A Tomato a Day Keeps You Healthy…and Full!

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When you’re living at the mercy of nature, (whose bounty can be very fickle), you need access to smart foods.  You’ll want to keep some foods around that are not only nutritious, but that will also make you feel full on a modest portion.  If it also happens to ward off a myriad of dread diseases, so much the better.  Say hello to what might be a survivor’s best friend: the tomato.

Evidence is emerging that suggests our plump red pal contains a mystery compound that suppresses hormones that trigger our appetite.  Preventing those pesky snack attacks has a lot of obvious advantages for us, whether we are living under normal circumstances or under the austerity of survival conditions.  Staying slim by not overeating may be a great benefit now, but think of those longs days and nights of rationing out a diminishing food supply, and nothing seems to satisfy your continual hunger.  A filling bite of a tomato to take the edge off would be heaven sent.

A French study compared the filling effect of sandwiches made with a tomato-enriched bread, carrot-enriched bread, and plain white bread.  Women of average weight between 18 and 35 were the subjects.  Amazingly, the fiber-rich carrots were not the winner.  Only the tomato bread kept the women satisfied and full.  So, if you only have a slice of cheese or a share of a can of tuna for today’s rations, a couple slices of tomato might be just the thing to turn those few precious bites into a fulfilling meal.

The results are incomplete, and it remains to be determined if tomatoes lower the level of the hunger-producing hormones, like ghrelin.  The part of the tomato that curbs the appetite has not been isolated yet either, though some suspect that it may be the red pigment, lycopene.

Regardless of lycopene’s connection to appetite, it is another reason to plant plenty of tomatoes in your survival garden.  Lycopene is linked to a reduction in a host of cancers including prostate, breast, cervical, skin, pancreatic, and even lung cancer—plus it slows down the progression of some cancers that have already occurred as well.

But wait!  There’s more…

Tomato juice and ketchup have been shown to significantly reduce levels of cholesterol, thus promoting heart health as well.  Tomatoes also keep skin healthy and looking young, and actually help to minimize sunburn.  They have a ton of vitamin C, which has healing, preventative, and nutritional properties—like warding off colds, promoting wounds to heal more quickly and completely, and allowing the body to absorb iron.  Tomatoes are rich in fiber, and they have lots of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants to keep you young and energetic.

Tomatoes are easy to grow, and will grow under many diverse conditions. One plant yields many fruits, and one fruit has enough seeds for a hundred new plants.  They can stay on the vine for a long time; they can ripen and survive after picking for a long time; and they don’t require refrigeration.  With all of these benefits, I’m thinking that a good share of my garden will be dedicated to this versatile vegi-fruit.  You can eat it raw, on a sandwich, in a salad, grilled, boiled, or in soup.  You can juice it, make ketchup, salsa, tomato sauce for spaghetti sauce or chili, and it can be sundried too.  Is there anything I’m leaving out?  Oh…and it tastes pretty good too.

The post A Tomato a Day Keeps You Healthy…and Full! appeared first on Off The Grid News.

A Tomato a Day Keeps You Healthy… and Full!

Click here to view the original post.

When you’re living at the mercy of nature, (whose bounty can be very fickle), you need access to smart foods.  You’ll want to keep some foods around that are not only nutritious, but that will also make you feel full on a modest portion.  If it also happens to ward off a myriad of dread diseases, so much the better.  Say hello to what might be a survivor’s best friend: the tomato.

Evidence is emerging that suggests our plump red pal contains a mystery compound that suppresses hormones that trigger our appetite.  Preventing those pesky snack attacks has a lot of obvious advantages for us, whether we are living under normal circumstances or under the austerity of survival conditions.  Staying slim by not overeating may be a great benefit now, but think of those longs days and nights of rationing out a diminishing food supply, and nothing seems to satisfy your continual hunger.  A filling bite of a tomato to take the edge off would be heaven sent.

A French study compared the filling effect of sandwiches made with a tomato-enriched bread, carrot-enriched bread, and plain white bread.  Women of average weight between 18 and 35 were the subjects.  Amazingly, the fiber-rich carrots were not the winner.  Only the tomato bread kept the women satisfied and full.  So, if you only have a slice of cheese or a share of a can of tuna for today’s rations, a couple slices of tomato might be just the thing to turn those few precious bites into a fulfilling meal.

The results are incomplete, and it remains to be determined if tomatoes lower the level of the hunger-producing hormones, like ghrelin.  The part of the tomato that curbs the appetite has not been isolated yet either, though some suspect that it may be the red pigment, lycopene.

Regardless of lycopene’s connection to appetite, it is another reason to plant plenty of tomatoes in your survival garden.  Lycopene is linked to a reduction in a host of cancers including prostate, breast, cervical, skin, pancreatic, and even lung cancer—plus it slows down the progression of some cancers that have already occurred as well.

But wait!  There’s more…

Tomato juice and ketchup have been shown to significantly reduce levels of cholesterol, thus promoting heart health as well.  Tomatoes also keep skin healthy and looking young, and actually help to minimize sunburn.  They have a ton of vitamin C, which has healing, preventative, and nutritional properties—like warding off colds, promoting wounds to heal more quickly and completely, and allowing the body to absorb iron.  Tomatoes are rich in fiber, and they have lots of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants to keep you young and energetic.

Tomatoes are easy to grow, and will grow under many diverse conditions. One plant yields many fruits, and one fruit has enough seeds for a hundred new plants.  They can stay on the vine for a long time; they can ripen and survive after picking for a long time; and they don’t require refrigeration.  With all of these benefits, I’m thinking that a good share of my garden will be dedicated to this versatile vegi-fruit.  You can eat it raw, on a sandwich, in a salad, grilled, boiled, or in soup.  You can juice it, make ketchup, salsa, tomato sauce for spaghetti sauce or chili, and it can be sundried too.  Is there anything I’m leaving out?  Oh…and it tastes pretty good too.

The post A Tomato a Day Keeps You Healthy… and Full! appeared first on Off The Grid News.

4 Meats That Are Packed With Protein

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I know I’ve advocated meat consumption many times before; I’ve talked about the benefits of eating meat (in moderation of course). In many cases I have stated that the human omnivorous diet (comprised of both meats and vegetal matter) requires a balanced intake of nutrients, from which meat shouldn’t not be left out, mainly because it’s the best source of protein we get. But I feel that I’ve never treated this subject with the proper respect it actually deserved, so I’ll fix that right now. If you’re a body builder or a fitness enthusiast you probably know much about what proteins are and what they’re good for. But for those of you who don’t, allow me to explain. Proteins are essential to living organism and humans make no exception. It helps build and repair muscle mass, it serves as a building block for body chemicals (enzymes, hormones etc.), skin, blood, bones, helps release carbohydrates into the bloodstream and so on. Every single fully functional cell in the human body needs protein in order to function properly. Some tissues (hair and nails) are comprised mostly of protein. So this macronutrient is one of the building blocks of life, it’s a major part of who and what we are and it’s important to have a balanced diet in which to include rich sources of protein. Let’s have a look at these 4 meats that are packed with protein. And there is no better natural source of protein out there that meat.

 

Venison (27g of protein / 3 oz)

Venison is an excellent source for protein, even better than the common beef. Not only does it have a higher amount of protein / per oz., but it also has a lower count of saturated fats. Protein is only one of the nutritious compounds venison has to offer. It’s packed with iron, riboflavin, vitamin BS and other minerals that are beneficial to human health. It’s pretty versatile when it comes to cooking methods. You can make mouth-watering stakes and stews from back straps, tenderloins or top hams. The neck the belly and the lower ribs can be easily grinded into sausages or stew meat. The best roasts result from the lower hams, but you’ll have to cook them long and slow to tender the meat. Venison has a specific taste, and if you’re not very keen on it, you can marinate it and tinker with the flavor as much as possible.

 

Chicken breast (27g of protein / 4 oz)

The chicken breast is a common household name that’s known and loved by everybody. We are all familiar with its tenderness and deliciousness. We all know how easy to prepare it is, in how many dishes and recipes we can include it in and how easy it is to procure (found in all types of stores and markets, big or small). But I don’t know how many of us are actually aware of the chicken breast’s nutritious properties. Apart from proteins, it also has phosphorus, magnesium, iron, zinc and also a small amount of calcium. The healthiest approach to eating chicken breast is to serve it grilled, with a side of fresh, steamed or grilled vegetables. But for those of you who don’t mind adding calories in the mix, you can just fry it and eat it with pretty much everything your heart desires. When it comes to cooking chicken breast, the sky’s the limit.

 

Ground beef 95% lean (24g of protein / 3 oz)

This is the best type of beef money can buy. The 95% lean ground beef it’s full of beneficial compounds, such as iron, creatine (that do wonders for your muscles), vitamin B6, vitamin B12, niacin, riboflavin, zinc, calcium and more. The leaner the beef, the better! Ground beef that starts at 90% lean is lower in fatty acids and calories, which makes it perfect as the main pillar of a healthy diet. Cooking it requires some caution and preparation. Because the meat lacks a high amount of fats, it’s advised to use the right amount for cooling oil before frying. If you’re planning a roast, it’s best if you add sauce and cook it slowly, because it’ll need all the moisture it can get. If you already have your heart on switching to this type of meat product, go for grass-fed beef, as it’s tenderer and even richer in protein and nutrients than regular lean beef.

 

Anchovies (24g of protein / 3 oz)

The anchovies are a small breed of fish that are extremely delicious and beneficial at the same time. Apart for being a rich source of protein, they’re also a rich resource of omega 3 fats (beneficial non-saturated fats), vitamin D, vitamin B12, niacin and other nutrients and minerals that make for tough blood vessels, strong bones and a healthy heart. Their small size also prevents them from accumulating high amounts of toxins, like bigger fish do. Before eating them, soak them in water for about 30 minutes; they retain high amounts of salt and this will remove the excess salt. They’re not meant for cooking (as they tend to dissolve), so just eat them out of the can with greens and cheeses or add them to salad dressings.

 

For a while I’ve considering pork chops as well. But I ultimately decided to drop them from the list, because of their high amount of fat: 1.2 g of polyunsaturated fat, 3.3 g of saturated fat and 3.9 g of monounsaturated fat.

These are some of my personal favorite meats, but I’m sure there are plenty more out there to take into consideration. I’m sure there are plenty of you that could successfully add to this list, and make it go for pages on end. But that is not my goal; all I wanted to do is to share with you the importance and joy of eating meat. Stay safe and healthy!

 

By Alec Deacon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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