The Science Behind How Colloidal Silver Is Made: Getting Less Ionic Silver

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If you have ever been curious as to how colloidal silver is made, and the science behind it all, you’ve come to the right place! Since there is a lot of confusing misinformation about colloidal silver out there, we’ve created a handy guide in the form of a series of articles to help you make the right decision about colloidal silver.

Since metallic silver is what we want when using colloidal silver as a supplement, when creating the colloid, we want as little ionic silver in the mixture as possible.  If you read the previous article on colloidal silver, you should already understand that ionic silver is less desirable as an antimicrobial supplement because of the missing election. Since ionic silver is missing an electron from its outer orbit, it easily bonds to chloride in the body creating silver chloride. The body then expels the compound through urine providing few, if any microbial benefits.

So how exactly is an effective silver colloid made?  That’s where things get a little more scientific. While a colloid can have many forms, colloidal silver is one type of colloid that consists of solid particles suspended in a liquid. The solid, in this case, is very small particles (not individual atoms of silver, but clusters of atoms which create particles) of metallic silver and the liquid is water. The “very small particles” in this context refer to particles whose diameter is measured in nanometers.  A silver colloid then must have silver particles in suspension. However, Colloidal silver also contains another form of silver called ions. The difference between solutions, colloids, and suspensions is defined by the size of the particles in the liquid.

Since we are focusing on colloidal silver, a colloid contains silver nanoparticles ranging in size from 10-9 m to 10-6 m (1 nm to 1000 nm). A one-nanometer silver particle consists of 31 silver atoms.  The diameter of a single silver atom is .288nm.

Colloidal silver is made when an electric current is passed through a series circuit consisting of a silver electrode and de-ionized (DI) water.  The current can be either alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC). The current flow causes Ag0 (metal) and Ag+ (ions) to migrate from the electrode into the DI water. AC processes tend to be more efficient than DC in limiting the ionic concentration. It is generally assumed that water ionizes to H + and OH- and that the H +, in the form of the hydronium ion, H3O +, migrates to the cathode, where it is reduced to hydrogen gas, H2, which is liberated. The electrons taken from the cathode are replaced at the anode when Ag metal goes into solution as Ag+.

Therefore, colloidal silver consists of silver in two distinctly different forms, metallic silver particles, and silver ions. The total amount of silver that is reported as the silver concentration (in parts per million) is the sum total of the silver contained in the particles and the silver contained in the silver ions.  Typically, silver ions make up 75 to 99 percent of the total silver while only 1 to 25 percent of the total silver is metallic particles.

A solution containing only ionic silver and no particles is not a colloid since there are no solid silver particles in suspension. On the other hand, if 100 percent of the silver was particles and no ions were present, the solution would be a pure colloid. One measure of the quality of a silver colloid is the percentage of silver particles. Ideally, all the silver content would be in the form of particles with no silver ions.

The good news there is it’s almost impossible to get argyria, colloidal silver’s only known side effect, by consuming silver ions. But ionic silver also won’t offer much in the way of antimicrobial benefits either. Accurate measurements of total silver content require the measurement by either atomic absorption or atomic emission of the silver atoms.

The diagram below shows the setup of a colloidal silver generator.  Remember: 9-volt batteries deliver DC.  As mentioned previously, to get more metallic silver, AC is more effective.  It’s also important to bear in mind that AC batteries are not actually batteries, but converters that create AC current out of DC battery supplies. AC can carry electricity several miles without the loss of power and can also be controlled to increase or decrease power with a transformer. An AC converter on a DC battery creates a more controllable AC energy source with the portability and self-contained benefits of a battery.

Since most manufacturers of colloidal silver do not list the concentration of metallic silver or ionic silver, there’s an observational way to note the difference. When looking at the advertised colloidal silver and the colloidal silver you create at home, you can easily tell by how it looks whether or not there’s a high concentration of ionic silver or metallic silver.  Ionic silver solutions should be clear (they look like water) or have a gold tint to them. The particles of ionic silver are too small to be seen except with an electron microscope. When ionic silver is created, bubbles will form on one or both of the silver wires. Colloidal silver is made from silver particles that are microscopic in size.  When creating colloidal silver, it will look like wisps of smoke emanating from one of the silver electrodes. The metallic silver particles will usually deliver a gray or silver tint to the solution.

It would be beneficial if colloidal silver manufacturers would list the concentration of ionic silver in their products, but until then, we’ll have to use our observational skills and decide based on appearance.

One of the purest silver collides can be found by clicking here. This particular brand also cites sources and attempts to educate the consumer.  You’ll note links to scientific articles below the image of their bottle which will also give you the information we are providing here. MesoSilver also labels the percentage of the metallic silver in their product vs. ionic silver so you’re a well-informed consumer.

In the next colloidal silver article, we will go into detail as to how and why silver particles are more effective than silver ions in the human body.

 

*This article is for informational purposes only.  It is not meant to treat or diagnose. 

 

 

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Sustainable Prepping: 5 Alternative Energy Types for When the SHTF

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There are actually a lot of different types of energy sources to tap into after a disaster strikes. One of the major differences is that unless you have formed some kind of intentional community or have a group of like-minded individuals in your area, you will be the engineer, the mechanic, and the maintenance man all rolled into one. To digress just a bit, this is why shows such as “The Colony” (the reality show, not the aliens), and “Doomsday Preppers” are productive for the introduction of ideas. Those ideas need to be researched and employed, in that order.

Let’s cover some methods to generate energy and provide power, and discuss the positive and negative aspects of each one.

  1. Wood:  absolutely a mainstay after disaster strikes. I’ve written several pieces on the benefits of wood stoves: for cooking, boiling water for washing, laundry, and drinking, and of course, for heat. For those with a fireplace and no woodstove, a set of Dutch ovens (cast-iron cookware) and a kettle that can be hung within it are good for starters. There are also racks out there for hanging laundry and taking advantage of the heat from the fireplace or the woodstove. The main problems with the woodstove are fuel and security. First, you need to lay in a good supply of wood long before either the winter and/or the disaster strikes. Secondly, the wood fire produces smoke, something that cannot be concealed, and this will alert others to your location.
  2. Solar:  It’s always worthwhile to throw some panels up on the roof, as these can give at least a trickle charge, if not power everything you have. Undertaking this is fairly uncomplicated. During your spring, summer, and fall months, you’ll get a lot out of it. Winter is a different matter: not just for the snow, but also for the gray days where you won’t receive that much light. There are even solar generators with high-capacity lithium power packs or portable solar panels you can take with you in your bug-out bag.
  3. Wind: There are plenty of kits out there that will enable you to throw up one or more windmills, and these can take up the slack for the solar panels on days that there is not much in the way of the sun. Windmills also need to be maintained a little more, as they can be damaged or have a breakdown from the moving parts.
  4. Bicycle Generator: Please take note: this is a generator that runs from pedal power, as in a stationary exercise bicycle that doesn’t move…just turns that front wheel. The wheel provides the power to turn a generator flywheel. There are many different plans and kits available here, as well. Basically, all you need is a generator of some type, a belt to rig up on the front wheel of the bicycle, a voltage regulator (so you don’t overload/blow out your battery), and the battery itself.
  5. Wood Gassifier: this contraption is made from a container holding a heat source (fire) that in turn heats another container filled with wood pieces. The resulting wood gas is then channeled to the carburetor of an engine and directly used by that engine for fuel to run on. The fuel tank is bypassed, as the wood produces a gas. The engine then turns a flywheel that is hooked up to an alternator, and your power is then produced…that can charge a battery array. There are plans all over the Internet for these gassifiers.

The time to begin undertaking these projects is now, prior to needing them. One other problem has to do with the human element, an element more inhumane than anything else. Local building codes, community and residential codes, inspectors, permits, and the usual “conga line” of loser-bureaucrats coming out to steal your money and prevent you from doing anything…these are sure to materialize. You may have to build everything and not employ it until after a disaster hits. Not to mention “friendly,” nosy, intrusive, vicious, snooping neighbors will swoop in to denounce you or cause you other forms of trouble. I’ve written about these “gems” before in the past: more deadly to deal with after the S hits the fan than the disaster itself.

Those are some basics, and you need to do some research and figure out which one (or ones) can be viable for you. There are plenty of resources out there all over the Internet, as well as in your local library or county extension office. Take some time working with each to come up with the best possible courses of action. Then when the time comes, if you’ve prepared, you’ll be able to sing the song, “I’ve got the power,” although it will be getting kind of hectic. You’ll be able to handle it.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Build An Impressive 1000 Watt Wind Turbine

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How To Build An Impressive 1000 Watt Wind Turbine 1000 watts is great power for any home. This turbine help charge the battery bank that powers our offgrid home. It’s a permanent magnet alternator, generating 3 phase ac, rectified to dc, and fed to a charge controller. The great thing about wind turbines is that these …

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Portable Solar Generator!

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Portable Solar Generator Ray Becker “The Ray Becker Show” Audio player provided! On this episode of The Ray Becker Show we begin with economic news for the week and look at the Markets and other economic indicators. We discuss in detail, Portable Solar Generators. We also cover the basics of electrical PIE. Think about the … Continue reading Portable Solar Generator!

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Build a Hand Crank Generator Out of a Dish Washer Motor

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If the grid goes down, generating power is going to be a top priority. The question is, how can everyday joe living in an urban area generate power without drawing unwanted attention? Gas generators are too loud, and solar panels only work on sunny days. Well, electronicsNmore came up with another option. In this video, […]

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3 Emergency Heat Sources When The Power’s Out

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3 Emergency Heat Sources When The Power’s Out All homes nowadays have to stick to building code to heat houses, they have to all be able to keep a house above or at the comfort zone for living. There are a few problems with that however, most heaters need electricity to run. If you have …

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Fail to Prepare Fail to Live

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destruction_katrina_featured

insurance_policy_prepDoes it make sense to be a prepper?  Should you spend time and money on things that will help you survive a potential disaster that might never happen?  I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about these questions and always manage to circle back to the same answer:  prepping is your auto, life, and house insurance all rolled up into one. Would you drive around without insurance?  You could, but if you get into an accident you’ve got the potential to be paying expensive medical and vehicle bills the rest of your life.  In my opinion it’s hardly worth it.  Even if you’re not the one causing the accident you might still wind up footing the bill if the other person is uninsured.  Life is a crap shoot and you need to stack the odds in your favor as much as you can.

By Jarhead Survivor, a Contributing Author of SurvivalCache and SHTFBlog

ice_storm_98_trees_line_noaa6198Sure, paying insurance premiums sucks.  I hate to see a portion of my hard earned pay check go out the window on payday to pay for something that might never happen, but I do it.  I look at prepping the same way.  You don’t know when a natural disaster or any other kind of disaster is going to happen.  For example:  winter is coming and we might get another ice storm like we did in ’98.  Some people lost power for two weeks during that time and it was really something to see how people reacted to it.  A few years ago we had a storm go through Maine and I lost power for three days.  Not too bad, but then again I have a generator and my house is wired with a transfer switch.   I had running water, cooked on a camp stove, used my grill, had lights, TV for the kids, and refrigeration. Although it was a pain putting gas in the genny every day or so, it would have been far worse without it.

Get Prepared

What I found interesting is that during that time people would say, “Man, you’re lucky you have a generator.”  Hmm, not really.  I show up for work every day, have a side gig writing for a blog, and stay busy doing wilderness survival training for myself.  I don’t consider myself lucky.  I just show up for work every day.

Related: Toughen Up and Take The Pain 

tv_wasting_time“I don’t have time to prep!”  Is something I hear from people who spend hours binge watching The Walking Dead.  If you’ve got time to watch TV, you have time to do some prepping.  I quit watching television back around the time MTV started airing that first “The Real World” series.  I watched two episodes and felt like I’d lost a little piece of my life I’ll never get back. I turned off the cable and never looked back.  After the cable is gone and there’s plenty of time I hear, “But I don’t have the money!”

You don’t need to go out and buy a huge stockpile of food, weapons, and ammunition the first day.  This can be a game of little wins.  Check out this post about how to buy a little more every week to get some extra food in your pantry.  Within a reasonably short amount of time you can have a pretty decent amount of stores in and ready to go in case of emergency.

What about firearms?  My personal opinion is that firearms should be down the list of things you need to start prepping, but I guess that depends on where you live and who you might be expecting for company after TSHTF.  I know this flies in the face of traditional prepper thinking and I’ll probably take some heat for it, but I’d rather have food to eat and keep out of sight then to have a large supply of guns and ammo, but little or no food to feed the family.  A single well thought out firearm should do the trick for most people.

But let’s say you do want a gun and don’t have a bunch of money to throw at it.  Check out this post from Road Warrior about how to spend your hard earned money on surplus firearms.  If you decide to get a gun and take from someone else who’s prepared, that makes you an armchair commando.  It’s also a good way to get yourself killed or branded as someone who needs to be locked away.  Chances are good that the SHTF event – whatever it may be – will not last forever and there will be a day of reckoning for those who went down the wrong side of the law, or moral code, or whatever may be in place at the time.

Ask yourself what’s the downside of having some extra food and water on hand?  If you’re doing it right there shouldn’t be a down side.  You should be eating the oldest part of your rotation and moving the new stuff to the back just like they stock groceries at the super market.  If the lights go out for whatever reason, you’ll have food and water for awhile.  That’s being smart, but you’d be amazed at how many people only have a few days food or less in their pantry at any given time.  A lot of city folk out there like to pick up dinner on the way home so it’ll be fresh.

Taking Care of Number One When The Lights Go Out

generator_prep_liveI don’t think everybody will be a bad actor, but there are definitely a few out there that will act badly during an SHTF event or even a short range crisis.  One of my favorite examples is during ice storms in the Northeast.  There have been reports of people stealing generators while they’re still running and even death threats to line crews if they didn’t get electricity out to someone’s home!

Think about how important electricity is to us.  It’s literally the blood that flows through the nation’s arteries keeping our food fresh, our lights on, helping to heal our sick people, and keeping us warm.  When the power goes out many people band together and help each other out, but there’s always those few who aren’t prepared and will do anything to help themselves.  You need to be prepared for those people as well.

Also Read: Urban Survival

If you can’t afford a full generator, or it doesn’t make sense because of where you live, you might also try a back up solar generator.  It’s small, quiet, relatively inexpensive, and good enough to power lights and small appliances.  It’s also renewable as long as the sun is shining!  What could be better than that?

My first responsibility is to my family.  I have a wife and two young children still living at home and I want to make sure they are safe and as comfortable as possible during any emergency.  I’ve spent some of my hard earned money to ensure that happens and you probably have too.  Part of that planning is protecting your equipment from those who haven’t and feel justified taking what is yours.  My generator is in a small shed and bolted down.  Someone could get it if they really wanted it, but it would mean some time and effort on their part.

Priority List

tent_sheter_rule_of_3Here’s a simple priority list based on the Survival Rule of Three’s.  This is off the top of my head, so if you have anything to add leave a comment at the bottom of this post. The Rule of 3’s looks like this: You can survive 3 minutes without air. You can survive 3 hours without shelter. You can survive 3 days without water. You can survive 3 weeks without food. I translated the rule like this:

Air – People die every year during blackouts because they have their generators in the basement or somewhere not ventilated properly.  Make sure your generator is in a place where it doesn’t build up carbon monoxide.

Shelter – You already have shelter and now it’s a matter of staying warm.  Wood stoves, propane heaters, and kerosene heaters, are all ways you can keep your family warm during those times when the grid is down.  You can also “huddle in place” by getting under some blankets if none of those options work for you.

Water – Have enough water stored in your house for at least three days or have a way to filter or clean it if you have a pond or other water source nearby.

Food – As you can see food is down the list as far as survival needs go; however, try telling that to your four year old when she gets hungry.  Stock up on food so that if something happens you can at least feed them for three days or a week.

Conclusion

Aim to be self-sufficient. To answer the question at the beginning of this article:  yes, it makes sense to be a prepper.  I dislike the show “Doomsday Prepper” because the producers always have them say something like, “I’m preparing for a solar flare,” or some such drivel.  Most preppers I know are preparing for anything.  To say you’re preparing for one specific event is absurd.  Prepare as broad and deep as you can and no matter what happens you’ll be ready when the time comes. Questions?  Comments? Sound off below!

Photos Courtesy of:

Pictures of Money
B Bola
Drew
Insomnix
Matt Davis
Glen B. Stewart 

8 Features To Look For in a Portable Generator

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With a good generator, you can run important appliances in your home like refrigerators, heaters, and air conditioners during power outages. Generator dealers record the most sales when there are massive storms in surrounding regions, which means most people don’t buy generators until they urgently need them. Waiting until the last minute forces you to […]

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Point Zero Energy HomeGrid™ 5000HD Solar Electrical Generator

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I’m a pretty jaded type. I don’t often get excited, but I was all “a-tingle” when I got word of what was heading my way for review.  Most of my reviews are of small items, handheld radios, machetes, hand axes, not 200 lbs. of high-end, high power solar generator.

Needless to say, I was as giddy as a little school girl.

You see, any serious prepping plan needs a foundation based on sustainability. You need to work from a sustainable supply of anything to hold your own, whether it’s a supply of beans, bullets or banjo strings. This applies especially for electricity.
The ultimate goal is to live comfortably “off grid”.  Unless a life of a wilderness mountain man with flint & tinder is your bag, if you want electric lights, air conditioning & internet, you’ll need a powerful electrical generator.

The HomeGrid™ 5000HD Solar Powered Generator.

Just like it’s name, this solar-powered electrical generator is made to supply a entire household with clean, continuous electricity, for totally off-grid living.

Four heavy boxes arrived from Point Zero Energy by ground freight, with two large deep cycle 12V DC batteries, the inverter/generator unit, unit base, cart wheels & handle. Plus two pairs of solar panels, with two 100 watt panel built into sturdy frames with hinged supports & carry handles. Total capacity of the included solar panels came to 400 watts. Also included, was an assortment of parts including a heavy duty battery charge controller, three heavy-gauge jumper cables & connecting cables for the solar panels, along with an illustrated manual & instructional DVD.

Assembly was straight forward… the generator  bolts to the flat metal base with welded axle for the two wheels. At each side of the generator sits the two 12VDC batteries, on top of the generator a heavy duty handle is bolted on. Everything can be pushed around like a hand truck. The two batteries get wired in series to the generator to supply 24 Volts DC. On the front face of the Inverter/Generator are four 110VAC outlets, two USB outlets & One 220VAC outlet. There’s also a power & standby toggle switch and an LED Display that shows battery status & output voltage.

With the large capacity deep cycle dry cells & heavy duty inverter, the Homegrid™ 5000HD is capable of 5000 watts of continuous 110 & 220 AC Power, and a whopping 22,000 watts of peak surge power. Read that again…TWENTY-TWO THOUSAND WATTS Surge power.  Meaning the generator can easily power multiple home appliances simultaneously including refrigerators, freezers, microwave ovens, and cooking appliances. It’s pure sine wave power output will safely run power tools, electronics, and medical equipment.

A “Mac-Daddy Cadillac” Solar Generator, perfect for off-grid living. Two things make it deliver… Massive Dry Cell Batteries with tremendous capacity & a robust DC/AC inverter, built to take tremendous demand. The 220 Volt output, wired to a household circuit breaker system can give household appliances clean dependable electrical power day & night.

For my test, I plugged into my house transfer switch circuit, specifically to isolate my home off the Utility Company power meter, (and avoiding back feeding). There was no noticeable difference to the house load. The TV worked fine, my computers booted up, lights came on through the house, the refrigerator & microwave ran without a hiccup. Even my water well, with it’s 220V AC motor did it’s job. Then I ran some power tools… my chop saw & band saw in the shop, they all cut wood with no telltale difference in performance.
Overall, the power draw on the generator was usually less than 2500 watts, most often less than a thousand watts. It was when the refrigerator compressor came on, or when the well pump kicked on that power surged. Throughout my test, the generator was loafing along, operating well under capacity all day & even all night. One exception though, my house AC unit wasn’t in the transfer circuit. When I wired up my transfer switch, I didn’t include it in the circuit so I couldn’t put it to test. Still, the AC is rated to draw 1500 to 3000 watts when operating, the HomeGrid™ 5000HD has the capacity to handle the load.  Through the night there wasn’t much demand, just the few lights I had on, my computer & TV, and the refrigerator… altogether, no more than 1000 watts. By next morning, the battery status indictor showed less than one quarter depletion, and within the first hours of daylight, the system had regained a full charge by the solar panels.

Using the 400 watt solar panel array, the generator’s batteries can easily be topped off throughout the day letting the system handle the heavy lifting alone only during the night. The generator can also accommodate a second 400 watt array as well.  Typically the deep cycle battery service life offers 7 to 8 years of reliable service.

Granted, my review was a weekend of use test, and in the long term, my energy demands would widely vary from day to day & seasonally. However, with some reasonable budgeting on the amount of power use, the Point Zero Energy HomeGrid™5000HD could give me a totally off grid existence right out of the box. Just by adding additional batteries & solar cells, the well of electrical power I’d have on tap would be far more than my modest needs. The great news is the HomeGrid™ 5000HD is easily expandable & PORTABLE.

My only gripe isn’t really a gripe at all.
I was staggered by the weight the Point Zero Energy HomeGrid™5000HD.  Although designed & built to be portable, you’d be smart to have a couple of stout helpers to pitch in moving the generator & battery unit. By myself, it was a task. The solar panels are not a problem, but you certainly work up a sweat horsing the generator unit & batteries around. Imagine taking a hand truck and deadlifting a small refrigerator up some stairs.  Again, this isn’t really a gripe against the gear, more it’s against my own lack of strength. The weight is actually a good testament of the sheer ruggedness built into the unit. Point Zero Energy isn’t building wimpy gear here, it’s high quality, high capacity & highly reliable power generation equipment. It’s well worth the sizable investment to insure safe, reliable, & dependable electrical energy to live totally off-grid, yet still enjoy modern electrical appliances in your household.  Until Doc Brown & Marty McFly shows up with a Mr. Fusion home reactor, the Point Zero Energy HomeGrid™ 5000HD is anyone’s ticket to an off-grid lifestyle. Now that I’ve experienced life off-grid, I’m striving for more.
Pay a visit to Point Zero Energy’s website to learn more about the complete line of HomeGrid™ Solar Powered Electrical Generators.

The post Point Zero Energy HomeGrid™ 5000HD Solar Electrical Generator appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Do You Really Need That to Survive: A Generator

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Homeowners can often power most household appliances using between 3000 and 6500 watts.

If your home has a small furnace and you are on city water, you can probably get by with a 3000 to the 5000-watt generator. If you have a large furnace and/or a water pump, you will likely need a 5000 to a 6500-watt generator (Honda).

If you plan to power just lights, fans or computers or a small camper then a 1000-2000 watt generator would be ideal. You have to determine your need before purchasing one, but even before that determine if you need or want one at all.

Appliances usually note their power requirements in amps while generators list their output in watts. It’s easy to convert from one to the other, however.

Watts = Volts x Amps

Amps = Watts/Volts

Starting vs. Running Wattage

Certain appliances require extra power to start up, while on the other hand others maintain the same power requirements continually.

To calculate the size generator you need, you will need to determine the load. (A load is defined as the device that you are powering.) There are two kinds.

Resistive Loads 

Resistive loads require the same amount of power to both start and run the equipment. A few examples of resistive loads include:

Reactive Loads 

Reactive loads will have an electric motor, which requires added power to start, in other words, higher watts to start and then reduced wattage to run. You need the higher watts to essentially kick-start the motor. Normally the starting power is 3 times the amount of power needed to run the application. A few examples of reactive loads include:

  • Refrigerators/freezers
  • Furnace fans
  • Well pumps
  • Air conditioners
  • Bench grinders
  • Air compressors
  • Power tools

It will take you putting pencil to paper to determine the size generator needed. Things you need to consider include portability, what happens if you have to leave your home, can you take the generator with you, will it fit in the car and fuel requirements, storage, and transportation of the fuel.

Most home use generators would easily fit in the back of a pickup or some SUV’s, but you would have to make sure you left enough room after packing your other supplies. The smaller generators may fit in the trunk of some cars.

Your larger generators will have 120 and 240-volt receptacles for direct plug in, but you can’t drag your dryer or water pump out to the backyard and plug it in so you do need the proper cords. If you are planning on powering up large appliances and are using a 5000-watt or higher generator then a power transfer system is recommended. It is also recommended that you have a qualified technician install this system.

What the system does is allows you to keep your appliances plugged into their normal receptacles. The transfer system connects to your breaker box. The system is then plugged into your generator when the time comes and power from the generator is routed through your home’s system to power certain appliances. The generator may not run your entire home, but will allow you to operate refrigerators/freezers, lights, radios and possibly your heat/cool system and water pumps. You may not be able to run all appliances/devices at the same time, however.

If you plan to just run cords to certain appliance directly from the generator make sure the cords are rated for the appliance and are rated for generator use.

Do you need a generator, almost anyone could benefit from one. A 1000-watt generator could run lights, emergency radios, and be used to charge up electronic devices such as cell phones, computers, Two-Way radios, and operate small power tools, and so forth.

Even if you live in an apartment building, you could take the generator with you if you can evacuate with a vehicle. Carrying one along with fuel without a vehicle would be out of the question. You could set one up in any outside location, keeping in mind, however; there is the noise factor if you are in stealth mode.

Those that live in a standalone dwelling would benefit from any sized generator. You can run refrigerators, freezers, heat, and cooling systems, water pumps, lights and so on, if you have the properly sized generator.

You, of course, would eventually run out of fuel if the distribution hubs are down, but with some rationing of fuel, you can maintain one for an extended period if you prioritize your needs.

Honda. (n.d.). Retrieved 2016, from http://powerequipment.honda.com/generators/generator-how-much-power

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Propane-Powered Generators: Are They the Best Choice?

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Propane Powered Generators-Recently I was asked the following question by someone who wants to install a 5000-watt generator to run their home in case of a power failure:

What is the best choice for fuel, propane, gasoline or diesel?

This reader is leaning towards getting a propane-powered generator. The choices are confusing, and a guide like this one can help the newcomer to the world of generators make the best choice.

I have been doing some research on the subject and here are some of the advantages and disadvantages of all three fuels for generators: gasoline, diesel, and propane.

Gasoline:
  • Advantages:
    •  Easily obtained
    •  Portable in small containers
  • Disadvantages:
    • Highly flammable
    • Short shelf life of fuel (approximately 12 months)
    • Storing large quantities of fuel is hazardous
    • May not be available during power outages
Diesel:
  • Advantages:
    • Least flammable fuel source
    • Fuel easily obtained (fuel is easier to obtain during a disaster because it is a necessary fuel for the military, trucking industry, and farming operations)
    • On site fuel delivery available
    • Designed for off-road applications and can operate on dyed or farm/construction diesel fuel which is sold without the road tax and thus is considerably cheaper to purchase.
    • Engines designed to work under a load for long periods of time and perform better when worked hard rather than operated under light loads.
    • In high use situations overall long term cost of operation is much lower than gaseous GenSets.
  • Disadvantages:
    • 18-24 month shelf life, without additives
    • Installing large storage tanks raises cost of system
    • May not be available during power outages.
    • Engine noise is higher on a diesel compared to a gaseous engine.
    • Requires clean moisture free fuel and a bit more maintenance than a comparable gaseous unit;

.

Propane:**See propane notes below.
  • Advantages:
    • Long shelf life
    • Clean burning
    • Easily stored in both large tanks or in smaller 5 – 10 gallon cylinders
    • Home delivery available for larger tanks
    • Quieter engine noise level
    • Less expensive units with air-cooled engines are budget priced.
    • Engine life for liquid-cooled 1800 RPM engines can approach 5,000 to 6,000 hours on industrial quality gaseous GenSets
  • Disadvantages:
    • Pressurized cylinder of flammable gas
    • Fuel system is more complicated (increased possibility of failure)
    • Somewhat expensive fuel, check your local prices
    • Propane can become very dangerous if lines are broken.
    • Initial cost of generator is somewhat higher, 15 to 20% especially in sizes larger than 30 kW.
    • More expensive to operate by as much as 3-times the fuel consumption compared to diesels;
    • Smaller air-cooled gaseous engines are less expensive than comparable diesels but have a short life expectancy as low as 500-hours depending on engine make and use

Propane produces 92,000 BTU’s per gallon, gasoline is capable of producing 114,000 BTU’s per gallon, and diesel is capable of producing 129,500 BTU’s per gallon. This means that it will take more propane per hour that either gasoline or diesel to run a generator.

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How much propane will my generator burn per hour?

    • It requires 2 horsepower to produce 1000 watts of energy per hour under load
    • Under load each horsepower consumes 10000 BTU per hour
    • Propane contains 92,000 BTU per gallon
    • Propane weights 4.2 pounds per gallon

Using these factors how long can a 5000-watt generator run on a 500 gallon propane tank at 50 capacity.

    • 10 horse power at 50% would use 5 HP to generate 2500 watts of electricity
    • 5HP X 10,000 BTU would consume 50,000 BTU per hour
    • 500 gallons X 92,000 = 46,000,000 BTU of energy in a full 500 gallon tank
    • 46,000,000 BTU divided by 50,000 BTU = 920
    • A 500-gallon tank that is full would run a 500-watt generator at ½ capacity for 920 hours.

After comparing the various fuels, I would probably go with propane for a large generator in a fixed setting. I would want a minimum of a 1000 gallon tank. For small generators I would go with a tri-fuel generator. Tri-fuel generators burn propane, gasoline and natural gas.

If you choose to purchase a large generator you need to weight the cost versus the benefits. Is running a generator worth the cost? Another consideration is how much fuel you are able to store. Propane tanks store indefinitely, which is another reason the propane generator is a good choice.

Howard

 

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Solar Generators Vs Fuel Generators

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In the past 10 years, many companies have tried to develop a new way of powering our lives. Most of them have placed their bets on solar energy. Sun provides so much energy in one minute that it can power the entire Earth for one year. Learning to harness that energy would bring so many changes, starting with the cost of electricity bills. But are solar generators the future, and can they replace fuel generators? Which one is better and provides more energy? Let us break it down and judge them based on their performances.

“Free energy”

The concept of free energy is pretty simple. Sun is there for a reason, and we might as well utilize some of its energy. There are plenty of reasons one should install solar panels: they will generate so much energy in the upcoming years that you will never have to pay for electricity again. Yes, they can be a bit expensive to start with, but the prices of solar panels are dropping every year and very soon they will be available even for the “common people”.

Solar generators rock!

These little wonders are very simple to use. Just place them somewhere safe, and let their photo-voltaic (PV) panels do all the work. The PV panels will transform the sunlight into electricity and send it to be stored inside the batteries to be used later. Once the batteries are full, the inverter will take direct electricity (DC) and convert it into alternative electricity (AC). If you are up camping in the wild, you can use these and get all the electricity needed for powering your favorite gadgets, charging your phone and even some more complicated devices. On top of all that, they are Eco-friendly and will not release any chemicals or gases. Your home value will skyrocket and if you ever decide to sell it, buyers will offer more only for the solar panels and generators.

Their performance compared to fuel generators

Yes, fuel generators are known to produce electricity a bit faster, but they require much more to start with. They require fuel to power the generators without which they are useless. In case you go out of fuel, you will also be left without electricity. Another downside of fuel generators is that they create a lot of pollution by releasing chemicals in the air. They are portable just like solar generators, but their function depends on having enough fuel to power them.

Preppers choose solar power

Since the technology is developing so fast, preppers can now safely rely solely on solar power. Designs such as goal zero yeti 400 generators have proven to be more than enough to power an entire house in case something “unexpected” happens. There is a chance that one day, something bad may happen to the world. It could be a nuclear strike, a zombie apocalypse or a virus outbreak. If that occurs, electricity will be almost unaffordable and the only remaining source of energy will be the Sun. So we might as well prepare?

Time to go solar

If you haven’t done it by now, do it as fast as you can. It will most likely be the most reliable source of energy in the near future and it will save you a lot of money if you invest now. With solar panels and grids set, you can become completely energy independent. Yes, there will be days when the clouds will cover the sky and you will collect less energy, but the Sun as we know it won’t leave us any time soon.

Verdict: fuel generators are old fashioned. Yes, they also collect and produce energy but free will always be better than the one you have to pay for.

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How To Build A Micro Generator For Around $90

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How To Build A Micro Generator For Around $90 This easy Micro Generator project could come in very useful for camping and if the power goes out. It is small enough that it won’t get in the way and powerful enough to run a household light bulb. If you can salvage or re use some materials …

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Why Every Prepper Should Have Five Gallon Buckets

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5 gallon bucketsPreppers have a habit of extracting as many uses from any given object as they can, and for good reason. Prepping is an activity that takes up a lot of space, and it’s done to prepare for emergencies that may or may not happen. It’s difficult to justify this activity if it displaces things that you know you’ll need, so preserving space by finding more than one use for your belongings is essential.

Also, it just comes naturally to preppers due to our mindset. We regularly prepare for chaotic and desperate situations that require improvisation and creativity to survive. Coming up with multiple uses for an item is child’s play for us.

However, some things are better suited to being modified for multiple purposes. Everyone knows that duct tape and paracord can be used for countless applications, but there’s another item that has nearly as many uses, and that is the humble five gallon bucket. Here are just a few of the ways you can use this simple product:

  1. Use them for carrying water, washing clothes, or harvesting rain water.
  2. Food grade buckets are also quite versatile. You can use them to store dry goods such as rice, beans, flour, or even dog food. Or since plastic is a fairly good insulator, you can use them as a cooler to store perishable food.
  3. If you own anything that needs to be buried for short periods of time, five gallon buckets can help.
  4. You can use them to build gardens, worm composting bins, or composting toilets.
  5. They’re great for storing any supplies that shouldn’t get wet, such as charcoal, paper towels, or kindling.
  6. With a few modifications, these buckets can be made into biosand filters for cleaning water, or you can drill holes in a bucket to make an improvised camp shower. If you’re exceptionally handy and live near running water, you can even build a hydroelectric generator out of a five gallon bucket.
  7. And of course there are a few odd tasks for five gallon buckets that most people would never consider. They can be turned into very effective mouse traps, and with the right gear they can even be used as backpacks

And to be frank, this is just a short list. Five gallon buckets are arguably one of the most versatile tools for a prepper, and their applications are endless. They’re also cheap and plentiful, and you can often get them for free from friends, neighbors, and local businesses. I’d be so bold as to say that you’re not really prepared unless you have a short stack of these buckets somewhere in your home.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Build A Bicycle Generator

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How To Build A Bicycle Generator Having a manual method of producing power is a great backup in case there is no wind or sun to charge your off the grid batteries in an emergency situation! Building your own generator requires a number of items. A person, a bike, a way of supporting your bike …

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How To Make A 5 Gallon Bucket Hydroelectric Generator

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How To Make A 5 Gallon Bucket Hydroelectric Generator This 5 Gallon Bucket Hydroelectric Generator could literally change the way you harvest FREE power! This is by far the most innovative modification I’ve found for a five gallon bucket. Sam Redfield developed this design to provide a source of electricity that can be built cheap and hooked …

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How to Prepare Your Family for a Widespread Electrical Outage

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When the grid goes down, everyone in the neighborhood and across town could be without electricity for a long time. Electrical outages can occur for a variety of reasons and can strike when you least expect it. For this reason, you and your family should be prepared to weather a long-term electrical outage. In order to achieve this goal smoothly and efficiently, it will be necessary to prepare ahead of time for just such an emergency. Here are some steps you should take sooner than later.

When the Lights Go out

There is nothing more frustrating than being in the middle of an electrical outage in the dead of night. Without lights to guide your way, you could be stuck in the darkness for hours. To avoid this outcome, a few accessories to keep on hand are: candles, flashlights, batteries, matches and battery-operated lamps. Having more than a single light source to rely on is always a smart idea.

Keeping Warm

Since power outages will often occur during the cold winter months, it is important to consider how you will keep your family warm. Where a regular wood burning stove may suffice in most situations, more heat will be generated through the use of a rocket stove. Engineered to burn hotter and cleaner than traditional wood burning stoves, a rocket stove will work best in some of the coldest of winter situations.

Making certain you have enough clothes, which can be easily layered, will also improve your family’s ability to remain warm as well. Using draft snakes to prevent cold air from entering your home and keeping heat from escaping will cause the inside heat to linger for much longer.

Using a Portable Generator

When you need electricity, even during an outage, a portable generator will prove to be an invaluable asset. A generator will ensure that your freezer, refrigerator and other essential electrical devices can be powered throughout an emergency. Lowry Services: Electric, Plumbing, Heating & Cooling in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, recommends a portable generator rated at 6000 watts, 30 amps, 220 volts, 4 wire or larger portable generator to help sustain your electrical needs during an outage.

Food and Water

According to The Organic Prepper, having access to clean water and easily prepared food options are essential during a lengthy power outage. Food that does not have to be cooked is preferable to use, since the power will be out anyway, unless you have a solar stove or other non-electrical heat source for cooking.

Keeping a couple weeks of bottled water on hand will make it possible to manage for a couple of weeks without electricity also. When a storm is about to hit, filling the bath tub with water provides you with even more emergency water for washing items or flushing toilets in case a power outage occurs.

While a widespread electricity outage can be a major inconvenience, it is inevitable that they will occur from time to time. Teaching your family how to prepare for such an emergency will ensure their safety as well as their comfort. Just be sure to have some creative entertainment options in mind for when a power outage strikes.

About the author: A recent college graduate from University of San Francisco, Anica loves dogs, the ocean, and anything outdoor-related. She was raised in a big family, so she’s used to putting things to a vote. Also, cartwheels are her specialty. You can connect with Anica here.

How To Build A DIY 1000 Watt Wind Turbine

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How To Build A DIY 1000 Watt Wind Turbine 1000 watts is great power for any home. This turbine help charge the battery bank that powers our offgrid home. It’s a permanent magnet alternator, generating 3 phase ac, rectified to dc, and fed to a charge controller. The great thing about wind turbines is that these …

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Build A DIY $40 Generator From A Lawnmower

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Build A DIY $40 Generator From A Lawnmower Have an old lawnmower collecting cobwebs? Don’t throw it away upcycle it into a cheap very powerful generator for your home. This generator can power TV’s, freezers and your Internet! This whole project will only set you back about $40 in parts and if you don’t have …

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Adjusting the Propane to Air Ratio after the Propane Conversion

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As the instructions from propanecarbs.com suggested, the actual conversion kit install took very little time, what took up my time was adjusting the propane to air ratio after the propane conversion so that the engine ran smoothly and started easily. This is important because the air/fuel ration is much more critical when burning propane, it burns leaner than gasoline, because it has less BTU’s by mass so it is easy to adjust the fuel so that their is not enough fuel to burn, it is also temperamental in that it ignites at a higher temperature so it easily becomes too

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How To Make Your Own Hydro Power

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How To Make Your Own Hydro Power Power by the movement of water is genius, if you have a huge river or stream you could generate a literal off the grid system, but what if you live with a small creek or a slow flowing body of water… over at otherpower.com they have a DIY …

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Converting a Generator to Electric Start

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I’ve thought about converting a generator to electric start for years now.  Actually, some years ago I bought a generator off of craigslist and decided that pull starting a temperamental 10 hp engine was not something I wanted to do, nor COULD my wife do it. Since most of the times a generator would come in handy (ice storms) I would be out of town for work, having an easy way to start the generator became a priority. When I bought the thing I did get a new flywheel installed so the engine would have the teeth needed to accept

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DIY Chispito Wind Generator – (Step by Step Plans)

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DIY Chispito Wind Generator – (Step by Step Plans) This wind turbine is not only extremely easy to build, it’s very powerful too. Get the FREE step by step plans today and get off the grid sooner than you may have thought! If you are looking to build your own wind generator, I’m glad you waited and …

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DIY Portable 12 Volt 17 Watt Wind Generator with Automatic Furling

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DIY Portable 12 Volt 17 Watt Wind Generator with Automatic Furling Solar is all well and good if you have sun! Wind is all well and good if you have wind! NOW, this project is taking alternative energy to the next step making a 12v system that is portable. They should come up with a …

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Honda EU2000 Winter Mountain Start

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Recently I was up in the mountains. Above 4,000 feet with lots of snow all around. We needed to use a generator unexpectedly. Of course as all those things work it was about 9 at night. The temperature was about 20 degrees.

I went outside with the guy. He pointed at the shed the generator was in and it was mostly buried in snow. We had to dig out about 2 feet of snow to get to the generator. Not a good start. Thankfully when we got the generator out I found it was a Honda, specifically an EU2000.

He set the appropriate nobs and such then gave it a couple pulls. It wasn’t starting and I saw the problem. He was pulling the cord strait. On those little Honda’s you  have to pull the cord at about a 45 degree angle. I asked if I could try. After confirming the settings were right I pulled it 2 or 3 times and it started. That generator had been sitting without any use since ‘summer’. It started right up and ran until we turned it off.

Out of curiosity I asked about the gas in it. He said that it was non ethanol gas and might have a preservative in it but he couldn’t remember.

For those in the market for a small generator I would suggest that you consider the Honda EU2000. While there are certainly cheaper generators out there those little Honda’s are pretty awesome generators. If you can afford it I would highly recommend the Honda EU series, specifically the EU2000.

Run your Dryer on Free Energy – Easy $$ Savings

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Run your Dryer on Free Energy – Easy $$ Savings This has to be one of the coolest DIY projects I have seen in a while. Who doesn’t like FREE energy. After reading this instuctable article, I need to do this to my dryer and make use of the solar heater I made a few years …

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