeping aware that it will deteriorate over time. Source

Wash your hands

Now that the water is clean, washing hands with soap and water are the best way to reduce the number of germs on the skin. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs. According to the CDC, you should wash your hands after the following:

  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • Before eating food
  • After using the toilet
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • Before and after caring for someone who is sick
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After touching an animal or animal waste
  • After touching garbage
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound

Make a sanitation kit

As well, you want to ensure your house has a way of dealing with sanitation issues. Having a sanitation kit that is ready in times of disaster is essential to keeping your family and neighbors healthy. These kits can fit comfortably into a bucket, are affordable, and will not take up much space. Additionally, being educated on how to properly dispose of waste is a key factor in keeping everyone healthy during a disaster.

Some suggested sanitation supplies should be added to any short or long-term emergency kits are:

  • Disposable bucket or luggable loo
  • Toilet paper (two weeks worth)
  • Rubber gloves
  • Garbage bags with twist ties (for liners of toilets or luggable loo)
  • Bathroom cleaner
  • Cat Litter or absorbent material such as saw dust or dirt
  • Baby wipe
  • Soap
  • Baking soda can be used to help eliminate odors
  • Vinegar
  • Bleach
  • Shovel
  • Women’s sanitary needs

Dispose of Waste

Properly disposing of waste products keeps water sources clean and cuts down on illness and disease.  If city water is still available, flush conservatively.  Grey water such as used dish water, bath water or water for cooking can be used to flush the toilet.  If water lines are damaged, or if the damage is suspected, do not flush the toilet.

If water services are interrupted, an easy way to utilize the toilet and keep it clean is to:

  • Clean and empty the water of the toilet bowl out.
  • Line the bowl with a heavy-duty plastic bag.
  • Once the bag has waste inside, add a small amount of deodorant such as cat litter, as well as disinfectant and securely tie the bag for disposal.
  • A large plastic trash can (lined with a heavy duty bag) can be used to store the bags of waste.
  • Once trash services begin, the city will come and collect these.

If a portable camp toilet is used, the above mentioned can also be used. However, if the trash crews are coming, carefully secure the waste bag and store in a designated trash can to be collected. If the trash crews are not coming in a given amount of time, the bag of waste will need to be buried (see the proper way to bury waste below).

Officials say to avoid burying your waste, but sometimes it is necessary. However, if the waste is not properly taken care of, pollution of water sources will lead to illness and disease. It also attracts flies and insects which will spread the disease further. Understand that burying feces takes up to a year to decompose. Therefore, finding the right spot to bury your feces is crucial. There are biodegradable bags that a person can put their waste into. These can usually be found in the camping department of outdoor stores, or on the Internet. The bags assist the waste in decomposing faster and assists in preventing the waste from hitting major water sources. If a person does not have one of these handy bags available, the feces should be buried in “catholes” far away from water sources, campsites and a communal spot where there are a lot of humans. If you find yourself in a situation where toilet paper is not available, you may have to resort to a more natural method of staying clean. Below is a list of toilet paper alternatives for an emergency situation.

Toilet Paper Alternatives

  • Leaves
  • Phone books
  • Unused coffee filters
  • Corn cobs (That’s right- Corn Cobs)
  • Dilapidated kitchen towels (no longer used for cleaning).
  • Bed linen strips
  • Mail order catalog

Hygiene

It is important to continue regular hygiene habits during an emergency. As well, a woman’s personal hygiene and ensuring children are clean is essential in making sure sanitation-related illnesses do not occur.Habits such as brushing your teeth, washing your face, combing your hair and even washing your body with a wet washcloth. This will provide a sense of normalcy, help prevent the spread of disease, as well as help to relieve the stress brought on by the disaster.

In a pinch, water can be heated outside using a sun visor for a vehicle or a sun oven. Use filtered potable water or fresh rainwater during times of emergencies. To prevent sanitation-related diseases, do not use standing water.

SHTF laundry

If your home was damaged by flood water, you will need to disinfect your washing machine. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Set the washer to the largest load capacity and fill with hot water
  2. Add one cup chlorine bleach
  3. Set the washer to a full cycle with a hot water rinse. Allow washing machine to run through the entire cycle.
  4. Clean the exterior of the washer – top, front and sides – and all other surfaces in the laundry room with a solution of chlorine bleach and hot water. Rinse with clean water.

Additional Maintenance Tips:

  • If the washer has been through a flood, have a technician check the appliance before cleaning and using.
  • If a dryer has been contaminated by flood water, have it checked by a technician and then wipe down the drum and outside of the dryer with a solution of chlorine bleach and hot water. Always rinse well with a cloth dipped in clear water.

Once your washer is clean and ready for use, it’s time to get that laundry going.

  1. Sort clothes into appropriate piles.
  2. Check your care label to make sure garments are washable.
  3. If labeled hand washable only, then hand wash—do not put into the washing machine.
  4. If the garment is dry, brush off loose dirt and residue. Rinse in clean, cool water to remove mud and flood water. This will take several rinses until rinse water is clear. Work a heavy duty detergent (liquid) or paste of granule detergent into all stained areas. Let stand 30 minutes.
  5. Work a heavy duty detergent (liquid) or paste of granule detergent into all stained areas. Let stand 30 minutes.
  6. Follow care labels and wash in hottest water safe for the garment with detergent. Use bleach if recommended for the garment.
  7. Sanitize with a disinfectant. Always test on an inconspicuous seam to be sure it does not harm the garment. Add to washing machine before adding clothing.

Some disinfectants to try are:

  • Liquid chlorine bleach (Clorox, Purex) if safe. Do not use on washable wools and silks. Follow directions carefully.
  • Pine oil (Pine-O-Pine, Fyne Pine) is safe for most washable garments. Do not use on washable wools and silks since the odor will remain.
  • Phenolic (Pine-Sol, Al-Pine) is safe for most washable garments. Do not use on washable wools and silks since the odor will remain. 1 Hang garments to dry.

Off-grid laundry is another option to consider

As well, you need to consider some off-grid laundry sources if your home has no power. Some items you will need are:

First, gather your supplies.

  • Laundry soap of choice (liquid is easier to use in this case)
  • Borax
  • Baking Soda
  • Hydrogen Peroxide
  • Sturdy scrub brush
  • Small bucket (I use a clean plastic kitty litter bucket)
  • Good quality janitor’s mop bucket with a press wringer
  • Large basin or clean bathroom
  • Drying rack and clothespins (or method of choice)
  1. Separate clothing into small piles.
  2. In a large basin, add laundry soap and begin filling with water with the hottest water. Mix the soap into the water until incorporated.
  3. As water is still filling up in the basin, add laundry. Turn off the water when water covers the soiled laundry.
  4. Add any disinfectants and mix to incorporate.
  5. Allow laundry to sit for 30 minutes to an hour to soak.
  6. When ready to clean clothes, fill the second basin up with water and set aside.
  7. Using an agitator, scrub clothes to get all stains off.
  8. Rinse clothes in the second basin to remove soap.
  9. Ring out clothes and set on dryer rack to dry.

Prevention is the key to spreading communicable diseases, so prepare appropriately.


Medical

Short-term disasters can bring on a myriad of medical situations and they can occur very quickly. Because of the disaster, roads may be impassable, or in some cases, the hospitals may be at capacity and cannot take in any more patients. With that in mind, it is important to know what the most common medical emergencies are and prepare accordingly for them.

In short-term disasters, prepare for water-related illnesses. This will be very common given the close proximity to contaminated water sources.

In The Prepper’s Blueprint, it states, “The relationship between communicable diseases and disasters exist and merits special attention. When there is a short-term emergency, there is an increased number of hospital visits and admissions from common diarrhea-related diseases, acute respiratory infections, dermatitis, and other causes. These type of medical issues are due to those coming in direct contact with flood waters contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage. These contamination factors will cause irritation to skin and a host of other medical conditions.”

In longer-term disasters, burns, cuts, rashes and secondary infections will also be very common medical emergencies to prepare for. Folks, these are the disasters you will likely face and it is imperative that you prepare for this with proper medical supplies and knowledge.

I realize that there are a lot of medical conditions to think about. The best approach is to look at the basics and prepare for those. Many medical items can be used for multiple disasters, so take comfort in this and prepare accordingly.

Build the Ultimate 1 Year Medical Supply with These First Aid Basics

Experts suggest that each home have a basic medical supply that is unique to your family’s needs. Therefore, keep any pre-existing conditions and allergies any family members may have, as well as the above list of the most common medical conditions that hospitals see. It is within your best interest to ensure that you have any and all necessary medications that require prescriptions before an emergency happens.We all have our fair share of band-aids and antibiotic ointment, but do you have medical supplies that can help with true medical emergencies?

The following list is your basic medical preparations broken into sections of the need to help in your organization.


Hygiene

  • Laundry detergent
  • Disinfectant (bleach, pine-sol, etc.)
  • Soap
  • Shampoo
  • Liquid antibacterial hand soap – 20
  • Disposable hand wipes – 20
  • Antibacterial hand sanitizer – 20
  • Feminine items – 12 packages
  • Extra baby needs (diapers, wipes, pacifiers, bottles, medicine, etc.) – in quantity
  • Exam gloves – 5 boxes
  • Rubber cleaning gloves
  • Extra mops and brooms
  • Large plastic bins (for doing laundry, clearing away debris or packing precious items in a pinch)

Essential Medical Tools

  • Trauma shears
  • Pen light or small flash light
  • Scalpel with extra blades
  • Stethoscope
  • Irrigation syringe
  • Tweezers
  • Thermometer
  • Foam splint – 2 per family member
  • Thermometer

Over-the-Counter Products

  • Aspirin or non-aspirin pain reliever (for adults and children) – 5 bottles
  • Stool softener – 5 bottles
  • Electrolyte powder – 3 boxes
  • Cold/flu medications – 2 boxes per family member
  • Expectorant/decongestants – 3 per family member
  • Hydrocortisone – 3
  • Miconazole/anti-fungal – 3
  • Syrup of Ipecac and activated charcoal – 2
  • Eye care (e.g., contact lens case, cleansing solution, eye moisture drops) – 3 per family member

Natural Supplements

Wound Care

  • Disinfectant (Betadine, isopropyl alcohol, iodine, hydrogen peroxide, etc.) – 2 per family member
  • Band-aids – 3 large boxes in assorted sizes
  • Antibiotic ointment – 5
  • Instant cold and hot packs – 10
  • 1 week of prescription medications – as many as you are able to get with your prescription
  • Ace bandages – 10
  • Non- stick gauze pads in assorted sizes (3×3 and 4×4) – 10 boxes
  • Sterile roller bandages – 5
  • Surgical sponges – 5
  • Adhesive tape or duct tape – 5
  • Steri-strips – 5
  • Moleskin – 3
  • Respirator masks – 4
  • CPR micro shield – 1 per family member
  • Suture kit – 3 per family member
  • QuikClot® compression bandages – 2 per family member
  • Tourniquet – 2
  • Thermal Mylar blanket – 1 per family member
  • Antibiotics

*These are your minimum quantities. If you are able to do so, prepare for more.

One cannot become proficient at something without study and application. Going as far as to take medical courses in community colleges, local county extension offices, local fire departments, and with veterans groups, along with other civic clubs and organizations can give you a great edge on acquiring knowledge on medical emergencies and how to treat them. It should go without saying, but stock up on medical manuals like:

Taking medical courses would be very beneficial in preparing for this type of emergency. The Fire Department, American Red Cross or Medical Centers are local resources that offer classes to assist in medical emergencies. To further prepare, find websites online that deal with first aid care and go through each injury to see what medical instruments and items are needed.

Customize Your Supplies

Many believe that a basic store-bought medical kit will provide for all of their medical needs, but these kits tend to be overloaded with unneeded items (i.e., 500 band aids). Buying your own medical supplies allows you to customize your kit to fit your family’s unique needs and is more economical. In fact, you can purchase many of these items at your local Dollar Store to save money.  Customizing your family’s medical supply gives your family members the best chance at being cared for when a medical emergency arises. Further, take your preparedness a step further and organize your medical preps and create medical response packs for quick acting.

Store a first aid kit in the car (being careful with heat sensitive items) and also tuck some medical supplies into your 72-hour bag as well as at work. This way, you can be ready to deal with medical emergencies wherever they happen to occur.

Storing Medical Supplies

How you store your first aid supplies is every bit as important as having the supplies in the first place. Medicines can lose potency or spoil if they are subject to moisture, temperature fluctuations, and light.  For example, aspirin begins to break down when it is exposed to a slight amount of moisture.

Unless the instructions indicate otherwise, store medications in a cool, dark place that is out of the reach of children.   However, you still want to store the medical supplies in a place that is easily accessible to adults, who may need to respond very quickly in the event of a medical crisis.

Check expiration dates periodically to ensure the medicines are still good to use.  While most medicines lose potency once they’re past the expiration date, there are a few that will actually make a person extremely ill if taken after it spoils.  For example, tetracycline antibiotics that have spoiled can cause a severe, sometimes deadly, kidney ailment.

Signs of Expired Medicines

Although there is data that states most medicines can last longer than their expiration dates, it is important to understand that using medicine years past its expiration date can lose effectiveness and in some cases, change its chemical makeup. If you are in a survival situation where your life depended on an outdated drug, then it is wise to follow the cliché “better safe than sorry”.

Knowing the signs of expired medicine can help indicate when new items are needed.

  • Creams or ointments which are discolored or have changed in texture.
  • Creams or ointments which have cracked or separated.
  • The medicines smell has changed since it was opened.
  • Tablets are broken or chipped and have changed color

Bear in mind, there are some medications that should never be used after their expiration and could have severe consequences for patients. These include:

  • Anticonvulsants – narrow therapeutic index
  • Dilantin, phenobarbital – very quickly lose potency
  • Nitroglycerin – very quickly lose potency
  • Warfarin – narrow therapeutic index
  • Procan SR – sustained release procainamide
  • Theophylline – very quickly lose potency
  • Digoxin – narrow therapeutic index
  • Thyroid preparations
  • Paraldehyde
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Epinephrine – very quickly lose potency
  • Insulin – very quickly lose potency
  • Eye drops – eyes are particularly sensitive to any bacteria that might grow in a solution once a preservative degrades.

Source

What if you don’t have enough medical supplies?

Now, let’s take this a step further. What if you prepared your food and water for an emergency, but completely forgot about getting medical supplies? (It’s hard to remember everything when you’re planning for a disaster) There are some alternatives that you may be lucky enough to have in your pantry to use.

Some of your kitchen staples may have some medicinal value. For instance, did you know you can make an antiseptic (first discovered during World War I) made of a diluted solution of baking soda and bleach? It’s called Dakin’s Solution and has been proven to kill most bacteria and viruses. As well, vinegar, baking soda, baking powder and salt have medicinal values.

Honey has become a poster child for an alternative to antibiotics can fight multiple species of bacteria, fungi, and superbugs, making it a viable alternative to antibiotics.

As Ready Nutrition writer, Jeremiah Johnson recently wrote, “Honey is also good for wounds/abrasions/cuts of the mouth, as it is a demulcent that soothes abraded tissues, and it also is a medium that microbes do not live in.  Who doesn’t remember the time-honored honey and lemon mixture for a sore throat?  The thing of it is: it works, and if it works it should be employed. Read more on how to use honey to treat wounds.

Having access to health-inducing herbs is another essential for wound care. Herbs such as oregano, garlic, lavender, and thyme can help protect a wound from infection and promote healing. Along those lines, writer, Jeremiah Johnson recommends every prepper have the Three G’s: Ginger, Garlic, and Ginseng in their natural medicine cabinet. Further, knowing which herbs can be used for natural pain killers is also paramount in your medical preparedness knowledge. Some pain reducing herbs to add to your herbal first-aid kit are:

  • Aloe (Aloe vera)
  • Calendula (Calendula officinalis)
  • Comfrey (Symphytum officinale)
  • Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica)
  • Tea (Camellia sinensis)
  • Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

Common pantry items can also be used to help bleeding wounds clot. Many have found that cayenne pepper is an effective alternative and natural version of QuikClot. Cayenne pepper contains an active ingredient, called capsaicin, which has analgesic (pain relieving) properties and various other medicinal uses.

As well, boiled and sanitized torn sheets can be used as bandages. Or, if the cuts are minor and you have access to an herb garden, consider placing a sage leaf or lamb’s quarters on the cut as a natural bandage.

In an extended disaster, bacterial infections and viruses are likely to be one of the reasons that people will die.

Historically, essential oils have been used as a natural therapy to relieve symptoms when modern-day medicine was not available. The most amazing aspect of essential oils lies in their ability to effectively kill bad bacteria while leaving good bacteria alone! Rather than targeting one symptom, as Western medicine does, it targets multiple symptoms.

There are two types of essential oils you should stock up on for SHTF planning:

Antibacterial – Due to the increase of antibacterial resistant illnesses, many are turning to essential oils such as basil, cassia, cinnamon, clove, cypress, eucalyptus, geranium, lavender, lemon, marjoram, melaleuca, myrrh, orange, oregano, peppermint, rosemary, tea tree, and thyme.

Antiviral – Oils that have been studied to help control viral infections include: basil, cassia, cinnamon, eucalyptus, frankincense, lemon, lemongrass, marjoram, Melaleuca, myrrh, oregano, and thyme.

I started out with a simple beginner’s essential oil kit and have found it of great use! Some more popular ways of using essential oils are aromatherapy, herbal soaks, compresses, tinctures, and salves.

Surviving Disaster-Related Diseases

In reality, the aftermath of a disaster is always to hardest to survive. We tend to find ourselves in third-world living conditions – off-the-grid, poor water conditions, lack of proper sanitation and poor diet.

Those conditions can create the perfect storm for outbreaks of disease and infection. And if you find yourself living in close proximity to others, those diseases can quickly spread, thus setting the stage for an epidemic.

Outbreaks

Let’s cut to the chase, epidemics are quite common following certain disasters. According to this publication, these are the most common diseases that follow a disaster:

  • Diarrhea-related illness (cholera, dysentery)
  • Leptospirosis
  • Hepatitis
  • ARI (pneumonia/influenza)
  • Measles
  • Meningococcal meningitis
  • TB
  • Malaria
  • Dengue fever
  • Tetanus

Many believe the misuse of antibiotics in the past has led to the dangers of super bugs such as the spread of MRSA and MERS virus. In fact, nearly all significant bacterial infections in the world are becoming resistant to commonly used antibiotics. This means that our current medical safety nets will be much smaller in the near future. Even the smallest cuts could pose a danger to our health.

To add insult to injury, the disease typhoid which is spread from contaminated food and water is also becoming resistant to antibiotics and could soon become an out of control nightmare. Why am I telling you this? Because superbugs are everywhere now and experts warn that “it’s almost too late.” In the wake of a disaster, we immediately fall back on medicines that have worked in the past. If we find ourselves with an infection and antibiotics don’t work, then a secondary infection will set in and your fate is sealed.

Phases of outbreak and classification of infectious disease

Infectious disease transmission or outbreaks may be seen days, weeks or even months after the onset of the disaster. Three clinical phases of natural disasters summarize the chronological public health effects on injured people and survivors:

Phase (1), the impact phase (lasting up to 4 days), is usually the period when victims are extricated and initial treatment of disaster-related injuries is provided.

Phase (2), the post-impact phase (4 days to 4 weeks), is the period when the first waves of infectious diseases (air-borne, foodborne, and/or water-borne infections) might emerge.

Phase (3), the recovery phase (after 4 weeks), is the period when symptoms of victims who have contracted infections with long incubation periods or those with latent-type infections may become clinically apparent. During this period, infectious diseases that are already endemic in the area, as well as newly imported ones among the affected community, may grow into an epidemic.

Source

When an outbreak occurs, those living in cities or in close proximity to others will be more at risk of contracting illnesses and spreading them. Any pregnant women, infants, elderly people, or those with chronic medical conditions are also at risk and could be the first of the population to contract the contagious illness. If an epidemic approaches, there could be long-lasting repercussions of such a disaster. The worst-case scenario in all of this is if the outbreak is widespread and extremely contagious drastic changes could be made to isolate the outbreak itself.

  • Challenges or shut downs of business commerce
  • Breakdown of our basic infrastructure: communications, mass transportation, supply chains
  • Payroll service interruptions
  • Staffing shortages in hospitals and medical clinics
  • Interruptions in public facilities – Schools, workplaces may close, and public gatherings such as sporting events or worship services may close temporarily.
  • Government mandated voluntary or involuntary home quarantine.

While these are extreme points, I want to make sure you are prepared for a worst-case scenario and knowing what to expect will help you in your efforts. As I have mentioned, with any type of disaster or emergency, the responsibility falls more heavily upon our shoulders to ensure you can meet our needs. Instituting preventative measures in the home could also help you better prepare for injured or infectious family members.

  • Taking proper illness precautions – avoid touching your mouth, nose, and eyes during any pandemic.
  • Create a sick room for the home.
  • Keep your immune systems up by getting lots of sleep, having a good diet, exercising and taking vitamins and antioxidants to protect your health.
  • Stay inside and avoid contact with others.
  • Get pandemic supplies to have on hand at a moments notice.

Some items to consider when stocking a sick room are:

  • Tyvek protective suit and shoe covers
  • Plastic sheeting
  • Bed with linens, pillow, and blanket
  • Small wastebasket or a bucket lined with a plastic garbage bag.
  • Gallon-sized zip-loc bags
  • Pitcher or large bottle for water
  • Large plastic dishpan
  • portable toilet and human waste bags
  • Clipboard with paper and a pen for writing in the daily log.
  • Clock
  • Hand crank or battery-powered radio
  • Good source of light
  • Flashlight with extra batteries
  • 1 clothing hamper or a garbage can that is lined with a plastic garbage bag used to collect soiled clothing and bedding items before they are washed.
  • A bell or a noisemaker to call for assistance.
  • Thermometer
  • Tissues
  • Hand wipes or a waterless hand sanitizer
  • Bleach or disinfectant
  • Cotton balls
  • Rubbing alcohol, disinfectant or bleach
  • Measuring cup capable of holding 8 ounces or 250 ml
  • Over-the-counter medications for use in the sick room
  • Protective eye gear
  • Protective clothing
  • Disposable aprons or smocks (at least 2 cases)
  • Duct tape for sealing off doorways and vents
  • Latex household disposable cleaning gloves
  • Disposable nitrile gloves (2-3 boxes)
  • Garbage bags
  • Trash can
  • N95 masks or N100 respirator masks for use when the sick person is coughing or sneezing

To conclude, there will always be the threat of completely unanticipated disasters, but your overall understanding of the disasters we face and the dangers that lie in the aftermath will help you maneuver through these types of emergencies.

 

Course Discussion

We all have a way to help others prepare. One of the most wonderful things you can do is to help someone prepare. New preppers, if you have questions, leave them in the comment section and as a community, we can help to answer them. You’re not in this alone. I know this information provided is a lot to take in, just pace yourself and we are all here for you if you need it.

 

Sign Up For This Week’s Giveaway!

To help some readers get prepared for sanitation-related emergencies, we’re giving away a copy of The Prepper’s Blueprint – widely popular and highly rated preparedness manual and a sanitation kit.

All you have to do is sign up for our newsletter and leave a comment in one of our weekly National Preparedness articles about what you feel the most important aspect of being prepared is in the bottom of the article. Good luck everyone!

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Latest Actions From North Korea Nuclear Tensions

Click here to view the original post.

The progression of nuclear activity within North Korea is mounting, with Kim Jong-un’s latest nuclear test marked as the largest of the series of six total tests. This latest, and most powerful, nuclear test created earthquake shock waves that reached as far as across the border of China and into an eastern sea port in Russia.

Such tests are not the only contributing actions from North Korea towards the immanency of war. One day after the country’s most powerful nuclear test took place, sources reported that, under the cover of night, an InterContinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) was being relocated into a coastal position. An ICBM has a minimum range of 3,400 miles and is primarily used to perform the delivering of nuclear weapons.

Nikki Haley, the United States Ambassador to the United Nations, called for the council to exert the “strongest possible measures” on the nuclear nation during an emergency meeting with the UN Security Council, saying “enough is enough” and “our country’s patience is not unlimited”.

Not only are nuclear tensions growing stronger, but North Korea’s nuclear program is “more advanced and more dangerous than ever”, according to Ms Haley.

Although the United States may not want war, provocative measures are increasing, and a response will be necessary to break the worrying cycle. Jeffrey Feltmann, the political affairs chief to UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, said “Such a response must include wise and bold diplomacy to be effective”.

A national response to the movement being made overseas is coming closer with each passing day, but what about a response that can, and should, take place in every American household? Preparations can be made in within the walls of your own home to keep your family as safe as possible in the event of a nuclear attack.

Educate your family on the nature of a nuclear weapon and what the consequences of a nuclear attack are. Practice drills that can get your family to evacuate or relocate to a shelter in an amount of time that will make a difference in preserving their health when facing the aftermath of radiation and fallout after a nuclear explosion.

One method of preparation everyone should make (infants to elders alike!) is to have Thyrosafe, currently the only 65 mg potassium iodide tablet sold in the United States that meets the FDA requirements for use in a nuclear emergency, in every emergency kit, bug out bag and family survival kit.

As soon as an alert from public health officials is released, one should ingest Thyrosafe as soon as possible, following packaging instructions. Thyrosafe protects the thyroid against radioactive iodine released during a nuclear emergency. Pregnant women, infants, and young children are amongst the highest at risk for thyroid cancer due to radiation exposure. Do not overlook the opportunity to include a preventative product like this amongst the preparedness measures for you and your family!

Click here to purchase Thyrosafe to keep stored away in your preparedness provisions for at home or on the go protection in the event of an imminent nuclear catastrophe.

The post Latest Actions From North Korea Nuclear Tensions appeared first on American Preppers Network.

A Crash Course in Preparedness – Week 1 – The Survival Basics

Click here to view the original post.

We’re ushering in National Preparedness Month with the first in a series of four preparedness guides. This crash course into preparedness will help you plan a strategy, position critical assets and greatly increase your chance of surviving many of the most common emergencies. While the subject of preparedness is an extensive one, we are going to break the basics down as much as we can so that you can stay focused and on track.

Before we start, I want to share my philosophy with you. A disaster of any kind rarely stops with the initial event. The aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life for a much longer time than we intended. This can last days, into weeks and even longer (depending on the circumstance). Because of this, it’s important to have a well-rounded approach to your preparedness efforts. I wholeheartedly believe in a layering concept when it comes to preparedness. You start at the beginning and slowly add more “layers” on preparedness until your family is fully insulated from the disaster itself. By accumulating items slowly and mindfully, you will stay organized and know that all of your bases are covered. I’ve broken the layers down into three groups.

  • The first layer is the preparedness endeavors that prepare you for emergencies that have shorter-term effects. This is what we’ll cover today and basically, covers your 3-day emergency into two weeks. Having supplies in place to last up to two weeks will carry you through some of the most expected types of disasters.
  • The second layer of preparedness encompasses the disasters that turn out to be much longer-lasting: job loss, extreme weather events, economic collapse, long-term power outages, and pandemics, to name a few. This requires more planning on your part but is a crucial investment in order to be prepared for these longer lasting disasters.
  • The third layer of preparedness is acquiring supplies for those far from equilibrium events that have long standing consequences. In this type of disaster, you must prepare for the long haul and a complete change of lifestyle. These are events that encompass the end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it and we have to learn a new way of life including new skill sets that reflect an off-the-grid lifestyle.

While there are a lot of subjects in between the highlighted layers, we must keep this prepper truth in mind: How we choose to be prepared for a disaster event is solely our responsibility, and no one else’s.

In this course, the responsibility lies with you. I will provide you links to important articles, suggestions and even checklists to further your research but it is up to you to apply the information to your lifestyle. Let’s get started!

How prepared do you want to be?

Disasters of all types are an undeniable part of life, and the only thing you can change is the way you react to them. Having supplies in place to weather the storm is a great start, but far from the desired end result. To be prepared, and I mean fully prepared, requires planning, anticipating the worst-case scenario, and training for skill sets you will need while living through the event. You can’t just waltz into your local grocery store, grab some food, batteries, and water and then be done with it. You need to prioritize, plan, and prepare.

Prioritize your needs

Ultimately, the easiest way to begin preparing is to decide what types of disasters you are planning for (weather-related, natural disasters, mass evacuation, economic or personal disasters), and prioritize what your emergency plans will be based on those emergencies. The best way to begin assessing what your needs are is by reading and researching the disaster you are planning to survive.

Ready Nutrition has an immense amount of articles pertaining to specific disasters, so do a search and start your research. Many people start by preparing for the most likely emergency to occur in your area.

Map provided by Redcross.org and Noaa.gov

Do not limit your emergency planning to natural or economic disasters. Go a step further and plan for personal disasters that also tend to occur without warning (unemployment, divorce, death in the family).

Plan

Researching and creating an emergency plan is the best way to stay organized and on point with your prepping.

Having a plan in place to determine what steps need to be taken by you and your family members when an emergency arises will ensure that all preparedness needs are covered. Now that your plan is beginning to come to life, it’s important to check and prepare the home. To start, every home should begin their preparedness endeavors with this checklist.

Complete this prepared home checklist

  • Post emergency telephone numbers by phones (fire, police, ambulance, etc.).
  • Teach children how and when to call 911 or your local Emergency Medical Services number for emergency help.
  • Determine the best escape routes from your home if you plan on evacuating. Do you plan on bugging in or bugging out? If you are having problems deciding whether to shelter in place or evacuate, answer these two questions and you will know what you need to do.
  • Find the safe spots in your home for each type of disaster.
  • Show each family member how and when to turn off the water, gas, and electricity at the main switches.
  • Check if you have adequate insurance coverage.
  • Teach each family member how to use the fire extinguisher, and show them where it’s kept.
  • Install smoke detectors on each level of your home, especially near bedrooms.
  • Ensure that your family’s important documents are backed up and in a safe location.
  • Before you begin investing into your preparedness supplies, take steps to get out of debt. Debt only enslaves you further, and simplifying your lifestyle can help break those shackles. Learn about these 6 ways to simplify your lifestyle.
  • Create an emergency fund to begin funding your preparedness endeavors.
  • Plan for the worst case scenario and have emergency I.D. cards made for each family member (including your pets) with current information provided.

Planning is the key to survival and the best way to start is with a “list of lists”

This list will become your Master List of preparedness needs, so keep it in an easy to access location. Your list will also help to navigate you through your preparedness plan. Ask yourself these pertinent questions and realistically answer them. After you determine what disaster you are planning for, sit down and begin to map it out. The way I started was by writing down all the main categories I needed to plan for. Here’s an example.


Short-Term List of Needs for Sheltering in Place for Two-Weeks After a Hurricane

  • Water
  • Food
  • Clothing
  • Shelter
  • Communication
  • Tools
  • Fuel
  • Skillsets
  • Resources

When planning for a disaster follow these beginner protocols:

  • Choose an evacuation location and let family members know where your destination is, the contact information, a secondary destination, etc.).
  • Decide on the duration of the disaster you are planning for (3-day, 2 weeks, extended or longer-term disasters).
  • Create a financial plan on how much money you can contribute to your preparedness budget. Keep in mind that prepping can be expensive initially, so it’s best to start investing in your basic needs first: food, water, shelter, clothing, safety, and communication. You can add additional prepping items once the basics are covered.
  • Try and find items that are light weight, functional and versatile so that if you have to carry them for long periods it will not be a strain.
  • Ensure that you have contingency plans put in place in case your first plan does not work out.
  • Plan and prep for the environment you are living in.
  • While we all make mistakes, the ones made during a disaster can be very costly. This is why it is essential to plan out a worst-case scenario and know which mistakes are the most common.
  • Essentially, you want your beginning preparedness list to look like this short-term emergency checklist.

Prepare

You need to understand the disaster you are planning for, how to be mentally and spiritually prepared for it and, ultimately, what supplies and skills you need to thrive.

Many of the items that often disappear as a result of a disaster are items that protect your basic needs. While a popular prepper adage is to prepare with the 3 B’s: beans, bullets, and band-aids, there are more concepts to consider. Therefore, it is best to begin with these fundamental disaster items to meet your basic needs: food, water, clothing and shelter and then add more preparedness layers onto this initial foundation. However, many decide to expand their disaster supplies to encompass a longer duration so that if a delayed emergency response occurs, it has little effect on them. This is why preppers believe in having “back-ups for their back-ups.”

As well, do not forget about preparing items for your pets! They are depending on you to make sure they have everything they need to.

Water

Image result for ready nutrition and waterFirst and foremost, you need a dependable water source following a disaster. Your initial line of defense would be the two week supply of bottled water that is recommended, but because this need is your top priority, it is highly recommended that you get a water filtration system like the Katadyn water filter or a Berkey Filtration System. That said, many believe the suggested amount of water by disaster organizations is grossly underestimated.

If we go by the suggestion from emergency organizations and have 1 gallon per person per day, a family of 5 will need 35 gallons of water per week.

Victims of previous disasters say the suggested water amount stated by disaster organizations is not nearly enough to get through a disaster. Conway Yee’s family went through the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy and were without power or their well water supply for a week. To keep hydrated and clean, “we went through 20 gallons a day” for drinking and washing, he says. That’s 120 gallons of water for the week after the hurricane. With that in mind, you want to consider these alternate solutions to boost your short-term water supply.

With water being one of your most important preps, play it safe and double the amount of water needed. The extra water can be used for other purposes like sanitation, cleaning, etc. As well, because many water sources are questionable following a disaster, water can quickly become scarce, so it is important to remember there are hidden water sources found in the home to fall back to. As well, it is also advisable to have alternate ways to treat your water.

As a precaution, keep a bottle of unscented liquid chlorine bleach with your water supply for cleaning and sanitizing and for disinfecting water.

Food

Image result for ready nutrition and food supplyOnce you have your water supply in place, it’s time to begin stockpiling some food for emergencies. The overall goal of having an emergency food pantry is to have a wide array of nutritious foods stored away in order to carry us through an emergency. Start out with a supply of non-perishable food that doesn’t require a lot of cooking time (if any).

Ensure that you have foods suitable towards survival. Foods that have the sustaining energy sources to burn slowly. Finding foods that are high in complex carbs and dietary fiber are far more efficient from a dietary standpoint and will keep you feeling “fuller” longer. This could go a long way if you are planning on rationing your food in an extended emergency. Also, stay away from overly salty or sweet foods. This will only increase your need for water and since your food stores are a precious commodity, you will want to try and avoid these types of foods.

Using a food storage calculator will help you to determine how much food is necessary. It is important to factor in your caloric intake, especially during an emergency. Your activity level could drastically increase in a disaster due to aftermath cleanup and other activities. These are some considerations to keep in mind before purchasing the food items:

  • It’s best to find items that have expiration dates that are 1-2 years away from expiring, unless that item is used frequently in the home, and can be rotated frequently.
  • Typically, the best sales are advertised in the newspaper flyers.  There are stores that have 10 items for $10, or 2-for-1 offers.  You don’t have to break the bank to get stocked up.  Just get a little each time you visit the store.  In season vegetables are typically cheaper.  Larger volume packages are often a better price
  • Shop with the number of people in the household in mind. Also consider their preferences, food sensitivities, and appetites.
  • Get a wide variety of food to help reduce food fatigue.
  • Don’t rely on junk food. It’s especially important to keep your strength up and remain healthy during an emergency. Purchase supplies that are loaded with nutrients.
  • Store food in a dark, cool area of the home and protect your food investment by reducing oxidation of foods, bug infestations, and exposure to increase temperature and moisture levels.
  • Be aware of any special health considerations for family members.  Make sure you have supplies for family members with allergies and intolerances, as well as issues like hypertension or diabetes.
  • Store what you eat, and eat what you store.  By following this adage, you will not end up throwing away expired food, and you won’t serve up something completely unpalatable during a crisis situation.

Here are some suggested food items to have stored:


  1. Peanut butter

  2. Whole wheat crackers (consider vacuum packing to prolong freshness)
  3. Nuts and trail mix
  4. Cereal
  5. Oats
  6. Pasta
  7. Plant-based cooking oil
  8. Power bars and granola bars
  9. Dried fruit
  10. Just add water meals (Hamburger helper, pasta meals, etc.)
  11. Canned meat such as tuna, salmon, chicken, and turkey
  12. Canned vegetables such as beans, carrots, and peas
  13. Canned soups and chili
  14. Sports drinks
  15. Sugar, salt, and pepper
  16. Coffee, tea, hot cocoa
  17. Powdered milk
  18. Powdered drink mixes
  19. Seeds for sprouting
  20. Multivitamins

Here are 25 must-have foods to put in your pantry.


Canning meals is also an option you should consider. This gives you more control of your dietary requirements, gives you more meal options, helps provide “normal” food during difficult times. One thing I hear a lot from disaster victims is how they wish things would go back to normal. Having some of the family’s favorite foods canned and stored away would do wonders for morale.

As well, I highly recommend storing a variety of heirloom seeds. These can be to grow sprouts for emergency nutrition and for gardens for long-term food sources. You could also plant edible flowers. Not only will they be lovely to look at, but they will provide sustenance when you need it the most. Alternatively, if you can locate food packing plants or warehouses in your city, that may be a good place to allocate additional food reserves if yours runs out. This article can provide information on foraging for weeds.

Find the best deals so you don’t blow your budget

Mentioned earlier is the importance of having a budget for prepping. It’s easy to go crazy wanting preps to get your home ready. But you can do this without blowing your budget. The large volume supermarkets typically have better deals than the smaller stores. Map your shopping route based on local ads from the large supermarkets to save on gas money as well as on shopping time. Even dollar stores carry canned goods and food products for short term/long term food supplies. Look for the best sales and buy as much of the item as your budget will allow. For a more in depth first time shopping list for your prepper, consider adding these items, as well.

You can also pack your own MREs to save money and to ensure your family has foods they will eat. Here are some tips and suggested foods to do this.

On another note, there may come a time when you run out of your food stores and need to go to the store in the aftermath of a disaster. If this occurs, be prepared for regular food staples to be in limited supplies. Foods like bread, milk, and eggs usually are the first items that run out. We saw that during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.  If you find yourself in this situation, look for alternatives to those foods.

Start with a 3-day food supply and keep prepping

I have found that when starting your preparedness measures, it is best to start at the beginning in order to ensure you have everything you need to build up your preparedness foundation. Start your preparations with a 72-hour kit and then create a vehicle 72-hour kit. Once that is complete, you can begin ensuring your basic needs are met for longer periods or begin targeting other layers of preparedness. This is the foundation of your preparedness supply.

A 3 day or 72-hour kit is small enough that items can be added to a backpack to take with you in the case of a sudden disaster that comes without warning. These preparedness kits should be made for all members of the family that can account for their basic needs for 3 days. Once your 3-day supply is secure, you need to move on to expand disaster supplies to encompass more areas of preparedness.

Communication

Consider, for a moment, how drastically your life would change without the continuous flow of energy the grid delivers. What would our lives be like without access to communication channels telling us what is going on? How vulnerable would we feel not knowing what is going on around us? For that matter, how would we get in touch with loved ones to let them know how we are?

Communication during a disaster can be quite troublesome given that the power grid goes down during most natural disasters. Sadly, during these types of disasters, family and loved ones need those communication channels up the most and it can be quite frustrating when they aren’t.

Prepare ahead for this!

According to the CDC, families should develop different methods for communicating during emergency situations and share their plans beforehand with all those who would be worried about their welfare. Options for remaining in contact with family and friends if a disaster strikes include:

  • Phone contact with a designated family member or friend who is unlikely to be affected by the same disaster.
  • Email notification via a family distribution list.
  • Registration on the American Red Cross Safe and Well Website.
  • Use of the toll-free Contact Loved Ones voice messaging service (1-866-78-CONTACT).

Types of Emergency Communication Channels

Cell Phones/Computers

At first glance, there is little potential for these devices when the grid goes down. Without the multitude of servers that are scattered around the globe and the electricity that feeds them, our computers are nothing more than bulky hard drives. Cell phones might still work for a little while since some cell towers have backup batteries and solar panels, but their use might be short lived.

However, don’t be too quick to scoff at the prepping potential of these devices. Computers might still be useful for communicating in some cases. It’s fairly easy to create a local wifi network (aka ad hoc network) between computers that are within range of each other. This would allow people living on the same street or in the same apartment building to talk to each other, provided they can generate their own electricity.

The better solution would be to create a local network for cell phones that isn’t reliant on any infrastructure. Their energy demands are far less than other computers, their range is longer than wifi, and they are of course, mobile. The technology for creating a peer to peer network between cell phones has existed for some time now, but unfortunately, it has yet to be sold to the public. Companies like Terranet have been perfecting it over the past few years, and they estimate that about 30% of cell phones will be capable of making these networks with a simple software change. So right now, cell phones will be pretty much useless when the grid goes down, but that may change before the end of the decade.

Ham Radio

When most preppers think of communications, ham radios usually come to mind, and for good reason. They can communicate to other radios over hundreds of miles, and they may be the only form of very long distance communication when all else fails. Unfortunately, they wouldn’t be very useful for the average person.

They use a lot of electricity, the equipment can be pretty expensive, and only about 700,000 Americans are licensed operators. Still, if even a fraction of them are up and running after a major disaster, they will play a crucial role in the relief effort. Due to their limited numbers and the amount of resources that are required to keep them running, you won’t see them being used for casual conversation, but you will see them used by communities for conducting commerce and coordinating reconstruction efforts.

CB Radio/Walkie Talkie

I suspect that CB Radio’s and Walkie Talkies will be the main form of communication for the average person, and they are the best candidates for filling the gap that cell phones and internet providers would leave behind. If anything, CB radios were our parent’s version of the internet. They were affordable and accessible, you had to learn the lingo to use them, they allowed you to communicate anonymously, and much like the internet, they were used to skirt the law from time to time.

There are millions of CB radios lying around, and many of them are still being used by truckers today, so they will be available to many of the survivors. More importantly, they don’t use too much electricity, they’re more user-friendly than ham radios, and some of them are portable. Depending on the conditions you’re using them in, their range can extend anywhere from 1 to 25 miles.

As for walkie talkies, I don’t have to tell you how useful they could be. Much like the wifi network I spoke of earlier, these will be pretty handy for staying in touch with your neighbors. Together, CB radios and walkie talkies will be most common form communication after a disaster.

Courier

If the grid is down long enough, eventually some enterprising citizens would start to provide courier services. Whether it’s by foot or by bicycle, they will fill an important niche that other items on this list can’t provide, and that is a secure form of communication. If you had to send a message to someone who lives out of the range of your radio or wifi network, and you needed that message to remain a secret, writing that message down and sending someone out to deliver it by hand would be the only way to do it. Wifi just doesn’t have the range, and radios are too easy to listen in on.

Fuel

Image result for ready nutrition and fireSo, the power is out. You have all of this wonderful food stored away but no way to cook it. Before you resign yourself to baked beans at room temperature out of the can, consider your options. You may not have a functioning kitchen but you can still do some cooking.

As with all things related to prepping, you should have a backup plan, and a backup plan for your backup plan, and if you can, one more for good measure. Further, having an ample supply of items to use to create fire with will be paramount in an emergency situation. Therefore, keep the following items stocked up in your supplies:

  • Stock plenty of fuel for your cooking methods. (Be sure to store your fuel properly and in accordance with local fire regulations.)
  • Store matches in waterproof containers.
  • Lighters
  • Dry wood
  • If you have a place to store them, tightly roll newspapers and magazines to use for fuel. You can also use newspapers to biomass logs.
  • Fireproof cooking vessels

If a fire is not an option for cooking there are several alternatives you can turn to. Here are some popular options for alternative cooking sources

  • Camping propane stove
  • Rocket stove
  • Solar funnel cooker
  •  Propane or charcoal BBQ grill
  • Charcoal Hibachi (you can burn nearly anything in this as long as it is non-toxic)
  • Outdoor fireplace
  • #10 Can cookstove
  • Sun Oven
  • The Wonderbag

Whichever type of cooking vessel you use, make sure you have an ample supply of fuel to use. Whichever fuel you decide, store an ample supply. For example, if you choose to grill food using a BBQ grill, understand that one large bag of charcoal briquettes will last for about 4 cook outs. If you’re preparing for a 10-day emergency, you will need 10 bags of charcoal. As well, temperatures can affect the amount of fuel you use as well. For instance, low temperatures and the wind can greatly influence the amount of propane you use on camping stoves. It can increase the amount of fuel used by three! My family has an indoor wood burning grill,

In such a case, I like to have multiple ways to cook emergency food. My family has an indoor wood burning grill, we also own a rocket stove and a solar cooker. We have an outdoor grill too but in a dire emergency situation, we want to maintain OPSEC (operational security) and do not want all the neighbors knowing we have food. A fear of many preppers during the beginning stages of a true SHTF event is how our smells, as well as the aromas from foods we prepare, could attract unwanted visitors. Cooking food can be smelled in best conditions up to a half mile or so. Further, those who have gone without food for days on end will have a heightened sense of smell and will use this to their advantage. Keep this in mind when choosing how you will be preparing food.

Tools

The right tools are a valuable commodity when it comes to survival and essential items to have on hand for hunting, digging, cutting, communicating and navigational purposes. A 72-hour bag should have all items necessary to survive for 3 days. Bottom line is your preparedness tools are your life line and without them, you could be ill-equipped in a survival situation.

The ten tools listed below are some of the most important survival tools that should be in your 72-hour bags. Of course, other items can be included, but these essentials are a must-have for every survival pack. Practice using these tools regularly so that you know their capability and their strength.

Read more about essential survival tools here. As well, consider having separate supplies for your vehicle.

Not only will you need the above-listed tools, but you will also need tools if your home has been damaged by a disaster. In the backbreaking early stages of rubble removal, simple hand tools will play a vital role in transporting and removing debris. Acquiring basic hand tools—shovels, axes, and hammers—meet immediate demolition needs and then take on a long-term role once construction resumes. The tools used in the first phase of reconstruction were:

1. Round point and square nose shovels, preferably heavy-duty variety with extra long blade socket.
2. Pick axe
3. Pulaski Axe
4. Rig builder’s hatchet
5. Axe
6. Bow saw
7. 24-oz. framing hammer
8. Sledge hammer
9. Digging bars, preferably both pointed and chisel tip varieties; crow bars.
10. Leather or synthetic work gloves
11. Protective eye wear
12. Hard hats
13. Dust masks
14. Contractor-grade wheel barrows
15. Bolt cutters
16. Large-diameter heavy-duty weatherproof rope; small-diameter light-duty line
17. Rope hoist/pulley, minimum 250-lb. capacity
18. Folding knife

Quite simply, having these tools and equipment on hand will help you operate in a non-technological environment. The bottom line is your preparedness tools are your life line and without them, you could be ill-equipped in a survival situation.

Written Survival Information

Image result for ready nutrition and survival booksIn a high-stress situation, it’s easy to forget the basic how-tos of tasks that you don’t perform every day. Many survival manuals and printouts can easily be downloaded onto a flash drive to be taken along in your bug out bags. Don’t underestimate the value of a spiritual book to boost the morale. You want books like:

I like to have hard copies of important books on hand at home. If the power is out, you may not be able to access e-books or websites.

Security

The reality is that the vast majority of people have about three days of food and water at home and when a prolonged disaster strikes it upends the stability of the entire system of just-in-time delivery. When those delivery trucks stop delivering, things can be pretty dicey.

Most people strive to make their homes safe and secure. We install motion lights, fence the yard and make windows difficult to open. We have good quality locks on the doors and sometimes burglar alarms, as well. But all it takes is opening the door to the wrong person, or someone throwing a lawn chair through a glass window.

In a disaster situation, these security measures may not be enough. We need only to look at the aftermath of hurricanes and other natural disasters to see that looters are out in full force, taking advantage of the people who have already lost so much. As we’ve said here before, “If you can’t protect it, you don’t own it!”  This is a common human response to disasters and most preppers know this which is why they have guns and ammunition with which they will defend their homes and families.

But let’s explore some other ways you can protect your home and belongings. One way is to understand the mind of the criminal. An MSNBC affiliate out of Atlanta recently did just that. They sent letters to 86 people who had gone to prison for burglary and asked them a variety questions about their crimes. Their answers could tell you a lot about how to protect your home from this crime. What they told reporters included the following:

  • Don’t advertise what you own. One burglar admitted to looking for homes that had cars with NRA bumper stickers, which would indicate that there are plenty of guns to steal there.
  • Burglars don’t just look in obvious places. If they feel safe, they’ll tear everything up looking for hidden valuables.
  • The best time to break into a house was between 12:30 and 2:30, because it’s rare for both kids or adults to be home at that time period.
  • Not all burglars are intimidated by security alarm signs and cameras, and many admitted to knowing how to disable alarms. Some suggested that cameras would indicate that there are valuables in the home.
  • As you might expect, burglars are terrified of large dog breeds.
  • Burglars aren’t typically killers. They don’t want to a serious confrontation with a homeowner, so any sign that someone is home is a deterrent.

You can read more about that here, but essentially, if you know what to expect, then you can better prepare for it. Remember – prioritize, prepare and plan for what may come.

Preventative measures can be put in place to keep criminals far away from your home.  Minimize the threat of a home break in or home invasion by adding layers of security to prevent your home from being a possible hit.  Security layers are preventative measures put into place that will advertise to possible intruders to avoid your home altogether.

Having firearms on site will help you reinforce these security measures and continue protecting your home. By training with these weapons, you will be familiarizing yourself with firearms you will definitely see in one way, shape, or form in a SHTF scenario.  Learning how to operate these will stimulate you to develop skills and perhaps to purchase one or more in civilian/legal ownership form.  There are also plenty of qualified instructors to be found in these ranges, and a high-end range that is worth its salt will provide one for you to familiarize you with the weapon free of charge before you fire it.

The 3 Security Layers for the home

Layer 1: The Outside Layer

  • Reinforced doors and locks.  There is only 1 ” of wood protecting you in normal door locks.
  • Invest in heavy duty door hinges and secure door frames with 3 ” screws.
  • Barred windows or European-style security/storm shutters.
  • Doors that are not glass or see through.
  • Install a peep hole for the door.
  • Never rely on a chain latch as an effective barrier (they are easily broken if the door is kicked in).
  • Install infrared flood lights or motion detector lights around the perimeter of the home.
  • A gate at the front of the driveway that has spikes at the top to prevent someone from jumping over the fence
  • Never leave a spare key hidden under a rock or door mat.  Too many people do this and it is the first place a criminal is going to look.
  • Cut back large trees or bushes near the windows to provide concealment.  Additionally, putting thorn bushes and other types of plants to further secure the home would be advantageous.
  • Have a guard dog trained to attack.  And place “beware of dog” signs on the front and side gates of the home.

Layer 2: The Inside Layer

  • Consider adding a 2-way voice feature to the existing alarm system.  This feature enables your security system to communicate directly with the control panel.  This feature also allows you to call into your system and be able to listen to any activity or speak to your child or other family members who are home.
  • Position web cams strategically in hidden areas.  Place the computer that is monitoring the locations in a hidden spot so the criminals do not walk off with the computer.
  • Have emergency plans and protocols set up where children or teens can see them.  Additionally, have important contact phone numbers next to the plan.
  • Teach the household how to call 9-1-1, and have a script ready for them to read to the dispatcher.  This will help keep them explain calmly to the dispatcher what the emergency situation is.
  • Teach members of the home different escape routes to use in case they need to leave the home, as well as a code word to use for the family to immediately leave the home to go to a safe location.
  • Close all curtains and blinds at night time and set the alarm.
  • Keep purses, car keys, money and jewelry away from windows where burglars can look in and see.  This only makes them want to break in more.
  • If a gun is in the home, have it locked up or put away so that smaller children do not try to use it.

Layer 3: The Personal Layer

This is the most critical layer.

  • Teach family members to be observant of their surroundings when coming home and be aware of suspicious activity.
  • Never open the door to strangers.  Teach children not to be easily persuaded by strangers who look professional or have badges.
  • Teach children to call “safe” adults, such as neighbors for help in cases where parents are not home.
  • Get to know your neighbors and have their phone numbers on hand in case the child needs help from a nearby adult.
  • Or, arrange a neighborhood watch program.
  • Never be afraid to call the police if a stranger or solicitor is acting suspiciously.
  • Teach children how to use the security alarm and where the panic button is.
  • Find a bug out location for family members to go to for safety.
  • If someone is trying to break into your home, activate your car alarm or panic button on the security alarm to draw attention from the neighbors.
  • As a last resort, teach older members of the home and older children how to use weapons against intruders.

In many cases, the local officials will be just as confused as you and may give mixed messages on how serious the situation is. In their defense, the information they are getting is constantly changing and informing the public is difficult at best.  Knowing this will help you ensure your preparedness plans are solid.

In an even longer-term situation, more plans for defense would need to be made, with perimeters, night watches, and an organized plan.

Skills

Once you move past the basics of prepping, the best thing for your plan is to learn a new skill or two. Remember, in an emergency situation there won’t be a repair shop to take your tools to or a grocery store to buy more food from. When the SHTF (Stuff Hits The Fan) you’ll be left to rely on the skills you have, and with no Internet available to look up information on, you might be stuck.

Mastering some basic off-the-grid skills will greatly enhance your survivability

Because many people are not adequately trained to handle the disaster situations in which they find themselves in, having the proper skills and training will provide an individual with a well-diversified knowledge base to help them survive during and after a disaster.

Not all Skills Are Created Equal

It is important to emphasize that some skills are more important than others. The first I would recommend are those skill sets that will enhance your off-grid environment.

  • Outdoor survival course
  • Medical training
  • Disaster classes
  • Canning and food preparation
  • Firearm training
  • Amateur radio classes
  • Exercise and weight training (get your body into shape)
  • Gardening/food production classes

Basically, any class that fits your basic survival needs, take it! As well, don’t neglect the primitive skills one can learn too. Many of these skills will carry you into longer-term preparedness measures, so the more you know the better.

One area of skills we all need to focus our attention on is self-defense. Self-defense is a crucial skill that we all should know, and it takes time to develop these skills. No doubt there have been times where you may have found yourself in a situation where you looked around and didn’t feel comfortable, and in some cases, the situation had the potential to quickly become dangerous. It’s important to have situational awareness and be aware of your surroundings at all times. If you do not feel comfortable, don’t feel bad about getting out of the situation altogether. As well, trust your gut. When your intuition is making your “Spidey senses” go off, it’s time to get out of there.

In many cases, predators watch their potential victims before they strike. In a study regarding how predators selected their victims, pedestrians were videotaped walking down a street and had incarcerated convicts view them. Within seven seconds of viewing the pedestrians, the convicts had selected their targets. Selections were not based on gender, size, age or race, but rather on the body language exhibited. The convicts identified the following body language cues used as their basis for victim selection:

Posture: People that walked with shoulders slouched or slumped were selected as victims as opposed to those who walked with their chin up.
Gaze: Those avoiding eye contact were chosen as victims because of the perception that they were preoccupied. Making eye contact naturally communicates confidence.
Stride: People who walked with a stride that was too long or too short, or those who shuffled or dragged their feet, were selected over those who had a smooth and natural gait.
Rate: Those who walked slowly with no apparent purpose, and those who walked fast as if they were uncomfortable, were selected over those who walked naturally and deliberately.
Fluidity: Those who demonstrated awkwardness in their movements were chosen over those who seemed to glide as they walked.
Wholeness: Those who swung their arms wildly while walking were selected over those who moved from their center, with coordination and balance.

Physical impairments may prevent some people from projecting confidence. If they fail, victims must decide whether or not defensive action is necessary and appropriate. Carrying a concealed firearm can level the playing field, but retrieving it may not always be possible. Introducing a firearm into a volatile situation isn’t always the best response. That determination is dictated by the totality of the circumstances. Two studies may provide helpful insight when making that decision. (Source)

Learning how to fight is your last lifeline of protection. Learning escape and evasion tactics, self-defense strategies like Krav Maga or even learning to use everyday objects to protect yourself can enhance survival. The most important aspect to learn is not to hesitate when confronted. Again, this skill set takes time to master but may save your life.

Conclusion

Disasters do not just happen to other people – they can happen to you.  When you are prepared for a particular scenario, then you already have tools in place for when you need them the most. While many feel that preparedness is an enormous endeavor, when you break it down into organized lists, it’s not so daunting. Keep prepping and keep an eye out for our next preparedness guide.

Remember to fall back on your list of lists to ensure that you are purchasing the needed items for the disaster you are preparing for. Have a well rounded short-term supply to compliment your long term food items.  Store your emergency supplies in an easy to access part of your home where natural elements such as sunlight and moisture are not an issue.

As well, keep in mind that once you get your preps, you will need to maintain them to ensure your emergency items are ready to go. Your gear can best be maintained according to a maintenance schedule and you can get a start on it now.  Some preppers do it twice a year when Daylight Savings Time hits. But it’s more than giving it a glance and it doesn’t just mean cleaning it.  It also means inspecting it for serviceability and function.  It means making sure that it’s well organized and that you can pick it up at a moment’s notice. You can’t do that unless it’s ready.

Course Discussion

We all have a way to help others prepare. New preppers, if you have questions, leave them in the comment section and as a community, we can help to answer them. You’re not in this alone. I know this information provided is a lot to take in, just pace yourself, have fun with it, and we are all here for you if you need it.

Sign Up For This Week’s Giveaway!

We’re giving away The Prepper’s Blueprint – widely popular and highly rated preparedness manual and a 72-hour kit at the end of this week to a lucky winner.

All you have to do is sign up for our newsletter and leave a comment in one of our weekly Crash Course guides about what you feel the most important aspect of being prepared is in the bottom of the article. Good luck everyone!

 

Additional Reading:

52-Weeks to Preparedness

Essential Prepping Calculators

20 Preparedness Articles To Help You Get Prepped

The Prepper’s Blueprint: A Must-Have Preparedness Manual

20 Additional Preps You Want in the Car for Urban Survival

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

6 Critical Items That Have Disappeared in the Immediate Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey

Click here to view the original post.

Before something like Hurricane Harvey, who would’ve imagined the kind of destruction that would literally immobilize a major U.S. metropolitan area for what could potentially be weeks if not months? As of this writing, we’re 72 hours into the aftermath of this major disaster and supplies are already running low.

Amid the images of loss and destruction, hurricane survivors know they must restock provisions to prepare for another week or more of sheltering in place. Now, imagine 6.2 million people trying to stock up at the same time. Panic buying is gripping the affected area and beginning to overload local and regional communities. Ahead of the hurricane making landfall the vast majority of people simply figured that the aftermath would, at most, last a few days. No one ever contemplated that real possibility that this scenario would be the end result or believed they would have to evacuate after the storm hit.

In fact, many have evacuated the city and moved to other Texas towns and now those areas are beginning to exhaust supplies as well. In any disaster, when the needs of the people are strained, frustration can quickly descend into a breakdown. While this is something no one wants to see happen, with a disaster such as this one, it is very easy to see how it can overwhelm government emergency response plans.

In an article explaining the breakdowns that occur after disasters, it was written, “When the needs of the population cannot be met in an allotted time frame, a phenomenon occurs and the mindset shifts in people. They begin to act without thinking and respond to changes in their environment in an emotionally based manner, thus leading to chaos, instability and a breakdown in our social paradigm.”

This is what is to be expected when so many people are hit with a rapid, far from equilibrium event. Keeping up with the desperate and immediate demands of hundreds of thousands of people will undoubtedly be a challenge in and of itself and supply trucks can only do so much, especially with flood water still standing on highway systems. Those living in this aftermath have a long road ahead of them, and knowing which items disappear off the shelves first can help them better prepare and stay on top of their personal supplies.

Just 72 hours after this disaster, here are the five supplies that have become difficult or impossible to find.

Gasoline

Concerns over closed refineries and disrupted pipelines erupted into a full-blown panic run on gasoline across Texas cities. Here’s the crazy thing, the shortages are not just happening in the greater Houston area, but two hundred miles north in Dallas, as well as in the cities of Austin and San Antonio, TX. This panic for gas is so insane that we are seeing gas lines that have been likened to the 1970’s.

While state officials are saying, “there is no need to worry,” things are getting real in Texas and whether they want to admit, the situation is beginning to get heated. So much so that reports of fist fights for fuel are popping up.

Water

Clean drinking water, the main staple in any disaster supply, is quickly being purchased faster than they can restock it. If hurricane victims do not have a high-quality water filter, they have to take their chances finding a store that has been restocked. In the flood ravaged areas, critical infrastructure has been damaged making it difficult for trucks to resupply the affected area, thus adding to the panic buying. Desperate residents do not know when this disaster area will normalize, so they want to grab supplies when they can to ensure their family has what they need.

In the city of Beaumont, things have become dire since the city shut off the municipal water supply, leaving 100,000 people with no other option but to hunt for water in surrounding areas. As well, the local hospital had to close its doors out of fear of water contamination, one of many immediate post-disaster threats we discussed in a previous article.

CNN reports that city officials plan to establish a water distribution point on Friday.

Meanwhile, earlier Thursday, residents lined up at stores hours before they opened in hopes of getting whatever bottled water they could find.

“It’s crazy,” said Khayvin Williams, who started waiting in line at Market Basket at 6:50 a.m. “People are freaking out.”

At a local Wal-Mart, Jeffrey Farley said the store was only allowing 20 people in at a time and was rationing water to three cases per customer. He got in line at 6:30 a.m. and waited until 8:30 to get his water.

Food Staples

The first food items that will sell out mostly consist of things that are already cooked or prepared in some way, including canned foods, frozen dishes, and bread. Fresh meat and eggs would also disappear pretty fast, despite the fact that they need to be cooked.

And that is what we are seeing now. Food staples like milk, bread, and eggs are all in high demand. Lines are forming outside of stores that are open to the public and these essential items run out fast.  In fact, grocery stores are putting limits on how much you can buy. In this report, one store manager in the area admits to the food limits. “Yeah, there’s limits,” Luis Castillo, a store employee who was working crowd control Tuesday, told BuzzFeed News. “But we already ran out of bread. There’s no more bread.” While many grocery stores and superstores like Wal-Mart and Target are opening more stores every day, at the given moment, it’s a race to resupply and stores can quickly be exhausted of food necessities.

Food staple shortages are also being reported in north Texas – 200 miles away from Houston.

Roni Neff, a professor of Environmental Health and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University is concerned about those not able to get to the stores. “In Houston, as everywhere, the impacts are not equally felt,” she says. “People with lower incomes, people who are elderly, with disabilities, with medically necessary diets, may be particularly hit by this kind of situation, and really have quite severe food security threats to them.” (Source)

Bleach

Most people may not have even considered this essential post-disaster item.

In the aftermath, bleach and chemical disinfectants are hard to come by. Cleaning flooded homes and questionable water sources are making this a high-demand commodity. Sanitation is one of the most important facets of staying prepared. After a hurricane hits, overloaded sewage systems will start spewing raw sewage. Diseases such as cholera, are contracted through contaminated water and food, and often occur as a result of poor hygiene and sanitation practices.

Moreover, cleaning supplies like gloves and garbage bags are also needed by many in the disaster area and those in the relief efforts have all listed cleaning supplies as a needed item.

Toilet Paper

Hurricane survivors may have grossly underestimated how much toilet paper they needed to ride out the aftermath. Toilet paper is used every day and when it runs out, things can get nasty.

On average, consumers use 8.6 sheets per trip – a total of 57 sheets per day. Multiply that by a week-long storm and a family of 5 and you run out quickly.

Due to the high need for toilet paper, it is flying off the shelves and restocking has obviously become an issue.

Now that many disaster victims are evacuating the area, stores in north Texas are also seeing a shortage.

Home Repair Supplies

The last thing on people’s minds was how massive the clean up from Hurricane Harvey would be. But as we have often noted, hurricanes are unpredictable in nature and this one “threw a wrench” in many preparedness plans.

While thinking about how they were going to clean up after flood waters ravaged their homes wasn’t something anyone really considered beforehand, is it now at the forefront. As a result of the extensive damage, home repair supplies are in desperate need.

Plywood, tools, wheelbarrows, large plastic containers, trash bags, buckets, generators, and other disaster necessities are being purchased. In fact, at Lowe’s, Rick Neudorff, the retailer’s emergency command center operations manager said generators were in such high demand that “some stores are practically selling generators off the back of the truck because people have been waiting in the stores for the generators to arrive.”

The reality is that the vast majority of people have about three days of food and water at home, when a prolonged disaster strikes it upends the stability of the entire system of just-in-time delivery.

This is why using a layered approach to preparedness planning that includes short-term, long-term and worst-case scenario considerations is paramount.

What Hurricane Harvey has taught us is that devastating events, while so improbable that they may happen just once in a hundred years, are still a real and present danger.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

3 Essentials To Your Family Emergency Plan

Click here to view the original post.

Preparation Planning 3 Essentials To Your Family Emergency Plan

You never know when an emergency situation may occur. According to FEMA, 80% of Americans live in a location that has been impacted by a disaster related to weather. However, you can do your best now to plan for as many types of disasters as possible. While there are several different components to an emergency plan, let’s take a look at a few universal items that everyone needs to be ready for the worst.

 

Make Sure That You Can Communicate

It is critical that you have the means to communicate with your family members in the event of a fire, flood or other emergency. Therefore, you should have a cell phone that is fully charged and has plenty of minutes on it. You may also want to have a set of walkie-talkies available in case the cell tower in your area is destroyed and calls cannot be made. Prepaid phone cards may also be ideal in the event that you have to make or receive calls from a public phone.

 

There Should Be A Designated Safe Zone

In the event of an emergency, there isn’t a lot of time to think about what it takes to get to safety. Therefore, you want to have a designated safe place where everyone can go to ride out the storm or until the fire can be put out. This could be a neighbor’s house, a relative’s house or a public place like a grocery store or bank that is easy to get to. As part of the plan, everyone should wait there until all family members are accounted for or until rescued by emergency personnel.

 

Make Use Of Your Medical Training

As part of an emergency plan, you should have some sort of first aid kit that can be used to heal cuts, scrapes or other minor wounds. However, it is also critical that you have the training necessary to treat injuries properly and safely. One way to improve your odds during an emergency situation is to receive basic first aid training. Training courses may be offered for free or at a discount, and they will also help you learn what to do in the event that trying to help on your own may actually make things worse. If you enjoy the healthcare world, you may also consider receiving additional medical training. Not only could it end up being a rewarding career, like a doctorate of nursing practice, but the additional lifelong skills you would gain would be invaluable.

 

There is nothing scarier than being put in a situation where you or your loved ones are in danger of being hurt or killed. However, with good preparation today, you may be able to take steps during a crisis to get yourself and your family out of harm’s way.

Guest Author’s Website

The post 3 Essentials To Your Family Emergency Plan appeared first on American Preppers Network.

SHTF Security: Principles for Patrolling Your Property

Click here to view the original post.

OK, all of you Readers out there in ReadyNutrition Land, we’re going to kick off this article on basics of how to patrol your property.  Sounds easy enough, right, I mean, you have two eyes and a brand-new popgun right out of Cabela’s, right?  And a licensed, approved, NRA-certified instructor at the gun range to show you how to shoot, right?  Sure, when it hits the fan, you and the family are just going to prop up a couple of sandbags in the windowsills and watch your lanes, right?  No, on all counts.

Patrolling is more than that, and you’ll need to patrol your property.

The Army Field Manual, FM 7-8 for Infantry Rifle Platoon and Squad, Chapter 3 will give you all you need.  You can also reference the Ranger Handbook, SH 21-76 for the info.

That being mentioned, let’s break it down to make it a little more simplistic for you.  Patrolling (in the case of the happy family defending their home when the S hits the fan) will amount to giving yourself and your family a “buffer” to engage hostiles before they reach your house.  There will be many parameters that cannot be addressed, simply because of the complexity and individuality of each situation.

Patrolling means that you will range out (usually on foot, but for large tracts of property, on horseback or with some type of vehicle) and observe everything that happens to protect your home and family.  It requires a routine for you to follow, as well as a schedule and an ROE (Rules of Engagement).  We’ll cover that last part later.  The main thing: you’ll need to rove and range around your property night and day to ensure your house isn’t approached and surrounded in an assault.

The more people you have in your family or group, the easier it will be to conduct scheduled patrolling operations.  The time to practice these operations is now before anything happens.  You need to find out how many people will be on your guard roster, and how frequently you will patrol.  It is different from military patrolling because you won’t have to establish a patrol base or occupy one: you have a house.

Patrolling Fundamentals

You must do the following for your property to follow good patrolling fundamentals:

  1. Draw a map of your property: this is a sensitive item! Do not allow it to leave the property.
  2. On the map, outline all natural and man-made terrain features, as well as what is adjacent to the property.
  3. Determine danger areas: these are areas that would enable an enemy or attacker to make maximum use of the terrain to gain the advantage. Examples of this would be a hilltop overlooking your house, or a large boulder near the end of the driveway with a view of your front door on either side of it.
  4. Determine the route and area you would patrol, and how many people this would need. You may have someone who always observes (a guard station) in the third-floor attic; however, that person can’t see everything…where a roving patrol can “flush” out someone hidden out of the view of the sentry.  Will you walk the whole perimeter of the property?  Or will you zig-zag back and forth, covering it that way?  You’ll have to determine what is optimal.
  5. Fighting positions: you may need to set up or construct some hasty fighting positions near your patrol route. Keep in mind: any fortified hasty position can be used against your house by an opponent, as well.  You can find all that you need on this in the infantry field manual.  These can suit purposes of defending a property.
  6. Measure distances and note azimuths from the house to different points on the property: I’ve done articles on sector stakes and sector sketches in the past. They work, and they’ll work for you as well.  They take the “guesswork” out of things and give you an edge to work with.

You need security 24/7 after the S hits the fan.  You’ll have to work out a schedule.  Basically, patrolling the property for 2-4 hours is monotonous work.  You’ll need VOX’s (voice-activated radios) or Motorola’s to use, and a schedule of frequencies to hop back and forth with.  Remember: if you can speak on a radio, someone else besides your team/family member can listen in as well.

NVG’s: Night Vision Goggles/Night Vision Devices – these are great to use until the firefight begins.  If they’re on your face when that happens?  Well, you’ll be hard pressed just to recover seeing.  The best ones to use are hand-held ones that you can take a quick peek and then take them off.  This way you don’t lose your night vision completely.


Just please keep this in mind: double up on that equipment and stick one of each item in a Faraday cage.  If an EMP hits, you’ll be glad you did.


You will need to range the property and the perimeter, checking for any vehicles, suspicious individuals moving in the area (all individuals are suspicious after the SHTF event), and individuals or groups making a move (incursion) onto the property.  This is where ROE (Rules of Engagement) come in.  Depending on the size and spread of the intruders, you need to determine the maximum you (as an individual or a group) number of hostiles you will engage and when you will break contact.

SALUTE for Safety

Before you make any contact, you want to radio in a SALUTE report to whoever is on radio watch.  This is to alert the family/team that there is going to be a problem and to provide them with as much intel as possible prior to contact being made.  Here is the “refresher” on SALUTE:

SSize: the size of the group/unit

AActivity: what are they doing?  Are they engaged in any other activity besides approaching the house?

LLocation: Exactly where are they on the property?

UUniform/Unit: Any distinguishing clothing/headgear/patches that mark them as a group or gang?

TTime: The time you observe them doing all of this

EEquipment: what weapons/special equipment are they carrying?

You’ll be coming up with procedures and plans to deal with different types of threats in accordance with what you learn.  Patrolling is a combination of scouting/reconnaissance and being a guard/sentry.  You’re ready to defend, and yet you’re performing intelligence-gathering as you safeguard your property.  Your focus is to conduct the patrols and yet be as non-obsequious as possible.  Stealth and guarded movements will keep you out of the limelight.  A sentry stays put, maybe walking to and fro a short distance.  When you patrol, you have a lot more ground to keep an eye on.  This (and those references) will get you started.

JJ

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Essential Home and Vehicle Emergency Kit and Family Preparedness Information

Click here to view the original post.

By Denis Korn

Franklin quote

This post -Essential Home and Vehicle Emergency Kit and Family Preparedness Information – is one of the most important posts I have presented.  I am posting it again in light of the recent devastating floods in Houston and surrounding areas.  The timeliness of this information can not be over stated!  The uncertainty of the times requires appropriate preparation and answering the questions contained in this article.  It is a valuable companion to another important post Essential Checklist for Emergency Preparedness & Outdoor Adventure Planning – Including Vehicle Preparedness – Latest Update

I feel it is very important to also include one of my Foundational Articles titled Is your entire family prepared for emergencies at all times?  It appears at the end of this post. 

You are highly encouraged to share this post and its vital information with family, friends, business associates, church and temple congregations and other members of any organizations to which you belong.  May this post help you in your serious preparedness planning.  Celebrate Peace of Mind!

Here are the crucial questions to answer when assembling your emergency kit/grab-and-go/bug-out bag – which is essential if you must leave your home or business quickly.

  • If an evacuation has been declared, a severe weather event is imminent or a significant disaster has occurred, how will I know?
  • If I have to evacuate, will I be in a cozy government evacuation center with food, water, blankets and a bed, or will I be on my own in the elements, a crude shelter or a friend’s/relatives house?
  • Am I clear on the circumstances and scenarios that may arise that will require me to evacuate versus the circumstances that would compel me to stay put and hunker down?
  • If specific government, church, community and friend’s sheltering options are not available, where do I go? How far? How do I get there?
  • What conditions can I expect to encounter – best scenario – worst scenario?
  • What are the weather conditions I am likely to encounter? What is the season?
  • Will I be alone, or are others depending on me? Family – children – elderly – pets?
  • Am I dependent on others? Who? Why? Do I expect the government to take care of me?
  • What kind of support is likely to be available?
  • How long should I prepare for?
  • What if there is nothing left when I return?
  • Are my essentials, heirlooms, personal treasures, irreplaceable photographs, documents and financial assets secure if I leave with only my grab-and-go bag?
  • Do I have a reliable communication plan to contact family, friends and business associates at a moment’s notice?
  • What is the potential severity of the emergency I might experience?
  • Will I have transportation, or will I be on foot?
  • Do I have enough money on hand to pay for possible shelter, food or supplies if I am suddenly evacuated and away from home or business?
  • Am I truly prepared for the unexpected, a procrastinator or am I in denial?

To have a truly adequate emergency kit/grab-and-go/bug-out bag the above questions must be answered. Your personal preparedness bag contents will vary depending on numerous factors such as time, number of persons, locations involved, mobility, support available, season, comfort level desired and the degree of peace of mind you want.

Here is a list of the basic essentials for every kit. Each category will have multiple options depending on how you answer the above crucial questions. Cheap, inadequate and poorly made provisions don’t belong in a quality kit. Prepare your kit as if you and your family’s life and comfort depended on it – because it does!

  1. Water – bottled/filters/purifiers/tablets/containers
  2. Food – ready-to-eat/bars/trail mix/freeze dried/shelf stable/food preparation equipment
  3. Medical – quality medical kit with instructions/prescriptions/glasses/essential medications/sunscreen/dental medic/foot care/safety pins/dust mask/gas mask
  4. Special Needs – food/medical/children/elderly/disabled/pets
  5. Tools – multi-tool/knife/wire/cable ties/duct tape/rope/paracord/gloves/small axe/repair tools/super glue/aluminum foil/ /manual can opener (often on multi-tool)/bungee cords/foldable or wire saw
  6. Communication – radio/hand crank – solar – battery/two-way radios/cell phone
  7. Fire – fire starter/lighter/matches/tinder/flint starter/magnifying glass
  8. Signaling & Orienting – whistle/signal mirror/compass/maps/GPS device
  9. Lighting – Hand crank – solar – battery/headlamp/flashlight/lantern/candles/lightsticks
  10. Power & Energy – batteries – regular and rechargeable/power-pack for batteries & cell phone recharged by solar and/or hand crank/solar and/or hand crank that charges devices directly
  11. Shelter – tarp/tent – tube or larger/plastic sheeting/insect protection
  12. Emergency Blankets/sleeping bags – emergency or larger or bivy sack
  13. Personal Hygiene/sanitary supplies/disinfectant
  14. Plastic Bags/ties
  15. Personal Security – weapon & ammo if appropriate/pepper spray/bear repellant/mace or other options
  16. Appropriate Clothing and Footwear – protection from the elements/apparel for warmth/heat packs – hand and body warmers
  17. Identification and Essential Documents – Bible/compact survival handbook/personal ID/insurance and other key documents/entertainment
  18. Spare Keys
  19. Phone Numbers and Addresses – friends, relatives, and emergency organizations/agencies
  20. Instructions on meeting and/or communicating with family and/or friends during or after an emergency
  21. Cash/credit cards
  22. Pen/markers/paper
  23. Configured Compact Emergency Kit with Essential Items
  24. Carrying Device – carry bag/backpack/suitcase/sturdy container/Food & Supply Brick™/duffel Bag (very durable and if you anticipate carrying your bag any distance shoulder straps should be available with your carry bag or duffel)

If time permits, take irreplaceable items such as heirlooms, heirloom jewelry, photographs, military/marriage/birth/deed records, computers, tablets, and personal contact information and documents not included in your grab-and-go device.

Water
An obvious necessity for everyone. Know what water sources are available to you during an emergency, or in the outdoors. Plan accordingly and don’t hold back preparing for this essential category.

Determine whether or not you want to purify water for viruses.  Not all water filters are designed for this purpose – look for water purifiers that specifically state that they will kill viruses.

Food
Numerous options are available. This category must be accessed carefully and the quality and quantity of foods chosen should be appropriate to the anticipated length of time of the emergency or outing, and severity of circumstances you anticipate might occur.  For shorter term scenarios foods in most situations should be nutritious and ready-to-eat; however you might want to consider some foods requiring only the addition of cold or hot water.  If you do need hot water you must plan for the appropriate means and equipment to heat your water.  Options listed have a longer shelf life and are suitably packaged for kits or backpacks.

Medical
When your health and survival during a medical emergency is at stake, you don’t want to rely on cheap or inadequate medical supplies. This is an important category to thoughtfully evaluate. Don’t forget medications or products needed for those with special medical conditions.  If your pre-assembled kit doesn’t include one, make sure you get a good book on medical emergencies.

Shelter/warmth
Protection from the elements and insects is essential, especially in a harsh climate.

Tools
Numerous unforeseen situations or just routine conditions occur during an emergency or during an outdoor adventure. Be prepared and secure with the proper quality tool.

Communication/Signaling
It is important to keep informed during an emergency with friends, family, and appropriate governmental agencies and emergency organizations. When in an outdoor environment, unsettled weather considerations necessitate weather alert radios. Avoid a sense of isolation during serious emergencies.  If you get lost or are separated from your group signaling can be crucial.  Since electronic items are included in this category, you may want to consider a small solar power device.

Lighting
This is an essential category to address when anticipating any situation where you may be in darkness. Not only for a sense of security and comfort, but to be able to see clearly and act accordingly if emergencies occur in the dark.

Personal protection
For some this may not be an essential basic category.  Each individual must decide the extent to which they will or will not provide protection for themselves and their families from physical harm by others or wild animals.

This article provides a very basic list of suggested items we believe are essential for emergency preparedness and outdoor recreation; especially if space, weight, and mobility are important.  For an expanded list of suggestions read our article: Essential Checklist for Emergency Preparedness & Outdoor Adventure Planning Including Vehicle Preparedness

Emergency Preparedness Items for Automobiles – Trucks – Vans – RV’s

These items are especially important for long trips, family outings, new younger drivers, inclement weather, remote areas and at night.

AS A FATHER OF 3 DAUGHTERS AND 8 GRANDCHILDREN, I  HIGHLY ENCOURAGE FATHERS AND MOTHERS TO ENSURE YOUR CHILDREN ARE SECURE AND PREPARED – ESPECIALLY IN WINTER AND INCLEMENT WEATHER – WHEN THEY ARE DRIVING!

  • Spare tire
  • Jack with tire iron and supporting tools
  • Device to break window and cut seat belts from the inside in an emergency
  • Tire inflation device – portable power and/or aerosol can inflator/other tire repair materials
  • JB Weld®/super adhesive
  • Jumper cables
  • Portable power unit for jump starting and backup power
  • Tow cables/rope
  • Chains/cables/bungee cords for tightening
  • Crowbar
  • Reflectors/flares
  • Hidden spare key
  • Extra oil
  • Extra gas/funnel if appropriate
  • Siphon hose
  • Tire pressure gauge
  • Extra fan belts/bulbs/hoses/additives/sealers/hard to get parts/repair kit
  • Window scraper
  • Important phone numbers/documents/insurance information
  • GPS device if appropriate
  • Empty gas can
  • Material to gain traction if stuck in snow or ice – cat liter/sand/wood shavings/old rug

Additional critical items from the Essential Checklist to carry in your vehicle:

  • Tarps
  • Blankets/emergency sleeping bag
  • First Aid kit
  • Baby supplies
  • Food and water/water purification/containers if appropriate
  • Maps
  • Pen/magic marker/paper
  • Personal documents and photo ID/registration/insurance
  • Gloves
  • Duct tape
  • Rope/wire
  • Repair tools
  • Plastic bags large and small
  • Cell phone/smart phone/charger
  • Emergency radio/hand crank radio
  • Emergency lighting
  • Rope/wire/bungees
  • Small solar/12 volt power packs for small electronics
  • Cash/credit card
  • Extra clothing in harsh and/or wet weather/hat
  • Hand/body warmers
  • Rain gear/rubber boots/poncho
  • Knife/multi-tool
  • Whistle
  • Toilet paper
  • Towels
  • Shovel
  • Small fire extinguisher
  • Matches/fire starter
  • Extra batteries
  • Personal protection devices or items as appropriate/pepper spray                                                                                                                                      
  • Refer to the Essential Checklist for other items relevant to your vehicles specific needs.

 

Is your entire family prepared for emergencies at all times?

Recent events have brought us catastrophic circumstances that have had devastating and lasting effects on thousands of people around the world.  I pray that you take this advice seriously.   Recent conversations have also motivated me to consider this important article as a Foundational Article.

I am reminded of a presentation I made some years back to a large gathering of preparedness professionals.  This convention consisted of folks who came from all over the country and of course this meant that they would be gone from their families for a few days.  Bear in mind that at my presentation there were a couple hundred people whose responsibilities included preparedness planning and education for very large companies, organizations, and governmental agencies.

At the beginning of my talk I asked the group how many felt completely confident that in their absence their families were prepared to deal with unforeseen emergencies or disasters – especially significant ones.  Only a few raised their hands!  Since most of these participants were the head of their households, what does it tell you about fulfilling one’s responsibility to protect and keep the family secure in difficult times?

Fortunately over the years the professional emergency management community has become more dedicated to personally embodying what they are responsible for in government and business.  What about the average household?

It appears that most head of households have some notion that their presence is security enough for the family during an emergency.  This is a dangerous assumption.  The sensible attitude is to ensure that all family members – adults – the elderly – teenagers – and young children, know:

  • What to do
  • How to respond
  • Where to go – or not go
  • Who to contact
  • Where the information and supplies are located
  • How to use and operated essential equipment
  • How to access drinking water
  • How to prepare any food reserves
  • How to communicate with family and emergency personnel
  • How to keep warm in freezing conditions
  • How to have the proper attitude
  • How to pray

Instructions should be in writing and the entire family should participate in drills and practices.  Family members – immediate and extended – should know their part during an emergency under all scenarios and given any combination of family members physically present – or absent.

  • Do your children, spouse and other family members know what to do and how to act if a serious emergency occurs and they are not at home?
  • How will your communicate with them or those in their keeping?
  • What if they are at school – what plans does the school have to communicate with parents or guardians?
  • What will the school provide for students?
  • What if they are at work – what plans does the business or organization have to communicate with other family members?
  • What will the business provide for their employees?
  • Does the business or organization have their own contingency plans?
  • Do you have contingency plans for communication and provisioning for your spouse – adult children – younger children when they are away from home at camp, business trip, etc.?
  • What if an emergency occurs while a family member is in their vehicle and in transit?
  • Is your family secure, knowledgeable and responsible?

Between Learn To Prepare and numerous internet websites, there is an abundance of valuable information for the whole family.  Study this information as if your life and your families’ life depended on it – in a significant emergency it does!

 So I ask all of you reading this post:  In your absence is you family adequately educated and prepared to properly respond and survive during a serious emergency situation?  I encourage you to have all family members read the Foundational Articles on the right column of this blog.

dilbertDisasterPlan

 

The post Essential Home and Vehicle Emergency Kit and Family Preparedness Information appeared first on Learn To Prepare – Expert Emergency Preparedness Information.

This Is How You Prevent Dehydration During the Hottest Time of the Year

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, we have covered many topics in the past such as fluid-based balance, electrolyte balance, and dehydration, along with several articles pertaining to first aid from heat-related emergencies.  We’re going to refresh (as it is the season) the importance of hydration and several things you can do in an emergency situation.  What constitutes an emergency?  Anything that threatens either life or limb, or threatens to incapacitate you in a permanent manner is an emergency that needs to be dealt with.

How Dehydration Occurs

Your body is about 75 to 80% water, which in itself is an oversimplification.  The reason for this being there is intracellular fluid (fluid within the cells), intercellular fluid (the fluid between the cells), and other factors affecting fluid dynamics.  This last term refers to the amount of fluid going in and out of the cells, and directly relating to both input (what you drink and take in with your meals) and output (in the form of urination and diaphoresis, also known as sweating).  An additional form of output is termed extra-sensory perspiration, and this is what is exuded from your body in the form of vapor from the lungs breathed out, as well as fluid loss from the eyes (yes, both the tear ducts and the eyeballs themselves).

When you couple these losses with strenuous or stressful activity, it amounts to fluid loss that can impair your health.  As mentioned in other articles, keep this rule in mind: thirst is a late sign of dehydration.  In order to be hydrated properly during the course of a day, you should consume at least half a gallon to a gallon of water daily.  This amount is in the normal daytime routine.  Heavy physical work or exercise adds to this amount needed.

Have Oral Rehydration Solutions Available

Let’s walk, now.  In addition to taking in water, you can also replenish your electrolytes with ready-made drinks or powders.  Gatorade and Powerade are beverages with a lot of sugar, yes, but they also contain electrolytes such as sodium or potassium that your body needs.  In the service, we had packets called ORS (Oral Rehydration Solutions) that had measured amounts of sodium and potassium to take with the water in your canteen for those strenuous happy moments that called for it.  You can save money and do the deed at your own convenience by buying up the powdered Gatorade and (as I’ve told you to save up the 32-ounce Gatorade and Powerade bottles) make up your own: not to guzzle every moment, but to maybe have one per day in order to maintain your electrolytes.


Make Your Own ORS:

In a one-quart bottle, mix 1-2 Tbsp.’s of sugar and ½ to 1 tsp. of salt in water and drink.


 

This will do in a pinch if you’re really hurting: the sodium will help you retain some of the fluids and also restore what you’re perspiring.  I did mention in one of my articles that for about $7 to $8, you can pick up a box of about 50 packets of powder that have complete supplies of electrolytes, minerals, and vitamin C to mix in a glass of water and down in an instant.  These are worth their weight in gold in an emergency and when the SHTF.

Natural Ways to Maintain a Healthy Balance of Electrolytes

A good, well-balanced meal will also help to maintain those electrolytes.  Magnesium is found in spinach and many of your raw seeds such as sunflower seeds.  Sodium you’ll take in with the normal course of much of your diet.  Potassium can be found in bananas and prunes.  Regarding the latter, take care and do not eat too many: the laxative effects can outweigh what you gain with the potassium.  Calcium (necessary for good heart function) can be taken in with milk, cheese, and dairy products.

What If You Are Unable to Drink Water?

Lastly, what to do when you are unable to drink for some reason or another?  This one will take a family member, spouse, or friend to aid you on.  Reasons for this may include but are not limited to a shot away/broken jaw, partially crushed or injured throat, or a gunshot/impaled object to the abdomen.  We mentioned IV’s in the first-aid articles last year.  Have you acted on the information?  In the aforementioned situations, you can hurt yourself further by drinking fluids (and potentially die if you have a perforated stomach or intestines with the last example), but you still need fluid.

The IV bypasses the digestive tract and sends the fluid right into the bloodstream.  Another method that is close: you can administer 200-300 cc (equivalent to ml) by inserting that IV tube directly into the patient’s rectum (assuming no trauma there).  It is a parenteral route: that is, a route other than ingestion.  The “regular”/well-known routes of the IV are the veins: radial (the wrists), antecubital (the bend in the elbow), femoral (in the thigh), and [you better really know what you’re doing] the jugular (in the neck).

Supplies being paramount, you must obtain IV’s solutions, with Ringer’s Lactate (or Lactated Ringer’s solution) being the preferred 1000 ml bag.  You’ll also need sterile tubing and a catheter, preferably large-bore.  And what if you don’t happen to have it?  Then you better improvise and improvise well.  Here’s your tip:

            Composition of Lactated Ringer’s Solution:   (per 1 liter/1000 ml bag)

Distilled water

            8.6 grams (g) of Sodium Chloride (NaCl)

            0.3 g Potassium Chloride (KCl)

            0.33 g Calcium Chloride (CaCl)

There you have it!  In an emergency, “you” may be the only “pharmacist” in town.  Your son or daughter’s life depends on it.  Now how far are you willing to go?  Time to get into that abandoned Home Depot and grab yourself some tubing and duct tape, then pick up either a turkey injector needle at Wal-Mart or a needle for inflating footballs and sharpen it up.  Sterilize all of it.  Get your ingredients together, sterilize a glass bottle by boiling, make up the solution, and hang the bag.  Improvise, adapt, overcome.

Those who will take the steps and are ready to employ the knowledge and “take a chance,” as ABBA sang it…these will be the ones to make it.  You must win with the weapons you have.  Crawl by keeping aware and hydrating regularly during the day to prevent dehydration.  Walk by obtaining ORS and other powdered supplements to help you maintain your electrolytes.  Run by taking classes in IV therapy, stocking up on supplies, and improvising your own when the SHTF.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Urban Survivors: A Post-SHTF Water Supply

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, we’re going to cover some quick, down-and-dirty techniques for throwing a water supply together before the SHTF for our urban-dwelling readers.  Too often urbanites are ignored, and there are surely many more of you as readers than the comments reveal.

Many of you may be wondering about this, as I’ve written extensively about a rain-catchment system for your home, underground cisterns, methods of water storage in the home, and the like.  I have also written on how to locate water from “unlikely” sources.  So why this?

Because we’re a hair’s breadth away from a war and/or an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) Strike against the U.S., and many have not initiated any of these plans for water storage.

On another note, naysayers and trolls have been posting without hiatus.  Their methods are simple: Deny, Discredit, and Denounce.  Do not pay any attention to these “nonproductive” comments, in which everything written is attacked without any viable solution being proposed.  The information presented here is not as “perfect” as the credentials of the trolls, however, if you take the initiative…research it yourself and then act upon it…the information gives you both options and ideas to enable you to succeed.

If you’re in an urban environment, especially living in an apartment or condo, your options regarding water storage are going to be severely limited.  Tell you what.  If you’re not thinking outside of the box, nobody will do so for you when the time is needed.  My advice is if you have a storage unit in the building or complex?  See if you can rent an extra one.  If not, then allocate the one that you have for storing emergency supplies, one of them being water.

You can store 5-gallon containers with water in that storage unit.  A good idea for you would be two 5-gallon containers for each member of the family.  That would give you a minimum of a five-day supply per family member, as each person needs about 2 gallons per day.  Cases of bottled water would be your next option, followed by the 2-liter bottle storage method.  Ensure that if you’re in an apartment, that you have at least 1 of those 5-gallon containers per person.  I’m trying to suggest it so that you don’t have too much “water weight” in one given area…although 1 container per person is certainly on the “conservative” side.  Use your best judgment.

In an apartment: allocate water for use for the toilet.  You want a couple of 5-gallon containers for the toilet.  When the emergency either occurs or looms “danger close,” you need to fill up the bathtub and all the sinks in the house completely.  Fill up every large container that can’t be easily knocked over, and preferably those with lids.  Fill up containers with lids, lining and stacking them up all over the house, if need be.

You may plan on bugging out, but you may be trapped there for a while, and it’s better safe than sorry: load up now and store it to see you through until you can leave.

Here’s an idea for you that may work should your city or town be suffering from the effects of an EMP but not a nuke or nuclear radiation.  Tap into the downspout nearest to your unit.  With the aid of a square and a sturdy but flexible sheet of plastic (such as a disposable plastic baking sheet, for instance), make a “funnel” and run the end of this into a length of 1” or comparable PVC pipe, securing your funnel with strong duct tape.  You’ll then need to “punch” into the downspout, and then position your funnel to catch the water and run it into your PVC pipe, then to a container that you preposition.

To answer your question: if you just place a container at the bottom of the downspout and there’s a water shortage, how long will it be until a “Planet of the Apes” scenario unfolds, and another 100 people want the water that’s in that container?

Not to mention that you’ll have to expose yourself to the outside.  High rise apartment-dwellers will have a hard time with this one, and if you don’t have a balcony facing the downspout, you’ll have to figure an alternative method to pipe it in or collect it.  For apartment dwellers with balconies, you can stretch sheets of plastic in an “open” funnel, and channel the water into collecting containers.  Preposition open containers all over your balcony.

Here’s a good idea for you.  Pick up a large metal or plastic outdoor garbage can.  Line the inside of it with two layers of thick contractor strength trash bags.  Leave that out on your balcony or on your porch.  Be smart: after the SHTF, place a bunch of trash around the base of it, maybe kick a dent or two into it, and go at it with a can of spray paint all over.  Make it appear to be a trash can.

But it’ll be your “urban cistern,” hidden from the IHM (Incredible Human Mob).

You can fill that with water you collect, from the rain-gutter tap I just mentioned, to the smaller containers and plastic sheets you use to gather rainwater.  With the plastic bag overlapped it will look just as an ordinary trash can.

Make sure you also have plenty of water purification gear: filters, chemical additives such as bleach, iodine, or HTH (calcium hypochlorite) to treat the water you collect, and pitchers with filtration systems, such as Brita’s, etc.  You also need to find a building or storage facility that is not going to hold anything particularly useful.  Use the spouts from this location to collect rainwater.  Just remember, chances are unless you visit it or watch over it, the water you collect will be taken.

Now, about others in your building: if you’re fortunate enough to have a laundry room in your building, you can organize a “building water supply” with the washing machines.  Run the machines to fill and use them as a storage reservoir.  You can (after it has hit) disconnect the hoses and see if you might be able to take some water from them.  Don’t forget that utility sink: stopper it up, plug it up, or whatever.  But fill that bad boy up, and keep it topped off.

The reason: if you’re working on some kind of “community/building/public good project” to save water for the rest of the building’s residents, it will deflect the attentions of the neighbors from water you’re storing in your own unit.  In addition, a “neighborhood watch” mentality may be just what you need to protect you and yours.  We’ll get into that more deeply in the next segment.  You’ll need that “watch” mentality, especially for the water supply, because you’ll have to rotate a guard on it.

Let us not forget other essential areas that will most likely be able to supply you with water: outdoor community pools, fire hydrants, and the like.  Water will be where you will find it.  Let us not forget those hot water heaters.  Use your own judgment…verify that an EMP has struck before you scavenge from ultra-critical/necessary infrastructure.

The nature of your water-gathering operations will be directly affected by the type of structure you live in and the population density.

I’m going to open this up to you and field you a questionI am especially interested in any readers who live in New York City who went through the blackouts of the 1970’s.  Please write to us and tell us how it was…especially those of you who may have lived on the 40th floor of a 100-story apartment building.  Let us know what you did, and the measures you took.  This is an experience that is valuable and would be greatly appreciated by myself as well as the other readers of ReadyNutrition.

Lastly, when all is said and done, and you’re able, unless you are “The Omega Man,” as Charlton Heston played in the movie, you need to get out of Dodge.  The challenge to find water after an EMP strike is a big one in an urban environment.  It can be done with the proper amount of desire, dedication, and planning.  The next segment we’re going to cover defensive postures in an urban environment for yourself and your family, as well as your building for a post SHTF scenario.  Until then, stay frosty and keep fighting that good fight each day.  JJ out!

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

SOLVED: Bug Out on foot with family AND gear…

Click here to view the original post.

Polymuleedit

It all started with a problem….

What if I needed to leave on foot?  If my mode of transportation was stolen, broken, out of fuel, stuck in a ditch, fried by an EMP, or in endless bumper to bumper traffic…

How would I take my young children …some who are too little to walk…or too little to walk for long…AND my food, supplies, and gear away to a safe place?

PROBLEM: Be ready to leave on foot with my family AND my gear...
I needed a reliable, time proven method for transporting people, goods, and equipment.  I needed something that was light weight, that could potentially hold a LOT of weight.  I needed something that required no tools, was easy to maintain, and could hold up to the rigors of mother nature in various climates and terrain.
So I went to work.  After a year of design and engineering, burning through three different prototypes, and over 980 hours of 3D printing…something truly remarkable was born:  The Polymule Handcart
A modern handcart that takes less than five minutes to assemble, has a completely tool-less design, and can be disassembled and stowed inside itself. It is both durable and functional, with a high-impact body, solid frame, and integrated kickstand mechanism.
Features :
– Over 300 lbs Capacity and up to 15 Cubic Feet of Cargo
– High Impact and Tough Thermoplastic Body
– UV Stable / Cold Hardy
– 5 Minute Tool-less Assembly and Disassembly
– Completely Stowable (All components fit inside the handcart body)
– Integrated Kickstand
– Precision Sealed Bearings
– No Flat Tires
– Drain Plug
– ATV Attachment
– Optional All-Weather Canvas Cover
How to get one :
In order to help make the Polymule a reality, we have launched a crowd funding campaign on Kickstarter.  On this page, interested parties can PRE-ORDER the handcart to help raise the capital needed to start production.

Cards are charged AFTER the campaign, and ONLY IF we reach our funding goal.  Therefore you could say, it’s “ALL OR NOTHING”.

You will notice our campaign has a limited time-frame to reach our funding goal, help us spread the word!

Design Considerations :
We are working hard to make the Polymule EVEN BETTER!
Ideas include:
– Shelter Kit
– Rear Handle
– Braking Kit
– Structural Foam Filled Body (increased rigidity, lower weight, adds flotation)
Have your own ideas?  Submit them HERE.
Stay Informed :
Sign up for our newsletter to stay informed about the Polymule:
Click “SUBSCRIBE” on the Top Right.

 

Guest Author’s Website

The post SOLVED: Bug Out on foot with family AND gear… appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Blackout: How You Can Act Decisively If an EMP Strikes at Work

Click here to view the original post.

[Editor’s Note: One thing is for certain if an EMP occurs while many of us are away at work, the city quickly can become a death trap. As writer“, Jeremiah Johnson warns, “Definitive action taken at the critical point is critical to your survival.” Having a plan in place and supplies will give you that critical edge you need to survive.]

 

ReadyNutrition Readers, this is Part 2 of a 3-part series dealing with immediate actions to be taken in the event of an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) attack.  You can read Part 1 here. In the last segment, we covered what you should do if you’re on the road heading to or from work, or traveling.  Now we are going to detail some actions and preparations for your workplace.  Keep in mind: there will be a “blending” of these parts in actual practice, as to move from one locale to another, you will use the information presented in Part 1 when traveling.  All the parts should complement one another.

I also think it would be a good idea to take listed items and burn off an extra copy as a form of a “checklist,” as not many people have perfect memories (myself included), and it could help you out in the time of trouble and eliminate the need for guesswork.  Let’s start off with a scenario.

Let’s start off with a scenario.

You are an office worker in Anytown, a small midwestern city who works in a 7-story building located on the eastern 1/3 of the town.  The direction of your home from work is toward the East.  You are sitting at your desk with a window facing the west, and it’s about 10:00 am.  Suddenly, a flash of light catches your attention in the sky, and then it disappears.  Simultaneously, all the lights in the office go out, as does your desk computer.  No backup lights come on.  You look at your watch, and it’s dead.  You pick up your desk phone, and there is no dial tone.  There are murmurings from coworkers, and people are shuffling into an open area with a conference table.  You have just been hit by an EMP attack, and it appears that you have already punched out early, and probably for good.

The scenario will be played out throughout the United States.  Now is the time to act. Those who are preparedness minded must keep this in mind: Definitive action taken at the critical point is critical to your survival.

10 Emergency Items to Have in Your Workplace

I have written articles similar in nature to this subject that you may wish to peruse.  What is on your person?  In your desk?  In a locker (if you have one) on the premises?  Let us examine some of the items it would be beneficial to have on your person at all times:

  1. Flashlight (with extra batteries)
  2. Watch (that will not be affected by an EMP or need batteries)
  3. Leatherman/Gerber multi-tool
  4. A good folding knife with a locking blade
  5. Matches and/or a lighter
  6. Some type of firearm for your defense with ammunition for it… (Note: this is, to paraphrase Alice in Chains, Your Decision…you will have to weigh your options)
  7. Pen and writing paper/note cards
  8. Transistor radio that works with a battery and an earphone-attachment
  9. Having an NBC gas mask and anti-radiation pills in your workplace could be a lifesaver if an EMP may be followed by radiological and nuclear consequences.

Flashlights

You are going to need a light source if battery-powered lights do not switch on and there isn’t any backup power source.  That small Maglite in your pocket may do the trick: the simplest of circuits will probably be safe and still working…a flashlight is one of them.  All the rest of the items are self-explanatory, except for the pen and writing paper.  These you’ll need to either make calculations, leave a note for someone, or copy any kind of relevant information that you may find.

Transistor Radios

Regarding the transistor radio, you will want to see if you can hear any kind of emergency information that you may be able to use.  The earphone/ear-buds you want to have for OPSEC…you don’t need to advertise that you have a radio.  More.  You don’t want anyone to hear where you are or give away your position with the noise from a radio.

Emergency Exits

Now, in previous articles, I had recommended walking the route and counting the steps from your desk to your vehicle, or from your desk to the front street, if you don’t have vehicle parking in your building.  You’ll have to do it in the dark, and you want to prepare as much as possible for this.  You’ll be taking the stairs.  You should be able to estimate how long this will take you.  Speed is of the essence.

Workplace Gear

Now, what’s in your desk?  You will either want to have a small bag with you with some dried food, a small first-aid kit, and some essentials.  Maybe a couple bottles of water and a few canned meals (prepared meals are the best…focus on high protein and high carbs…you’ll be burning all of it off with the energy expended.)  There should be some room in the bag, because also, you’ll want to change (if you’re not already wearing them) into good boots/hiking shoes, and a good set of clothes instead of the Happy Western Consumer Clown Suit of tan pants, loafers, button-down shirt, ad infinitum, in all the ensemble’s color variances.  DX’em (that means get rid of them) …. you won’t need them anymore.  They’re not worth the weight to carry.

Move quickly and with a purpose: your mission to leave the building without incident and without fanfare.  Your vehicle?  If it doesn’t start, and its electronics have been “fried” by the pulse…then salvage that “go/bug-out” bag from the trunk, along with any weapons and equipment you packed.  Food and water, medical equipment, and prepositioned supplies…tote as much of it as you can.  This is where a large rucksack (or Alice pack) comes in handy, as it can take the weight, take a beating, and hold a ton of stuff.

For a long-gun, I strongly recommend a scabbard-sheath that will enable you to reach up and grab it, while keeping it sheathed.  You’ll be relying on your sidearm, hopefully, a semiautomatic pistol or a powerful revolver of some type.  Get your stuff, get it up on your back, and get out.

There will probably be vending machines in your building.  There won’t be electricity, even if you have coins or bills.  On the other hand, a backup power system may kick in.  You may wish to pick up as many dried/packaged goods as possible.  Just remember this: on the Day After Doomsday, there will be no more of those packaged goodies.

To paraphrase Jack London, the “law of club and fang” just emerged as the new norm for society.  As you leave the building, you need to have several points where you can rest or take refuge.  You should have already planned these out in advance, as well as the route you will be taking.  This route must also take into consideration any rally points for the family, points for resupply (food, water, and medical supplies), and places you may need to shelter in for more than a few days.

Success regarding this segment will completely depend on what you have planned for in advance and either stashed in your now-defunct vehicle or at work.  Good intel is the key to making it through this one.  You’ll have to consider sections of the city/town where you work you must “traverse” through, such as a “bad” area with gang or criminal activity, or such.  For those with the ’67 Mustang Convertible or the ’54 Ford pickup who have working vehicles, then refer to Part 1, and get out of that town as quickly as you can.  If you’re on foot, also refer to Part 1 for techniques, such as traveling when it’s dark, if possible, and things to look for/avoid on your way.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Additional EMP Reading:

A Green Beret’s Guide to EMP

Protect Your Vehicle From an EMP with this Simple Strategy

A Step-By-Step Guide to Preparing for Emergencies

Prepper Home Defense: 10 Ways to Create an Impenetrable Home Security after an EMP

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Tips to Prepare Your Family from Home Invasion

Click here to view the original post.

Chain Castle Burglar Closed Close Metal Stainless

Home invasion should never be taken lightly. It can terrorize your family, lead to physical abuse or cause the loss of a loved one. Although there are measures you can do to prevent unwanted people from getting inside your home, you should still be prepared in case an invasion does happen.

If you are unsure about what you need to do, here are some tips you can use to prepare your family in the event of a home invasion.

Start with a plan

You should establish a plan long before an invasion happens. Since panic and stress can easily fog your thinking, having a good plan can keep you aware of what you should do. It can keep you in control of things, too.

An effective emergency plan includes having a specific place the family should go to in case of an intrusion. You should dedicate a safe room that has reinforced locks and all the necessary items you’ll need for survival and to call for help. This includes a phone with an extra battery, flashlight and, if possible, a weapon. Do not get out of your safe room until help arrives or the situation calms down.

Part of an effective plan is practice. Role play your plan to find out which areas need modifications. Do this every 6 months and make changes to the plan as necessary. Include your kids when role playing. The more they act it out, the more they are likely to retain the information.

Use your alarm system

An alarm system is helpful in deterring burglars and intruders. It can connect you to the monitoring station, in case it’s monitored, or alert you of possible trespassers.

In the event that your home alarm system does signal intrusion, do not expose yourself to danger. Instead, use your alarm system to check your home. This is where having security cameras proves to be helpful.

If a full system doesn’t fit the budget, you can try installing a DIY home security system. Most DIY systems are inexpensive and you can easily install them without professional help. They are transferrable, too. If you are renting the place, you can easily take the system with you or transfer it to a new owner in case you decide to sell the house.

Know who to call for help

Even if you are skilled in combat, it’s still not a good idea to physically challenge the intruders in your home. Most of them go in groups and you’ll never know how many people are inside your property unless you get to see each one face to face. Consider your safety and that of your family as top priority.

At the first sign of intrusion, call for help. It can be your neighbor, local police or 911. Make sure your kids know who to call, too. Write down emergency numbers and keep a copy in your safe room and other parts of the house. Consider making them memorize those numbers, too.

Keep your phone and car keys near you

Home invasion can happen anytime, but they are more frequent at night. This is one good reason to keep your phone and car keys beside your bed.

If you hear a strange noise outside and you have no cameras to verify, press your car key’s panic button. That should trigger your alarm and scare potential intruders away from your property. It can help alert neighbors, too. After a few seconds of alarm, they are likely to look out their windows and no intruder would want that to happen.

Your car’s alarm makes a good alarm system, even if you are not at home. You can use it in parking lots in the event that you recognize threat and possible assault.

Know your neighbors

Your neighbors can be one of your strongest defenses against home invasion. In a close-knit community, intruders and burglars are less likely to attack since they can easily be spotted. Apart from that, your neighbors can also be the first people who can respond to your aid in case of an emergency. You can rely on them to check on your property when you’re out for a trip or you’re at work.

Set up a neighborhood watch program in case your community doesn’t have one yet. Talk to people who can lead the program and find out how each person can contribute. Distribute fliers, brochures and other materials to increase your people’s awareness about safety and security. You can reach out to your local law enforcers, too. They should be able to give you a more thorough lesson when it comes to protecting your family during a home invasion.

Neighborhood watch programs don’t necessarily have to be big, but it should be an effective one.

Author’s Bio:

Rose Cabrera writes for http://topsecurityreview.com/. She specializes in writing in-depth home security system reviews and safety tips and tricks anyone can use.

The post Tips to Prepare Your Family from Home Invasion appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Is Prepping Stressful?

Click here to view the original post.

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com I meant to write this post last week but I held off until I got a chance to ponder it a bit.   I was at work around mid-morning a few days ago when the power went out all of a sudden.  First the computers turned off, then the lights and air conditioning shut down and emergency backup lights turned on.  It was not weather related as there were no storms in the area […]

The post Is Prepping Stressful? appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

How To Harden Your Home Using the Cheapest Materials on the Market

Click here to view the original post.

Purchasing sandbags have always been sold in late summer early fall as a preparedness product that is associated with the flooding attached to the fall rainy seasons and hurricanes.  The time to order and purchase your sandbags is now, but for a different reason: to harden your house if possible.  Those sandbags can be filled with more than just sand and can be used to stop more than just water.  Look at the world situation right now with North Korea, China, and Russia: need I say any more to encourage you to prepare and fortify your homes for a SHTF event?

There are charts ad infinitum that will give you the amounts of layers of sandbags that are needed to stop a bullet, depending on the caliber.  Most fill them with sand; however, unless you live on a beach, sand may be something not found out in your backyard.  You can fill them with dirt, but the stopping factor is significantly reduced.  It’s up to you: your decision (to paraphrase “Alice in Chains”).  You can make them permanent with concrete.  You can convert a front porch into a semi-fortified fighting position with three layers of sandbags about 3 to 4 feet high.

I don’t care to hear naysayers complaining at how the front porch will collapse, the room will collapse, yada yada.  It is up to you the homeowner to find what the weight-bearing structural load is for your porch or any other room you intend to fortify.  The main point is that there are steps you can take at home to make your property harder to enter and to enable you to defend it.

One of the big problems is that it’s hard (or impossible) to “scrap” different types of building materials or construction supplies out of the dump.  The days of “dumpster diving” for materials are just about over.  Salvage companies save everything to sell back to China, to be sent back (and sold) to us…as the salvors are raising money that is taxed by the local government…the same local government that will not permit you the citizen to “dumpster dive,” as it cuts into the “chain of events” just outlined…and their profits.

You’ll have to pick up some rolls of heavy-gauge fencing wire to cover over your windows.  Nail them right to the frame with fencing staples, and ensure they’re taut.  In this way, the Molotov will not go through.  Also, ensure that you have at least 1 inch between this fencing-grating and the glass from the window.  The Molotov may hit and allow the glass to break by bending the wire in enough so that the bottle’s weight impacts the window.  Then you’ll have to cover the busted window with plastic.

And since we’re on the subject, you can pick up rolls of 6 mil plastic, 25’ x 10’ for about $10 at Wal-Mart…could come in handy to close those windows if needed.  If you pick up the fencing wire rolls with rectangular apertures, say 2” x 4” it will facilitate you using the window as a firing port if the window is able to be opened from the inside and not a fixed window.  I wrote several articles a couple of years ago for SHTFplan detailing how to harden your home; I highly recommend reading them if possible.

A good door brace (also referred to as a New York Lock) for the entry doors to your home will help out.  It won’t completely prevent a break-in, but it’ll slow it down enough for you to deal with it.  Consider a good brace-bar to go across the door.  You want to make sure you have a solid frame.  If it is one of those premade “cookie-cutter home” frames, you may have to reinforce it.

Plywood sheets should be measured and cut for the event (or eventuality, depending on your viewpoint) that your windows will disappear.  Cut out your sizes to be able to nail or bolt into the frame on the outside of the window, and mark the pieces to enable you to match them up to the appropriate window.  I suggest (at a minimum) ½” pressure-treated plywood.  Also: measure and match up with those pieces pre-cut 2” x 4” sections, to put together as a “T” or multiple “T’s” to brace up the plywood in the center when it is in place.  You never know when some fool will try to smash out the center of the plywood and enter the house.

Cut apertures for firing ports and viewing ports at the appropriate levels in your sheets.  You can cover these up with pieces of plywood either on a screw or on a hinge to the side, to enable you to use your firearms to deal with Mr. Moron who just won’t take “no” for an answer.  Make sure you take down and remove any trees, bushes, or anything that can provide marauders with cover and/or concealment.  Cut down these things and use them for firewood later.

Now is the time to place any building materials and supplies you can on your property for use in repairs later.  Most of this article applies to those who live in a house, and it has not yet taken into consideration the plethora of neighbors, neighborhood associations, and other assorted worthless groups that try to infringe on your rights and safety in the interest of keeping their property values high and in conformity.  You may have to do it all on the q-t, and keep the OPSEC at a high.

The best thing you can do: conduct a thorough assessment of your home and determine likely avenues of approach for invaders foreign or domestic, weak points in the house, and areas where you would most likely make a stand.  We’re getting “long in the tooth,” so to speak, with world events, and you need to harden all of the points of your home now while there is still time.  An ounce of prevention is more than a pound of cure.  Keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

America’s Tainted Water Supply: Study Warns Two-Thirds of the U.S. are Drinking Cancer Causing Chromium-6

Click here to view the original post.

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan isn’t the only water supply found sickening its citizens. Recently, more news articles are suggesting that multiple municipal water supplies are being investigated for health compromising chemicals and heavy metals.

TCP, a chemical that causes cancer, has been found in California water supplies and, after further investigation and test data compiled by an activist group show this chemical has been detected by utilities across the country. As well, on the other side of the country, towns in New York and New Jersey are both dealing with chromium-6 being found in their water. Some of you may remember that chromium-6 was the cancer causing metal featured in the movie “Erin Brockovich”. That said, New York and New Jersey are not the only states to have this issue. In fact, the highest levels ever recorded were in Norman (Oklahoma), Honolulu (Hawaii) and Riverside (California).” Source

In a 2016 study, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) released an analysis of more than 60,000 tap water tests conducted nationwide, finding that chromium-6, or hexavalent chromium, is in the tap water of more than 218 million Americans.

Interactive map of chromium-6 in U.S. drinking water shows an estimated 218 million Americans served unsafe levels of the chemical. Environmental Protection Agency, UCMR-3

The study concluded that two-thirds of the U.S. are being served water with chromium-6 at, or above, the level that California state scientists consider safe.” Source

Despite the mounting evidence of chromium presence in drinking water and its harmful effects on human health, the problem has not been fully recognized by the state and federal regulatory bodies.

Moreover, if you think that solely drinking bottled water will protect you against chromium-6, think again. Rebecca Sutton, a senior scientist with the EWG and the lead author of a study conducted on carcinogens and harmful pollutants in water supplies stated, “Bottled water is not necessarily any safer than tap water,” said Sutton. “We just don’t have any guarantee that hexavalent chromium isn’t in that water.”

So how can you protect yourself? Sutton says your best bet is buying an effective water filter.

How to Effectively Remove 99.9% of Chromium-6 From Your Water

Until federal regulations are mandated for better drinking water, it is up to you to ensure your family is getting the purest form of water there is. This is one of the many reasons I am such an advocate for Berkey water filtration systems. This water filter is not only ideal to have in times of off grid emergencies, but can be used in everyday life as it removes this dangerous compound and other contaminants found in your water. According to the Berkey website the Black Berkey filter “will remove chromium-6 from tap water at levels greater than 99.9%.”

Don’t take my word for it? Let’s look at some Berkey Water Filter stats:

  • Black Berkey water filter removes chromium-6 from your water, as well as 203 other harmful contaminants including fluoride, heavy metals, pesticides, pharmaceutical drugs, and dangerous microorganisms.
  • Has a top of the line gravity fed filter that exceeds EPA NSF/ANSI standards for filtration.
  • The filter removes 95% of fluoride and arsenic!
  • Removes bacteria and parasites
  • Removes heavy metals like lead and mercury, VOCs (endocrine disruptors) and toxic chemicals like benzene and chlorine to levels higher than 99.99%

Check out the lab results here

What I love the most is the simplicity and adaptability of using it in my everyday life, as well as in times of emergencies. A complete standalone system that can be setup in less than 10 minutes without any tools. You can have peace of mind with the Berkey water filter knowing that it is providing your family with safe drinking water. As well, it’s the most economical water purification system available as you can purify water for about two cents per gallon and it will last for years.

Hopefully, this article will prove that tainted water is widespread and it is up to you to ensure your family has quality drinking water.

 

Limited Time Offer: 

The folks over at Berkey want to provide you with the best water filtration system for your home and is offering 5% off at checkout by using this code: readynutrition5off

As well, you can get up to 50% OFF on selected accessories with the purchase of Berkey system 

 

Additional Resources:

https://www.epa.gov/dwstandardsregulations/chromium-drinking-water

http://www.bigberkeywaterfilters.com/blog/chromium/health-risks-of-chromium-6-in-drinking-water/

https://www.ecowatch.com/erin-brockovich-chemical-drinking-water-2010490185.html

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Summer Survival Threats You Should Look Out For

Click here to view the original post.

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com I love summertime, a chance to kick back and take some time off.  Kids are out of school for the summer and the pace has slowed down.   The summer also signals a slowdown in preparedness – I know… even blog visits get a bit slower.   People go out of town, go on vacation and relax, which is just fine.  But summer also has its own share of dangers that are often overlooked in […]

The post 5 Summer Survival Threats You Should Look Out For appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

7 Critical Components of a Prepared Home

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, it doesn’t take a stretch of the imagination to see that we’re living in perilous times and on the brink of a slew of problems.  There are several flashpoints occurring domestically and throughout the world that can translate into destabilization at any time.  Knowing these things, your preparations and training need to continue.  You can continue this preparation by conducting a home assessment regarding medicines and supplies you will need.

It’s time to prepare for the worst-case scenario with this best-selling preparedness manual

What do I mean by this?  I mean for you to specifically identify all the needs of each of your family members and begin acquiring them.  Family members have varying needs depending on age and physical condition.  Now is the time to ensure you have all the meds you need and the vitamins you will need when the SHTF.  Allow me to sound the personal “trumpet” that I have been sounding throughout the years and in many articles:

You guys and gals need to get into good physical shape: it cannot be overemphasized.

7 Critical Components of a Prepared Home

That being said, how do you start?  It is simple enough if you just insert a measure of organization into it.  Let’s do it, shall we?

  1. Start by identifying family members who have special needs and/or ongoing, long-term treatment in terms of medication.  Examples of conditions can be Type I Diabetics, Blood Pressure/Circulatory patients (meds such as Calcium Channel blockers, etc.), and family members with respiratory compromise (such as COPD, or severe, chronic asthma).
  2. Make a chart/sheet for each family member and identify what they need: The correct medicine, the amount needed/dosage, the quantity that is on hand, and a plan to attain more of it.  BE SPECIFIC!  Accuracy is critical: you cannot afford a “transposition error” either in dosage or in the name of the med.  “Flexiril” and “Flagyl” should never be confused, for example.  One extra “zero” at the end of a dosage could mean death; one zero “short” could mean substandard, inadequate dosage.
  3. Shop the sources: Price is almost as important as quality…because you will need quantities. Many items can be purchased at discount stores. Make sure you have these 50 items as the basis for your medical supplies. Once you have these, then you can begin to combine your medical supplies to make first response packs for faster medical attention when emergencies occur. Check out all the discount pharmacies that you can and do your research.  Also, convince your happy, Hallmark-Card family physician to write these extra prescriptions for you.  If he or she won’t do it?  DX’em.  That’s an Army term: meaning dump/discard them.  If you don’t use the stones now, you won’t use them when the SHTF.
  4. Pet antibiotics: Yes, “protect the pets,” as I’ve explained in other articles. Pet amoxicillin, pet erythromycin, pet Praziquantel (Biltricide).  All of these “goodies” and more are available…to keep those “pets” readily supplied with medicine.  ‘Nuff said there.
  5. Vitamins/supplements: Concentrate on the multi-vitamins, and others that are crucial, such as Vitamin C. Again, you need to be sharp when it comes to quality and quantity.  Here are five supplements you should seriously consider. Never sacrifice quality for quantity, except if the comparable product is so close to the “top dog” that the difference is negligible.
  6. Herbal/Naturopathic supplies: Here is where your research is going to be critical. DO NOT EXPECT TO BE “SPOON-FED” INFORMATION, especially by your photo-frame-phony-photo family physician.  You have to assess on your own what herbs will do the backup for your family member’s (or your) needs if the med supply dries up or is unavailable.  There’s a secondary reason: you need to learn and memorize these herbs “cold,” because you may have to scrounge for them as well…in a ruined, burned-out health food concern, or out in the wild with wild-crafting.
  7. OPSEC: Don’t allow anyone outside of the immediate family (and even with them…screen ‘em!) to know about your medicines.  You need to safeguard them in protective containers that will safeguard them from elements and secret them from the eyes of marauders or other jerks that will pillage them.

Now is the time to get all of this stuff done.  You are responsible in the end for taking care of yourself and your family.  Do not procrastinate.  You may not have a perfect example to follow, but you can allow common sense, savvy, and street smarts to guide you in the path you need to pursue.  Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today.  The “bad days” will come upon us in an instant.  Less than an instant.  Fight that good fight, and stock up on those supplies you’ll need to take care of your family now…because you won’t be able to on the day after it hits!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Could Our Parenting Style Be Damaging Our Kids? This Author Thinks Some Changes Could Be Made.

Click here to view the original post.

 

Layout 1Raising kids has changed dramatically over the last century. Children once acted as helpful additions to the family farm or as caretakers of the homestead and younger children. In more recent times, kids were simply little people who were meant to explore the world around them, alone, from sun-up to sunset. Today “parenting” is a full time job replete with a strict schedule and a dozen extracurricular activities, rigid play dates, teams of specialists, and a library full of books about the best techniques. Alison Gopnik wants to change the way we view parenting in this country. The word parenting “is not actually a verb” Gopnik challenges in her book The Gardener and the Carpenter, and too much emphasis on the actions of parents is stifling our kids’ abilities to grow up as healthy, self-sufficient individuals.

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Parent Without Parenting

Gopnik’s central argument in this book is the notion that modern parents (particularly affluent ones) are approaching child-rearing in a way that is potentially damaging to children. “Parenting” Gopnik, treats children as work, not love, and it places undue pressures on parents to “do it right.” The metaphor of the book’s title sums this up: rather than imagining raising children as being a carpenter, a person who chisels and shapes who a child becomes, Gopnik encourages parents to think of raising children as being like gardeners. You plant the seeds, you set the conditions for success (proper nutrients and water, a place to grow), and then you stand back a watch what emerges from the soil. No amount of standing over or shouting or nagging will cause those flowers to grow taller or more colorful—the plants will simply become who they were meant to be. The goal of a good gardener is to provide a safe space and let nature take its course, not to “create” a flower through sheer will or desire.

Gopnik is a developmental psychologist and she uses studies and the results of learning experiments to make her points in this book. By decreasing parental involvement, Gopnik shows how we allow our children to learn from their mistakes, make better decisions, and use their imaginations. This notion is refreshingly counter to much of what parents are being fed these days from the so-called experts. Gopnik hopes that the metaphor of carpenter and gardener will be applied freely, both for the relief of miserable parents who believe they are failing at their “job” and for the children, who really need space and love much more than guidance.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Is Your Car Bug-Out Ready for Summer Emergencies? These 8 Items are a Must!

Click here to view the original post.


ReadyNutrition Readers, this article is to formulate some preps for you and your vehicle for a daily basis during the months of summer.  Why?  Because the summer months hold some potential for problems that are quite different from the winter months, and the S can HTF at any time, that is why.  Dehydration, sunburn, sunstroke, and other dangerous events can happen in addition to the EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) attack that turns your 2016 Dodge Ram pickup into a motionless slab of several tons.

First, let’s address the issue of dehydration.  Water.  Simple solution, right?  Wrong.  Should a disaster occur, all the existing water lines may either be contaminated and/or non-functional.  And there you are on the highway.  Do you know how to procure water in the wild? Humans need 1 gallon per day on normal/non-stressful days.  You will need a couple of gallons of water in your vehicle in sturdy containers.  Your “bug-out”/go bag is already in the car.  Make sure you have a three-day supply of food and a method to purify water, in addition to a method to tote it.  Many prefer the Camelback drinking systems.  I stick with the issue canteens.  Whatever method you choose, you’ll need to add a couple of gallons into them eventually.

In your backpack, you want to either have a poncho or some type of “space” blanket, preferably (with the latter) containing grommets.  If you can’t find one with the grommet holes, there is a grommet-making kit available in Wal-Mart or another big-box store for around $10.  The poncho comes with the grommets.  You will also need (5) bungee cords.  In this matter, you can use the 4 grommeted corners and the middle of the poncho/blanket to construct some kind of shelter to shield you from the sun.

Yeah, I know, Mr. Negative…if there’s trees to attach the bungees to, then why would a person need to spread out a shelter at all?  Simple.  Just because you may make it to a wooded area doesn’t mean that the trees provide adequate protection from the sun.  In addition, yeah…next is, what if there are no trees?  Then you use the bungee cords and attach them to other things, such as the bumper of that now-defunct Dodge truck, or a chain-linked fence…to make a lean-to and take you out of the sun.

An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure

Here’s a short (and by no means complete) list of some things to have with you on your daily commute, some of which we have covered in previous articles:

  1. Electrolyte packets
  2. Small (compact) first-aid kit
  3. Knife (folding/Swiss Army)
  4. Fire starting materials with matches or cigarette lighter
  5. Radio
  6. Flashlight
  7. Firearm(s) and ammo
  8. Tools

The situation is going to dictate the actions you take.  Obviously, if a nuclear war is what occurs, then you are going to have a different set of dangers than if a viral pandemic is occurring.  You will make the determination about what you will do, but you should have these basic supplies with you and readily accessible at all times.  If you are parked in a parking garage and you still must walk three blocks or more to reach the office, this is not near enough.  In such a case, have multiple bags…one in your vehicle, and one within the workplace by your desk, as I have stressed in the past.

You’ll also need good sunglasses with a 100% UV protection factor.  Along with this, a strong sunscreen, with an SPF of 50 or greater.  A floppy hat would also do you some good for any kind of walks that will shield both your head and face from the sun.  Also, don’t forget a bottle of good bug repellant.  You don’t think the bugs will stop bothering you and take a break while the disaster strikes, do you?  An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.  Take all of these things into consideration, remembering that the summer sun can be more than just a happy shining face on a box of cereal.  It can also be a deadly furnace trying to turn you into jerky.  On that happy note, keep fighting that good fight and have those supplies ready for when you need them.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading Material:

5 Ways To Keep Your Vehicle Evacuation-Ready

Vehicle 72 Hour Kits

The Preparedness Guide that will Get You Ready for Any Disaster

Emergency Evacuation Checklist

 

Subscribe to our newsletter and get the latest tips for preparing your children for emergencies.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Live-Off-The-Land with These 7 Summer Survival Foods

Click here to view the original post.

So, summer is here again, guys and gals.  What better time to practice your survival skills?  I have mentioned in articles past that it is a good idea to put away all the high-tech gizmos and get back to the basics of doing things to give your practice realism.  We’re going to do a few articles that broach that mindset, and this one is the first: how to make dinner when the SHTF…some not-so-obvious sources.

I’m not going to cover what has already been covered, such as methods of fishing and the types of fish to catch.  We’re going to utilize a hypothetical framework.  You are “under the gun” in a SHTF/the “Road” environment.  You can’t stand idly by with a fishing pole carved from a branch, seeking dinner in a relaxed, “On Golden Pond” manner.

While many would turn their nose up to these 7 survival food sources, in a dire emergency, where there is no food, you have to take it where you can get it. 

  1. The Crayfish: Let’s do it up, down and dirty, with the “mudbug,” as they’re called in New Orleans, as our first survival food. Yes, he is known by many names, including Crawdad, Crawfish, etc.  The crayfish will provide you with ready protein, and also for bait for night fishing later (this on trot lines).  Prepare them by boiling them.  Throw in some wild garlic or wild onions for a little flavor.  You’ll get some protein in the form of meat from the tail, and a little within the front claws.  You’ll have to round up a bunch to make a good meal.  Best method: find some large rocks in a shallow stream and slowly overturn them little by little.  As the cloudy/silty water clears, he’ll usually be sitting there, waiting.  One hand place behind him, and when the other is to his front, he’ll move back.  You can also use a small dip net if you don’t prefer my method.  The big ones lurk in the deeper pools.  Eat the meat right after you cook it in a pot.  The ones for bait at night keep in a separate container with water in it.
  2. The Frog: yes, those frog legs can be eaten.  They can be boiled and peeled, or roasted over a fire.  Protein is where you find it.
  3. The Grasshopper: Grasshoppers and other edible insects are packed with protein and can be dried out in the sun, or lightly roasted over a fire.
  4. Cattail roots: This survival food can be boiled and are similar in taste to potatoes, with a more starchy taste to them.  They’ll give you some carbs and sugars, to help round out the meal.
  5. Snakes: Yes, high protein in these guys!  Gut them, peel off their skin, and put them on a spit…a coat hanger (metal) works great…and then roast them.  If not, then slice it up and cook it over a fire.  Venomous snakes can be eaten in this manner, as well, but take care when obtaining them.  Decapitate the snake by cutting off the head and about 1” behind it.  Either bury or burn the head…you wouldn’t want to either step on it or sit on it and be bitten by a dead snake’s head!  The snake meat is a little greasy, but hey, you’re eating and he’s not, right?
  6. Trot lines: Set out fishing lines at night, and set them at intervals that enable them to be checked regularly during the night.
  7. Greens: Dandelions (the whole plant), shepherd’s purse, and wild berries you can garner for starters.  Make sure you can positively ID them!  Don’t survive the SHTF initial event only to poison yourself with something you didn’t recognize!  Pine needle tea will give you a supply of Vitamin C…boil it for about 20 minutes in a pot or canteen cup.

We’re going to go more in-depth in future articles but in a SHTF situation, you want to make sure you cook in a fire pit or on a shielded fire.  Don’t allow the flames to give you away either day or night.  This situation here follows a forage-cook-feed-move/hide method.  You’ll have to also take due diligence to clean up your mess so as not to allow others to trail you.  This is another reason the fire-pit method is good.  When it’s time to put out the fire, do so and then bury it.  Practice these skills now so that they will be second nature for you when the time comes that you need them.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Train for a Worst-Case Disaster

Click here to view the original post.

        


How you train in peace is how you’ll fight in war.


These true words are the basis for “High Suck Factor” training for you to follow.  What does this mean?  No, fear not: we’re not going to siphon gasoline or another volatile fluid with a hose!  No, this means that you need to train under the similar conditions (that “suck”) that you will be faced with in real life.  This is an all-inclusive concept that does not just refer to the weather or training in miserable outdoor conditions.  We will elaborate on what this means and how you can jump on this wagon to get the maximum, realistic effects out of your training time.

Firstly, anybody can disassemble a weapon on a clean, neat, dining-room table under a big light where there’s a cozy heater keeping your house nice and warm, with no distractions.  That is not realistic for what you’ll need.  Unless you’re on a range when you have a misfire and need to clear the weapon?  When rounds are whizzing by your ears and overhead, that is not the time to wave your palm out vertically before your face and call for a ceasefire.  You have to clear that weapon yesterday.  The bad guys don’t stop shooting at you or making noise.

Train under the most realistic conditions possible.  When you disassemble your weapon for time…practice until you can do it, first off.  Then practice it blindfolded, or with your eyes shut until you need to look.  Until you can do it completely blindfolded.  Why?  Because when an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) sings “Boom-Boom, Out Go the Lights,” you may not have any time when that jam occurs. 


Murphy’s Law: What can go wrong will go wrong at the most inopportune moment.


You need to learn to disassemble that weapon blindfolded…then with the loud music cranked up right next to you.  Then outside, when it’s raining, with no clean, “Holly-Hobbie” table to rest on.  Yes, it will suck!  The weather will suck!  But you will overcome it and learn to do it with a clear mind…never allow it to take you from your task.

Inclement weather, low-light levels, and noise.  These are all very good things to use.  Same for excursions in the field (or “camping” if you prefer).  Why just wait for that perfect two or three days that the smiling weatherman assures you of?  No, go out when it’s raining hard, or you’re threatened with alternating temperatures and weather.  That will test you: that will take you to your limits.  Anybody can walk all over the happy park with a GPS.  You need to practice with that Lensatic compass…day and night, in difficult terrain.

You need to prepare your meals over an open fire when it is pouring down rain to test yourself.  Learn!  You won’t die, and if you feel as if things are too much, “can” the exercise, regroup, assess yourself, and learn from your mistakes.  Then get back up on that bull and ride the next chance you can.  You need to challenge yourself and see what you can do.  If you don’t succeed, then go back to the drawing board and plan it out until you overcome it.  Pretty soon, you’ll have (if you keep training logs, which are very, very beneficial and I strongly advise you to) all kinds of successes.

You should take your weak points and make them strong points.  That is how we triumph as a species.  You’ll be amazed at what you will be able to do under pressure.  Break out those firecrackers, and on the 4th of July, instead of just sitting around blowing off M-80’s, turn it into a training event.  Set up a land navigation event complete with an “ambush” by a family member with the fireworks.  Of course, be safe, but use your imagination!  Try disassembling that weapon, identifying the parts groups, reassembling it, performing a functions check…all blindfolded.  Then fire at a target.  All of this while the firecrackers are going off all around you.

The more realistic you make your training, the more relaxed you’ll be when it all goes to pot when the SHTF.  You can make it real.  Just use the planning and organizational skills you have, and outline your tasks beforehand.  You’ll feel a sense of accomplishment as you overcome the obstacles and take your training to levels you had not previously imagined.  Only imagination limits us.  Keep in that good fight, and train to win.  The training may be simulated, but in the long-run, you will face the real thing someday.  Be ready when that day arrives.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

What to Remember When Packing Your Emergency Prep Kit

Click here to view the original post.

When you are prepared for an emergency, it makes the situation much easier to handle. To be on the safe side, you should have an emergency supply kit in your home that you can call on to get you through any emergency. You have to pack your emergency preparedness kit carefully to ensure you are ready to handle any contingency. The right supplies will ensure you can ride out emergencies when they occur. Here is a guide to packing your emergency supply kit so your home will be ready when disaster strikes.

 

Water

Most people always think of food first when they put their kits together, stocking up on things like canned goods. Really though, the first thing you need for survival is water. You need to gather at least three days’ worth of water for your kit. It is even better if you make that a week’s supply of water. You will need one gallon of water per day for each person in your household. A gallon is enough water to take care of your drinking and sanitation needs.

 

Food

While you could ride out a week-long disaster without food as long as you had water, you will be much better off if you fill your disaster kit with non-perishable food items. Make sure to choose food items that your family will actually enjoy eating. Canned goods that are high in water content are an excellent choice. You want to avoid foods with high-salt contents so you can avoid getting thirsty. Salt-free crackers and whole-grain cereals are fine choices. Nuts, peanut butter and protein bars are also good choices for your emergency prep kit.

 

Light

Power outages and disaster often go hand-in-hand. You need to make sure that you have all the light sources you need when the electricity fails. Fill your emergency prep kit with plenty of flashlights and electric lanterns. Stock up with lots of extra batteries. Make sure you avoid falling prey to the sentimentality of using candles for light during an emergency. The last thing you want to do is start a fire during a disaster situation because you thought it would be romantic.

 

Medicine

You want to have the medicine you need in your emergency supplies. Standard medications you should include are pain relievers like aspirin and ibuprofen, antidiarrheal medications, antacids and laxatives. You also want to have a good first-aid kit as part of your emergency supplies. Make sure to include a supply of any prescription drugs you are taking as well. You may want to think about adding an e cig charger for your electronic cigarette to use as a tobacco alternative which you could carry in your emergency kit.

 

Solar Charger

When the power is off for several days, it is nice to have an alternative power source to charge up your cellphones and other electronic devices. There are loads of incredible solar chargers on the market today that you can use to power your electronic devices. Of course, the ultimate way to solve power issues during an emergency is to get solar panels installed on your roof.

 

Papers

It is critical that you keep the important papers you need in your emergency kit. You should have copies of your health insurance cards. Maps of the area are also necessary. Of course, you should have a supply of paper cash in case you need it. You should also have a copy of your family’s emergency plan, including where to meet in case you are forced to leave your home.

 

Radio

If the power goes out, a radio may be your only way to stay connected with the outside world. You should get a radio that is battery-powered, but make sure to get a model that can also powered by a hand crank just in case.

 

If you put together these supplies, you will have a well-stocked emergency prep kit. Remember to add in supplies for your pets if you have them. When you have these emergency supplies, you will be ready for anything. That gives you tremendous peace of mind.

The post What to Remember When Packing Your Emergency Prep Kit appeared first on American Preppers Network.

A Green Beret’s Guide to Prepper Firearms

Click here to view the original post.

 ReadyNutrition Readers, the purpose of this article is to list the many reasons why it is important to own a firearm.  It is a choice that certainly is your right to exercise or not to exercise: to have a firearm in your home.  This piece is not to present a moral basis for ownership, but rather the practical reasons it is important to exercise your 2nd Amendment rights.  The moral questions are best answered in the privacy of your own home according to the way your family lives and worships.

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Your Right To Defend Yourself

That being said, the primary reason for ownership of a firearm is defense.  This used to be a requirement during the days of the American Revolution and upon the founding of the United States.  If you do your research, most of the State Constitutions for states that are “border states,” meaning upon the outer edges of the United States…these states had provisions that either required or requested the citizens residing in them to own a firearm.  Why?  Because the U.S. citizen is the cornerstone of the phrase “common defense” in the preamble of the Constitution.


The United States is a nation formed by citizen-soldiers who knew their first responsibility to the nation involved taking up arms on its behalf…for the good of all.  That hasn’t changed. 


The bottom line for the 2nd Amendment (equally as important) is that if our government ever “morphs” into a tyranny that attempts to subvert individual rights under the Constitution…the ability of citizens to bear arms is a recourse to that tyranny.

The average citizen has been conditioned for more than 100 years to place all faith in the government.  Soldiery nowadays is not generally viewed as an honorable profession, but rather as a “necessary evil” that you only do “when there are no other options available to you.”  We had a Secretary of State (John Kerry) that publicly expostulated that drivel.

Six Benefits Firearms Have for the Average Joe Prepper

Firearms ownership and knowledge of them have many benefits.  Let’s cover some of them, shall we?

  1. Hunting: In either a survival or non-survival scenario, you must put meat on the table. Hunting is the way to do it, and firearms make it easier. In recent articles I have recommended the Winchester ’94, an outstanding lever-action rifle in 30-30 caliber.
  2. Home Defense: This varies from state-to-state with gun ownership laws and what you can or cannot do, per the law, with the firearms. Some states (Montana being one of them) have the “castle” doctrine…where if a threat is perceived, the homeowner can take action.  Other states will practically sue you if you don’t offer the burglar/rapist a meal when he breaks in.  My personal rule is simple: it’s better to be judged by 7 than carried by 6.  A firearm can prevent Mr. Rapist from carrying out his plans. Some ladies carry around a Saturday Night Special to deter unwelcome advances or perhaps some of these firearm suggestions would do the trick.
  3. SHTF Collapse: Yes, either the EMP has struck or the economy has collapsed…or both. What then?  When the marauders are coming down the street, do you pick up a bullhorn and tell them to leave or you’ll call the police?  Do you think that “Brinks” sign on the front lawn will cause them to shiver and shudder and move away?  The answer to both questions is probably “No,” and I guarantee…that Mossberg 500-A 12 gauge pump will be the best. I’ve gone into a lot of detail on the subject in this article. As well, consider the .357, .45 ACP and these other post-collapse firearms.
  4. Barterable Skill Post SHTF: Yes, the ability to reload cartridges or repair firearms will be a barterable skill…and a skill you will need for yourself with a collapse. Consider diversifying your ammunition for this very reason.
  5. Legacy to your Family: Don’t those words sound great? What they mean is that with proper instruction on the use of, safety with, and care of your firearms, you’re giving your children an education in something that they can use the rest of their lives…it’s their birthright as American citizens to have the right to own and keep firearms.  Why not give them a head start and show them all the fundamentals?
  6. Sport: Yes, sport! You can develop your marksmanship skills on targets…paper targets and at different ranges and clubs.  You and/or the kids can all compete in matches.  Sometimes there are prizes in the form of money, equipment, etc., that can be won when competing.  There are no limits except the ones you set upon yourself.

Other Considerations

Preppers, I must stress how important it is to maintain your weapons, as well as to having as much support equipment for your firearm as possible.  A good cleaning kit with all the component parts for multiple calibers is essential. You can make your own cleaning kit with these items.  Another thing you need is a gunsmith’s tool kit.  They’re precisioned for the set-screws and special screws for mounts, scopes, and the firearm in general.  Along with other things, such as reloading kits and presses, optics, and other books and videos to make you a well-rounded marksman.

As well as basic maintenance, I must emphasize the important of practicing regularly with your firearms. It is one thing to be a fast shot, but it is more important to be an accurate one. Read more about tips to improve your marksmanship here.

To summarize, firearms have held their place above the mantelpiece and mounted on the wall in American homes since even before the days of the American Revolution.  Firearms are a part of your American citizenship heritage, and they can serve a multitude of needs and functions.  For further training, hook up with a veteran or a qualified NRA instructor, and get started on something that is your fundamental right under the 2nd Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.  Keep that powder dry, and keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Family Preparedness Guide to Surviving a Nuclear Disaster

Click here to view the original post.

One of the most important characteristics of survivalists, preppers, and their ilk is the ability to concede that no matter how improbable it may be for a situation to arise, it is still possible.  With the current state of affairs of the world being the way they are, there is nothing in the news that can truly dissuade a prepper from this concept.  That being said, what if a nuclear war occurs?  No, really: what will you do, and what actions will you take when it begins?

Learn How Tactical Gas Masks Can Save Your Life

We have covered the topic of preparedness for a nuclear war before, but we have not discussed immediate actions to take within the first hours that such a nightmare becomes a reality.  First, let us mention again Cresson Kearney’s work Nuclear War Survival Skills,” and can also be downloaded from the internet.  It is the end-all, be-all for information on preparedness for a nuclear war.

Immediate Actions a Family Must Take to Survive Nuclear War

The topic for this article is immediate actions to be taken when nuclear war present itself; however, stress and emphasis must be made on preparations beforehand.  You want to garner all of the supplies possible beforehand and prepare a fallout shelter before the football game kicks off.  This will cut down on the scrambling when it all comes about.  There will be enough confusion in the works, and you don’t need to make any more for yourself through a lack of readiness by not having supplies you need in place.  Let’s cover some basics questions you need to answer for yourself and your family.

  1. A Plan: you need a plan to “kick into action” immediately, depending on where you are…at home, at work, or traveling. This plan needs to take into account what you’ll do if your engine dies (from the EMP, or Electromagnetic Pulse), for example, and you’re still five miles from home.
  2. “Rounding Up the Tribe”: How will you gather your family together? Do they know the plan and are they both on board with it and prepared to act in accordance with it?  You need an ORP (Objective Rally Point), so to speak: a place to meet together in one location, if for the purpose of consolidating and traveling back home together.
  3. Assessing the Targeted Areas: this must be done beforehand, and if you are in a targeted area susceptible to attack, you better be prepared to move out of it.
  4. Personal Protection from Radiation: (in accordance with your assessment of how much radiation there will be) Do you have Geiger Counters (radiological survey meters), dosimeters, and a suit and mask to protect you from the radiation? If so, how will you get to them/into them when it occurs?
  5. [We’re using a “Shelter in the Home” Scenario]: OK, you made it home. Now, do you have backup measures in place for the loss of electricity that will occur?  Do you have a shelter where you can “hole up” for at least the next three weeks to a month?  Is it defensible?  Can you effect such a defense while radiation is still at a dangerous level?  Let’s review what needs to be in the shelter:
  6. Food and water supply for all members…at least six months’ worth
  7. Medical supplies and equipment
  8. Shielded electronic supplies (radio, night vision devices, etc., shielded until it is safe to expose them with no threat of EMP) in Faraday cages
  9. Weapons and ammunition to defend yourselves
  10. Tools and materials to repair or replace components of the shelter
  11. Equipment to monitor radiation levels inside and outside of the shelter
  12. Sanitation and hygiene measures (people don’t stop going to the bathroom or needing to clean themselves regularly)
  13. Books and reading material: survival oriented, and also for a diversion
  14. After the exchange has halted: What will you and your family do then?  Remain in place, or head for new ground?

Time is of the Essence

There won’t be a lot of time for action.  Hopefully, you’ll be at home, and able to take steps from there.  Such steps can include (but are not limited to): covering all of the basement windows with dirt, and if you have a basement or sub-basement shelter, securing all parts of it prior to relocating into it with your family.  You’ll already (hopefully) have your supplies ready and in position, but you can also run the water and fill up as many containers as possible to take down with you.  Same with food: any canned or dried goods that you can move from the upstairs into the shelter will be money in the bank for you later.

There’s never enough blankets and clothes: stock some of these down in your shelter.  Pets are a big consideration that we’ve covered in a previous article.  You’ll have to provide for them if you do indeed intend to save them.  Special needs members of your family, such as infants and toddlers, the elderly, and any family member with a medical condition…you need to provide for those needs well in advance.

Especially for them, you want to load up on whatever supplies you need to take care of them and move any equipment or supplies that you can manage for them into that shelter.  After the war commences, there won’t be any more deliveries of those necessities.  Research Cresson Kearney’s work and put these measures into place…stocking up on the supplies you need and coordinating all of your initial actions with your family prior to the arrival of that fateful day.  Hopefully, none of these measures will be needed, but if they are, it will give you a better chance if you determine them and implement them beforehand.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading on Nuclear Preparedness:

How to Survive When a Nuke Is Dropped

An Urban Guide to Surviving a Nuclear Attack

A Step-By-Step Guide to Preparing For Any Disaster

What Happens to Nuclear Power Plants Following an EMP?

Mom, Could You Please Pass the Potassium Iodide?

How can I avoid radiation exposure?

7 Natural Supplements You Should Have in Case of Nuclear Fallout

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Five Tips for the Ultimate Family Road Trip

Click here to view the original post.

road-tripMy husband and I are frequent flyers, but Delta’s recent major malfunction with their computers hasn’t made me excited to travel by airplane these days. Say what you will about driving long distances with young children, but I still prefer to be somewhat in control of my travel plans. Whenever possible, we choose to drive to our destinations in our SUV.

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

After literally dozens of vacations, I’ve come up with these 5 tips for making the most of a family road trip.

1) Ditch the Routine:  Routine is critical for raising young children. At home, my kids’ morning and evening routines are flawlessly executed so that I can tell exactly who is brushing their teeth and who has not completed their homework. Routine is a comfort for them and it keeps the machinery of the family well oiled. BUT, a road trip is no time to force a routine. No matter how noble your efforts, something will delay dinner or bedtime. Your kids may spend an entire morning watching television in the hotel room. They may sleep through lunch or drink milkshakes for breakfast (more on healthier eating in tip #2). Trust me when I say you need to GO WITH IT. Try as hard as you can to ignore the clock altogether (especially if you’re traveling through multiple time zones). Stressing about routine will only make your trip less enjoyable. I promise you that even several weeks on the road will not permanently disrupt your family routine. As soon as you are back at home, your kids will fall into their familiar patterns.

2) Don’t Get Hungry: We’ve all been there—it’s dinnertime on a road trip and everyone is cranky and hungry and there isn’t a restaurant in sight. The kids are fighting in the backseat and my husband and I are starting to turn on each other. After what feels like forever we find a gas station and load up on processed junk and sugar. Then we continue on, comatose and exhausted, no less annoyed with each other. To avoid this, buy a cooler or two and stock up on sandwiches, fruit, nuts, cheeses, and other healthy hand-held snacks. Purchase milk in single-serve cartons for the kids and invest in a large coffee thermos for the adults. Whenever you find yourself in a town with a grocery store, spend a little extra time buying food and getting it separated out into single servings before you get back on the road again. This seems like a lot of planning but it soon becomes second nature—and it’s so worth it!

3) It’s About the Journey: Sure, you probably have a goal in mind—whether it’s to visit the grandparents or see the Grand Canyon—but try to be open to possibility. I can’t tell you how many “detours” turned out to be more memorable or exciting trips that the planned destination. Tell you kids to be on the lookout for billboards offering interesting tourist stops and make sure to check out the pamphlets in any hotel lobby you might be staying in.

4) Talk the Talk: We sometimes forget that driving is a perfect opportunity to talk to our loved ones, and not only about the surroundings we happen to be traveling through. Rather that playing “I spy” or trying to keep my kids entertained every single second with the iPad or coloring books, I like to talk to them about their lives. Hypothetical situations are also fun or funny (you can play the “Would you Rather” game, i.e., “Would you rather eat a worm or touch a tarantula?”) especially with younger players. One of the thrills of my life as a mom is listening to my sons talk to each other. Older kids will naturally talk about their interests or their goals and it’s a great opportunity for parents to listen to them.

5) Carry the Closeness With You: Not to get too sappy, but family road trips definitely happen during a limited window of time. Try as much as you can to appreciate being in close quarters with your kids and attempt to maintain that connection long after the trip is over. Taking photos is very important, but to keep it even simpler you can have every family member talk about their favorite and least favorite parts of each day. Look for patterns in the trip (for example, one summer it seemed the radio was constantly playing “Staying Alive” no matter where we went) and encourage kids to collect keepsakes. Don’t fall into the trap of buying expensive souvenirs—a pretty rock or seashell work just as well. Once you’re back at home, that song or silly joke or seashell takes on the symbolism of the entire trip. Treasure it.

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

What is the Best Location for a Cache On Your Property?

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, recently I suggested 5 projects to undertake in the Spring to get a head start on preparing for emergencies.  As the title suggests, this article will outline several methods to hide your stuff underground.  Be advised: this means you’ll have to have some property at your disposal.

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Caches are the ultimate back up plan because everyone wants to hide their “stuff,” but hiding it effectively is a different matter.  Yes, everyone wants a set of diagrams and ideas, but you should have a plan before you implement your construction.  Let’s outline some basic principles and considerations first that it would do you good to keep in mind.

A Word to the Wise

Firstly, OPSEC (Operational Security) is paramount with any kind of project such as this.  You must keep everyone out of the loop: nosy, big-mouthed neighbors; prying relatives; overly curious co-workers; ad infinitum.  You can’t “advertise” what you’re doing and expect any measure of success.  What you place in what we’ll call your “storage room” is your business and your business alone.  The only ones in the loop with you should be ones you can rely on absolutely to keep their mouths shut.

The Perfect Location For Your Cache

You must take time to find the ideal location on your property for your storage room.  Be advised: there are local cops, the Sheriff’s department, the IRS, ad infinitum ad nauseam…an endless “conga” line of creeps who can metamorphose and metastasize almost instantly overnight with a full-blown tyranny.  They have everything at their disposal courtesy of your tax dollars: infrared scanners, metal detectors, drug and bomb-sniffing canines, etc.

That said, if you think you are going to be able to hide something from them right next to the house, you had better think again.  They’ll sweep the entire area with a fine-toothed comb…with you there or with you in matching silver bracelets, being “chauffeured” to jail.  You can optimally hide your supplies by doing two things:

1.Throw them a bone

They must pick up something and can’t leave empty handed…I’m not talking about anything illegal, mind you, such as drugs or bombs.  I’m talking about if they wish to confiscate your weapons, etc. when the government morphs into tyranny.  Throwing them a bone means you should give them a few things.  One or two rifles, per se, and a couple of pistols, along with some ammo.

For anyone who disagrees with this and recites the “when they pry it from my cold, dead fingers” line, go ahead…they will.  They’ll either do that or worse.  You won’t be able to face them and defeat them head on.  It’s better to lose a small part than to lose it all.

If you can’t part with your firearms, consider hiding some less innocuous items like tools, food and/or old clothing.

2.Have your storage room in the most unlikely place to find it that you can.

You know your own property.  It’s going to be up to you to know these unlikely places, and whether it is feasible to use them.  Let’s go over some ideas and general spots:

  • Near the septic tank: Yes, indeed, that septic tank can be a perfect cover for an “adjoining structure” in the form of a concrete tube or cubicle set into the ground right next to it. You can really make it look good by ensuring they both physically touch, and then throwing some cement in the “joint” to make it appear as if they’re one structure.
  • Farthest points on the property: The “four corners” and adjacent spots…the greater the distance between the storage room and the house, the better.
  • Surface running water camouflage: a small stream or creek flowing across your property? Stick that storage room under it.  You temporarily divert all or part of the creek…sink that storage room underground, and then allow the stream to return to its normal flow.  This method is best done with a “cache” rather than a walk-in storage room, for obvious reasons…you won’t be able to get to it rapidly.
  • Under something innocuous: A children’s swing set, or a decorative fountain/goldfish pond in your front yard.
  • Under/near a stone wall, panel partition, or fence: Not a “normative” place for the “normal” people to look.

There are several decisions you must make before you undertake all of this.  Most of them deal with structure and logistics.  How much stuff do you want to store, and what?  Are you going to close it off in the manner of a cache, or are you going to make it more accessible?  How much time and labor are you willing to put into it, along with money?  If someone else is building it…are they reliable in terms of keeping their mouths shut?  Even more: Will they take what you have if they are given the opportunity?  Or in a SHTF situation, might they “show up” on your doorstep to take what you have?

You can’t rule out any of these possibilities.  You may also want to screen off the area that is most visible while it is being built.  Part II we will have some diagrams for you to use and 3 different ideas for a storage vault/structure, modifiable by size and only limited by your imagination or the resources you can afford.  You’ll have to consider it all: the nosy neighbors, friends, and relatives, and the governmental “pests” in all their taxing and enforcing forms.  Until next time, keep your powder dry and well-hidden!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

7 Improvised Defense Weapons That Could Save Your Life

Click here to view the original post.

This piece is designed to provide you with a few ideas to stimulate your creative thought processes.  We’re all Constitution-loving, survival-oriented preppers who are always preparing for every emergency.  The problem is that emergencies are not able to be “compressed” into a format: they arise.  You plan the best you can, but there’s an age-old military adage that summarizes the whole situation, in a nutshell, “No battle plan ever survives the first five minutes of combat completely intact.”

This is true, and places emphasis on the quality that made man the dominant species on this planet and enabled him to survive as long as he has: adaptability.  In this light, there will be a time when you will need to defend yourself and do not have a weapon readily available.  When such a situation presents itself, you must follow the advice of “Gunny Highway”/Clint Eastwood in the movie “Heartbreak Ridge,” advice that holds brevity and clarity:           


“You improvise, you adapt, you overcome.”


That is eloquence swathed in simplicity.  Yes.  Two hoodlums, for example, are coming over to you at night in the parking lot after work.  You can’t avoid them and get into your car before they’re on you.  One clicks open a knife.  It’s time to act.  The action has to take place in a split second.  Let’s say you’re unarmed – no firearms or blades, and you can’t escape.  What now?

7 Improvised Defense Weapons That Could Save Your Life

Common objects on your person may either be utilized or prepared beforehand and then utilized.  Let’s go through some of them you may have, and what to do with them:

  1. Keys: (this will take practice) – take three of them and slip them between your fingers with the keyed end (“blade”) facing out. Grip the rest in your fist and prepare to punch. An effective way to plan ahead for this encounter is if you attach a kubaton to your keychain.
  2. Pens: A good sturdy one made from metal is preferred; a plastic one may work, but you better strike effectively. Hold the pen one of two ways: gripped within your fist with the pen extruding from the bottom of your fist/hand, or with the pen between your middle and ring finger, the base on your palm and the point out from between the fingers.  “Method 1” is preferable because you can stab (a backhanded type of stab) with the pen, and still punch with the fist that holds it.  “Method 2” will take more precision as you strike for the vulnerable points.
  3. Belt: Use only if your pants won’t just fall down and they can stay on without the belt. Strip that belt off, and wrap it around your dominant hand and make a fist.  If you really know what you’re doing, you can wrap the knife hand of the attacker and disarm him.  You had better have practiced this unless you’re a really good athlete.
  4. Credit card/ATM card (handy): By “handy,” there’s no time to take it out of your wallet. You may keep a very rigid plastic card in your shirt pocket.  Hold the card tightly and the edge can be knife-like when striking an opponent…for a very effective strike.
  5. Jacket/windbreaker: Take it off and use it to shield you (in one hand as a shield) from the blade as you strike with the opposite hand. You can (if you’ve practiced) wrap up that blade-carrying hand of the opponent while you’re striking.
  6. Leatherman on that belt? Pull it out quickly, and in the manner of the pen (described in #2) hold it in the manner of “Method 1” where the pliers are extended past the bottom of your hand…to stab/strike in a backhanded method.
  7. Purse: Ladies, that handbag can be a lifesaver for you. Prep this beforehand: keep a 1-pound or ½ pound weight or little dumbbell in it.  Then no cop can get you for a concealed weapon.  You’ll even have a light workout during your day!  But when you swing that bag down and put a three-inch dent in your attacker’s head, you’ll be glad you put the weight in there.  Make sure your purse strap is strong enough to handle this action without losing your purse or snapping.

Now, of course, you should also look around (use your peripheral vision!  Don’t take your eyes off of or away from your attackers!) for boards, bricks, rocks, or anything else within your reach.  Do you have a car alarm?  Push that button and raise a ruckus.  I knew a woman once who was going to get jumped in this manner in the parking lot.  She didn’t have a car alarm, but she threw rocks at a couple of other cars before they closed on her and set off those car alarms.  Then she threw rocks at them and screamed, and others came to her aid.

The eyes and the face are your primary targets with the keys and pen.  Secondary are the sides of the neck and the throat: where the carotid and jugular are, and the airway respectively.  The face of the credit card: a slash maneuver. You’ll be surprised at how deeply into the flesh that card will slice.  Your objective is not to engage with them.  Your objective is to inflict the maximum amount of damage and pain on them and then break contact…get away…at the soonest possible moment.

Don’t let a pair “flank” you: if you must face one, try and step to his side so the other one is behind him…so your primary attacker is in between you and his buddy.  With these methods, you need to practice them to enable you to execute them.  It is different when the adrenaline is pumping and you’re faced with the threat.  Don’t be afraid to experiment; however, make sure your experiments and the “main event” are not the same thing.  The more practice, the more you will build your confidence and increase your chances for success should such a situation arise.  Hope it won’t, but if it does?  Go for the win.  JJ out.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Best Survival Foods on a Budget

Click here to view the original post.

If you’re looking to stockpile on foods that you will need in case of emergency, but you want to save some money, then don’t worry you are in the right place. Survival foods, as a whole, are not very costly.

Buying them in bulk isn’t going to break the bank. In this article, we seek to provide a concise list of the 5 best survival foods that you can buy on a budget.

It’s very important to be prepared for whatever disaster that comes your way. Below, you will find a list of 5 great survival foods to buy on the cheap. We didn’t mention water, but it goes without saying that safe drinking water is the most important prep to your survival.

The following list will give you your best options when purchasing some new emergency supplies on the cheap!

Top 5 Survival Foods for Those on a Budget

  1. Rice

Rice should be first on every list of survival foods. It feeds millions of people every single day and only a little of it can keep you full for hours. Bulk rice from somewhere like Sam’s Club or Costco (which sells many items in bulk) costs around $17 for 50 lbs. of rice.

It will certainly hold you over for a good amount of time, even if you are trying to feed other people as well.related It’s a staple of diets all around the world and for good reason.

Rice is cheap to buy and filling and nutritious for those that consume it. It can easily be prepared and it’s no wonder it’s a popular survival food.

Be sure to keep some amount of rice on hand in case of an emergency. Plain rice, while not very flavorful, will definitely keep you going during tough times.

  1. Spam

Spam is another survival food that will keep you fed in an emergency.

It’s no surprise that canned foods are one of my favorite survival foods and although I don’t love it, spam does the trick just fine. Spam is easy to maintain for a long period of time and is quite filling.

The average container contains 12 ounces of spam meat. At Walmart, you can buy one can for less than $5. Also, if you buy 10 at once for a total of 120 ounces of spam, you will only spend around $40. That one-time investment will help you and your family a long time.

To some, that may seem like a lot of spam, but think about how long a survival situation might last in case a bad storm hits.

It’s important to note, spam is consumed in slices. It is a meat, which can be hard to find for a low price and even tougher to keep when you do not have access to freezers or heat sources. Spam can and should be eaten cold.

  1. Powdered Milk and Drink Mixes

Powdered milk can be used for both convenience and for survival situations. Powdered milk is often used to make food that calls for a milk ingredient when the liquid form isn’t available and while providing a good nutritional value.

It is also very valuable when you need it to last without electricity and an emergency strikes.

A box providing 10 quarts of powdered milk costs around $10. That’s a good investment to stock up on if you ask me.

Consider purchasing breakfast drink mixes to use the milk with. Breakfast drinks typically pack in essential vitamins, minerals, and proteins that a cooked breakfast meal normally provides.

Try purchasing Puritan Pride Spiru-Tein, which is very high in vitamins A, C, and D. A two-pound tin sells for around $30 at the time of this article.

The powder can be easily stored, packed with nutrients, and is meant to substitute and entire meal.

  1. Dried Eggs

Dried eggs can be used just like powdered milk. It provides the same nutritional value and works just as well as a cooking ingredient and a meal. Eggs are one of my favorite nutritious and affordable foods.

There are not many mornings that I don’t go with a couple scrambled eggs to get my day moving.

Dried eggs were originally produced first for the U.S military, but are now being sold specifically as a survival and emergency preparedness food. Try it out, I am sure you will find then quite tasty when things go south.

On Amazon, a one pound container costs $25. You can maintain them for a good while unopened and should be mixed with water.related

  1. Energy Bars

Last but not least, why not trying out energy bars. Energy bars are used by almost everyone from athletes to extreme sports enthusiasts to adventure lovers who go hiking and camping.

Even the normal Joe likes to snack on one if they do not have time for a full meal. We know how many brands exist out there and how expensive energy bars can be, but you can purchase Clif Builder’s energy bars in a box of 18 for around $20 at the time of this article.

That’s plenty to stock up on for you and your family.

They are a good meal substitute which is normally high in protein and meant to keep you going during heavy activity periods. Save up a few and keep them stored away in case of tough times.

Conclusion

All of these budget survival foods can be purchased online or in stores like Costco and Sam’s Club, which sell many bulk items for a fair price. In case you prefer shopping online like I do, I put some referral links on the foods that we recommend to buy on Amazon.

Remember that your emergency survival foodsrelated may be extremely necessary one day and are worth investing in. We tried to offer a few low-cost items, but either way, you are going to have to spend money to be prepared.

Not everybody has money to throw around even for necessities. If you fall into that category, hopefully, none of these prices seem out of your range for the amount of food and nutrition you get and the peace of mind you will obtain. Just make sure to store your food in a good place.

Survival preparedness is no laughing matter, so please don’t make the mistake of forgetting about it!

The post 5 Best Survival Foods on a Budget appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Frugal Prepping: 12 Cheap Ways to Prep Like There’s No Tomorrow

Click here to view the original post.

With economic times being what they are, it only means that we become more frugal when it comes to prepping. No one wants to be overdrawn in their accounts because they were trying to prepare for emergencies. Frugality is an art form, and if used properly, it can save you lots of money. The key is to know where to find these hidden gems. With a little “out of the box” thinking and some patience, you can acquire prepper items like food, tools, shelter, first aid and weaponry for pennies on the dollar.

Before you begin, keep these tips in mind:

  • Find out what your budget it and set aside an allotment each month for preps.
  • Take inventory of what you already have so that you don’t purchase multiples of items.
  • Have a list of items you need and don’t deviate from the plan!
  • When you are prepping on a budget, be patient and wait for the right opportunity to purchase.
  • Don’t ever panic buy or shop impulsively. This is where you lose money and the key here is to save it.

There are many strategies you can take to save money on your preps, you just have to choose which one is best for you. Here are 12 suggestions you can take to frugally purchase preparedness items.

12 Cheap Ways to Prep Like There’s No Tomorrow

  1. Buy in bulk. A lot of preppers use this frugal shopping strategy so they get more bang for their buck. Discount warehouses are great for this type of purchasing. As well, when you buy in bulk, you will enough of this item for a short-term emergency, so you can cross the item off your prepper list until you need to buy more. The LDS warehouse is another place to get bulk items inexpensively.
  2. Purchase a small item at a time. If your budget is so tight that you only have $5 extra in your account – you can make that work. Take a look at these prepper food items that are $5.
  3. Barter in your community. Your skills and services can carry you far if you allow them to. Consider what abilities and knowledge you possess that can be shared with others and barter them for goods or other services. Here are some great tips on how to barter better.
  4. Go to farmer’s markets and get in contact with local growers. If you work a deal with a vendor at a farmer’s market, you can get lots of food relatively inexpensively. Work a deal such as, get 5 lbs of strawberries to turn into jam and give 4 jars to the vendor. This is a great way to practice self-reliant skills and put food in your pantry. If you are an avid hunter, work a deal and see if someone will preserve the meat. See what I mean?
  5. Thrift stores. Thrift stores are a great way to collect vintage or antique items for a fraction of the cost. Ready Nutrition writer, Ruby Burks found cast iron pots, old cookbooks and kitchen utensils to use in her home. Remember, keep a list of items you are looking for and don’t deviate. This will keep your budget in check.
  6. Look for free stuff. I know this one is a long shot, but there are items you can get for free at garage sales, Craigslist, and even rummaging through items people have thrown out. Freecycle.com is another place to look for items. At this website, people recycle previously owned items and give them away for free.
  7. Go to the Dollar store. Not only can you buy food at the Dollar stores, but tools and medical supplies. This could be an untapped local source of preps for you!
  8. Use coupons. Finding coupons in the Sunday newspaper, magazines, local grocery stores or even online is a great way to start the search for what you need.  Not only can you use coupons to use for short-term and long-term food supplies, but you can find deals for camping equipment or warm clothes, etc.  You can literally save hundreds of dollars using coupons.
  9. Purchase gently used items. Pawn shops, Ebay, military surplus stores, and Craigslist are great places to look for used items. You can save a lot using this method, but take all necessary means to ensure the products are not damaged in any way. As well, if you are meeting someone at their home, practice safety and go with someone else.
  10. Look for deals – When you are shopping and you come across a deal such as 10 canned goods for $5 – get it! This is a great way to save money and stock up your pantry. This cumulative savings strategy can go for any of your prepping needs – medical supplies, dental care, garden seeds, etc. Typically, these type of deals can be found in your local newspaper. Don’t forget that coupons are your best friend in this situation.
  11. Do-It-Yourself – Whether it’s DIY projects or dehydrating your own food, this method can save you a lot of money. For example, instead of spending $4 on waterproof matches, dip them in wax yourself and viola! Or, if you need dehydrated food, buy a dehydrator and do it yourself.
  12. Grow your own food. Having food stashed away for a rainy day is one of the must-have items in your preps. Why not start a garden and grow your own. Any food that comes from our harvest can be dehydrated or canned for long-term use. This instantly saves you money at the grocery store too and is a great way to practice self-reliance.

We are all looking for ways to save money in our prepper ventures and hopefully some of these suggestions can help you. What are frugal strategies you use to save money on your preps?

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

20 Hurricane Survival Tips From Real-Life Scenarios

Click here to view the original post.

 

Imagine this scenario: It’s the year 2005 and you are living in the heart of New Orleans. A hurricane is threatening to hit and even though the city sits 8 feet below sea level, you choose not to evacuate or even prepare because you’ve seen many hurricanes threaten to hit the city and it never makes landfall, so why prepare for this one? Days later, your great city is almost completely flooded from Hurricane Katrina and over 1,800 lives were claimed including some of your neighbors because, like you, they decided not to leave the city. Now you are left without electricity, water, and dwindling supplies. To make matters worse, supply trucks are cut off, the police and emergency services can’t meet the needs of the people and there are looters breaking into homes for supplies. 

Yes, the above scenario is a worst-case scenario, but aspects of this are very common following hurricanes. These tropical storms are extreme and have the capacity to cripple our entire way of life. They are erratic in nature in terms of where they land, the types of damages sustained, and if there will be disasters in the aftermath, such as water-borne diseases, bug infestations, etc. Because of the unpredictability of these disasters, some choose to be complacent and wait to get preparations in order until the storm is imminent and hours away. While some take this disaster seriously and are meticulous in making preparations each year in case this natural disaster hits. So, which group do you choose to be in?

I’ve been very honest about my ordeals in living through a hurricane and I learned from my mistakes. Long story short, after I went through Hurricane Ike and felt helpless and under prepared, I made it my mission to help others get their homes ready for living in off-grid disasters. We all have a life lesson to share, and I am not alone in trying to get the word out on preparing for these storms. I asked some fellow preppers in the community what advice they would offer on how to better prepare for hurricanes, and the community overwhelmingly stepped up to help their fellow-man. When you read this list, pay attention to recurring advice – prepare ahead of time. This is the key to having all of your preparations in order.

20 Hurricane Survival Tips From Real-Life Scenarios

These are their words and, in my humble opinion, this is some very solid advice to follow.

  1. Put all of your important documents on a flash drive and put it in your bug out bag. If the time comes and you need to evacuate, you have everything all prepped and ready to go! – Tess Pennington
  2. My mom had supplies stored in new plastic trash bins. If they needed to bug out, easy to grab and put in the back of the car. Also, the bins would be useful. They also keep thing dry. – Judy Keller
  3. Keep enough cash in your BOB (bug out bag) for at least 1-2 nights in a moderately priced hotel and a few meals. A credit card with a zero or small balance would be beneficial as well. If you forget or lose your wallet, you want a backup method for paying expenses until you can return home. – Jim Cobb
  4. Well before the back to back hurricanes of 2004 in South Florida, I bought 28 gallons of water. I am glad I did because we had enough water for the police directing traffic. There was a lot we did. Whatever you think is best for your family and communities do it. Friends, coworkers so many lost their homes, businesses and more, so the things I regret not stocking up on are items such as diapers, toothpaste, etc. Essentials for all life is key. – Joanne DeHerrera
  5. They evacuated us several times after [Hurricane] Charley for Ivan, and people got stuck on the freeway, people died and animals etc. Ivan hit exactly where they said to evacuate too. We had 6 animals at that time. If I needed to squish them all in the car we would have but there was no gas, so glad there wasn’t. Our circumstances dictate how to respond, however, our gut instinct is always best. -Joanne DeHerrera
  6. We keep about 30 liters of water on hand at all times. I just save empty 2-liter bottles (the plastic is stable for room temp storage unlike plastic milk jugs) and treat the water using the 2:1 ratio with bleach. 2 drops to 1 liter of water. – Abigail Nicholson
  7. If you do not have a generator, get one! Have at least enough power to run the washing machine and microwave. A few solar cells to restore cell phone power, charge batteries for radios and flashlights is a must. Don’t forget the toilet paper and enough clean water for everyone in your family for cooking and drinking. You can use pool or rainwater for other purposes. Often overlooked in the city is a chainsaw with fuel mix, bar oil, extra chains. The bulk of damage outside the home is fallen trees. I was blocked in on my cul-de-sac for over a week by fallen oak trees from my neighbor’s yards. – Jim Alkek
  8. Those little solar lights that go in a garden or along your driveway come in handy to give you some light without candles or lanterns…I charge them up during the day and stick in a flower pot half filled with rocks…it’s not a lot of light but enough that you can see basically what you are doing.  – Sue Heath Reynolds
  9. Using my daughter’s experience from SC, the last time. In her area, her biggest problem was a lack of utilities because of downed trees and flooding. She had food, but no way to cook it. She has 3 daughters and had no way to bathe them. No light and so on…..it was the simple everyday things that made it hard. – Gary Rosenlieb 
  10. Hurricane veteran here. Each storm is unique but the main thing is to pay attention BEFORE everyone else does…that means at least 5 days in advance having everything in place so that all you have to concentrate on is securing your home. Also, knowing in advance if you will stay or go and LEAVING BEFORE they tell you to. Don’t forget oil (chainsaw/generator), a new chain for chain saw (all of which you should have anyways but most don’t replace); and well just making sure you have 2-3 weeks of supplies in place for being on your own. After several east coast hurricanes, it took WEEKS for stores to be back up and running, even 100 miles outside of the strike zone. Oh, TARPS and bug spray. I am not a bug out person, can’t really because of animal obligations (15 dogs, chickens, etc) so I have plenty of crates/kennels and such for them to come in (oh yeah baby, ugh, done it before). – Laura Bradley
  11. Also, a butane burner is great, like a demo chef at a restuarant…they can be used indoors, not expensive and easy to load…at SAMs and many places $22 and a case of fuel (like hairspray cans $12) – Sue Health Reynolds
  12. Around here, we don’t have to worry about water surging in from the coast, but winds can be an issue. When a hurricane comes, we usually tape the windows in an X or * shape. People closer to the water board up their windows, maybe sandbag around their house. All other preps are the same. Be ready to leave in advance of the storm if it looks like it’s going to make landfall close to home. – Cat Ellis
  13. Make sure you know all of the available evacuation routes in your area. The main roads and highways will be delayed due to from the heavy traffic flow, so you will want to plan multiple alternative routes in order to ensure that you are not trapped in a flood while attempting to flee the storm. – John Haskell
  14. Everyone should have these in their EDC/BOB! In a Zip Lock Freezer bag or waterproof sleeve keep a FAMILY picture, copies of your and your children’s birth certificates…parents/grandparents/guardians/siblings should have a clear picture of children they may have to “claim” because you were not together when a problem occurs. Hopefully, this wouldn’t be necessary for an evacuation type scenario but you just never know. No telling who would be in charge when you arrive to pick up kids…it could be teachers, leaders that don’t know you personally or outsiders from DHS/Law Enforcement/TSA…Heaven forbid…there are no guarantees with anything anymore! I’m sure you can add to the list copies of your vehicle title, home title…things that are irreplaceable! You don’t want to get to bogged down but it it’s ultimately important to you…you may someday need proof that it is YOURS!! A flash drive is a great idea but in an extended power outage (EMP/ SHTF) you wouldn’t be able to show someone “the kid is mine”! – Sue Health Reynolds
  15. Not sure if this was mentioned already but have at least one or two pics of you and your pets together. This will go a long way toward proving ownership should you and your fur babies get separated. – Jim Cobb
  16. After making it through Hurricane Matthew, flooding, a week without electricity, and 2 weeks without water, I revised my preps slightly and have 3 major priorities here; a lot more water (needed to drink, cook, wash, and flush) extra fuel for cooking (and multiple cooking types we have a propane grill and a fire pit but after a flooding everything too wet) and non-kerosene lamps (after 2 nights cooped up, and unable to ventilate the fumes get to you). – Deborah Middleton
  17. Put as much as you can in plastic tubs. Especially shoes. Came back after Rita and had a tree through my house. Went right through my closet. No shoes, actually very little of anything. SO PUT AS MUCH IN PLASTIC TUBS AS YOU CAN. Forget the furniture, appliances they can be replaced. – Sue Tidwell
  18. In case it helps everyone is welcome to download the Hurricane and Evacuation topics (and some others) in PDF from our preparedness book. – Janet Liebsch
  19. It’s very wise to unpack your BOB every three months or so, minimum once or twice a year. It helps to be sure what is in there…items you decide you don’t really need and more importantly…items you may not have and really should have. WEIGHT…it’s also important to put those suckers on and see if you can actually carry it 🙂 better yet we need to be walking with them ON 🙁 physical fitness should be one of our number one preparedness priorities…as I point a finger at MYSELF 🙂 – Sue Heath Reynolds
  20. Prepare to defend your home at all costs. You don’t know how long the grid will be down and there will be looters. – Mac Slavo

These pieces of advice are all from those who have lived through this ordeal. They shared their stories because they want to help others prepare and get ready – listen to them. If you need a guide to help you in your preparations, consider The Prepper’s Blueprint to get you disaster ready – step-by-step. Do not wait until the last-minute to prepare or the items you need to live through this ordeal will be limited.

If you live in a highly populated area, understand that resources will diminish quickly, so preparing beforehand can circumvent this. You can always start out with these basic preparedness items to get through a disaster:

  1. Food and alternative ways to cook food
  2. Water – 1 gallon per person/per day for consuming only. Plan more for sanitary needs.
  3. Fuel for generators. Also, consider charcoal for outdoor grills
  4. Batteries and battery charger
  5. Flashlights and lanterns
  6. Generator
  7. Emergency lighting
  8. Ice
  9. Medical supply
  10. Items for baby needs
  11. Sanitation supplies

Ultimately, you are the only one who can best care for your family. Having a stash of your family’s favorite canned or dry goods, a supply of water and a simple medical kit can maintain your basic needs for a short-lived disaster. This simple preparedness supply could set you apart from the unprepared. If you live in an area prone to hurricanes, now is the time to prepare. Listen to the advice of your fellow man.

 

Additional Reading:

Preparation

Supplies

Medical Needs

Communication

Sanitation

Evacuation

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Learn How to Properly Sandbag Your Home Before the Next Storm Arrives

Click here to view the original post.

Anytime a major storm is approaching, time is of the essence to prepare. We all see the same thing on the news, images of first responders and volunteers constructing sandbag barriers to hold back a potential flood. But have you ever seen that and asked yourself if you know how to build a sandbag barrier? I’d wager that most people don’t, because by all appearances, building up a wall of sandbags is a very simple task. It’s physically demanding, but not complex at all, so most people probably assume that if they ever had to protect their home from a flood, working with sandbags would come naturally.

However, just because a task is simple, that doesn’t mean that it lacks finer points. There is definitely a right way and a wrong way to build a sandbag barrier. If you’ve never been taught the right way, check out the following video. It was produced by Australia’s SES, a volunteer organization that provides emergency services during disasters. In a few short minutes, it explains all of the most basic and important tips you need to know to protect your home during a flood.

That tells you pretty much everything you need to know about using sandbags to hold back minor floods. However, if you think that a storm is going to produce a more serious flood, you may need to build a much more extensive barrier; perhaps something that will fully surround the perimeter of your home.

If that’s the case, you should check out this video from Canada, which also offers a more in-depth analysis on sandbag construction.

Of course, the best way to ensure that your home will be safe from flooding is to have the tools you need in place, long before the flooding starts. If a major storm system is moving in, then people are going rush to the stores to buy things like sandbags, so they’ll be in short supply during an emergency. You should buy plastic sheeting and sandbags ahead of time. And if you don’t think that you’ll have access to sand, there are several varieties of bags that don’t require it. They work by absorbing large quantities of water, which form a barrier that can hold back the rest of the water.

 

80% of the population lives near a coast. If you haven’t prepared for hurricanes, get the step-by-step guide on how to prepare for any disaster.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition