Decided to survive? Make sure to avoid these common prepping mistakes and pitfalls – Part II

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By  – Natural News

(Natural News) Deciding to become a prepper is not an easy decision. There is much involved, and not everyone gives ample consideration to the potential pitfalls and problems you can encounter once you’ve made the decision to become better prepared to face – whatever. A lot of times people just jump in with both feet thinking they know what they’re doing, only to discover some months later that all of their time and effort really hasn’t contributed much to their overall preparedness.

In Part I, we discussed a number of steps beginning and even seasoned preppers should take in order to avoid wasting time and money on a process that really is so important it could actually save your life in an emergency. We talked about not allowing the over-exaggerated 24-hour news cycle to force you into making bad prepping purchases and decisions; guarding against “fake news” that over-excites but does little to actually inform; looking out for scams; overspending on items you don’t really need and prepping for real-life scenarios that you could actually encounter. (RELATED: In plain sight: How to stay hidden during a crisis)

In Part II, we’ll examine additional things to watch for as you evolve in preparations to survive any number of circumstances, including natural- and manmade disasters, economic collapse and political turmoil (H/T Survival Prepper):

Continue reading at Natural News: Decided to survive? Make sure to avoid these common prepping mistakes and pitfalls – Part II

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

Ready to survive? Make sure to avoid these common prepping mistakes and pitfalls – Part I

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Image: Ready to survive? Make sure to avoid these common prepping mistakes and pitfalls – Part I

By  – Natural News

(Natural News) Making the decision to become a prepper is not an easy one and, frankly, should not be made in haste. While most people have a natural instinct and will to survive – whether it be a natural disaster, global war or a societal collapse – not everyone is motivated to make the preparations necessary to survive.

It’s easy to see why. Millions live in denial that such events could take place in their lifetimes. Prepping requires a sizeable investment of time and money. Preppers must often alter their lifestyles in order to begin living more simply. Prepping tools must be mastered, medical skills honed, and making the decision to protect yourself and your family with a weapon must be carefully considered and accepted.

But once a person does decide to take on the responsibility, there are a number of common mistakes and pitfalls that await. Everything from paying too much for supplies to purchasing the wrong gear to falling for prepping gimmicks can throw you off your prepping schedule and set you back weeks, months or even years. (RELATED: World’s Ultra-Rich Buying Bug-Out Retreats In Anticipation Of Mass Social Uprising)

With that in mind, let’s go through some of the more common pitfalls of prepping, per the Survivalist Prepper:

Continue reading at Natural News: Ready to survive? Make sure to avoid these common prepping mistakes and pitfalls – Part I

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

The Government Knows Something We Don’t

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By The Survival Place Blog

After some digging around the political archives, we have discovered that almost all governments have some form of strategy for surviving a zombie apocalypse. Now they clearly know something we don’t, what with all of their intelligence agencies and secret sources, and that means we have to seriously consider how we would survive a sudden – and unprecedented – rise of the dead.

But don’t worry, we’re not going to be selfish with this one because, should the day come where a zombie plague spreads like wildfire – we’re going to need to civilization to stand tall. As such, we have come up with a list of equipment you’ll need if you’re planning on being around to see the new world.

 

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Food & Water

Sustenance is going to be your best friend here. When a zombie apocalypse happens, you’re going to need to get used to life on the road for a while. That is where food and water come in. As long as you are able to look after your body, you will be able to outrun a herd of zombies. As such, make sure you know where fresh water supplies are before heading anywhere, make sure you know how to store it properly and make sure you have plenty of non-perishable foods with you. Zombies don’t die unless killed, so stock up as good as possible because the waiting game is not an option.

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First Aid

Unfortunately, your current first aid kit will need to be seriously ramped up in order to meet the demands of a zombie outbreak. The reason for this is, the injuries are likely to be more severe. As such, it is important you have certain things like bandages, possibly a casting kit, a defibrillator, oxygen masks and morphine, as well as the more regular things like plasters and insect repellent.

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Get Yourself A Vehicle

Of course, the more multi-purpose your vehicle is because, well, roads won’t always be an option. As is often the case, roads tend to fall prey to blockades, or even a hoard of zombies. As such, you will need a vehicle that is capable of going off-road, and capable of carrying multiple people and things. That is where an RV will come in handy. It will give you somewhere to sleep, as well as somewhere to store bigger pieces of equipment, such as an inflatable fishing boat, which would not only serve as a secondary getaway vehicle but grant you a source of protein. A place to call home that will allow you to keep moving, and keep scavenging, will help as much with your sanity as it will with your survival.

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Load Up and Load Out

You’re going to need a gun, and the more guns you have the better. It is as simple as that. As a standard piece of equipment, we suggest you have a handgun and holster. It may not be your first choice in a weapon, but it doesn’t hurt to have an easy to access a good backup option. After that, we suggest you get your hands on a shotgun, simply because ammunition is easy to come by. But, as a rule, don’t turn your nose up at anything, especially not a sniper rifle.

Originally published at The Survival Place Blog: The Government Knows Something We Don’t

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

Hobbies That Will Save Your Life!

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By The Survival Place Blog

The great thing about life is that you gain experiences. It could be that you enjoyed a camping trip last summer, or playing 5-a-side soccer every Tuesday night. But while these are often seen as normal everyday experiences when taken at face value, more often than not they can double up as survival skills; it is just a matter of looking at them from a slightly different angle.

Think about it. Camping helps you understand how to live in the great outdoors and soccer improves your fitness; both of which would be highly sought after skills when survival instincts kick in. It is just a matter of understanding what skills and experiences you have, and how you can transfer them to another area of your life.

All too many people believe they wouldn’t survive in a state of emergency because they don’t have the skillset of a Navy SEAL or an SAS hero. But you don’t need their training to be able to survive. That is why we are going to show you what skills can be learned through just normal, fun activities.
Your preparation to survive a crisis situation starts now, and it starts with a smile.

Get Used To Life On The Move

When a crisis situation arises – whether that be war, zombie apocalypse or an alien invasion – nothing is going to become more helpful in your need to survive than your ability to live outside and live life on the move. That is where camping and backpacking come in. You see, learning how to shoulder a heavy load for days at a time can come as quite a shock to anyone who hasn’t done before, as can knowing how to survive in a tent, but these are so crucial to the longevity of your survival.
But it is not just about the hiking miles and miles with heavy equipment, it is also about the equipment you will have handy to you. If you have been camping, then the chances are you already have a huge chunk of the survival gear needed without even realizing. What’s more, if you have been wild-camping, then you will also have a steady understanding of what to look for in a good spot, such as the need to be on high ground and need a source of fresh water.

Know Enough About Mechanics

For a lot of people, this is a hobby that has helped them fulfill their petrolhead addictions. For others, it is simply a way to save money when it comes to getting their car, motorbike or plane fixed. Whatever the reason, when it comes to a scenario where survival is the main focus, this is going to be one of the most valuable skills.

Even by just learning the basic movements of an engine you will have a huge advantage. It could be that you manage to flee town in your Ford Ranger, which then ran into problems in the middle of nowhere. It could be that you stumbled across an airfield, and you have knowledge on how to jumpstart the plane in front of you, and thus be able to start flying in a Pitts S2C. Or perhaps, after days stumbling through a forest, you come across a lake, with a jetty, and a selection of boats, all of which require mechanical tinkering in order to get underway. That is where even a basic level of how engine works could save your life.

Hunting Is How We Got Here

These days – and quite rightly – there is a lot of stigma around hunting animals. We have done enough to harm the earth and all those that we share this planet with. But should the world start to implode, for whatever reason, knowing how to hunt is going to be the very skill that allows you to live? Without a food source, you can’t live, and it could be that you go days or weeks without finding a source of tinned food or non-perishable goods. It could even be that you had ample food stored, but this isn’t going to last forever, which is why knowing how to hunt will be critical.

What’s more, knowing how to hunt isn’t just about knowing how to kill. Hunting is about stalking, it is about blending in with your surroundings, knowing about wind direction, how to cover your scent, how to track and know how to avoid being tracked. All of these skills can help you avoid being detected by the enemy – or potential hostiles – meaning you will be able to effectively avoid the chance of being captured. Being spotted may be inevitable, that is why you will want to know how to disappear as quick as humanly possible, and without a trace too.

 

Back To The Basics Of Weaponry

Knowing how to hunt is going to heavily rely on your ability to shoot and kill while remaining undetected is going to mean using weapons that are silent. Basically, think Daryl in The Walking Dead. Knowing a little about archery is going to be your biggest asset when it comes to weapons.

But it isn’t just about offense, defense or being stealth; it is also about the fact you will be able to reuse your ammo over and over. This is not the case with modern weapons; with guns. When a bullet is spent, it is spent. When an arrow is fired, it is just a matter of collecting it and starting again. Crossbows are also incredibly durable too. As such, we recommend you start getting into archery, just in case. After all, it is relatively inexpensive, doesn’t require you to go through any thorough background checks, and doesn’t need a license. It could be the thing that keeps you alive in more ways than the obvious.
Of course, while these hobbies-slash-survival advantages are going to be imperative to your health and well-being should disaster strike in any form, it is also worth preparing yourself in other ways too. Such as knowing the surrounding area, understanding orienteering, and having a bug-out bag by the door. The more prepared you are, the better your chances of staying alive.

Originally published at The Survival Place Blog: Hobbies That Will Save Your Life!

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

How To Survive In A War Zone

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By The Survival Place Blog

It hasn’t been a question that many Western civilians have needed to ask in the past couple of decades because we have remained relatively clear of any world wars, military invasions or coups. However, whether we like it or not, the political landscape has changed a bit, what with Trump, May and Putin leading the free world.
As such, the chances of us getting caught up in a war zone type scenario are increasingly higher than they have been. Korea is testing nukes. Russia is influencing elections. Ukraine has been made unstable. And a lot more. That is why we have taken the time to give you some advice on how you can survive a war zone.

  1. Water and food are going to be your priority and that is because they are usually the two first things to be subjected to limitations, whether through the panic of enemy tactics. As such, stock up on non-perishable foods and learn how to effectively store water.

 

  1. Never expose yourself unnecessarily, especially during a firefight. Your best bet when it comes to surviving is to stay as concealed as possible, and that means learning how to use cover and stay low. It also means staying away from obvious and potential targets.

 

  1. Protect your home or hideout. Your defensive strategy is going to be absolutely key to your survival rates. So block the doors and board the windows as an immediate measure. Then see what other methods are available to you. If you can get hold of blast curtains, then do. Otherwise, use furniture as a means to protect yourself from any explosive damage. The more you can protect your home, the better.

 

  1. Spend the time learning about basic first-aid. Chances are that electricity will go pretty quickly in a war zone, so stock up books that will educate you on how to survive, and how to perform basic first aid. If you are with a group, then don’t keep this knowledge to yourself. This isn’t The Walking Dead, this is war, and so your vital knowledge needs to be shared.

 

  1. Know the area in which you are. It could be that you are familiar with the area, know the terrain and have a solid understanding of the different routes you can take to escape or move around. If you don’t have this knowledge, then get a map and learn all you can about your surrounding area.

 

  1. Learn how to use a firearm. This may not sit well with you, but it is better to know how to use a firearm and not need it than to need it and not know how to use it. You will want to do this without giving away your position or alerting anyone to your position. So start off with learning about the safety and how to reload. Then learn how to be comfortable holding a firearm. It could be enough to deter someone. It is also worth knowing how to maintain any firearms you have.

 

  1. Be disciplined when it comes to light and sound. At night, light and sound can travel a long way, so make sure you have a self-imposed curfew and stick to it. Another tip should be using red lights instead of natural lights, as it doesn’t travel as far. This could be a matter of life or death, so ensure there is nothing in your vicinity that shines or rattles without your permission.

This is only the basics but it gives you a good base line to start you thinking and making plans for just this sort of scenario.

Originally published at The Survival Place Blog: How To Survive In A War Zone

Filed under: Emergency Survival Tips, How To Prepare, Prepping

“Micro-Homestead” This Modest Survival Shelter Could Save Your Life When It’s Time to Bug Out

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By Mac Slavo – SHTFplan.com

It certainly isn’t much, but when you have nothing else, it could be all you need.

In many emergencies, bugging out may not be the best option. Certainly it is not the best choice for every SHTF situation.

However, there may be situations where you need to leave your home or dwelling, get out of the city while you can, and lay low until/if sense ever returns to society.

You Tuber Kevin Coy shows you what may be the lowest cost, least effort way to build a viable survival shelter – which could also have uses for hunting, camping, play, etc.

He’s calling it a “micro-homestead.”

For the millions of Americans who can barely make it to the next paycheck, much less invest in high priced gear, supplies and stocks, it may be much better than nothing at all.

Here’s the set-up he came up with:

Of course, there are many other options, especially for those who have the means to purchase, build and develop more ideal structures and set-ups.

However, at 8×8, this building could likely be built without permit or on-grid approval in most areas, and could at least serve as a temporary structure until your dream getaway is ready to go!

Prepping requires time, energy, mental and physical effort and especially the mindset to plan ahead, make sacrifices in the “now” and put valuable resources towards insurance for the future. Many will contemplate taking action, but fewer still will actually be ready when the SHTF.

But the first step in this direction may prove to be the most important one you ever make…

This article first appeared at SHTFplan.com“Micro-Homestead” This Modest Survival Shelter Could Save Your Life When It’s Time to Bug Out

Filed under: Bug Out Bags, How To Prepare, Prepping, Shelter

What Makes The Best Just In Case Place?

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By The Survival Place Blog

Ever wondered what makes the best Just In Case locations, for when the SHTF and you need somewhere away from all the inevitable trouble that will start happening? If so, you’re in the right place. We’re going to go through a few of the vital things you need to consider when choosing the location of your bolt hole.
It’s a critical decision that you need to get right now, as it will be too late after the event. All your preparation, investment, and work in build the perfect Just In Case place will be for nothing if you a) can’t get there and b) choose the wrong location. Let’s take a look at everything you need to know.

 

Somewhere close

When a national emergency or worst case scenario occurs, you can bet on a few things; one of which is, the authorities will set up roadblocks and close major road arteries. And that’s going to cause anyone wanting to travel a lot of trouble just a few hours after the event. So your bolt hole’s ideal location has to be somewhere close to your current home – a place you can access within a few hours. Not only will it help you avoid roadblocks, but the smaller distance will reduce the number of potential incidents that you will encounter along the way.
Within walking distance

Ideally, you will want to choose a place that you can walk to. Within five days is your best bet – and given you will only be able to walk a maximum of 12 miles a day, that means your bolt home should be within 60 miles. Of course, the route you take will also be critical – are there enough places along the way to keep out of harm’s way? You should already know how to build a survival shelter, of course, but you’ll also need to have somewhere safe to set up at the end of every day.

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Near water

Finding a location with a natural supply of water is essential, and will save you a lot of work. Whether you are buying land to build a survival hut or plan to use public land, make sure you are within a reasonable distance of a natural spring, river, or lake. Not only is water vital for hydration, but you can also use it for sanitary purposes and power – all of which are going to increase your chances of survival.

 

Somewhere hidden

Finally, the sad truth is that in the event of a critical national emergency, there will be people out there willing to take whatever they find on their own – including your survival home. Therefore, the better hidden your Just in Case place, the less likely it is someone will see it. Avoid areas that are near well-travelled routes, and the more challenging it is to get to your location, the fewer people will find it. Don’t forget; it’s not just about blending your hut in with its surroundings. You’ll also need to find somewhere that hides much of the smoke and light from fires or smells from food.

This article published by The Survival Place BlogWhat Makes The Best Just In Case Place?

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping, Shelter

Keep Your Belongings and Supplies Safe from Looters

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By The Survival Place Blog

If you’re a dedicated prepper, then you’ll understand the importance of keeping your belongings safe. When disaster strikes and everyone’s survival instincts kick in, you’d be lucky if you don’t run into looters and hooligans who resort to stealing from others. When we’re in a nasty situation, it really is survival of the fittest and if you can’t hide your belongings and most important pieces of gear safely, then you’re going to be vulnerable and it’ll only take a single night for your survival chances to turn from decent to grim.
To help you survive the threat of thieves and looters, here are a couple of handy tips that you can employ right now to keep you, your family and your friends safe.

Fencing

A sturdy fence around your home is the first line of defence from looters. Combined with CCTV and traps, a fence can not only protect an area, but it can also deter people from wanting to try and steal your belongings. The more fierce looking your surroundings, the more likely people will stay clear from your place to loot you. However, it’s good to keep in mind that a fence will be your first line of defence because it is the most easily penetrated. Dedicated looters will be able to cut through the fence with ease, and agile climbers will easily be able to vault over the fence or climb over it. This means you shouldn’t spend too much of your money on fencing, just enough so it surrounds your home and deters intruders.

Safe Boxes

Your most valuable possessions should be kept in a safe box or a disguised storage container. The Safe Depot has plenty of good examples of this. They’ve turned everyday essentials such as water bottles and cans into sneaky storage solutions for small belongings and bits of equipment, but you can also invest in a large safe to store things like weapons and money. A smaller safe box that you can carry around with you is a good place to store everyday essentials such as a flip knife, multi-tool and rations.

Shutters for Windows and Doors

Full lockdown of your home is ideal when it comes to avoiding looters and hooligans. Shutters can often buy you enough time to fend off thieves, and in some cases, if the shutters are strong enough it can make your home virtually impenetrable. This is an excellent long-term solution that will not only protect your home from looters, but also from natural disasters such as extreme gales. Shutters can be installed for relatively low prices, but you need to keep in mind the quality of the metal itself. The heavier it is, the sturdier it will be but it will also be hard to maintain.

Locks and Doors

In the event that your shutters have failed, you need to consider falling back to a defensive location that houses all of your supplies. In this case, a strong metal door is a great way to fend off attackers and also make your supplies almost impossible to steal unless the intruders have the key. Sturdy locks are also great for when your supplies are housed outside of your home so that you can keep all of your prepped supplies safe during the night.

This article published by The Survival Place Blog: Keep Your Belongings and Supplies Safe from Looters

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

Life-Saving Skills All Preppers Should Have

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By The Survival Place Blog

As you can imagine, there are a lot of people in the prepper community who think they’re better prepared than they really are. They assume that because they have a getaway vehicle, bugout safe house, and an arsenal of different survival tools, that they’ll be safe if and when a disaster began tearing at the fabric of civilization. This isn’t necessarily true! The tools for survival are only as good as the person wielding them, so here are some essential skills every prepper must learn.

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Water Purification

You’ve probably heard before that we can go three weeks without food, but a mere three days without water. Water is by far the most important thing you’ll need in a survival situation, so learning how to purify dirty water sources is essential to your skills as a prepper. There are three main techniques you can use to purify water. Boiling it for at least five minutes is probably the most accessible, provided you can start a fire and source an appropriate receptacle. Where you don’t have a heat source, chemical purifiers such as chlorine, iodine and potassium permanganate can be used, provided they’re in small enough doses not to be toxic! Store-bought charcoal and ceramic filters can also be handy for purifying water. Get familiar with all three of these techniques; your life could depend on it!

Fire Making Without a Lighter or Matches

After water, heat is among the most essential things you need for survival when civilization breaks apart. This will allow you to boil water and therefore purify it, cook food, ward off wild animals, and protect yourself from the cold. Fire is one of the first technologies that our earliest ancestors are thought to have harnessed, and there’s good reason for this! While you should certainly try to have a decent stock of matches and lighters in preparation for a worldwide disaster, these things are going to run out eventually, and after that you’re going to have to rely on your own means. Make sure you learn a few techniques for starting a fire, such as using a fire bow or flint and steel.

Whittling and Wood Working

One of the major things that’s going to make it hard for most people to adapt to life post-disaster is not having easy access to all the materials and commodities which we take for granted in our day to day lives. Without oil rigs, steel mills and so on, preppers need to learn a bit about manipulating the one material they’ll always be able to get a hold of: wood. You may have hated it in school, but get a few woodworking tools and start learning the basic principles of making some of the wooden structures and tools that you may need. Here’s a useful reference that will get you started. Of course, you’re going to have limited access to electricity when the grid goes down. However, learning woodworking can be exceedingly helpful even when you only have hand tools.

Learn these three skills, and you’ll be in a much better position when disaster strikes!

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Life-Saving Skills All Preppers Should Have

Filed under: Emergency Survival Tips, How To Prepare, Prepping

Environ-Home: Live Life Alongside the Environment With These Awesome Hacks

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By The Survival Place Blog

Making your home more environmentally friendly is important. You need to live a greener life alongside the environment. Becoming more self-sufficient is a wonderful way of making sure you improve survival skills and help care for the planet too.

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Solar Energy

We are moving towards a greener and more eco-friendly world, and this is a good thing. But we still have a way to go yet. So you need to do as much as you can to make sure you are as energy-efficient as possible. In recent years we’ve seen the likes of Chile’s Renewable Energy Conference show the importance of greener living. It doesn’t matter if you’re a business or an individual, renewable energy is the future for all of us, so we need to understand that and prepare for it.

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Grow Your Own Food

One of the key things you can do to have a greener life is to start growing your own food. And you’ll notice that more and more people are doing that these days. You don’t even need an allotment to do it. You can convert areas of your garden into a vegetable patch, etc. Growing your own food is a wonderful way to enjoy the freshest produce and save yourself some money in the process. It also allows you to learn the skills of planting and growing and feeding yourself naturally.

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Limited Technology

Technology is so prevalent in life these days that many people have forgotten how to do things without it. There are a lot of things we take for granted these days because we have technology to do it all for us. So, to enjoy a more natural life, you need to make sure you limit your technology usage. This doesn’t mean you have to go all out Amish. But, you should try to cut down on the amount you use, and, where possible, refrain from using technology. This will give you a greater appreciation of the outside world and how wonderful nature can be sometimes.

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Learn to Live off the Land

It’s important to learn valuable survival skills wherever you can, and that means living off the land. You can take weekend or week-long excursions to learn how to do this. You can also move to somewhere more remote so you can make full use of the natural resources that are around. Our ancestors used to live off the land all the time, and we have lost our way somewhat. If you can learn to do this, then you will have picked up some of the most valuable survival skills. It means that if anything were to go awry, and you had to survive in the wilderness, you’d be fine.

Having a more simple and stripped back existence is crucial for helping you live life alongside the environment. You want to try to turn your home into an eco-home and learn to live alongside nature a bit more. We get so caught up with technology these days that we wouldn’t survive without it. At least you’ll be okay if the apocalypse should hit!

This article was first seen at The Survival Place Blog: Environ-Home: Live Life Alongside the Environment With These Awesome Hacks

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

Family Fun That Doubles As The Preparedness Training You Need

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By The Survival Place Blog

The stereotype of preppers is one that very much doesn’t fit the reality a lot of us live in. Many will imagine that we’re loners without families. In reality, a lot of us have kids and spouses who we’re keen to protect as much as ourselves if not more. So, as a prepper with a family, you need to start preparing them, too. It just so happens to be that there are plenty of activities you can get into year round to help with that.

Real camping

An obvious activity to get into is camping. There are plenty of great spots for it. But we’re not talking about the places with running water and electricity within five feet. To really benefit from camping, you need to go as wild as you can. You need to teach your family to create rope from nature, how useful a knife is for first aid and cooking and how to really thrive in the wild.

Traversing those waters

Being near water when out in the wild is important. Being able to move over it is even better. If cars and public transport fail, then water is one of the best ways to travel. Look up the best sit on top kayak and get practicing. It helps a lot that kayaking is one of the most fun ways to spend your time in the water.

Nature hikes

When you’re not camping, considering taking the family to see some of the most beautiful environments that nature has to offer. But don’t just take the sights in. Learn them. Consider using apps to start identifying different plants. There are those with harmful properties as well as helpful ones. Not to mention all kinds of foodstuffs that could be foraged when needed. Make your hikes a much more educational experience. That knowledge of nature is something we’ve been lacking for far too long.

A good fishing trip

As important as nature is, it’s also important we learn how to sustain ourselves from it. Fishing has that obvious benefit. But it’s also a great way to teach your kids some important values. Values like patience and dedication. It also serves as a time to spend one-to-one with your kids. The intimate peace of a fishing trip can be a tremendous force in building lasting bonds.

Winter building

Not every activity is best done in Spring and Summer. Camping is one thing, but it’s not enough in the Winter. Yet Winter can be one of the most magical times to get out in nature. So take your kids somewhere you can all practice building a Winter shelter together. Build yourself a cozy space where you can sit inside with your family and watch the landscape fill up with snow. The kids are guaranteed to love it and you’re guaranteed a skill that could one day be the deciding factor for your survival.

What we consider recreation was once essential for survival. If the world we know changes (as it has before and will again), they might be essential still. Make sure your family is as prepared as you.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Family Fun That Doubles As The Preparedness Training You Need

Filed under: How To Prepare, Outdoor Recreation, Prepping

Essentials To Convince Your Non-Prepper Friends They Need

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By The Survival Place Blog

It goes without saying that we are living in uncertain times. Anyone who keeps their eye on the news will know that the human race hasn’t been so divided in most of our living memory. Of course, there are people around now who lived through World War 2, so it would be disrespectful to say things have never been so bad. But right now, it’s easy to envisage a scenario in which things escalate fast.

When you’re a prepper, you get used to people’s reactions to you telling them. For the longest time, it has been a case of glazed eyes, polite smile and “Oh! OK!” from the majority and “Tell me more” from a few. Perhaps for the first time for a lot of us, the latter reaction is becoming increasingly frequent. So if you’re speaking to a friend, family or a trusted acquaintance, what would you tell them is the most important thing to have should the worst happen?

We’re not talking about people becoming preppers here. Some people are too tied to their everyday homes to be ready for it yet. You won’t persuade everyone. But you can tell them a few things that they can put in their home, glove box or their boot. It’s a start – a kind of mini everyday carry.

As Much Drinking Water As They Can Fit

When things go down, infrastructure takes a hit early on. Some people even say that local authorities turn off water supplies so that they can put in place a state of emergency. True or not, it does mean you find yourself stuck without one of nature’s essentials. And that sends people straight to the grocery store to panic-buy as much as they can carry. So stocking up in advance is just common sense.

A Power-Outage Preparedness Kit

A generator would usually be best, but not everyone can be talked into buying one. If they feel safe in their home, they often don’t want to keep fuel around there, and if they don’t need a generator they don’t want one. Add to that the fact that fuel prices skyrocket in such times, and it takes commitment to make that jump. But a gas stove, heater and a flashlight like a Vultra Bright Torch can never be a bad idea.

A Means Of Self-Defense

Nothing divides preppers and non-preppers like getting armed. It’s a controversial issue, and if you want to help someone you won’t insist that they buy a firearm. It’s a good way to scare them away. However, non-lethal methods of protecting yourself are essential tools in the middle of unrest.

Along with the advice that you never engage someone unless there is no alternative, pepper spray is an option. It’s a safe, non-controversial means of keeping things from getting too hairy. If someone’s not ready to become a hero, do not advise them to try. That’s a situation that will end badly for someone – probably them.

Some people just aren’t of the mindset to go full prepper and bug out when the situation demands it. But you can help them stay safe – and let them know you’re at the end of a phone if they need more help.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Essentials To Convince Your Non-Prepper Friends They Need

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

Do You Live in a Flood Zone? You’ll Want to See This

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flood-truck_RN

By Joshua KrauseReady Nutrition  

Living in a flood zone is a lot like living next to a time bomb. You have no idea when it’s going to go off. Though some areas are flooded on a routine basis, those communities tend to be more prepared for such events. The real danger lies in living in a 50 year or a 100 year flood zone. The threat is great enough that it will probably happen in your lifetime, but not so great that you can expect local authorities and the local infrastructure to handle it properly.

But regardless of where you live, if there’s any chance of water reaching your home, you’ll want to do whatever you can to prepare for that event.

Aside from fires, floods can cause the most expensive damages to your home, and that’s assuming your home isn’t completely destroyed.

Thankfully, there is a rather unique method for guarding your home from flood water. Though it’s pretty expensive, it pales in comparison to the cost of flood damages. It’s called the Aqua Dam, and it made headlines last month when Texas was being inundated with flood waters.

According to the company that makes the Aqua Dam, it’s actually cheaper per square foot that sandbags, and is far easier and faster to install in an emergency. As an added bonus, the Aqua Dam can be used for storing potable water, which can be hard to come by if a storm damages local utilities. With attributes like that, I have a feeling that this product is going to be a hot commodity among preppers in the near future.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: Do You Live in a Flood Zone? You’ll Want to See This

About the author:

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

 

Filed under: Emergency Survival Tips, How To Prepare, Prepping

“This Is The Disaster Everyone Will Wish They Prepared For”: SoCal Megaquake Threatens 20 Million

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Screen Shot 2016-07-11 at 6.10.54 PM

Image: Martin Luff, Flickr, Creative Commons 2.0

By Mac Slavo – SHTFplan.com

Experts in business and policy have conducted a survey of the potential damage that could be expected after what scientists now say is an inevitable mega-earthquake along the San Andreas fault. It exposed many deep flaws in the system, and forecast a disaster of epic proportions for of Southern California.

Because the pressure has been building for over a century, and simply must be released, the earthquake is not just a potential event, but a liability that is sure strike sooner or later, and models show that the magnitude could easily approach 8.0.

It could easily become every prepper’s worst nightmare – an event big enough to test the shaky resolve of the entire population as they face being cut off from food, water and electricity; even a modestly large earthquake could disrupt pipelines and power lines for water supply, sewage, natural gas and more for several weeks or even months… and it would only take a matter of hours and days for riots and looting to begin.

According to Phys.org, this is the disaster everyone is going to wish they prepared for:

But when the Big One hits, a recent report says, the western state is ill-prepared and local officials as well as major businesses need to face that reality to “prevent the inevitable disaster from becoming a catastrophe.”

Drafted by a group of business and policy leaders, the report identifies several key areas that need to be addressed before a quake as strong as a magnitude 8 happens, notably aging infrastructure, water supplies and the risk of catastrophic fires… including freeways, railway lines, gas and petroleum pipelines as well as electric lines.

A major earthquake on the San Andreas, one of California’s most dangerous faults, would cut most lifelines in and out of southern California, preventing critical aid from reaching some 20 million people and hampering recovery efforts, experts say.

[…]

“It is inevitable that we will have a big earthquake because that pressure needs to be released,” said Robert Graves, a seismologist with the USGS.

For society to come unglued at the seams and spill over into pure chaos is hardly impossible in the sprawling, superficial and highly unstable cultural combustion engine that is Los Angeles, where gangs and clashing ethnic groups will be pitted against a shallow and ill-prepared general public with no grip on reality.

Just imagine how that will play out when 10-20 million people are deprived of water sources, fuel and food:

Computer simulations by the US Geological Survey (USGS) suggest that a magnitude 7.8 quake on the southern end of the San Andreas fault would cause shaking for some two minutes, killing at least 1,800 people, injuring 53,000 and causing $213 billion in damage.

“Most of the water that we get has to cross the fault to reach us but when the earthquake happens, all of the aqueducts will be broken at the same time,” Jones, known as California’s “earthquake lady,” told AFP.

[…]

Installing automatic shutoff valves on natural gas and petroleum gas pipelines that run near the San Andreas Fault could also help prevent major fires [because otherwise they would be widespread; either way the source of fuel and heat will be cut off].

As for maintaining communication with the outside world once the Big One strikes and disrupts energy grids, Jones said solar power could be one answer.

There are many ways to prepare for what is coming to Southern California, and may well occur in other key parts of the country.

Experts admit that services could be disrupted for several months, so serious preppers living in earthquake zones should be certain that there is a minimum 2-3 month food supply for everyone in the home, as well as 30-60 days of water, along with other typical supplies.

Tess Pennington put out a comprehensive guide to prepping for a major earthquake, including common sense tips about avoiding placing heavy objects on shelves and high places that could collapse in your home during a seismic event, as well as information about evacuation, route planning, and of course, prepping an emergency supply of food, water, medicine, supplies and backup sources of fuel and electric power:

After an Earthquake

The danger isn’t over when the shaking stops. There are many hazards that still exist. You must quickly survey the safety of your environment.

  • Look for electrical hazards like downed lines.
  • Turn off the gas and water to your home.
  • Do not use matches, lighters, camp stoves or barbecues, electrical equipment, appliances until you are sure there are no gas leaks. They may create a spark that could ignite.
  • DO NOT turn on the gas again if you turned it off; let the gas company do it.
  • Repair any defective electrical wiring or leaking gas connections before using those systems again.
  • If there are damages done to the ceiling or foundation, get an expert opinion about any structural defects.
  • Have well water tested before consuming it.

Emergency Evacuation

In some events, you’ll have to leave your home due to damage caused by the earthquake.

If you have to evacuate, having a 72 hour kit or bug out bag ready to go will expedite the process of leaving.  Your bag should contain all items necessary to survive for 3 days.  When preparing a bag keep the main survival points is mind (water, food, shelter, clothing).  Having a separate bug out bag for the vehicle will also come in handy in the event that you are caught on the road during a sudden emergency.

When the big one hits, it is tragic but predictable that many people’s lives will be at risk, and property damage could skyrocket. If the response is not adequate to deal with the risk, millions could be cut off from their lifelines in society.

Don’t be one of them. Anyone living near a major fault zone will wish they had prepared for this. Surely you have already begun…

This article first appeared at SHTFplan.com: “This Is The Disaster Everyone Will Wish They Prepared For”: SoCal Megaquake Threatens 20 Million

Filed under: Earthquakes, How To Prepare, Prepping

The Preparedness Wheel: At-A-Glance Balance Check for Readiness

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business plan with cup of coffee

The Prepper Journal

There’s a little tool called a health wheel I learned about as a victim’s advocate forever ago. Another variant is called a wellness wheel. They’re not complete and total bunk since they can help keep our lives more balanced, but the real reason I bring them up is that as soon as I saw one, I immediately thought of the preparedness application. It’s not about the mental and emotional health. It’s about the balance. When wheels are balanced, we roll much more smoothly through life’s up and downs. Converting a wellness wheel to a preparedness wheel gives us an easy visual of where we’ve concentrated our efforts and if the rest of our preparedness needs and goals are in balance.

Anybody who’s dealt with a broken wagon wheel or a bent or flat bike, cart, or dolly tire can tell you how much harder they are to deal with. In preparedness, leaving one wedge of our wheel empty while another bulges can have serious implications – like watching crops and gardens we were counting on fail for lack of the pest control we usually buy, or having whole bedrooms of firearms and ammo but watching them disappear because we had a lack of smoke detectors and fire control mechanisms.

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: The Preparedness Wheel: At-A-Glance Balance Check for Readiness

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

Preparedness Advantages of Holding on to Your Older Vehicle

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pickup

By Jeremiah Johnson – Ready Nutrition

ReadyNutrition Readers, I’m the last person on earth who would ever advocate going out and buying a brand-new vehicle from a showroom floor.  For any of you who may be selling automobiles, this is no insult to you or your products.  This article is meant to point out the advantages to “recycling” that older vehicle you have, and making an old thing into something new.  This has to do with a preparatory and survival mentality, not about saving dollars.  It has to do with things that may help you when you need them after the SHTF.

We have already seen and read a myriad of articles on the Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP), and the susceptibility of newer-model cars and trucks to the pulse, due to the reliance of the vehicles on complex circuitry and integrated computer systems.  OK, so you have an old 1973 Ford pickup truck, and it’s on it’s last legs.  It is a five speed and doesn’t utilize any of the ultramodern component parts just mentioned; however, the engine is not what it used to be.

Before you scrap it, I want to bring before you the possibility of doing a complete engine overhaul on the vehicle.  Understand if this avenue is pursued, you need the services of a competent mechanic…one who you can totally trust and rely on.  What an engine overhaul entails is detailed, but not complicated.  You will put out some money on this one, however, it may turn out to be a goldmine for you.  The pragmatic, non-preparatory reason is that if the engine is completely fixed and placed into reliable working order, the money you would have sunk into a new vehicle is completely eliminated.

The engine overhaul is just as it sounds: taking your vehicle’s engine completely apart, cleaning the parts that are serviceable, and replacing any parts with new ones as needed.  You can spend several thousand dollars on this, and once again, this will vary with your factors of the vehicle’s condition, availability of parts, and what not.  A good mechanic will do this and certify your vehicle after completion for an additional hundred thousand miles.  Then what?

Well, you’ve eliminated a car payment, as we mentioned.  Your older model should be well within the limits of being protected from an EMP, as mentioned, as it does not hold all of the modern hardware.  There are some other factors worth considering as well.  Remember those “black boxes” installed in the vehicles after 2012/2013 and (some firms) even earlier?  Well, that “secret agent” inside of your engine that tracks your every move with the vehicle is then eliminated.

In some states (Montana is one of them) if your vehicle is a certain age, you can apply for a “permanent” tag that will eliminate the yearly fee of their sticker on your license plate.  In addition, an older model may not be subject to the same emissions requirements as a new one, eliminating the needs for inspection, compliance, and funds expended.  Also, your insurance may even be reduced if you present paperwork showing that your vehicle has been improved in this manner.

Camouflage is another issue.  Your “beater” of a pickup truck doesn’t attract as much attention, both pre and post-SHTF.  It is less likely to be stolen or interfered with (interior looted, etc.)  Another thing is its simplicity.  The good mechanic will be able to advise you on what extra parts to obtain, pertaining to those that frequently wear out.  If the engine is simple, it is usually simple to repair it.  Of course there are other factors to weigh in, such as if it’s a gas guzzler, but here again, the mechanic can help you out in the initial assessment and can tell you whether or not the engine overhaul will significantly improve the gas mileage you’ve been getting.

Also worth mentioning is the fact that you may have “tailor made” this vehicle to serve your needs, such as weapons racks or tool brackets and boxes.  You are familiar with it, and know its limitations when you’re driving it…what it can and cannot do.  Think of how it was when you picked up the vehicle new.  You’ll be taking it back in the direction of that capability.  You won’t have to start out on a brand-new slate; it’s almost akin to having a surgery that will extend your life, and in this case it is the life of your vehicle.

Consider the engine overhaul on that early-model vehicle, and you’ll save money in the long run, and keep that anonymity that you so desperately desire as a prepper and survivalist.  The key is the good mechanic.  When all is finished, you’ll have something that will not look pretty on the outside as a new vehicle but you’ll have restored an asset that you need.  You will have invested in something that you know inside and out…capabilities and limits.  Then you can capitalize on this, and rely upon it again to suit your needs.  Happy motoring, and find that good mechanic!  JJ out!

About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

 

 

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

Everything You Need to do to Survive in the Wilderness

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mountain-man-205306_1280

Pixabay.com

By The Survival Place Blog

When it comes to survival in the wilderness, this is not something that should be taken for granted. Nature can be very harsh and unforgiving, and you have to be prepared. So many people try to take on the wilderness without making sure they’re fully prepared. And this is often a recipe for disaster. Don’t let yourself fall into this trap, and make sure you do everything you can to help your survival chances.

Imagine you’re preparing for a time when the world regresses, and we are forced back into nature. This is when all of your preparation and training is going to come in handy. Here is everything you need to do to survive in the wilderness when the time arrives.

Get Basic Training

The first thing you should do as soon as you can is to get basic survival training. This could be a few weeks of simple training on how to make a fire, learning Morse code, and hunting strategies. Getting some basic training is essential for helping you learn the ropes and develop new survival skills. Without this training, you’re basically going in blind to any survival situation.

Pixabay.com

Pixabay.com

Stock Up

You also have to make sure you have stocked up on all the relevant things. There is a lot of stuff you’re going to need for your survival experience. Things like weapons, a tent, fishing apparatus, etc. So, you should check out Chandler Rod and Gun Club and see the sorts of things they talk about. It is absolutely essential that you stock up and have the right supplies to help with your survival.

 

Watch Bear Grylls!

If you want to pick up further tips and ideas, you need to tune in and watch Bear Grylls. The survival expert often provides a lot of useful tips and suggestions on his programs. Use these as your bible and learn from them. You may even think about keeping a journal of all the things Bear suggests so that when the time comes you’re ready to use them.

Image Via Flickr

Build a Home

When you’re out there trying to survive in the wilds, you need a base. You have to have some sort of home or base of operations. And that means you need to get to work building somewhere. So, try to do this as soon as you can to make things easier for you. Find the ideal location and build yourself a fort or a hut you can live out of.

Pixabay.com

Pixabay.com

Expect the Unexpected

The main thing you need to remember when trying to survive in the wild is to expect the unexpected. Remember, nature can be unpredictable, and a lot of things might happen you haven’t prepared for. Try to pre-empt this by expecting and preparing as much as you can for unforeseen events. Have an emergency plan in place if the time comes.

Picture

As you can see, there is a lot to think about when it comes to survival in the wilderness. Only a few people are actually cut out for this kind of thing. By making use of these ideas and suggestions, you can be sure you will have a great chance of survival.

The Survival Place Blog: Everything You Need to do to Survive in the Wilderness

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping, Wilderness Survival Gear

You Have To Try This Delicious Onion Pie!

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You Have To Try This Delicious Onion Pie!

Today’s recipe is for and “Onion Pie”. It comes from the Primitive Cookery book and it is absolutely fantastic. It’s very inexpensive and easy but it is perfect for a main dish. Wonderful flavors and textures. You have to try this! ***************************** ***************************** Sign up for our Youtube Newsletter! – http://jas-townsend.com/ytemail.php Standing Crust Video – […]

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Choosing a living or camp site

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Choosing a living or camp site

On a warm spring day a young man went on an outing in the majestic mountains near his home. Although he had been there in those same mountains many times he had never been to this particular area before. After several hours of initial exploration he decided to go a little further. The young man […]

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Trout Lily

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Trout Lily

Trout Lily grows in huge colonies that can completely cover a forest floor. The colonies can be hundreds of years old and takes a long time to grow to such a size. Its bulbs are sterile up to about the seventh year and then it produces only one leaf and no flowers. When they mature […]

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Knowing Your Priorities In a Primitive Situation.

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Knowing Your Priorities In a Primitive Situation.

Whenever you may find yourself in a survival situation or choosing to live off the grid or even primitive you will have 5 basic priorities that you must have in order to survive. Most people know this and some do not. Reality personalities categorize these the way they themselves place these in order of importance […]

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On The Trail? A Simple Recipe For You.

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On The Trail? A Simple Recipe For You.

Today’s recipe is a simple meal meant for cooking while on the march or on the trail. These are “Norfolk Dumplings” and it comes from the Primitive Cookery book. For such a simple recipe, it really is quite delicious. A perfect outdoor recipe! ***************************** On The Trail? A Simple Recipe For You. ***************************** Sign up […]

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How to Protect Yourself as We Approach the Limits of the Internet

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ball-63527_1280

Pixabay.com

The Survival Place Blog – Staff Writer 

The Internet. As boundless and infinite as space. Or is it? Though spending time online has become one of America’s favorite past times — nearly 75 percent of U.S. homes have Internet access, according to the U.S. Census Bureau — it has also become the backbone of countless businesses, organizations and government agencies. Since the dawn of dial-up, the main goal of providers and the main demand of users has been faster, faster, faster. However, that horizonless hub of information may now be facing some very real limitations.

The World Wide Web may be intangible, but users still require very tangible methods of connecting to it. Analysts in the U.K. warn that the fiber optics and cables necessary to send data to our devices are rapidly approaching their limits. Data handling is not the only issue at hand, either — there also exists a power problem. With Internet accessibility and usage increasing everyday, in the country of the Britain alone, internet usage has the potential In just 20 years to consume all of the U.K.’s power supply. These troubles have many expressing very real concerns about Internet usage caps and even the possibility of collapse.

At the risk of such devastating consequences, backing up one’s data and protecting sensitive information from security breaches in the wake of an Internet collapse is more important than ever. Here are a few tips:

Create a partition

For Windows users, by default, the files you create are stored in your My Documents folder. This folder then categorizes the files based on the kind of files they are. This is great for an organization, but the My Documents and all of its subfolders inhabit the most vulnerable area of your hard drive: the Windows partition. If you create a different partition to store these files, when it is time to reinstall Windows, you do not overwrite the files, making it easier and safer to back up data.

Use an external hard drive

Naturally, as handy and convenient as cloud storage is, it will do you no good if you cannot reach the cloud. For your most sensitive information, like tax documents and identity data, or for your most treasured files, like family photos and videos, maintaining a separate hard drive allows you to have digital copies that aren’t “plugged in” to the Web. It is basically a catalog of your files that you can hold on to for safekeeping but hook up to a computer if you need access, no online transmission required. So if the Web unravels, you still have your data.

Be informed

In 1998, a group of hackers known as LOpht attempted to warn a panel of senators of the threats that lurked in the shadows of the Web. LOpht spoke of the vulnerabilities within programs and software and encouraged the statesmen to take action, yet nothing was done to ensure the safety of Internet users, and the burden of security falls on the shoulders of the users even today. Cybercrime is constantly evolving. With every security measure businesses and individuals take, the black hats seem to find new ways around. Being educated on cybersecurity vulnerabilities is your first line of defense in online security.

As engineers scramble to find solutions for the limitations of optic fibers, and as countries begin to understand the power demands swelling internet usage requires, it’s time to begin your own line of defense against the consequences of finding the end of the Internet frontier.

The Survival Place Blog: How to Protect Yourself as We Approach the Limits of the Internet

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

Being Prepared: Have You Covered The Basics?

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Being Prepared: Have You Covered The Basics?

Let’s be honest, when it comes to preparedness matters, most of us tend to gravitate toward those aspects which bring us the most pleasure. In some cases, we neglect to involve our families in our plans and practice. I can tell you that I truly enjoy practicing bushcraft skills, cooking with the bare essentials over […]

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Five Alternatives to the Most Overrated Survival Items

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mre wikimedia

By Joshua Krause – The Daily Sheeple

If you’re new to the prepping scene, you should probably know right off the bat that you’re about to waste a lot of money. I’m so sorry to break it to you, but it’s true. We’ve all done it. It’s practically a right of passage by now.

You’ve just become aware of how fragile our society really is, and all the horrifying ways the shit can hit the fan, and you think you have to rush out and buy a bunch of supplies and gear to survive the inevitable looting spree. There’s something you should know first though. If there is one thing that is practically guaranteed to part an otherwise smart person from their money, it is fear.

So stop, take a deep breath, and realize that in all likelihood the world is not going to end tomorrow. There may not be any serious crises for months or years. I know this (as do many other preppers) because I couldn’t possibly count the number of times I’ve heard someone I would consider reputable, sound the alarm on a possible threat.

Don’t get me wrong I’m glad they do, because it’s good that we have people who are dedicated to looking for these threats, but you should know that most of them never come to fruition. If anything, they are usually signs that our society is in a slow decline towards oblivion, rather than an explosive last hurrah. There’s still danger ahead, but when it’s all said and done, there may never be a single day that will go down in history as the day the world ended.

So now that I’ve assuaged your fears, hopefully you’re gripping your wallet a little tighter than you were before. That state of mind you’re experiencing, the one that isn’t an anxiety riddled mess, is the correct state of mind you should be in for prepping. It’s time to take a critical look at that list of supplies and gear you’re thinking of purchasing, and be prepared to cross a few items off, because some of them are highly overrated.

Canned Food and MRE’s

I don’t want to completely bash canned food. It certainly has its merits. In most cases it will last a very long time, longer than the expiration date in fact, but most canned foods aren’t very healthy. The whole canning process tends to degrade the nutritional value of the food, and most cans are laced with toxic preservatives and BPA. They’re also heavy and somewhat awkward to store. If you want to can your own food, that’s a worthy endeavor for other reasons, but to go to the store and max out your credit card on canned food is a terrible idea.

After realizing the folly of cans many preppers turn to MRE’s, but they also come with their own set of problems. For me personally, I find them to be utterly disgusting and unhealthy. They usually taste great when you’ve been hiking all day and you’re starving, but in that condition anything can taste good. I remember the first time I tried an MRE. I thought, “wow, this tastes familiar.” After looking over the ingredients, I realized that I was basically eating the same stuff that is served at McDonald’s and 7/11.

What Should You Get Instead?

mountain house

Freeze dried food. Mountain House brand is the most popular, but there are several other good brands out there. It’s arguably healthier than most packaged food, and has a shelf life of 10 years or so. It’s small and lightweight, and to me at least, has an excellent flavor. The only downside is that it’s not perfectly edible out of the package. You have to add water (preferably hot), but I consider that a fair trade-off compared to the downsides of the other options. If you live in an area that would have a severe lack of water after the collapse, then maybe canned food is for you. Otherwise, freeze dried is the way to go.

Generator

This is a tough one, because I have to admit that generators can be useful for many short-term disasters. If you need to keep the lights on for a couple of days it’s a viable option, but generators may be completely useless during any long-term disaster. In that case, they become a logistical nightmare. Since it’s safe to assume that there will be gas shortages during any major disaster, do you really want to store enough gasoline to last you six months? And keep in mind that gas has a limited shelf life, and generators are usually really noisy.

Another thing to consider is energy efficiency. The majority of the electricity you use in your home goes toward appliances that provide heat. But the process of turning the combustion from your generator into electricity, and then back into heat, is incredibly inefficient. We don’t normally think about this because the power grid provides electricity at such a low-cost, (relative to a generator) so it’s not a big deal.

What Should You Get Instead?

propane stove

If you live in a rural area, you might be able source wood from your environment. Otherwise, You should probably use propane for all your heating needs. There are portable stoves, lanterns, and space heaters that all run on propane. You can buy those tiny Coleman tanks for your stove, or you can buy an adapter to connect it to a larger tank. Most of the lanterns have to take the Coleman tanks, but many of the space heaters are designed for the 20lb tanks as well. It’s a pretty versatile option, and best of all, propane has a much longer shelf life than gasoline. If you have to stock up on fuel, this is definitely the superior option.

The rest of your energy needs will probably go to electronics, which will be minuscule compared to your heating needs. For that, I would take a thin and flexible 100 watt solar panel over a generator any day.

Camelbak Canteens

I’m an avid backpacker, so I think I have more experience with this than any other item on this list. For such a simple task, there is a wide variety of ways to carry water. Nowadays the most popular way is with any kind of soft, flexible canteen. They’re lightweight, easy to store, and since you can squeeze the air out of them the water doesn’t slosh around and make a lot of noise.

Over the past 10 years it seems that the Camelback and the Platypus canteens have come to dominate the market. But frankly, I’ve never been a big fan of those drink tube apparatuses, due to their maintenance needs. You have to keep the tube and the drink valve very clean if you don’t want to get any mold. It doesn’t take a whole lot of effort, but personally, I don’t want to put any more work than I have to into my canteen, and I don’t see the Camelbak giving me a huge advantage in any way.

What Should You Get Instead?

canteen

For a while I tried using bota bags, but honestly I don’t think they make them like they used to. Maybe I’m just unlucky, but I’ve tried using three different bota bags over the years, and none of them worked very well (they always leak).

If you want a really simple soft-shelled water carrier, I’d recommend the military issue bladder canteen. It holds two quarts, and has all the advantages you’d come to expect from a flexible canteen, but without any of the fuss.

Camouflage

I’d have to say, the most overrated item a prepper could buy is military camouflage. There really isn’t a good reason for it unless you live way out in the sticks, in which case you probably don’t need a military pattern. A good hunting camouflage pattern should be sufficient. And since only 18 percent of the US population lives in a rural area, it’s safe to say that camouflage isn’t really that important for most preppers. If anything, that would just make you stand out in an urban or suburban area.

Even camouflage that is specifically designed for an urban area is a bad idea. Even if it helps to conceal you in a tactical situation, it will still make you stand out in literally every other situation.

What Should You Get Instead?

dickies shirt

Instead of camouflage, just get something that is durable, comfortable, and is dyed in solid, muted earth tones. I’m sure there’s more than one opinion on what that entails, but in this case I’m referring to brown, tan, olive drab, and gray, or at least something similar.

These colors have the advantage of being versatile. You can wear them on city streets or in suburban parks without standing out, but on the off-chance that you wind up in a rural area later on, you won’t be too obvious there either. Basically, it’s not the best you can use for any single environment, but it’s the best you can use in most environments without looking like a stereotypical survivalist.

Your best bet would probably be something made by Dickies. They make great civilian looking clothes that are just as durable as their military counterparts, and it’s not hard to find Dickies shirts and jeans that come in earth tone colors. Wrangler and Carhartt brands are also great choices.

Ballistic Plates

This one has a lot of the same problems as wearing camouflage. It’s pretty much impossible to wear these bullet proof plates without it being painfully obvious. They’re so big and heavy, that every soldier who wears them looks like some kind of sci-fi mashup with a Roman legionnaire.

That’s not to say it’s stupid. It’s probably just unnecessary. These plates are made for stopping rifle rounds, and considering the fact that only 2-3 percent of murders are committed with rifles, it’s safe to say that ballistic plates are overkill for civilians.

Keep in mind that the violent criminals you might face after the SHTF aren’t that different than the ones you might run into now. There will probably be an increase in murders committed by rifles since there would be no cops to stop people from carrying them openly, but I suspects that pistols, shotguns, bats, and knives will still be the most common murder weapons.

What Should You Get Instead?

kevlar vest

If you even need ballistic protection to begin with, which I don’t think most people will, just an ordinary kevlar vest will do. At most you won’t need anything that is rated above level IIIa, which should stop pretty much all handgun rounds, and some shotgun rounds. They’re also lighter, breathe better in hot weather, and some are designed to be concealable. There’s no need to overdo it with a hulking rig of ballistic plates.

Now I’m sure a lot of folks will disagree parts of this list, but does it sound reasonable to you? If not, then for the benefit of anyone reading this who is new to prepping, let’s hear your opinion in the comments. And if you have any overrated boondoggles from your early prepping days that you’d rather forget, now is a good time to get it off your chest!

Delivered by The Daily Sheeple: Five Alternatives to the Most Overrated Survival Items

About the author:

Joshua Krause is a reporter, writer and researcher at The Daily Sheeple. He was born and raised in the Bay Area and is a freelance writer and author. You can follow Joshua’s reports at Facebook or on his personal Twitter. Joshua’s website is Strange Danger .

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

Prepping: The Only Way to be Ready for Anything is to be Ready for Anything

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By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

Most of the time, no one actually expects the S to HTF on that particular day.

Most folks don’t go through their lives expecting one specific disastrous event to occur, and then have it unfold according to a predetermined script.

Two weeks ago, I didn’t get up in the morning expecting some jerk to get mad at his girlfriend, light a tree in her yard on fire, and set off a 100,000 acre forest fire. But he did.

People don’t go to work, expecting to sit down at their desks and grab another cup of coffee, only to find the company filed bankruptcy at midnight the night before. But it happens.

The folks in West Virginia last year didn’t expect that  a container would leak deadly chemicals into the municipal water supply. But it did.

Residents of Haiti weren’t expecting it the day an earthquake leveled most of the homes on the island. But they still found themselves homeless.

Some disasters we can expect. If we live on the coast and there’s a hurricane warning, we know that we either need to evacuate or batten down the hatches and ride out the storm. We are usually aware if a war is brewing. Often, we suspect we’re on thin ice in the workplace long before the pink slip arrives on our desk.

But most disasters are a complete surprise, either in their suddenness or an unexpected intensity. We can’t prep specifically for every single eventuality, but that doesn’t mean we must face challenges unprepared. By combining adaptability with general preparation, we can be ready for whatever life throws our way.

If you’re a fan of shows like Doomsday Preppers, or a reader of some disaster-specific websites, you may feel that to be truly prepared, you must have preparations specific to given disasters. Maybe you live near a nuclear facility, so you worry about a disaster at the plant. Perhaps you live in an area prone to earthquakes. It could be your deepest concern is the economy, a potential catastrophic pole shift, or a jihad on our shores. And you get ready with this disaster in mind.

While it’s important to prep for threats specific to your geographical location, if you’re only prepping for one disaster, you’re not truly prepared.

The only way to be ready for anything is to be ready for anything.

I was recently interviewed on the awesome radio show, The Liberty Brothers, regarding my family’s experience during the King Fire.  Jim asked me to share what I’d done specifically to prep for forest fires, considering I live on the edge of thousands of acres of national forest. I thought about it for a moment, and then I realized…

I couldn’t actually answer his question.

Nothing in my preps was specific to the threat of wildfire.

At first, in light of that question, I thought, well, duh. I should have been specifically ready for this. Fail!

But then I thought about it a little bit more. We were ready. There are only a couple of minor changes that we’ve made to our preparedness plan in hindsight of this situation.

The key to true preparedness isn’t to be ready for one thing.

It’s to be ready for anything.

How can you be ready for anything?

Teaching someone to be ready for anything would take an entire book.  (And there is one, as a matter of fact – it’s called The Prepper’s Blueprint.)

But here’s the Cliff Notes version. You have to prioritize your most vital needs, and prepare accordingly. Here are the most important ways to be ready for anything – everything you do on top of this is just extra protection for your family.

Be prepared to bug out. There is a wide variety of reasons you might need to suddenly leave your home: wildfires, industrial accidents, and hurricanes, to name a few. Many evacuations allow you 5 minutes to gather what you need and go. If you can do it in 3 minutes, you’re that much further ahead of the others in your area. Here are two different takes on the bug out bag: Ready Nutrition and Graywolf Survival.

Be prepared to live without power.  After a devastating storm or other natural disaster, it can sometimes take several weeks to restore power to everyone. You should be ready for this by figuring out secondary cooking, heating and light plans ahead of time. Preparations for climate will vary based on your location and the season, but you want to be able to maintain a survivable temperature, at the very least. Much preferable to “survivable” is a plan that keeps you warm and cozy. Here’s a guide to prepping for a two week power outage.

Be prepared to live without potable running water. The aftermath of many different disasters is made worse by the fact that public utilities are also affected. When we lived in our cabin, our well pump ran on electricity, so any power outage also meant that we had no running water. Not only this, but there have been several examples over the past year of exactly how vulnerable our water supply is.  Residents of West Virginia were without water for weeks after a chemical spill, and more recently, Toledo, Ohio had to ban public water usage when an algae bloom occurred in the public water supply. You should have a water plan, including back-up supply of drinking water, as well as a way to harvest and purify water. As well, you need to have some back-up sanitation solutions.

Be prepared for financial emergencies.  In our current economic climate, a personal financial disaster is on the horizon for many families. You need to build an emergency fund to help prepare for life without a steady paycheck or for unexpected, but necessary, expenses that crop up.  Build a pantry of food and supplies that can be relied on during difficult times.  This means that you’ll have to spend less on those items, freeing up your savings for things like keeping a roof over your head or keeping the utilities on.

Be prepared to live without going to the store. Many events cause a breakdown in services.  Perhaps supplies can’t get through because of a natural disaster. Maybe the power is out for a long period of time and purchases can’t be made electronically. If a pandemic were to break out, you might need to isolate your family to keep them safe from illness. Whatever the reason, you should have enough supplies that you can hunker down in your home for at least a month, if not longer. Stock up on food, first aid supplies, over-the-counter remedies, health and beauty aids, and pet supplies to see you through until business is once again restored.

Be prepared to defend your family and property. Violence and crime often follow in the footsteps of a disaster. Who can forget the photos of looters carrying televisions through the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina? During the recent civil unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, the only business that were not looted where the ones from which the owners stood armed and ready to defend their property. Depending on the situation and the desperation level, property crimes can quickly turn into violent crimes. Make a plan for defending your family. If you’re armed, go to the range and practice, practice, practice. Secure your home and make it less appealing to criminals with layers of protection.

 

Obviously, this is very general and you’re going to want to go more in-depth with each of these preparations. The list isn’t meant to include every single possibility.  It’s important to research your area and identify specific threats. However, by creating a broad base of preparedness, you’ll find that you are well-equipped to handle nearly any trouble that man or Mother Nature sends your way.

Here are some books to get you started:

The Prepper’s Blueprint: The Step-By-Step Guide To Help You Through Any Disaster

The Pantry Primer: How to Build a One Year Food Supply in Three Months

And some disaster specific books:

Ebola Survival Handbook: A Collection of Tips, Strategies, and Supply Lists From Some of the World’s Best Preparedness Professionals

Prepper’s Home Defense: Security Strategies to Protect Your Family by Any Means Necessary

The Prepper’s Financial Guide: Strategies to Invest, Stockpile and Build Security for Today and the Post-Collapse Marketplace

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: Prepping: The Only Way to be Ready for Anything is to be Ready for Anything

About the author:

Daisy Luther lives on a small organic homestead in Northern California.  She is the author of The Organic Canner,  The Pantry Primer: A Prepper’s Guide to Whole Food on a Half-Price Budget, and The Prepper’s Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health and preparedness, and offers a path of rational anarchy against a system that will leave us broke, unhealthy, and enslaved if we comply.  Daisy’s articles are widely republished throughout alternative media. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest,  and Twitter,.

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

95 Survival Tips For When the SHTF: “Carry These. Do This. And Don’t Ever…”

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bugout-guide-2

By Mac Slavo – SHTFplan.com

Here is a quick barrage of sometimes unconventional survival tips for when the worst happens in just a few fast minutes of video.

Some are useful supplies to bring along, others are simple tips you need to learn and practice before the situation gets real.

These ideas may help you stay alive, avoid losing heat and sweating, stay hydrated and establish shelter, fire and food:

Would you carry your bug out bag supplies in a guitar case to throw off suspicion, or remember aluminum foil as a simple fire starting barrier to moist or wet ground? Remember how to foster sparks when you need to start a fire without wasting too much valuable time?

What about homemade ballistic protection? Or a hobo fishing kit and toothpaste for bug bites? Glow sticks to attract rescue crews? Don’t forget first aid basics and cigarettes for barter, or alternately, bug repellent.

Most know the basics of water treatment, but carrying bleach, charcoal and/or tablets is a must for your bug out bag. This video remind you not to wash wounds or broken skin in questionable or untreated water, as infection could result.

Add a foil blanket inside a tarp or tent structure, and amplify the heat generated and kept in the temporary shelter – now a “super” shelter. Ponchos can turn into a shelter, block rain, or collect rain water for additional drinking sources.

There are many other simple tips and supplies you’ll want to think about ahead of time – consider these factors, and use them to upgrade and refine your preps and plans. Think ahead, practice and train – well before the SHTF.

Have some tips that weren’t covered in the video, or have it beat? Please share and discuss below.

This article first appeared at SHTFplan.com: 95 Survival Tips For When the SHTF: “Carry These. Do This. And Don’t Ever…”

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

A 300-Year-Old Delicious Sausage Recipe

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A 300-Year-Old Delicious Sausage Recipe

Published on Feb 29, 2016 Michael joins us in the kitchen again this week! Today he’s brought us a late 17th-century sausage recipe from Martha Washington’s Book of Cookery. This recipe is attributed to a dish from “The Tavern at Oxford Gates” in the city of Oxford, England. These light and savory sausages are so […]

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How This Man Converted “Underground Shelter Using a 20 Ft. Shipping Container”

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underground-shipping-container

By Mac Slavo – SHTFplan.com

In a SHTF event, underground is exactly where many people plan to go to ride out the storm of whatever has descended upon society.

With brewing unrest and economic collapse, the elite have poured millions of dollars into luxury underground communities – many fitted to be more like five-star hotels than emergency bunkers. Even the Davos elite have expressed worry. Those with the means to do so hope to use private planes and helicopters to escape and hideaway. Continuity of Government (COG) operations have a parallel government structure in place buried in fortified mountains redoubts that can withstand all contingencies.

For the rest of us, it is only the most well-prepared among us who will have access to underground facilities – where families could seek refuge from marauding masses, extreme weather, criminals and rapists, police sweeps and paramilitary raids among other scenarios. With the right structure, retreat and hideaway preparations, it could be one of your most important assets.

There are many companies that will install these shelters, but the main barrier for almost every prepper is cost, and a balance of priorities for your limited resources. So it is no surprise that many people have figured out how to build their own.

There’s plenty of disagreement over what methods are best, and sufficiently safe enough, to endure time, the elements and the incredible weight of the earth when considering underground shelters. Further, everyone will have different preferences and needs.

But this man successfully built a very nice looking underground shelter using a 20′ shipping container, with a reinforced concrete entrance using a process that is simple enough to be DIY, with the exception of lowering the container into the ground, and the use of heavy equipment to excavate the earth (which could be DIY).

Whether you think buried shipping containers are ideal, or disastrous, is worth checking out this idea from Wayne Martin’s YouTube channel:

Final attempt to record building of an underground shelter using a 20 ft. shipping container. For those wondering why I didn’t simply pile dirt over it without pouring a concrete cap first….. These containers are mostly sheet metal. Heavy duty as it is, the roof and sides will push inwards from the weight. Eventually the metal will rust through and you’ll be buried alive. My way will insure it is still there a few hundred years from now. Problem is, you’d better keep an eye on your sump pump. If it goes bad or loses power, you’ll go in one day and find it the whole thing flooded. A surface alarm letting you know the water level is above where it should be isn’t a bad idea. Putting the sump pump on a UPS is also a good thing.

Some have ruled out shipping containers, however, because water and moisture are such important considerations, and these metal boxes are not water tight without being sealed up and reinforced, in spite of the sump pump system which is basically mandatory for these structures.

SHTF commenter “Genius” explained that, for this reason, he recommended building a shelter inside a 2000+ gallon septic tank, which is plenty large enough for people and supplies, and is built for water tightness:

Hey Man, you might want to rethink the buried container idea. I have seen first hand a man that buried a container and the next spring it had 3 feet of water in it. They are anything BUT waterproof! You will waste a lot of money and labor if you think it will seal your stuff. A better idea is to bury a few (or a lot) of the biggest plastic septic tanks with good lid seals, they are not as roomy but way way better sealed and rustproof and a hell of a lot easier to haul to your location and bury. If you buried oversea containers where would you get rid of all the excess dirt, how would you hide that? A 2000 gallon septic tank is big enough for 4 people and quite a few supplies. You also need to think about a powered ventilation system, I use 12 volt computer fans with 3 inch pvc pipe, a sealed 12 volt battery, a 20 watt solar panel and a small charge controller. get 2 batteries and a 50 watt panel and you can run your radio and charge small things and have light (led). Please think again before you waste your precious resources on buried containers, you will thank me later :)

This YouTuber, RealWorldReport, shares his approach on how to build a buried structure from scratch with lumber – and on a limited budget:

Mike Oehler wrote the classic book The $50 & Up Underground House Book on building underground homes on the cheap back in the 70s, geared towards minimalists and off-the-gridders.

Many of these same ideas can be utilized in tailoring an underground shelter plan for your prepping needs. They center around sound principles of construction, using found or cheap materials, consideration for a water/moisture barrier, novel solutions to water runoff that could damage an improperly built underground home, and general principles for concealing your home and blending in with the beauty of the natural environment.

Depending upon your situation, a well thought out panic room can be built – and concealed – in your existing structure, or a closely connected one either above or below ground. Joel Skousen is the leading authority on the DIY, common sense and time tested strategies for The Secure Home – including how to reinforce your entire home, as well as how to construct a protected and unnoticed safe room for any emergency that may arise.

This article first appeared at SHTFplan.com: How This Man Converted “Underground Shelter Using a 20 Ft. Shipping Container”

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping, Shelter

A Delicious “Boiled Trout”

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A Delicious “Boiled Trout”

Michael Dragoo is back in the kitchen and he has brought a wonderful recipe from Martha Washington’s “Booke of Cookery” (annotated by Karen Hess). This “boiled trout” dish is actually poached rather than boiled, so it takes only minutes to prepare. This recipe is so delicious, it will likely find it’s way into our top […]

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Frumenty: A Wheat Pudding From the 18th Century

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Frumenty: A Wheat Pudding From the 18th Century

Today’s unusual recipe is absolutely delicious. It’s called “frumenty,” and it’s found in Charles Cook’s 1749 cookbook, “The London and Country Cook.” This warm dish is perfect for this cold weather, you have to try it!   ***************************** Click here for today’s recipe! – http://jas-townsend.com/furmenty.php Sign up for our Youtube Newsletter! – http://jas-townsend.com/ytemail.php To purchase […]

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Hunter Gathering Cook

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Hunter Gathering Cook

‘Dent-de-lion’: Hunting Lions, Salade Pissenlit & the Ultimate pickling liquid. One of the first questions asked by many a beginner when it comes to their first foray into the wild larder is ‘what easiest to begin with?’ The most obvious would be the stinging nettle, blackberries, elderflower and of course: the dandelion. Dandelions (Taraxacum officinale) […]

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An 18th Century Cheese Soup

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An 18th Century Cheese Soup

Published on Jan 25, 2016 This cheese soup is another recipe from Ann Cook’s 1755 cookbook, “Professed Cookery.” It’s a very easy and delicious little dish that is perfect for this cold weather. You have to try it! An 18th Century Cheese Soup ***************************** Genesee Country Village – https://www.gcv.org/ Click Here for the last week’s […]

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Survival

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Survival

Survival.  The very idea of being placed in a survival situation evokes deep feelings.  The reaction it stirs in you indicates a great deal about how you would react to an unexpected situation where lives may be on the line.  Could you accurately assess your ability to survive in a real survival situation?  Do you […]

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Persimmons

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Persimmons

Persimmons are a sweet and delicious fruit that are an excellent source of vitamin A, C, and B-complex and minerals such as potassium, manganese and copper. They contain an anti-cancer and anti-tumor compound called Betulinic acid which makes them highly beneficial for lung, colon, prostate, breast, and skin cancer. Persimmons contain active enzymes that help […]

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Kale

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Kale

Kale is a nutritionally packed leafy vegetable that contains incredible healing and rejuvenating properties. Kale is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, chlorophyll, amino acids, vitamins A, C, E, K, B-complex and minerals such as iron, magnesium, copper, and potassium. Kale is an anti-cancer powerhouse and contains phytochemicals such as glucosinolates that help protect the body […]

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70 Tips That Will Help You Survive What Is About To Happen To America

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Survival World News

70 Sign

By Michael Snyder – End Of The American Dream

You may have noticed that things are starting to get crazy. Financial markets are imploding, violent crime rates are soaring in our major cities, and we have witnessed a truly unusual series of natural disasters in recent months. War in the Middle East continues to rage out of control, and Islamic terror continues to spread all over the globe. And many believe that 2016 is going to be a year of political shaking, civil unrest, governmental crackdowns and great economic chaos in the United States. All it is going to take to plunge our society into full-blown panic mode is a major “trigger event” of some sort. Another 9/11, a new “Lehman Brothers” moment, a massive EMP burst from the sun or a historic seismic event are all examples of what this “trigger event” could look like.

So are you…

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Filed under: Emergency Survival Tips, How To Prepare, Prepping

Primitive Life Intro

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Primitive Life Intro

                                                                                  Primitive life     Hello my name is Jason Wroten. I came up with the concept of primitive life training last year. I felt the need to teach people primitive survival skills in hope of spreading the ancient knowledge that was passed down to me at a young age and knowledge that I […]

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The No Mess No Fuss Method of Making DIY Laundry Detergent

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No Muss No Fuss Laundry Detergent

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

It seems as though the big news going around the prepping and DIY community is how to make your own laundry detergent.  As a matter of fact, enter “DIY Laundry Detergent” in your search engine and you will come up with more than 1.8 million hits.  As you start to click through the links, you will find dozens of variations on the recipe.

Well I am here to tell you that you can forget about grating bars of soap.  In addition, you can forget about making up 5 gallon buckets filled with detergent and you can forget about cooking up a laundry detergent stew in a big kettle on the stove.

Who has time for that craziness?  I sure don’t.

The Basic Recipe for Laundry Detergent

Before I launch into the recipe, I want to say a word about the ingredients.

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: The No Mess No Fuss Method of Making DIY Laundry Detergent

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping, Recipes

Protein In SHTF

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Protein In SHTF

When we think about bugging out or bugging in we often think about firearms, backpacks, and other tools. We often do not consider our edibles. Preparing for a bad time and putting away stock is always a good thing. Your preparations will only last so long though, and planning ahead for when your preparations run […]

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How to Dehydrate Foods for Long Term Storage

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By Tess Pennington – Ready Nutrition

I wholeheartedly believe in layering your preparedness endeavors with both short and long-term food sources. That way, you can ensure that you have enough food to see you  through any type of event. Many turn to freeze-dried foods as the quintessential long-term food source. This can be both costly and cause problems with your health. Many freeze-dried foods are riddled with sodium, empty carbohydrates, and preservatives. This can cause your entire digestive system to back-up. Perhaps, the freeze-dried 10 year shelf life, isn’t worth the constipation. That said, there is another method that is both cost effective, and more nutritious.

For centuries, dehydrating food has been seen as a survival necessity. Many believe this preservation method is the safest, most affordable and best way to preserve flavors of foods. The dehydration process removes moisture from the food so that bacteria, yeast and mold cannot grow. The added benefit is the dehydration process minimally affects the nutritional content of food. In fact, when using an in-home dehydration unit, 3-5% of the nutritional content is lost compared to the canning method which losses 60-80% nutritional content. Additionally, important vitamins and nutrition such as: vitamin A and C, carbohydrates, fiber, potassium, magnesium, selenium and sodium are not altered or lost in the drying process. Therefore, the end result is nutrient packed food that can be stored long-term.

How Can a Person Use a Dehydrator

In the book, The Prepper’s Cookbook, I outline the multiple ways that one can use a dehydrator. They can dry vegetables, fruits, make jerky, make fruit or vegetable leather, dry herbs, make spices, dry soup mixes, noodles, and even make crafts. When I first began dehydrating foods, I purchased a modest dehydrator. Then, I realized how much I loved it and got a higher end model.

Dehydrating vegetables and fruits  to use for long-term storage is a great way of including needed nutrition into diets with minimal investment. When dehydrating food, one should use fresh produce or meat. Typically, when overly ripe fruits and vegetables are dehydrated, the texture is not as crisp. For example, if one were to dehydrate over ripe bananas, the end result would be a chewy banana chip as opposed to a crispy banana chip.  If a person were to use the ripe fruits or vegetables, they could puree the produce and make fruit or vegetable leather to use later.

How Long Does Dehydrated Food Last

In most cases, dehydrated food can be stored for up to a year. Once dehydrated, the food does not take up a lot of space, and can be stored in a more organized fashion.

  • Fruits and vegetables can last for up to 1 year, if properly stored.
  • Dried meats should be consumed within 2-3 months.  However, it is suggested that if dried meats have not been consumed after 1 month, they should be stored in the refrigerator to prolong the freshness.
  • Herbs can last for years.
  • Noodles should be eaten within 1 year in order to enjoy the freshness.

If a person wanted to rehydrate the food to use in cooking, add boiling water and cover with a lid for 20-30 minutes to expedite the process. Note: it is recommended to add salt after the rehydration process has been completed.

Storing Dry Foods

Once food has been dehydrated, it should be stored in an area not exposed to a lot of light, such as a pantry.  It is recommended that any food that contains vitamin A not be exposed to light.  According to James Talmage Stevens’ book, Making the Best of Basics, Stevens recommends these general storage suggestions:

  • Freezer zip-lock bags are excellent for packaging dried foods.  Force excess air from bags as they are sealed.
  • Procure heavy-duty, food-grade, storage-quality, sealable plastic bags from local commercial packaging wholesalers.
  • Store dried food products in a cool, dry location out of direct sunlight. Use a craft paper inside larger plastic bags to shield dried foods from sunlight. Paper used outside the plastic bags provides a nesting place for bugs or spiders.
  • Store only one kind of food in each individual package to avoid mixing flavors and possible cross-contamination should molds or spoilage occur.
  • Another method for storing dried products is to place dried food in a food-quality, plastic bag, then put it in an airtight glass or metal container.
  • Discard moldy food. Don’t take chances on botulism or a debilitating sickness over a few pennies or dollars. Don’t feed mold foods to pets, either!
  • The problem of a few bugs in dried foods may be solved by spreading the infested dried food on a cookie pan, placing in tn a 300 degree oven for 25-30 minutes.  Bugs and eggs die, and the food is edible again.

In planning for a long term disaster, people are always trying to find foods they can look forward to that will give them optimum nutrition.  Having the necessary vitamins and nutrition will give a person mental clarity, and strength to carry on during a disaster.  After all, surviving and being healthy is what matters.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: How to Dehydrate Foods for Long Term Storage

The Prepper's BlueprintTess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals.

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

 

 

Filed under: Food, How To Prepare, Prepping

Bone Broth

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Bone Broth

Bone Broth It’s winter here in Colorado so Aaron with Dream Catcher Botanicals shows you how to make bone broth. Stay warm! Bone Broth

The post Bone Broth appeared first on Around The Cabin.

A Delicious Cheese Spread, Welsh Rabbit from 1788.

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A Delicious Cheese Spread, Welsh Rabbit from 1788.

Today’s recipe is from Richard Briggs’ 1788 cookbook, “The English Art of Cookery” It’s for a delicious and easy cheese spread. Jon shows first how to make it, then he demonstrates three ways to serve it, including an authentic recipe for Welsh rabbit, a very popular Tavern food of the day! A Delicious Cheese Spread, […]

The post A Delicious Cheese Spread, Welsh Rabbit from 1788. appeared first on Around The Cabin.

Winter is Coming: Here’s Your Vehicle Emergency Kit Checklist

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By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

“Still … in this world only winter is certain.” ― George R.R. Martin, A Dance with Dragons (A Song of Ice and Fire)

If you happen to be a Game of Thrones fan, you know the Stark Family motto: “Winter is coming.”  It’s inevitable and sometimes dangerous. According to all predictions, this winter will be a repeat of last year, or perhaps even worse.  Most of the country can expect extreme cold, an abundance of snow, and a longer-than-normal winter. It may be early in the season, but that first storm of the year can sneak up on you. Now is the time to double check your preparations and be certain that you are ready for anything, well before the first snowflake falls.

Many of us spend far more of our waking hours away from home, busy with work, school, or chauffeuring our kids to their various activities. Because of this, a vehicle emergency kit is vital. In recent winters, there were two notable situations during which a well-stocked kit would have been beneficial. During one scenario, a freak snowstorm struck the Atlanta, Georgia area.  Because weather like this is such a rarity, the area was completely unprepared, officials didn’t have the experience or equipment needed to deal with it, and traffic gridlocked almost immediately. Hundreds of people were stranded as the freeway turned into a scene reminiscent of The Walking Dead, with bumper-to-bumper vehicles at a standstill.  Those without food and water in their vehicles went hungry, and many people ran out of gas as they tried to keep warm. No matter how comfortable you are with winter driving, in a situation like this, you are at the mercy of others who may not be so experienced.

The take-home preparedness point here is that it doesn’t matter how great of a driver you are in the snow, whether or not you have moved to the tropics from your winter chalet in Antarctica, or whether you have huge knobby tires and 4WD.  Over-confidence in your own ability can cause people to forget about the lack of skills that other folks have. Many times, people end up in a crisis situation through no fault of their own and are at the mercy of other people who have no idea what they are doing. (source)

The next situation had a lot more potential for a tragic ending, had it not been for the survival skills of a father of 4 small children.  A family of six had taken off for a day of snowy adventure, when their Jeep flipped over in a remote part of the Seven Troughs mountain range in Northwestern Nevada. James Glanton, a miner and experienced hunter, kept his family alive and unscathed for two days in the frigid wilderness using only the items from his vehicle and the environment. Due to his survival skills and the things he had on hand, none of the family members so much as suffered frostbite while awaiting rescue. You can learn more about the hero dad’s resourcefulness HERE.

Before adding any preps to your vehicle, make sure that it is well maintained, because not having a breakdown in the first place is a better plan than surviving the breakdown. Change your oil as recommended, keep your fluids topped up,  and keep your tires in good condition, replacing them when needed.  As well, particularly when poor weather is imminent, be sure to keep your fuel level above the halfway point. If you happen to get stranded, being able to run your vehicle for increments of time will help keep you warm. Build a relationship with a mechanic you can trust, and pre-empt issues before they become vehicle failures at the worst possible time.

What’s in my vehicle emergency kit?

Disaster can strike when you least expect it, so now is the time to put together a kit that can see you through a variety of situations. I drive an SUV, and I keep the following gear in the back at all times. You can modify this list for your amount of space, your environment, the seasons, and your particular skill set.  Some people who are adept at living off the land may scale this down, while other people may feel it isn’t enough.  I make small modifications between my cold weather kit and my warm weather kit, but the basics remain the same. While you should have the supplies available to set off on foot, in many cases, the safer course of action is to stay with your vehicle and wait for assistance.

Some people feel that having a cell phone means they can just call for assistance. While this is a great plan, and you should have a communications device, it should never be your only plan. What if there is no signal in your area or if cell service has been interrupted?  What if you simply forgot to charge your phone? In any scenario, calling for help should never be your only plan. You should always be prepared to save yourself.

How-to-Create-a-Vehicle-Emergency-Kit1-300x236

I drive a small SUV, and I manage to fit a substantial amount of gear in it, still leaving plenty of room for occupants. The tub on the right hand side just has a couple of things in the bottom and serves two purposes. It keeps the other tubs from sliding around, and it contains shopping bags after a trip to the grocery store. You can also place purchases on top of the other containers if necessary. I have two 18 gallon totes and a smaller 10 gallon tote, with individual components in small containers within them.

Tools

tools

knife

First Aid

first aid

I use old Altoids containers for small items like band-aids and alcohol wipes. They stand up far better than the flimsy cardboard boxes those items come in.  (Also, that means we get to have Altoids.)

altoids tin

Light

The police flashlight is also a taser.

Individual Kits

individual kit It’s sort of hard to see but in the photo above, the container is a stocking hat for warmth and a waterproof hat that will also provide some sun protection.  Inside the container are two pairs of socks, a rain poncho, a Berkey sport bottle (it can purify up to 100 gallons of water), and a space blanket. Each of these is topped off with a hoodie in warmer weather. In the winter, gloves and scarves replace the hoodie.

Shelter

shelter Obviously, THIS is not the Taj Mahal of tents. But it fits easily into a backpack and would be sufficient for day-to-day emergencies in warmer weather.  In the winter, and anytime we are going further from home, we have a bigger sturdier tent that we put in the vehicle. This would be used in the event that we were stranded but for some reason, unable to use the vehicle for shelter. Generally speaking, your vehicle will provide better shelter and safety than a tent.

Emergency Kit

All of the above mini-kits go into one big 18-gallon tote.

Emergency kit

Also included are a few different types of rope, a compass, a road atlas (I like the kind that are spiral-bound), WD-40, duct tape, and a 4 pack of toilet paper. There is room for 2 warm blankets folded on top.

Food

I use a separate smaller container for food and hygiene items.

food

Our food kit contains graham crackers with peanut butter, pop-top cans of soup, pop-top cans of fruit, antiseptic wipes, hand sanitizer, baby wipes, garbage bags, spoons, forks, a survival guide, and plastic dishes.  Not shown: ziplock bags of dog food in single servings.

portable dog bowls

These collapsible pet dishes are lightweight additions for a backpack. In a pinch, they could be used for human food also.

Shoes

The second large tote in the back is a lot fuller in the winter. I leave it back there year-round because it keeps the other container from sliding around and it makes a good container for shopping bags and small items that I am transporting. In the winter, I have a pair of heavy, snow and moisture resistant winter boots for each passenger, snow pants, and winter coats. Since the coats and snow pants are squishy, we can still put grocery bags and parcels on top of them.

shoes

Notes

  • Not shown: My vehicle has space beneath the back seats, where we store tightly rolled sleeping bags. If I didn’t have this space, I’d be able to put them in the tote that holds the shoes.
  • Because of extreme temperature fluctuations throughout the year, the food should be rotated out of the vehicle every couple of months so that you always have fresh food available.
  • In cold weather, your water bottles should have about 2 inches of the water removed to allow room for expansion when the contents freeze.
  • Always have a backpack for each family member.  If you are forced by circumstances to leave your vehicle on foot, you want to be able to carry as much of your gear as possible.
  • Depending on the laws in your state (and your interest in complying with them) weapons and ammunition can be very useful additions to your vehicle kit.
  • Your kit should change with the seasons.  Snow pants won’t do you much good in the heat of summer, but extra water will be invaluable.
  • When taking a longer trip, add more food and water to your kit than you might normally keep in it.
  • Don’t forget about communications: you can summon help with a cell phone or a two-way radio.

Vehicle Emergency Kit Checklist

Not every person needs every item on this list.  Pick and choose the items that are important given your family situation, your environment, and your most-likely disaster scenarios. No list can be comprehensive for every person, but this one has served us well.

Do you have any other supplies to add to the list? Have you ever needed to use your vehicle emergency kit?

Other Resources:

Packing Survival Junk in Your Trunk

15 Items That Should Be in Your Vehicle During the Winter

Be Ready with Vehicle 72 Hour Kits

What do you need in your car survival kit?

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: Winter is Coming: Here’s Your Vehicle Emergency Kit Checklist

About the author:

Daisy Luther lives on a small organic homestead in Northern California.  She is the author of The Organic Canner,  The Pantry Primer: A Prepper’s Guide to Whole Food on a Half-Price Budget, and The Prepper’s Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health and preparedness, and offers a path of rational anarchy against a system that will leave us broke, unhealthy, and enslaved if we comply.  Daisy’s articles are widely republished throughout alternative media. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest,  and Twitter,.

Filed under: Emergency Survival Tips, How To Prepare, Prepping

Checklist For Winterizing Your Home

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By Tess Pennington – Ready Nutrition

Winter disaster scenarios are not something you want to mess with. You could be off grid for days on end with only the food and water present in your home. Your could be snowed in or your car blocked by debris. The point is, even though we are usually given fair warning of winter storms, there are unpredictable circumstances and you should be prepared to face them.

According to emergency organizations, there are ways to fortify your home for winter to help you have a better chance at thriving in these circumstances.

Winterizing the Home

Outdoor Preparations:

Extend the life of your fuel supply by insulating walls and attics, caulking and weather-stripping doors and windows, and installing storm windows or covering windows with plastic.

Outdoor structures, such as the barn, shed or any other structure that may provide shelter for your family, neighbors, livestock or equipment may also need winterizing. Clear rain gutters; repair roof leaks and cut away tree branches that could fall on a house or other structure during a storm.

Clean and inspect chimneys and other heating equipment every year.

Insulate pipes with insulation or newspapers and plastic and allow faucets to drip a little during cold weather to avoid freezing. Running water, even at a trickle, helps prevent pipes from freezing.

All fuel-burning equipment should be vented to the outside and kept clear.

Keep fire extinguishers on hand, and make sure everyone in your house knows how to use them. House fires pose an additional risk, as more people turn to alternate heating sources without taking the necessary safety precautions.

Learn how to shut off water valves (in case a pipe bursts).

Hire a contractor to check the structural ability of the roof to sustain unusually heavy weight from the accumulation of snow – or water, if drains on flat roofs do not work.

Rock salt or more environmentally safe products to melt ice on walkways.

Sand to improve traction.

Snow shovels and other snow removal equipment.

Sufficient heating fuel. You may become isolated in your home and regular fuel sources may be cut off. Store a good supply of dry, seasoned wood for your fireplace or wood-burning stove.

Minimize travel. If travel is necessary, keep a disaster supplies kit in your vehicle and have winter related items included.

For indoor preparations:

Make a family-based emergency plan.

Have a short term emergency supply and ensure that you have an ample supple water and  shelf stable foods.

Adequate clothing and blankets to keep you warm in an off grid environment.

Make a Family Communications Plan. Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to know how you will contact one another, how you will get back together and what you will do in case of an emergency.

Have a battery powered radio on hand to listen to changing weather conditions.

Know how to stay warm in an off grid situation.

Bring pets/companion animals inside during winter weather. Move other animals or livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking water.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: Checklist For Winterizing Your Home

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals.

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

 

 

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

What Is Bushcraft: Survival Skills, Tools, & How To Learn

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what is bushcraft

By Chris Ruiz – The Bug Out Bag Guide

The old saying goes “The more skills you have the less gear you need”.  This is a great mindset to have and it provides a clear path on the journey to preparedness.  Today I am going to share with you a set of skills and tools that all add up to the overall field known as “Bushcraft”.  If you are an old hand at wilderness survival or are just asking, “What is Bushcraft?” this article will show you what skills to learn and tools to use when growing your bushcraft knowledge and survival abilities.

What Is Bushcraft?

Bushcraft is the art of using the resources provided by our natural environment to survive and thrive in the great outdoors.  It combines the knowledge of how to best use the plants and animals at your disposal with some basic bushcraft tools to make outdoor living easier and more efficient.  In learning bushcraft skills we benefit in many ways including:

  1. Increasing our ability to adapt to new challenges
  2. Becoming more self sufficient
  3. Growing our confidence
  4. Increasing our survival skills
  5. Becoming better prepared to face unforeseen problems

Bushcraft is not just one thing to learn.  It is a group of related skills that help you survive and adapt to overcome obstacles.  Although traditional bushcraft is focused on wilderness survival, its mindset of using the world around you can easily be applied to an urban or suburban setting.

bushcraft skills

Learning bushcraft survival skills will go a long way in making you better prepared the next time a disaster strikes.  Many of the skills and projects within the field of bushcraft can be directly applied to survival situations and are immensely useful to learn.

What Are Bushcraft Skills?

Bushcraft encompasses several primitive skills to shape the world around you and meet your survival needs.  In this article I am going to focus on the fundamental bushcraft skills that are most related to survival:

Continue reading at The Bug Out Bag Guide: What Is Bushcraft: Survival Skills, Tools, & How To Learn

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

How to Build a Simple Faraday Cage for EMP Survival

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How to Build a Simple Faraday Cage for EMP Survival - Backdoor Survival

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

Of all of the reasons to prepare, one that we all need to take seriously is the possibility of a catastrophic EMP, or electromagnetic pulse. This is a frequent topic in many post-apocalyptic novels and something that most of us are aware of, even if we do not completely understand the science.

As I wrote way back when in the article Prepping for an EMP and Solar Flares:

To be blunt about it, an EMP, if large enough, would affect the entire planet.  In an instant, civilization as we know it would change as we get swept backward in time by a century or two.

Understanding the risks of an EMP goes hand in hand with threats of a cyber-attack since there is a cause and effect relationship between the two.  In this article I want to accomplish a few things:

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: How to Build a Simple Faraday Cage for EMP Survival

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

 

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

20 Items to Kick Start Your Food Storage Plan

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20 Items to Kick Start Your Food Storage Plan

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

No matter how many times I write about food, there is always something new to consider or a new and different way to present the same old information in a more useful manner.  With that in mind, today I would like to share a method for getting started with your food storage program in an easy, step by step, and cost effective manner.

To be truthful, my initial goal with this article was to respond to readers who were just getting started and wanted a shopping list of things to buy for their food storage pantry.  I also wanted to compile a checklist that more experienced preppers could use to compare what they had to what they needed.  My goal can pretty much be summed up by saying that I wanted to write about getting started with food storage the easy way.  No frills, no fluff – just a common sense list of food items to get you started.

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: 20 Items to Kick Start Your Food Storage Plan

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

Filed under: Food, How To Prepare, Prepping

A Savory “1788” Steak Pudding

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A Savory “1788” Steak Pudding

Jon and Kevin are working together on a recipe today! This is an absolutely delicious “Steak Pudding” from the 1788 Cookbook “The English Art of Cookery.” This is definitely a top-tier recipe that you have to try! A Savory “1788” Steak Pudding To learn more about suet, watch our video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypRsO… To learn more […]

The post A Savory “1788” Steak Pudding appeared first on Around The Cabin.

A 240-Year-Old Recipe for Pickling Eggs

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A 240-Year-Old Recipe for Pickling Eggs

Here is another video that is part of our 18th century food preservation series. It is a very simple method for Pickling Eggs found in the 1777 edition of “The Lady’s Assistant Cookbook.” Whether you use these eggs as a garnish or as a dish by itself, this recipe makes stunningly colorful and delicious treats. […]

The post A 240-Year-Old Recipe for Pickling Eggs appeared first on Around The Cabin.

12 Skills for Preppers That Money Just Can’t Buy

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12 Skills for Preppers That Money Just Can't Buy | Backdoor Survival

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

There comes a time when every prepper finally says, “Enough with all of the food and enough with all of the gear!”  After years of seeking out the best stuff at the best prices, creating a stockpile, and purchasing equipment, you just might want to stop – at least for awhile – and focus on something else: the vital qualities and abilities that no amount of money can buy.

The biggest stockpile in the county won’t be enough if you don’t learn the important skills that will carry you through when you’re faced with hard times. Likewise, there are certain personality traits that will enhance your ability to survive.

Instead of adding to your stockpile, consider investing some time gaining proficiency in old-fashioned competence and common sense. While these aren’t things you can buy, taking a class or picking up some books about the following can be of far more value than yet another bag of beans.

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: 12 Skills for Preppers That Money Just Can’t Buy

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

6 Ways to Get Your Chicken Coop Ready For Winter

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By Tess Pennington – Ready Nutrition

When it starts getting cold, the chickens need a little extra T.L.C. to keep up egg production. Winterizing your coop can help keep the chickens happy, healthy and producing.

How you winterize your coop depends on your geographic location. For instance, those that live in the Midwest will see temperatures dip into the negatives, and their coops will need more care compared to those who live in the Pacific Northwest or the South. No matter where you live, you will have to do some winter chores to keep your chickens clucking merrily along.

6 Ways to Winterize Your Coop

1. Clean Bedding

Ensuring that the chickens have fresh bedding such as straw or wood shavings to lay and roost on will prevent frost bite. For our coop, we like to use hay for our bedding, especially in the wintertime because it retains heat better. This will keep them more active during the day as well as control the smell of chicken droppings until your Spring cleaning. Move all soiled bedding to the compost pile to compost down for Spring or Summer gardens.

2. Coop Inspection

Check out the coop to ensure that predators have not found an entry in. Predators are usually more desperate to find food during winter and you want to protect your flock. During this time, I also like to check the roof of the coop to make sure there aren’t any cracks or holes.  As well, check out the roosts and any other furniture to make sure it is still in good condition.

3. Batten the Hatches

During the warmer summer months having vents and hatches on the coop’s roof and floorboard assist with airflow, help to reduce humidity and any toxic ammonia from the hen house. During winter it is best to fasten the vents and hatches to reduce any cold drafts. Another solution is to wrap a portion of the coop with a tarp or plastic sheeting. This keeps moisture out of the coop, protects it from wind and further insulates it. 4-mil polyethylene film is low cost and readily available. Secure it to the chicken coop to ensure that moisture and wind cannot get through. Again, we want to ensure that the chicken’s body temperature stays at an optimum temperature.

4. Heat Lamps

Keep in mind that young chickens will require more body heat compared to a fully grown chicken. Further, the avian reproductive cycle, which is how a hen produces eggs, is stimulated in poultry by increasing day length. 14 hours of light is what a chicken requires to lay eggs and usually get these results during the warmer months. Having a light bulb hooked up to a timer can assist in continued egg laying. An added benefit to this is it creates added warmth to the flock. To provide some warmth, but not too much light, we use a 250 watt bulb in our coop. One heat lamp per 30 chickens will be sufficient. Light fixtures in the coop should be placed above feeders and waterers, and care should be taken to avoid having areas in the chicken house that are shaded from light.

5. Continued Flow of Water

For those of you who have to deal with frozen water trays in the coop, you’re not alone. This continues to be an issue for many keepers of chickens. One solution is to purchase a heated base for the waterer and run a heavy duty extension cord into the chicken coop. Another solution is to check on your chicken’s water more frequently. Bringing warm water out to replace the frozen water will be very welcomed.

6. Dietary Supplements

Adding grains such as corn in addition to their regular diet can add more fat to their bodies and at the same time provide more insulation and energy during winter. Grains shouldn’t replace their entire diet. We usually do 70% scratch and 30% corn. We also continue to supplement their diets with vegetable and fruit scraps for added nutrition.

Signs of Trouble

Check on your flock a few times per day to ensure the outside temperatures are not too harsh. If your chickens are huddled in a corner or making a lot of noise, take some time to make them more comfortable. Further, if chickens are lethargic or not moving, they may be ill and should be cared for.

Frostbite of the feet and combs are very common in winter months. If signs appear, thaw the affected area with cold water, slowly warming it to room temperature. Then apply a coating of petroleum jelly to isolate it from direct contact with the cold. Reapply two to three times during the day. Warming lights are especially helpful to prevent this.

Another sign to look out for during the cold months is a condition called “pasting.” This occurs when their anuses are blocked with droppings. If caught early enough, you can prevent the chicks from dying by slowly and gently removing the blockage with the help of warm water.

With a little extra attention, your coop will stay very happy during the cooler months. All it takes is some time to get it all prepped and ready.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: 6 Ways to Get Your Chicken Coop Ready For Winter

 

The Prepper's BlueprintTess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals.

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

 

 

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

A “Must-Try” Recipe: 18th Century Bread Pudding

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A “Must-Try” Recipe: 18th Century Bread Pudding

Published on Nov 2, 2015 We’ve tried many recipes from various 18th century cookbooks, but every now and again one rises above the rest. Today’s featured dish is one of these exceptional recipes. It’s found in Amelia Simmons’ 1796 cookbook, “American Cookery.” A “Must-Try” Recipe: 18th Century Bread Pudding To purchase the items featured in […]

The post A “Must-Try” Recipe: 18th Century Bread Pudding appeared first on Around The Cabin.

Creamy Chicken / Bacon Tortellini

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Creamy Chicken / Bacon Tortellini

Ingredients Three Cheese Tortellini 1 ½ lb Turkey or Chicken Breast 1lb Bacon 1 Cup Sour Cream 1 Cup Mayonnaise 1 Teaspoon Basil Dry Or ¼ Cup Basil Fresh 12oz. Jar of Roasted Red Peppers 1 Packet of Ranch Seasoning 6 Roma Tomatoes 6 Green Onions All-Purpose Seasoning Directions Bring 5 Quarts Of Water To […]

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How to Create an Emergency Ammo Can First Aid Kit

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How to Create an Ammo Can First Aid Kit | Backdoor Survival

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

When it comes to having a well-stocked first aid kit, I want to be prepared.  I truly do.  Having spent weeks at a time on a boat in the remote waters of British Columbia, I have always understood that a drugstore and medical doctor may not be accessible.  If sick or wounded, I would be on my own.

So why then, were my first aid supplies in such a disorderly mess?

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: How to Create an Emergency Ammo Can First Aid Kit

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

 

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping

Emergency Water For Preppers: Resources You Need to Know About

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Emergency Water Resources | Backdoor Survival

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

For the past month or so, the focus has been emergency water, that most vital but often under-appreciated prep.

During this time, I have highlighted various aspects of water preparedness, including storage, acquisition, and purification.  These recent articles, coupled with those that have been posted in the past, bring to you a wealth of knowledge that will enable you to be water-prepped, regardless of where you live and the size of your budget.

And that, in a nutshell, is the point.  The internet is a wonderful place and there is a wealth of knowledge available free for the taking.  Sure, there are some questionable websites posting bad information but overall, you will find a treasure trove of free, credible resources that will help ensure that the water you drink following a disaster or disruptive event is safe.

Today I want to help jump start your quest for free information about emergency water.  These are articles from websites I trust.  These are resources you need to know about in your quest for emergency water.

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: Emergency Water For Preppers: Resources You Need to Know About

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

 

Filed under: How To Prepare, Prepping, Water

Ginseng

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Ginseng

Ginseng has often been referred to as a general panacea for its ability to promote healing for almost every type of ailment. Ginseng is an adaptogenic herb meaning that it has the unique ability to balance and tone multiple physiological functions at once which can provide more efficient and effective healing. It is a powerful […]

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Banana Apple Oatmeal

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Banana Apple Oatmeal

Oatmeal is one of the most common and popular breakfast choices for Americans. It’s comforting, filling and delicious. This recipe for oatmeal skips the grains altogether which is an added plus for those looking to avoid them. Instead delicious sweet fruit is used to mimic the consistency and comfort of oatmeal, with the added bonus […]

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Simple Soldier Cooking Without Utensils

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Simple Soldier Cooking Without Utensils

Jon and Josh are on the march today! Jon draws excerpts from Joseph Plumb Martin’s campaign memoirs to put together another simple soldier’s meal straight from the 18th century. Simple Soldier Cooking Without Utensils Joseph Plumb Martin Book – http://www.amazon.com/Memoir-Revoluti… Ash Cakes Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIdsJ… Soldier Ration Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUt1Z… Our Website – http://www.jas-townsend.com/ Request […]

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Simple Soldier Cooking Without Utensils

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Simple Soldier Cooking Without Utensils

Jon and Josh are on the march today! Jon draws excerpts from Joseph Plumb Martin’s campaign memoirs to put together another simple soldier’s meal straight from the 18th century. Simple Soldier Cooking Without Utensils Joseph Plumb Martin Book – http://www.amazon.com/Memoir-Revoluti… Ash Cakes Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIdsJ… Soldier Ration Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUt1Z… Our Website – http://www.jas-townsend.com/ Request […]

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BBQ Deviled Eggs

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BBQ Deviled Eggs

Place A Dozen Eggs In A Bowl Of Tap Water, Make Sure Water Is Deep Enough To Cover The Eggs Bring Water To A Boil At Medium To High Heat Remove Pan From Heat, And Place Lid On Pan Leave Eggs In The Water For 15 Minutes Remove The Eggs, And Immediately Place In A […]

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Reverse Seared / Smoked Pork Chops

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Reverse Seared / Smoked Pork Chops

Lets start with some nice 1.5 to 2 inch thick chops The kind you would want to butterfly cut, but don’t… we want them nice and thick and one solid piece. Season Both Sides Of Thick Cut Pork Chops With Bad Byron’s Butt Rub Let Sit For 45 Minutes At Room Temperature Preheat Smoker To […]

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Smoked Bloomin’ Onion

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Smoked Bloomin’ Onion

Peel The Sweet Onions Cut Downward On One Side With Your Knife At A 45° Angle, Cutting From The Outside To The Inside, And Stopping At The Middle, But Not Cutting All The Way Through The Bottom. Turn Your Onion ¼ Turn And Repeat The Above Step Continue Until All 4 Sides Have Been Cut […]

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Making Fresh Sauerkraut

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Making Fresh Sauerkraut

Welcome to the series 7 premiere of 18th Century Cooking! We start things off by trying a delicious and easy Sauerkraut recipe right out of the 18th century! Making Fresh Sauerkraut Wooden Masher – http://jas-townsend.com/handcrafted-w… Rolling Pin – http://jas-townsend.com/wood-rolling-… Lidded Crock – http://jas-townsend.com/lidded-crock-… Our Website – http://www.jas-townsend.com/ Request a print catalog – http://www.jas-townsend.com/catalog_r… Facebook – […]

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Tarragon

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Tarragon

Tarragon is a culinary and medicinal herb that is rich in vitamins A, C, and B-complex and minerals such as zinc, copper, iron, and magnesium. It is known to help stimulate the appetite, relieve flatulence and colic, balance the body’s acidity, alleviate the pains of arthritis, rheumatism and gout, regulate menstruation, stop hiccups, prevent dyspepsia, […]

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Great Advice For Beginners

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Great Advice For Beginners

Today’s main comment offers some excellent advice for the first steps into reenacting! Since we get so many great comments from all of you, we are going to start splitting our Q&A videos up. This is to make sure all the information doesn’t become buried in long Q&A videos. Great Advice For Beginners Max Forloine […]

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Sunflower Seeds

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Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds have the power to nourish the entire body. They are a rich source of easily digestible and assimilable protein which is essential for the repair of tissues, nerves, and cells. Sunflower seeds are an excellent source of Vitamin D, B-complex, Vitamin K, and Vitamin E. Vitamin E, also known as tocopherol, is an […]

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