13 Essential Items For Your Get Home Bag

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Let’s begin today’s article with a simple question: How much time do you spend at home compared to the time you spend at work, running errands, driving, in school, visiting friends, and so forth? Now let’s suppose something bad happens while you’re away from home, something like a random car accident that leaves you stranded […]

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How much ammo in your bug out bag?

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I have always believed that when it comes to bugging out, (click the link to learn about when it’s time to bug out) speed is your friend. I have written articles in the past stressing the need to keep your Bug out bag/Get home bag, light weight. The faster you get to your destination, the […]

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The Best Way Home: SHTF Route Planning

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Written by Pat Henry on The Prepper Journal.

Imagine it’s 1:15 on a Thursday afternoon. You and some friends at work have recently returned from lunch and you are settling back into work. As you are going about your daily responsibilities, the Emergency Broadcast System starts to blare over a coworker’s radio. Normally you would ignore this, but you also get an Emergency alert message on your smart phone. Funny, you could swear you had disabled those, but is says that there has been a terrorist attack in Los Angeles and urges calm and promises more information soon. You start walking out of your office towards the break-room and notice everyone crowded around the TV when the power goes out. Looking down, you notice your phone isn’t working either.

Making for the nearest window, you notice that vehicles on the road have stopped, seemingly right in their tracks. Could this be an EMP? Not wanting to overreact, you take the stairs and walk out to the parking lot. You try your key fob but that doesn’t work either so you use your key. A quick check of the ignition and you realize your car isn’t going anywhere either. Slowly your co-workers validate the same with their cars and you start looking at the possibility that you will could have to walk back home. Unfortunately for you, you work 72 miles away from home.

It’s one of the more common problems us preppers try to figure out. What is the best way home as quickly and safely as possible when SHTF and you are far away? I had a reader ask me the following question:

My husband works 75 miles from home. My greatest fear is that disaster or SHTF will happen while he is at work. I would like to start planning for how he might get home, but don’t know how to begin figuring out what is the best route. Most posts (here and elsewhere) on the subject are about get home bags and what equipment to have with you, but not so much about planning the actual route, other than to stay off major highways. Would like to hear the pros and cons of sticking to roadways, crossing private property, what type of maps to consult, etc. – Zendelle

I always appreciate questions from our readers and I will try to give my thoughts about this subject as I have considered this myself. So without any further ado…

What is the best way home during a SHTF event?

There are so many factors that come into play when you are talking about a situation like this. How far away are you? What is the weather like? What region will you be traveling through? Are you in an urban environment or rural? What type of shape are you in? Do you have other people, like children you have to consider? Are your two youngest in school or daycare? What type of clothing and footwear are you wearing? What time of day are you starting out?

Each person is unique and our situations are also unique so there are no firm and set rules for anything but I have given this some thought. At one point in my life I commuted 90 minutes each way to work. It was 77 miles’ door to door and getting home in that type of scenario I mentioned above would be no picnic for anyone. To be really prepared, you have to imagine walking home in the heat of summer or the bitter cold of winter.

For this hypothetical, we will assume that there really has been some type of national catastrophe. Maybe an EMP attack from a rogue nation or terrorist cell has disrupted all modern electrical appliances. Virtually everything electric has shut down and you have precious little time, a couple of days tops to make it back home to your family before the chaos really starts.

To be really prepared, you have to imagine walking home in the heat of summer or the bitter cold of winter.

Before you take the first step: What gear do you need to consider?

I know our reader mentioned that most people only talk about Get Home Bags when this topic comes up but it is worth spending a few sentences here on how best to equip yourself before this even happens.

  • Get Home Bag – Having a get home bag in your car will be an important step in the right direction so to speak. I won’t get into what you should pack in your get home bag, but we do cover all of that in several articles on the subject. You can read our post about putting together your Get Home Bag.
  • Proper Footwear – Flip flops belong at the pool people! My children are guilty of this too, but if you are forced to walk home, what are you going to wish you had on your feet? Sturdy footwear like hiking boots or at least good athletic shoes should be one consideration.
  • Dress for the elements – Dress like you will be spending all day outside not sitting in a cubicle. Regardless of the season, have appropriate clothing on that will protect you from the elements, especially if you are going to be further than an hour’s walking time from home.
  • Food/Water/Shelter – You should have at a minimum, a container that will hold water, a way to filter water, some form of emergency shelter and food. You don’t need a four course meal to survive, but something to keep your energy up. Think power bars or protein bars. Survival rations work too and won’t go bad in the car.
  • Protection – Do you have some protection from two-legged animals? I always have a personal firearm, but Tasers and bear spray are options too that are better than nothing.
  • Maps – And the knowledge of how to read them. These can be simple street maps, you don’t have to have topo maps of the entire region. You can grab the road atlas out of your car before you head out.

Planning your route and alternate route home.

For the commuter who drives to work, I would imagine that each of you have already mapped out the most efficient route to your place of business that you use virtually every single day. We get into a routine because we found a way that works. It’s usually the most direct, fastest way to get where you need to go. I even go into autopilot some days on the weekend and start driving my work route even when I am not going that direction. These habits can be a good thing in one respect.

London Map

each of you have already mapped out the most efficient route to your place of business that you use virtually every single day

Commuters who use trains or buses follow a similar route. The trains go into central spokes normally that would mimic a commute via car. None of us should really worry about the normal route we take back home as long as we know the roads we would take if public or personal transportation was down. With few exceptions, the highway system is going to be the quickest way we can get back to our home city. Highways level out hills and go around natural obstacles. However, what if the route you normally follow has been blocked? What if you travel through less savory parts of town that you wouldn’t normally want to be walking down the street?

Identify your primary, secondary and tertiary routes home – In my case, working 77 miles from home, I was likely looking at 2 to 3 days of hiking to make it back assuming I did not encounter anything that made me need to alter my course. Most of my commute was interstate highway so I would have simply followed that route. However, if that didn’t work out, I could cut back on a smaller highway that would have taken me on a much more rural track to the South back home.

Depending on how people were reacting you could run into rioting or looting in some areas. I would have been walking on the highway through several major population centers that might be best avoided. I don’t think I would ever cut across someone’s property unless there were strong benefits and low risks that I perceived from doing so. Going cross-country, without the benefit of a road can slow you down and may even bring on injury more quickly as you could have to navigate natural obstacles like streams, dense underbrush, rocks, etc. The last thing you want to do is injure your self and make walking more difficult or even impossible while you try to shave 20 minutes off your trip.

Having more than one route back home can help you avoid dangerous areas.

Having more than one route back home can help you avoid dangerous areas.

Rather than having a specific route I am taking, I would consult the maps I store in my car to decide which ways I would alternate if needed. I would go to the south of the major urban areas if I sensed any danger but I would still be staying on paved roads that were common thoroughfares.

Pros and Cons of various routes

In the example above, does your normal route take you through urban areas you would rather avoid? Has the disaster already started to make people act irrationally? I think that most of us even in the scenario I described above will be able to count on average people thinking that nothing is wrong. The power will come back on because it always does. Food will still be available and there will still be items on store shelves. You should be home way ahead of any actual panic, but sometimes it’s better to be safe than sorry with your route. I don’t think anyone would be barricading streets the first or even third day after the lights go out.

Are you carrying three days’ worth of water on your or are their sources you can tap into along the way. Assuming you have cash on hand you will likely be able to purchase it from stores who are likely still in operation as the Normalcy bias takes over for most.

What factors do the weather play?

Adverse weather could seriously impede your progress. Walking in snow or ice or even extreme heat would sap your energy and could cause injuries. You first have to plan for those extremes if they are common to your area.

If you are facing a walk home and you live in the deserts of the Southwest, you could be forced to walk only at night when the temperatures are cooler and find shade to rest during the day. You understand the weather factors that could influence a trip like this so you have to plan accordingly.

For most of us, walking home is not incredibly difficult with a decent fitness level and some simple preparation. We may never be forced to use our get home bags, but it makes sense to prepare now like we do. You will be more able to react quickly and make the right decisions if you do.

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The post The Best Way Home: SHTF Route Planning appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

10 C’s Of Survival How To Build The Best Kits Episode 112

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10 C's Of Survival

10 C’s Of Survival

 

http://www.survivalpunk.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/10csofsurvivalepisode112.mp3

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10 C’s Of Survival How To Build The Best Kits

The main topic this week is 10 C’s Of Survival How To Build The Best Kits. I came across Dave Canterburys system years ago. Besides some of the stretched names to follow the C pattern I love it. The 10 C’s Of survival streamlines the kit building process. Taking much of the guesswork out of building a kit. It will work for all kits from a mini kit to a Bug out Bag.

You know you need to hit the first five then move on. If your kit does not have these 10 Items then you need them before moving on. You should include more than the 10’s of Survival in your kit but you could survive with just them.

We dig into each of the 10 C’s and give examples of each. What has worked for us in our kits and what has not.

Mike and I  go on to discuss where we diverge from Dave and the 10 C’s of survival. Dave is not big on first aid. He feels that duck tape should work till you make it to medical care. Mike and I both carry well stocked first aid kits. I don’t recommend everyone running out and getting suture kits. Having plenty of gauze and pads to stop bleeding is critical.

 

 

Ten C’s Of Survival

  1. Cutting
  2. Combustion (A way to make fire)
  3. Cover (Shelter)
  4. Container
  5. Cordage
  6. Candle (A source of Light)
  7. Cotton (Bandana usually)
  8. Compass
  9. Cargo Tape
  10. Canvas Needle

 

Topics

7:15 First News Story. Anti Clinton Activist are dropping.

20:36 FDA Approves GMO Mosquitos for release in Florida.

28:22 10 C’s Of Survival How To Build The Best Kits.

 

Links

Dave Canterburys 10 C’s of survival

Fox Outfitters MicroSoft Towel

Buying and Cooking Grassfed Beef

GMO Mosquitos

Two prominent anti clinton activists found dead

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The post 10 C’s Of Survival How To Build The Best Kits Episode 112 appeared first on Survival Punk.

How to start prepping in 5 easy steps

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I receive emails quite often from people who are new to prepping. A few says they have thought about it for a while, but haven’t really got started. I’m sure it can feel like a daunting and overwhelming process to the beginner. But it does not have to be. Being prepared is really not hard if […]

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Get Home Scenario

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

You have to have a flexible plan. Be prepared to change and adjust it according to the situation. Your kit levels aid you in maintaining the flexibility and ability to adjust and resupply on the go.

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How Will You Get Home Post-Collapse?

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Have you noticed a trend in the prepping community? It’s not new, yet it could mean the end of many folks who might not make it in the coming collapse. I’m talking, of course, about the tendency to buy tools and gear and ignore survival skills and think about disaster scenarios. Today I want to […]

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Ultimate BOB

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How to build YOUR Ultimate Bug out Bag aka “The BOB ”
DJ Cooper “Surviving Dystopia

BOB Tactical-BackpackMost of us are aware of what the BOB or Bug out Bag is and some of us are aware of what we need to put into this bag but most of us follow any one or combination of lists out there to help us decided on what to put in a bob.

2-3-16 mini_01BUT….The bug out bag is personal carrying all the things YOU need to survive should you be forced to leave the security of your homestead. Because it is personal I wish to talk about how to determine what is best for YOU and YOUR needs in this bag.

All of the different recommendations for bob bags and gear should be personal for you or your family’s needs.  These can range from medical conditions to the ages of children or simply personal preferences.

A few things that are pretty standard needs are:

  • 2-3-16 20160128_150153Water (Some way to carry or make it pure)
  • Fire (A means to heat and cook)
  • Food (you gonna open a package or hunt it?)
  • Clothing (This varies by the climate and the season)
  • Shelter (again are you going to build it or open it?)
  • First Aid (so many fail to give this segment the importance it mandates)
  • Tools (you at least need a knife, right?)
  • Self Defense (this could be a matter of life and death)
  • Misc (this may be your largest category)

Other considerations…

  • Weight (who is carrying this pack?)
  • Shelf Life of items (how often do you update it?)
  • The Pack itself (rigid or soft?)
    • One large bag or multiple smaller ones

2-3-16 ed05a6957ce7b10db5e8fbdde4231e9aThese are but a few considerations when deciding on what you choose to do but also there is the EDC (Ladies won’t want to miss this part!), 72 hour, Get Home bag, Auto kit, Med kit and others.

This week I would like to explore the different recommendations as well as considerations you should take into account when building your very own BOB.  How to keep it organized and ways to categorize and keep track of your items.
Look for more on this as well as a few lists on my blog www.survivingdystopia.com
Up next week: HEAT… It is still winter and cold happens.  Join me to discuss some of the different ways to just stay warm.

Join us for Surviving Dystopia “LIVE SHOW” every Wednesday 9:00/Et 8:00Ct 6:00/Pt Go To Listen and Chat

Listen to this broadcast or download “Ultimate  BOB” in player below!

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Ultramarathoning Tips for Non Running Preppers

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editor’s Note: This post is another entry in the Prepper Writing Contest from Huples. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today.   Around six years ago I stopped running (got suddenly sick of it) […]

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Creating an At-Work Emergency Bag

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editor’s Note: This post is another entry in the Prepper Writing Contest from Mike Turner. Be ready for your workday. Like many other preppers all over the world I find myself in daily situations where I feel less than fully prepared. While you can never be ready for everything, and yes this includes when you […]

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Ultralight Get Home Bag List

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

4.67/5 (3) Editor’s Note: This post is another entry in the Prepper Writing Contest from John Ferry. Each of us has responsibilities and they all come in different sizes. In times of crisis or emergency, many of us won’t be at home. We will be working or traveling away so the Get Home Bag concept […]

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7 Items You Should Carry Every Day

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As the Boy Scout motto goes, “Always be prepared.” It’d be nice if you could always have your bug out bag with you, but that’s simply not realistic. You can keep it in your car, but occasionally you’re going to go somewhere on foot and have nothing on […]

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Ultimate Guide To Cheap Knives: 38 Quality Folders For Under $40

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First, let us define “cheap” “Cheap” gear is always a popular topic for discussion and I’m always looking for budget gear options to test and review.  Now I put emphasis on cheap, because it…

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Prepper Problem Solving – Creating a Bug Out Bike and Trailer Rig

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editor’s Note: This post is another entry in the Prepper Writing Contest from David Paul Smith.   Prepping is an attitude of being prepared. Very few athletes would consider showing up to a major sporting event without training and preparing for it. Few students would show up to take a test without doing any preparations […]

The post Prepper Problem Solving – Creating a Bug Out Bike and Trailer Rig appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Cheap Handguns: 25 Quality Semi-Autos under $400

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The recent terror attacks, as well as the general insanity that consumes this great nation, has left a staggering impact on our citizens…we’re scared.  Gun sales have soared (recent article) and people everywhere are…

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The 13 Best Deals This Week on Budget Survival Gear

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Hello everyone and welcome to another edition of “The Best Survival Gear Deals Of The Week”!  Here are 13 awesome deals on budget survival gear that could be just what you’re looking for.  In case you missed the first edition, you can check it out here:  Let’s get started! LifeStraw Personal Water Filter – $19.95   … Continue reading The 13 Best Deals This Week on Budget Survival Gear

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How To Build The Ultimate Budget Get Home Bag

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A GHB (Get Home Bag) is an important thing to invest in if you commute on a regular basis.  It’s basically a stripped down Bug Out Bag, only containing the items you need to get your ass to the house. You don’t need an AR with 500 rounds and a 4 man tent in this … Continue reading How To Build The Ultimate Budget Get Home Bag

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11 Best Survival Gear Deals of the Week

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With the holiday season coming up, things usually get pretty hectic.  Maybe you have to spend more time at work, you’re planning family dinners or events, or you’re buying gifts for everyone but yourself.  I thought I would put together a little survival gear “deals of the week” series.  I’ll highlight the best deals I … Continue reading 11 Best Survival Gear Deals of the Week

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Winter Survival Finale – 17 Ideas for your Get Home Bag

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Hey guys, in Part 5, we’re going to wrap up the Winter Survival series.  If you missed any of the previous posts, here are the links to them: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4.  In this post, I’m going to go over a complete list of items we’ll be using to build a BASIC Get Home … Continue reading Winter Survival Finale – 17 Ideas for your Get Home Bag

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Winter Survival Part 4 – “Survival Vehicle” Prep

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I hope everyone is enjoying the Winter Survival series!  If you need to catch up, here are the links for Part 1,  Part 2, and Part 3.  In Part 4, I talk about preparing your vehicle for the winter weather ahead. You don’t have to be extreme and build a “hardcore SHTF survival vehicle”, but if you … Continue reading Winter Survival Part 4 – “Survival Vehicle” Prep

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Winter Survival Part 3 – Food Storage and Water Treatment

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Ok everyone, I hope you’ve enjoyed the series so far.  In part 3 we’re going to discuss food and water storage.  As I mention in the article, I’m writing a food storage article right now that’s going to be huge.  But for now, this is some basic stuff for anyone to consider…nothing over the top. … Continue reading Winter Survival Part 3 – Food Storage and Water Treatment

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Building a Get Home Bag on a Budget, the Thrifty (Aka Cheap) Way

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

3.91/5 (11) Editor’s Note: This post is another entry in the Prepper Writing Contest from PAD Commander and in it he discusses how he built his Get Home Bag, rather creatively from a lot of underutilized resources. If you are trying to build your own get home bag, check out some of the ideas below […]

The post Building a Get Home Bag on a Budget, the Thrifty (Aka Cheap) Way appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Winter Survival Part 2 – Emergency Shelter

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Hey guys, I hope you enjoyed the first part of the winter survival series.  In part 2, we’re going to cover some emergency shelter options for you to fall back on, just in case you find yourself stuck in the elements.  I’d like to thank you for coming by and if you have any comments … Continue reading Winter Survival Part 2 – Emergency Shelter

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Winter Weather Survival – Part 1 – Home Prep

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Preparing for the 2015-16 Winter Season Depending on your geographical location…preparing for possible winter weather emergencies should be standard practice.  Early predictions from weather experts call for above average snowfall for nearly half of the country for the 2015-16 winter season. Click on the image below for a link to the Farmer’s Almanac discussing particular … Continue reading Winter Weather Survival – Part 1 – Home Prep

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Get Home Bag Essentials

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You are at work and you are trying to beat the clock, is just one of those days when nothing seems out of the ordinary. Suddenly you hear sirens in the distance and the power goes out, you try to use the cellphone but the line is busy, it’s not use. You know that a … Read more…

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Testing Your Get Home Bag

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testing your get home bagYou built your get home bag. You hand selected each item. Now you need to put the same thought and care into testing your get home bag!

Testing Your Get Home Bag

So you worked on your survival bags for the past 6 months. You hand-picked the items to get the best ones for the best price. Heck, you even assembled your own first aid kit….

But have you actually tested your survival bags? Did you simulate an emergency and try to get home in record time? If you’re not doing this now, in a survival situation, you’re gonna wake up with a slew of problems you never really thought to. This is why drills are good: they uncover holes in your prepping plans you wouldn’t otherwise see.

Let’s see how you should test your get home bag and, with it, a few get home scenarios. You need to know how you’ll be getting home in case of an emergency. If you have a car that you use every day, that’s probably where you keep your GHB (short for Get Home Bag). On the other hand, if you’re using a bike, public transportation, taxis or even go on foot, then you need to do things differently.

In short, you have to test getting home in record time but there’re a few things to consider.

For example, you’re gonna need to think about getting speeding tickets or even causing an accident. While you’re buy simulating a disaster in your own head, the rest of the world won’t see that, particularly the police officers who won’t hesitate to stop you.

On the other hand, if you’re using a bike or if you’re on foot, you can rush it. People will just assume you’ve got an emergency and will even step aside to let you pass.

So how would you go about testing your GHB? The first thing you need is time. If you’re at work, you need to make sure you have time to get home and then come back from your lunch break. Doing it during the break is better because it puts extra pressure on you to get back but you can also do this in the evening, when you finish work.

One thing you need to do in advance is measure how long it typically takes you to get home, so you see how much faster you’ll be in case of an emergency. It’s always good to have a benchmark so you can break your record in subsequent drills.

Yes, doing this drill more than once is recommended. You’re gonna need to simulate taking a different route and even more complex scenarios such as getting into a car crash or running into an angry mob that stops your car and surrounds it. No, you don’t have to stop your car in the middle of the road or use pepper spray but stopping the car on the side of the road and seeing how fast you can reach your self-defense weapon is will work.

Ok, we talked about testing the self-defense items in your bag. You learned that if the bag is in your trunk, you can’t really get to them unless you get out of the car. How do you actually test the other items?

It’s easy. You just have to imagine running into various obstacles along the way and having to use the items in your bag to overcome them. For example. If you see a vending machine on the side of the road, quickly stop the car, then use the cash from your bag (not your wallet) to get some water and energy bars.

Another thing you can do is call your friends and family along the way; this will help you practice your distributive attention. I should mention you shouldn’t use the phone while driving unless you have hands free. You also don’t necessarily have to talk with them about survival as you don’t want people on the bus (if that’s what you’re taking) to panic or think you’re crazy.

Last but not least, let’s not forget that if your GHB might is too heavy or if you haven’t done a push-up since high-school, you’re either gonna need to carry less stuff or improve your fitness levels. The last thing you want is to stop every couple of minutes to catch your breath.

Final Word

If you liked what you read, that’s great. If you actually went ahead and did it, that’s amazing. Once you start taking action, you realize some of these survival drills aren’t that hard at all!

And if you’re wondering how to assemble a get home bag, there’re plenty of resources out there. You just need to keep the whole thing light (unless you keep it inside your car) and to always have quality items inside.

A guest post from our friend, Dan Sullivan – www.SurvivalSullivan.com

The post Testing Your Get Home Bag appeared first on Geek Prepper.

Creating Emergency Preparedness Kits

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Several of the most frequently asked questions in emergency preparedness have to do with kits: “Check out my kit–What am I missing?” for example, or “Help! My bugout bag is too heavy!” When I put together emergency preparedness kits, I go through three mental checklists. These checklists are flexible enough that they are useful whether I am building an EDC, an Altoids tin kit, a Nalgene bottle kit, a get-home bag, a bugout bag, or a 72-hour kit. All I need to do is adapt the requirements for the space and weight constraints I’m facing.

pskThe Rule of Threes

One can survive for:

For air, I might consider such items as a gas mask, an N95-rated particulate respirator mask, and first-aid treatments for bleeding. For shelter, I think in terms of starting a fire, keeping warm, keeping dry, and replacing electrolytes. For water I consider what containers I might want and how to disinfect and filter water for drinking. Because food is something I can go without for weeks, I not only pack food as space permits, but I also think about getting food–purchasing (so cash), fishing, or hunting, etc.–and also I think about what happens when eliminating bodily waste at this point.

Second, I run through David Canterbury’s 10 C’s of Survival.

David Canterbury’s 10 C’s of Survival

The 5 “must have’s:”

  1. Cutting tool (knives, saws, razors, etc.)
  2. Combustion (ignition, tinder, fuel)
  3. Cover (tents, raincoats, ponchos, blankets, garbage bags, survival blankets)
  4. Container (canisters, bladders, pouches, etc. for water and cooking)
  5. Cordage (rope, 550 paracord, thread)

The 5 “should have’s:”

  1. Candle (illumination)
  2. Cotton
  3. Compass (compass, maps, GPS)
  4. Cargo tape (duct tape)
  5. Canvass Needle (AKA sail needle)

I like to add another 5 “nice to have’s:”

  1. Conflict (firearms, pepper spray, batons, etc.)
  2. Communication (radio, whistle, marking tape, Sharpie pen, paper, signal mirror, etc.)
  3. Constitution (first aid, medicine, wellness)
  4. Connectors (sewing kit, superglue, safety pins)
  5. Cells (batteries, solar power)

Third, I make sure I can document what Shane Steinkamp calls my IESSEP. This can be documented on paper or some sort of flash memory.

IESSEP

  • Identity
  • Education
  • Skill Set
  • Earning Potential

I travel quite a bit, and having an electronic copy of my passport, drivers license, birth certificate, etc. could come in handy if the original documents are stolen or not available. In the case that I can’t go home again, it makes great economic sense to be able to document my degrees, certifications, skills, etc. and to be able to produce a résumé. I generally include a collection of precious family photos on any flash drive as well.

In terms of quality, I find myself going two ways. On the one hand, many of my kits are only meant to get me through a few days or so. Combine that with the fact that like many preppers I have many kits (OK, maybe I have too many kits), and it’s no wonder the gear in my kits is not necessarily top quality; it doesn’t have to last me for the rest of my life, just for those few days. On the other hand, if I am going to be trusting my life to the gear in my kits, I want the quality to be high enough that I can rely on it if needed.

What am I missing?

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Turning the Tables on an Active Shooter

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I don’t need to list the most recent attacks on unarmed civilians that have taken place in the past year or even past month to get my point across. Violent attacks are clearly on the rise with attackers ranging from pissed off former employees to religious fanatics and everything in-between.



You need to come to terms with the fact that you can never be prepared enough to prevent an attack from happening. You will not be able to grab your battle rifle, plate carrier, and call the police prior to getting attacked unless you are in your home, awake, and near your gear.

 

It is more likely you will be vulnerable and wearing what you are wearing now in a crowded public place or alone in unfamiliar territory. Hopefully you have a pistol and or knife on you to give you an edge on your would be attacker/attackers. If it all possible dialing 911 should always be your first action when you get the feeling your life is in danger.


If you are in a situation where your life is in danger and you can dial 911 without sacrificing safety:

·         Dial 911

·         Put your phone to speaker

·         Put the phone in your pocket so you have use of both hands

·         Describe your surroundings to the dispatcher in great detail

·         Seek cover or a safe zone

·         Prepare to defend yourself until help arrives

Leave the square ranges for BZO
A great way to prepare yourself is to break away from relying on square ranges and bulls-eye targets as a sufficient means to becoming an effective defensive shooter. Square ranges are meant for zeroing firearms and marksmanship training, not drawing from your holster and moving to cover in order to land some well-placed shots on target. If you don’t have access to a range or facility that allows dynamic training or scenario training try some of these simple drills in the comfort of your own home. Make a room clear of all ammo and never bring ammo or loaded guns in there, practice drawing and reloading your cleared gun or blue gun for a few minutes a day so you become comfortable drawing and acquiring a target after seeking cover.


 

Dry firing is great practice but it’s just that, so once you feel you have mastered drawing your pistol, clearing malfunctions, reloading, etc. Seek out courses and training that is geared towards active shooters and concealed carry scenarios. Do your research and make sure the course is run by a professional that has a verifiable background in firearms training and is insured. This day and age there are folks who grow a beard, buy some gear and call themselves a firearms instructor. Please make sure these people have actual credentials that mean something. The NRA is a great source for finding quality instructors as well.

Airsoft is a highly underrated and affordable way to do force on force training that allows you to actually shoot people and to get shot without actually dying.

Let’s run with that idea:

·       Get the airsoft equivalent of your carry pistol and a training knife

·       Make a friend do the same

·       Get proper protective equipment

·       Find a safe private place (so people don’t think it’s real)

·       Create 5 scenarios where you are vulnerable (Entering/leaving vehicle, asleep in bed, taking a poop, walking your dog)

·       Get attacked and take note of what works and doesn’t for you

·       Start timing closing speeds of an attacker in unknown distances to evaluate what reaction fits the situation

Yup, you will look like a total freak doing these exercises but looking like an idiot when training may just be enough to give you the edge if you were to be attacked or became involved in an active shooter situation.


Physical fitness can never be stressed enough for this subject. Close quarters confrontation,  gun free, and knife free zones leave you with only your physical skillset to keep you safe and alive.

If you are legally permitted to carry a concealed firearm you should never leave your home without your pistol and a spare magazine.

My EDC, within arms reach 24/7

For some added firepower and magazine capacity consider storing a rifle in your vehicle, but be cognizant of local laws prior to doing so. Rifle manipulation in a vehicle is frustrating at best so look into acquiring an AR or AK pistol.

My work in progress AR pistol

These rifle caliber pistols are relatively new to the market and have tremendous benefits. Especially if you value maneuverability in tight places such as a vehicle or in your home.


It’s a shame the cameraman didn’t have a gun

 You can be that person who spends their last moments with their hands up begging for mercy or you can be prepared and give yourself that chance to fight back and stop a tragedy. What do you do to keep as prepared as possible?


Stay Fit and Keep that Warrior Mindset!

Bugout Bag = Get Home Bag

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As a self-proclaimed minimalist when it comes to all things prepared I wanted to give my 2 cents on the Bugout Bag and the Get Home Bag.

These two items seems to have quite the debate on what the contents should be and the more pushy types on the forums tend to be of the mind that if you don’t use the same designer bag as them that you are woefully under-prepared.

Let’s squash that here, who gives a shit what brand bag you have, the things that matter in regards to the bag are:
  •  Durability
  • Volume of storage
  •  Comfort
  • Ease of concealment

I could add a few more but after the big 4 it really is just a matter of opinion, these four characteristics should be the end all and be all when shopping for the actual bag. I prefer a simple Alice Pack with no frame or a plain high school book bag if keeping a low profile.


Guru left his Warrior Mindset at Taco Bell
I feel the Bugout Bag and Get Home Bagare one in the same; the only difference is a get home bag is typically on you or in your vehicle and the bugout is in your home. They serve the same exact purpose; each bag is to only carry the minimal amount of supplies to get you from an unsafe location to a safer location.







This is the point where the forum guru tells me “What if the sky was pink and I was an elephant, you would need a full pack with months worth of food!” If you would like to carry a pack that weighs 30lbs or more be my guest. 

Keep in mind that you have this bag because it will have the supplies you need to get home or lead you to your bugout location. Chances are, if you need to use a bugout bag or get home bag that you will be running and running far. Keep It Simple Stupid or KISS is where your head should be when assembling this bag, think of the basics; Beans, Bullets, and Band-Aids.


Basic minimum essentials: