Everything You Should Know About Bowhunting

Click here to view the original post.

Bowhunting is enjoyable and can be an addictive sport if you have the right equipment. Experienced bow hunters know the where to start because they have the required information. If you what to start bow hunting do not worry. You can learn a few things that will get you started. Experienced bow hunters also require additional tips that will enhance their expertise. Once you have the right bow and right bow stabilizer you can get started. The preparation and position are important while hunting.

How to Start Bow Hunting

First, ensure you have a draw weight of about 50 pounds. Your arrow should be about 900 grains. Before you get in the action, it is good to know the hunting policies in your state and the right season for hunting. Beginners should start practicing before engaging in real bow hunting. You can practice at your backyard before proceeding other the fields or woods. The idea is to ensure you have some knowledge of bow hunting to avoid frustrations when you go for the real action.

It’s advisable to have a good preparation if you want to be a good bow hunter. While you practice archery, consider wearing clothes similar to the outfit that you will be wearing while hunting. This tip might sound ridiculous, but it really comes in handy when you go for the real hunting. Wearing your hunting gear will orient you to the real action.

When hunting, there are different kinds of bows that you can use. Some of the best options are a cross bow, composite bow, and compound bow. You can use any of these bows, and you can also consider having the right bow stabilizer. Even if you are a skilled bow hunter, you might have to practice when you get a new bow. Beginners can start with the compound bow, but the choice will depend on your preferences. When practicing, try to shoot from different positions and angles. Remember the more comfortable you are with the specific bow, the better chances you have at successfully shooting your prey. You will also want to know how far you can shoot. Your prey might not pass close to you. Continuous practice will improve your shooting distance. If your best distance is only 40 feet, you will be unsuccessful if you target a prey at 60 feet.

Now you have practiced enough and can start bow hunting. Positioning is very fundamental in bow hunting. In case you are upwind, the prey might not come your way because they will have smelled you. So the best position is downwind. At this position, you will likely see many animals, although you will have to stalk them. At times, the positioning is a challenge. If you don’t know how to determine the best position, you will likely miss all animals. In fact, most hunters just let the prey to come their way because they choose to remain quiet. If you alarm the animal, you might not be able to shoot, and you will miss a chance.

You will have to measure draw length for the best results. Your physical size and the mechanical setting of the bow need to match. For example, if your physical size requires a draw length setting of about 29 inches, then your draw length is 29 inches. The shooter and the bow should have a draw length that matches up. To get a draw length that will be best for you, measure yourself and then search for a bow which will adjust to fit your size. Alternatively, you can just select a bow with average draw length, and it will adjust to your specific size.

In Conclusion

This bow hunting guide offers a few things that will make your hunting simple and predictable. However, there is no any guarantee you will be successful when hunting. Your success will be determined by your bow, skills, and position. Practice will, however, increase your chances of shooting an animal. Depending on the time of the day or season, the weather conditions might impact your shot. The animal might not even cooperate with you. They might keep running away. These hunting tips will give you an edge in bow hunting. Remember to prepare sufficiently before you go hunting to increase your chances of shooting a prey.

Author Bio: Mitchell is the founder of MusketHunting. At Musket Hunting, He provides guides on how to hunt effectively, answer reader’s questions, and review on the latest hunting gears. Hunting will give you the experience that nothing else in this world can provide

How To Choose Your Archery Arrows!

Click here to view the original post.

How To Choose Your Archery Arrows When it comes to selecting archery arrows, you have to be ready to deal with a lot of different factors. Naturally, the price is one of the main concerns. However, you need to realize that the best carbon arrows usually cost expensive and they are high value. One of … Continue reading How To Choose Your Archery Arrows!

The post How To Choose Your Archery Arrows! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

What You Should Know About Coyote Hunting and their Behavior

Click here to view the original post.

What You Should Know About Coyote Hunting and their Behavior Coyote hunting poses significant challenges in a hunter’s game. This is the reason why it is considered to be the hardest and one of the most dangerous activities which a hunter can ever experience. With this, it is only imperative that you keep the following … Continue reading What You Should Know About Coyote Hunting and their Behavior

The post What You Should Know About Coyote Hunting and their Behavior appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Climate of Fear- US Perspective on Australia’s Sensible Gun Laws

Click here to view the original post.
“Sensible Gun Laws” Not So “Sensible”

Measure Distance Using Compass

Click here to view the original post.

Your compass is a measuring tool that can be adapted to a variety of needs. As shown here, it can be used to measure more than just direction.

You can use your magnetic compass to determine the width of a stream or small body of water without having to get wet. This quick and easy method of determining distance using a compass may just come in handy. In any case, it is always a good trick you can use to amaze your fellow survivors.

Here is how it is done.

1. Standing at the edge of the water, sight an object directly across from you on the far bank. Take a compass reading on this object and mark the spot where you are standing.

2. Walk along the stream until the compass reading to the same object across the stream changes by 45-degrees and mark this spot also.

3. Now measure the distance between the two marks you set. This will be equal to the distance between the first mark and the object you sighted across the stream.

For example:

Say you are standing next to a stream and directly across from you on the opposite bank is a large tree. Take out your compass and sight the tree. 

Let’s pretend the compass reads 300-degrees (Azimuth type compass) or S30W (Quadrant type compass). Mark this spot and then walk either downstream or upstream until the compass sighting on the same tree reads 45-degrees in either direction from your first reading (either 255-degrees or 345-degrees on an azimuth type compass, S15E or N15W on a quadrant type compass). 

Mark this position also. The width of the stream is equal to the distance between your two marks on the ground. If you have practiced pacing (and every survivor should) you can count the number of paces between the two marks and calculate the width of the stream.

The best survivalists are skilled in using whatever materials at hand in novel ways that give him an edge over his environment. “Thinking out of the box” is a trademark of the true survivor.

~Urban Man~

7 Approaches to Crossbow Hunting For Forward-Thinking Preppers

Click here to view the original post.

Have you had a hard time getting into crossbow hunting lately and need a little kick in the pants for better luck in 2017?

Then consider these great tips. We have compiled some of the most innovative, fun, and exciting crossbow hunting breakthroughs that are currently impacting the sport. By understanding these ideas, you can integrate them into your routine.

Not all of these ideas might be right for you, though, so make sure you carefully research or try them out first. Integrating at least a handful of these ideas should get you all the help you need to create an incredible crossbow hunting experience.

1. Don’t Be Afraid to Go Mobile

Crossbow hunters like you shouldn’t be afraid to get out their cell phone and use it to increase their mobility.

Obviously, you need to turn your ringer off. Better yet, let everyone know you’re in the woods and cannot be reached. However, you can use its GPS devices, download hunting maps, and many other bowhunting apps more to create an immersive and efficient bow hunting experience.

Even better, you can use your phone to take pictures of your game and text them to your friends and family.

There’s nothing like showing off your trophy, especially to your buddy who always gets a bigger deer than you every year. Show off that huge rack and make him hilariously jealous.

2. Don’t Be Afraid to Super Tune

So what exactly is super tuning? It requires adjusting your crossbow lines before you go hunting.

Most crossbow hunters tune their bow once before the season starts and figure that is good enough. Not usually, especially if you use broadheads. These arrows require a more precise tuning that can be tricky to maintain.

First of all, you need to shoot your bow at a target, see where the arrow lands, and adjust the tuning. This process requires many subtle adjustments, some of which might be very minute.

However, increasing your accuracy in this way at least once a week (or more) ensures quality shots.

3. Study Your Game

New crossbow hunters often fail to consider their game before going up in the tree fully. But even experienced hunters sometimes don’t know exactly what they are doing.

There are many strategies and tweaks that you can utilize to increase your bowhunting success. For example, it is important to know how to spot deer runs and to guess where they end.

Look for rubs, broken twigs, droppings, fur, and even shed antlers in the woods. These are areas where deer are concentrated.

However, if you’re hunting other animals, like bears, you need to look for rubs and broken soil. These spots indicate a hungry bear that is looking for grubs to eat.

4. Pay Attention to the Wind

Obviously, crossbow arrows aren’t as affected by the wind as traditional arrows. They move faster and typically strike the target a lot more accurately. That said, wind can still capture your shot and take it just enough off path to ruin your accuracy. So make sure to gauge the wind before shooting to see how it will affect your chances of success.

The best way to do this is to wet a finger, hold it up to the air, see which side dries first, and how quickly it dries. If you are shooting into the wind or if it is blowing too hard, wait until it dies down.

If it doesn’t calm, adjust your shot location based on the wind. Practice this skill on a course before real hunting to ensure your success.

5. Invest in a Scope

Do you have a scope on your crossbow? If you don’t, why not? Scopes work as well for bows as they do for rifles.

Unlike other bows, which typically use sites, crossbow scopes allow you the chance to use superior zooming options and increase your accuracy. If you do have a scope, maybe it is time to update it to a great red dot scope. What are these scopes and how can they benefit you?

A red dot scope is a very accurate and high-powered scope that sends a small red laser dot towards your target.

This dot helps you know exactly where your crossbow arrow should land, excluding any influence of the wind. These scopes not only increase your accuracy, but they also make you feel like a sweet sniper in an old spy film.

6. Try Out Tarsal Glands

Are you looking for a way to attract a deer closer to your shooting spot? Try tarsal gland scent. This attractant is potent and should attract a broad range of bucks.

It simulates the smell of a doe in estrous and is irresistible to any male deer. What we like about this particular attractant is that it tends to bring in many bucks, especially those with huge racks.

You should spread this scent in an area that is within the range of your crossbow. Thankfully, that should be quite an extensive area.

Put the scent on the base of trees near you and wait until they show up. If all goes well, you should have many choices from which to choose and shouldn’t have a hard time getting one.

7. Hunt During the Midday

As a hunter, you’ve probably had it drilled into your head that you need to hunt in the early morning and just before the sun goes down. Sitting out during the middle of the day is usually talked about as if it hardly matters. That advice ignores the fact that most big bucks aren’t active until the middle part of the day.

This fact is particularly the case if bucks are in the rut. They tend to sleep heavily until the middle of the day and get up looking for love. So you don’t necessarily have to get out into the tree at the crack of down to be successful. In fact, your chances of spotting a great buck are pretty slim if you try that during the rut.

These Tips are Just the Beginning

As you can see, bowhunting doesn’t have to be a major pain in the you-know-what if you follow these tips.

Hunting fans like you can get the chance to enjoy a significant resurgence in their favorite sport without having to learn how to hunt again. You should also get better equipment that improves your accuracy heavily.

Do you have any hunting tips you’d like to share with us? Please comment below or e-mail us and let us know! We love connecting with our readers and learning more about our favorite sport.

Even better, share this article with friends to help improve their crossbow hunting game.

The post 7 Approaches to Crossbow Hunting For Forward-Thinking Preppers appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Bowfishing for Survival

Click here to view the original post.

Outdoor Life

Planning to bug out along the waterways, rivers, or coastal areas?

Great! You’re in the right hands.

In this post, I’ll teach you a new skill (and an effective way of gathering food while out there) – bowfishing for survival.

Also referred to as archery fishing, this practice involves using your bow to catch the fish. And you can easily do it in shallow water or from your little boat- making it one of the most flexible adventures on planet Earth.

Sounds interesting, right?

You’ll discover even more exciting details as you read our full bowfishing guide which I’ll walk you through in a few moments…

 

WAIT…if you think that archery fishing isn’t practical or you can’t do it, just think of the Indians who reside by the Amazon River and rely on bowfishing to catch their daily bread.

 

Bowfishing for Survival – How To Catch Fish With Your Bow:

 

Arm Yourself With the Right Bowfishing Equipment

via bowhunting.com

Just like any other job, bowfishing requires you to equip yourself with the right equipment.

If you’re a serious hunter, I believe that you have most of these tools, so you’ll just need to pack them into your backpack and head to the waters.

If you don’t have them, don’t worry. You can get them anytime you want…they’re readily available on the market at reasonable prices.

These equipment include:

– A bow: yes, this is bowfishing, and you’ll need a bow to make it work. But which bow should you use? I’d suggest that you go for the compound or recurve bows. Clearly, these will give you the best results.

Both bows share a number of aspects and will offer sufficient drive force to send an arrow right into the heart of the fish…plus they consume less space in your boat.

– You’ll need a set of arrows in your bowfishing endeavors. But don’t make the mistake of picking just any other type of arrow. The perfect set should comprise of arrow made using light wood or fiberglass material. They should also have a sharp pointer that easily pierces through the fish.

– Hey, you’ll also need some bowfishing reel…and I mean the best bowfishing reel, not any reel.

(Optional, depending on the fishing situation) bowfishing gear includes gloves, rubber hip waders, and sunglasses with polarized lenses.

 

I assume you’ve the above “tools of work” with you right now, right?

Let the fun begin!!

 

#1. Pick a suitable water body

Choose a water body that will enable you to catch fish and give you the desired results easily. If you prefer a shallow after body, be sure to fish around your target fish- particularly close to the grasses and weeds that provide cover. And, of course, make sure the environment is clean so that you can see beneath the water surface.

Typically, you should be within a range of 3-4.6 meters (10-15feet) from the fish you wish to bow down. Ensure you don’t cast a shadow over the fish as this might spook and frustrate your bowfishing efforts.

Also, consider approaching your target from the upwind location.

 

#2. AIM your Target fish

Get ready for the most important step of bowfishing- aiming your target.

How exactly do I do that?”

Are you wondering already?

Well, all you have to do is point your bow at the target fish and shoot it…nothing new

But there’s one trick you need to learn to correctly shoot that fish you’re targeting:

That is, how to point your bow at the fish you wish to catch. See, the light traveling from one medium to next (air to water in this case) results in refractions. Thus, you’ll see the refracted image (the apparent fish) of the fish you’re targeting more clearly on the water surface.

And if you point at the apparent fish, your arrow might go high, and you’ll perfectly miss your target!

Many bow fishers have learned this lesson the hard way, and if you ask them, they’ll all give you this piece of advice:

Point your bow as low as possible!

 

#3. Don’t Forget this Important Bowfishing RULE:

via bowsite.comMake a closer observation of your target fish:

If it appears about 3m (10 feet) away and 30cm (1foot) underneath the water surface, then you MUST point your bow 10cm (4 inches) low.

What if the fish appears in a different location? For instance, let’s say the fish appears about 6m (20 feet) away and 60cm (2feet) underneath the water surface. In such scenario, it means the location has doubled…

and you’ll have to double the 10cm as well. In other words, you’ll have to point 20cm (8inches) low.

It’s that simple!

If you utilize this 10-4 rule in all your bowfishing practices, I can guarantee you that you’ll bag more fish than you can imagine.

 

#4. Time To Make That Shot!

Congrats! You’re on the last step to catching your target fish with your bow.

But there’s a real problem here:

You have to hit your target such that it dies right away…and that means that you’ve to target the first half part of the body of the fish. Needless to explain, this section contains many vital organs such as the brain, meaning you’ll kill it on the spot.

We all know that fish can swim really FAST in water. So, you don’t have much time between pointing and shooting. I believe that your archery experience has taught you speed and accuracy which you’ll need to apply here.

What if you’re targeting the bigger fish- like alligator?

You’ll need to shoot them at least twice so that you can strike them down.

After a lucky shot, pull in the line quickly. You’ll be surprised at how easy it is to catch fishes at a single stroke with bowfishing!

 

Wrap UP

I told you bowfishing isn’t that hard! After reading through the above guide, I believe you can catch some fish with only your bow and arrows.

This is a fun-filled practice that does take you no time to perfect it. With the right archery equipment and our expert guide above, you’ll be awed by how easy it is to catch fish!

 

The post Bowfishing for Survival appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Goose as a Survival Game Meat

Click here to view the original post.

You may remember from Dickens, and the stories of that era, what a big deal a goose was on Christmas. The goose is one of the most underrated meats in abundance. These creatures are made up of dark, succulent meat and a nice fatty skin that crisps up when roasted. If you have ever had …

Continue reading »

The post Goose as a Survival Game Meat appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

How to Prep for Your First Elk Hunt

Click here to view the original post.

How to Prep for Your First Elk Hunt Hunting elk is a trip of a lifetime for many. There’s an art to hunting; finding that prized animal takes skill, patience and a little bit of luck. With the right preparation, you too can have a successful elk hunt. Here is what you must do before …

Continue reading »

The post How to Prep for Your First Elk Hunt appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Top 10 Tips for Survival Deer Hunting with A Compound Bow

Click here to view the original post.

Guns are overrated for survival. There’s denying that a firearm is superior to any other weapon for defense and hunting. That being said, you have to carry it, it’s ammunition, and you have to have everything that goes along with cleaning, maintaining and protecting that weapon as well.

You also have to pay a significant amount of money for all that equipment as well. There’s another compromise to make, plan on using a compound bow. It is certainly a good weapon for hunting and offers many distinct advantages over a firearm for a survival situation, here are the top 10 tips for survival hunting with the bestcompound bow.

Whenis it Survival?

Make sure when you’re tuning up and getting ready for the ultimate test of survival, do it legally. Don’t be tempted to poach deer on the outskirts of developments, that you don’t have permission to hunt on.

It’s going to be hard to practice hunting with your compound bow without a hunting license. Stay legal as you practice these skills and have either permission or a really good excuse in case you get caught.

ConserveYour Shots

Arrows only last so long. If you’re in a situation where a working bow can mean the difference between living and die, you need to be 100% you make that bow last as long as possible. Conserve a number of shots you take, during practice, during hunting, and do whatever you can to minimize the wear and tear on your arrows and the moving parts of your bow.

HuntClose

You need to hunt as close to your game as possible. Mostly because the closer you are, the harder it is to miss. The better your shot is, the more likely you are to kill what you’re aiming at. That is the entire point and you should do everything you can to do to kill the game you need for food. The closer you the less likely you are to lose your arrows as well, ensuring you can continue to hunt.

StayClear of Branches & Debris

When you hunt make sure you know if there’s limbs or branches in the way of your bow’s limbs. When your bow fires, your limbs are going to violently shoot forward and slam against anything in their way. This is going to also skew your shot and most likely make you lose your arrow. An impact like this has the potential to destroy your bow.

Don’tGamble

Don’t make a shot unless you know it’s worth it. You never know if you’re going to get that arrow back after you release it. Improvising arrows for a compound bow is tricky at best and you should do your best to always have your arrows after the shot.

Stayon top of Maintenance

Rust is hard to deal with, in the field but easy to prevent. Keep your bow clean, dry, and lubricated. Dirt and grime in the bearings of the cams is a kiss of death for the bow. Having a bow string caked with dirt and dust is going to kill your bow. Stay on top of your maintenance, your bow is a lifeline in the woods.

UseQuality Components

It may be tempting to buy the extremely cheap bows, arrows, and broad heads for your set up. The worst thing that can happen is when you need these components the most they fail on you. Buy gear that’s you’d consider hunting with, it doesn’t have to the name brand high end gear you’d use day in and day out but stay away from bargain basement equipment you can’t rely on.

CarrySpare Parts

Make sure you carry spare parts for your bow. You need to be able to have spares for parts of your bow set up. Extra bow wax, extra serving string, extra cord for your D loop, extra nocks, extra fiber optics for your sight …ect. You’ll need it eventually and murphy’s law says till happen at the worst time possible!

Considerlighted Nocks

Lighted nocks are great. Not only do they allow you to track your arrow in flight at dusk and dawn, they can be a huge help to finding your arrows after the shot. Seriously consider getting a set of lighted nocks for your survival set up. They’ll help you hunt longer and be a tool for finding your arrows after they’re shot. Make sure if you’re going to test them before hand, it’s legal in your state.

Don’tExpect Your Bow to Protect You

You aren’t in the huge games. Your bow is a bad self-defense weapon and you’re better off with a lance or a knife against a charging bear or moose. You should avoid hunting game, or get yourself into a situation where you may put yourself in a compromising situation. You simply won’t have time to nock, draw, aim, and fire accurately before a bear has its sights on you, or an attacker bum rushes you. Rely on other means of protection because the compound just isn’t fast enough.

Keepyour bow Ready

Your bow should be at no more than an arm’s reach when it’s protecting your life by helping you gather food. If for no other reason, you can be absolutely sure it isn’t being damaged you need to keep it in a constant state of readiness.

If you ever find yourself in a situation where you need to live off the land you’ll have a much easier time if you’ve already mastered hunting with a compound bow and have one at the ready. Get your hands on a good quality bow you can afford to keep stocked away just in case, pick upyour best hunting packs and get in the woods and hone your skills with a bow.

Even if you’re a dyed in the wool gun hunter, you might just start to love archery hunting!

Author bio: Brandon Cox loves everything hunting and regularly posts on his blog stayhunting where he shares his experiences in hunting giving you the latest hunting information. You can find more from Brandon on Twitter.

The post Top 10 Tips for Survival Deer Hunting with A Compound Bow appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Raising Dogs for Hunting and Farm life!

Click here to view the original post.

Raising  Dogs for Hunting and Farm life Austin Martin “Homesteady Live“ Audio in player below! DO you want a dog for your farm that will not chase and kill chickens, and that will still retrieve birds and track wild game for you? Find out how to get that in this episode of Homesteady Live. Since … Continue reading Raising Dogs for Hunting and Farm life!

The post Raising Dogs for Hunting and Farm life! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Turkey Hunting with Compound Bow – Top 5 Best Tips

Click here to view the original post.

Turkey Hunting with Compound Bow – Top 5 Best Tips Spring turkeys season has a few district sounds, gobbles and shot gun blasts! It doesn’t always have to be this way though. If you like the sound of a calm spring morning and don’t want to disturb it, consider getting some extra time in the … Continue reading Turkey Hunting with Compound Bow – Top 5 Best Tips

The post Turkey Hunting with Compound Bow – Top 5 Best Tips appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Hunting vs Buying Meat: The Traditional Hunter in the Modern World

Click here to view the original post.

This article was originally published by J. Townsend  on harvestingnature.com

This whole thought process was derived from a conversation about the sustainability of hunting in modern times. Many people feel that hunting for food has outlived its use in modern America. Well, with the recent changes in our eating habits, as in searching out fast food instead of fresh food, hunting had been surpassed. There is still an emerging group which believe we should kick the fast food and revert to the traditional “Farm to Table” way of eating. I agree with much of this philosophy and wish to take it a step further. I am here to represent those who feel that a family can sustain a portion of their diet with game meat. I know many of you see this and think you would have to spend your every day hunting and fishing in order for that to work. Simply not true.

In thousands of rural areas (and some non-rural areas) there are people who either are supplementing their diets partially or fully with game meat. I have to admit that when I was younger there were many things that I though you could only shoot or catch to obtain. It wasn’t until I got to college when I realized that you could buy catfish from the store. I had believed, due to my outdoor upbringing, that if you wanted catfish, you went to the river/lake/pond to catch it.

I have also heard the argument that many people could not live a lifestyle where you sustain yourself on wild game. They say that they prefer to not see where their food originates. They cannot stand to eat food with bones in it or eyes staring at them. My only advice to these people is that they trust too much in the grocery store to get their food. Those same people have not seen the cramped dirty feed lots or the packed chutes of a slaughter-house. They could not handle the sights and many would revert to vegetarianism. Me, I prefer to get my meat from the wild.

I offer up hunting and fishing as an alternative to the dependency upon store-bought meat to those people who don’t mind processing your own animals or eating a fish that looks up at you from the grill. Simply put, hunting and fishing is a healthier and more economical way of providing the necessary proteins that you need for your diet versus going to the store and buying a package of ground what-ya-ma-call-it.  I don’t wish to deceive anyone, it is certainly a lot more challenging to track and kill and animal then it is to go to the super market. But where is the independence in that?

In the end, the total cost of hunting and fishing enough meat for a family of three will be substantially lower than the cost of buying a somewhat equal product at the store. You can sustain yourself by simply securing a selected amount of five different game animals (Deer, Elk, Turkey, Rabbit, and Wild Pig) and three different fish (Tuna, Catfish, and Trout). The animals you choose to hunt can be changed to suit your specific region. Let’s break it down.

The USDA recommends the average person (children, women, and men) consume 5 – 7 ounces of protein a day broken down into 2-3 servings. So we will use is 6 ounces of protein a day for the average person. This gives us 2184 ounces of protein consumption for the entire year. Converting this to pounds will make it easier for our calculations. The average human should consume 136.5 lbs of protein a year.

Here is an average breakdown of the yield from my selected game animals.

Quantity 

Animal

Live  Weight

Edible  Yield

1

Deer (Buck)

165lbs

58lbs

1

Elk

400lbs

197lbs

2

Turkey

20lbs each

22lbs

12

Rabbit

3lbs each

18lbs

1

Wild Pig

150lbs

90lbs

2

Yellow Tail Tuna

30lbs each

30lbs

4

Trout

2lbs each

5lbs

10

Catfish

5lbs each

15lbs

Total = 435lbs of meat

435lbs of meat is enough to sustain three individuals for a period of about a year. As an alternative, if the choice to hunt an elk is not reasonable then you could exclude this from the equation. You would then have 85% of your total protein consumption for two people from game meat. The other 15% would include the consumption of other sources of protein such as eggs, nuts, and beans or the addition of another fish or game animal.  There is certainly room to play around with the figures. This model serves merely as a base line for the sake of debate.

Deer and Elk would take the place of beef in your diet. Turkey and Rabbit would replace chicken. Wild Pork will substitute store-bought pork and hand caught fish would replace that fresh/frozen purchased or canned. Average prices for the store purchased meats will be combined with the total yields of wild game and fish.

 

Quantity  

Animal

Edible  Yield

Total Game Yield

1

Deer (Buck)

58lbs

255lbs

1

Elk

197lbs

Store Bought Beef (Average price $4.71/pound) x 255lbs = $1201.00

 

Quantity 

Animal

Edible  Yield

Total Game Yield

2

Turkey

22lbs

40lbs

12

Rabbit

18lbs

Store Bought Poultry (Average price $1.37/pound) x 40lbs = $54.80

 

Quantity  

Animal

Edible  Yield

Total  Game Yield

1

Wild Pig

90lbs

90lbs

Store Bought Pork (Average price $3.15/pound) x 90lbs = $283.50

Quantity 

Animal

Edible  Yield

Total  Game Yield

2

Yellow Tail Tuna

30lbs

50lbs

4

Trout

5lbs

10

Catfish

15lbs

Store Bought Yellow Tail Tuna (Average price $18.00/pound) x 30lbs =  $540.00

Store Bought Trout (Average price $6.50/pound) x 5lbs =  $32.50

Store Bought Catfish (Average price $3.99/pound) x 15lbs =  $59.85

  Total: $ 632.35

 

Total Store Bought Meat for one year for a household of three = $2171.65

I know, you are thinking to yourself, that’s not that too bad for three people. Here is how we will figure the benefit of landing your own meat. This example works for me here in California. For others it may be cheaper or more expensive depending on where you live. There will still be a substantial difference in the totals.

The total for all the necessary licenses and tags for the state of California equals $164.53. The cost of a deep-sea fishing expedition out of San Diego is $46.00. California hosts a random drawing for the Elk tags so I chose Washington for my Elk meat because the state allows an open purchase. In Washington, a Non-Resident Elk Tag is $497.00 and a Resident Elk Tag is $50.00. So that gives us a Grand Total of $260.00 or $707.00depending on how you play your cards. That is a savings of $1688.00/year on average.

There are really only two variables present in the equation. If you do not have the necessary equipment then you would have to purchase such equipment prior to hunting or fishing. This would be an upfront cost which would diminish over time as you acquired the equipment. The second would be your success rate. This model is based upon a 100% success rate. Each year you would be hunting for your food for the following year. If you failed to meet the quota for a specific season then you could modify your plan to encompass other game animals or supplement the remainder of your diet with other sources of protein depending on the time of the year.

The health benefits are certainly present. Game meat has been proven to be leaner and more beneficial to your body than domesticated livestock. The condition from which wild game is harvested is much cleaner, environmentally safer, and healthier than its domesticated counterparts. As an added bonus, the general worry about injected hormones, toxins, steroids, and additives are eliminated. What you harvest is safe for your body. Now your food is as organic and local as it gets. Not to mention, the pursuit of game requires some level of active participation which forces you to live a more involved lifestyle as you pursue your food.

So, in the end, it is more sustainable, healthier, and more economical to hunt and fish for your meat versus purchasing them from the store. What are you waiting for? Grab you pack and get outside!

The Lost Ways is a survival book that shows you how to survive using only methods that were tested and proven by our forefathers for centuries. The best way to survive the next major crisis is to look back at how people did things 150 years ago. This book is a far-reaching book with chapters ranging from simple things like making tasty bark-bread—like people did when there was no food—to building a traditional backyard smokehouse. Watch the video below:

 

Source : harvestingnature.com

 

                      RELATED ARTICLES : 

The post Hunting vs Buying Meat: The Traditional Hunter in the Modern World appeared first on .

Tales from the Turkey Woods

Click here to view the original post.

Tales from the Turkey Woods Austin Martin “Homesteady Live“ Audio in player below! This week I spent some time chasing turkeys through the woods and fields. The last eight years I have been on a mission, to kill a turkey. The last eight years I have failed. Eight years ago I started hunting. After watching … Continue reading Tales from the Turkey Woods

The post Tales from the Turkey Woods appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Bowhunting: For Food and Survival

Click here to view the original post.

Bowhunting: For Food and Survival There is definitely an enigmatic mystique and awe when it comes to archery. Most people know what archery is, but few truly appreciate it. The amount of skill, dedication and practice that it takes to become a good archer is definitely underrated. Many people, when they try to shoot an … Continue reading Bowhunting: For Food and Survival

The post Bowhunting: For Food and Survival appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Life-Saving Items You Need To Carry When Hunting

Click here to view the original post.

As you prepare yourself for the hunting season, it is important that you emphasize on your safety by giving it the priority it deserves. Taking into consideration what survival items you need to carry whether you plan on using them or not is paramount regardless of your hunting prowess. You never know what might happen when you are out and about in the wild. There are items that you should never forget when going out on a game hunt.

This article strives to give you the most essential must have survival items you need not miss on your hunting spree.

  1. First aid kit

    A hunter’s first aid kit is very different from the ordinary kit that just contains pain relievers and a Band-Aid. An excellent hunter’s first aid kit should be built from scratch taking into consideration all tools that you may require in case of a major accident. Some of the things that need to be in your first aid kit include; Special medication for those who suffer from a special need that requires them to frequently medicate, heavy-duty bandages and gauze, water purification tablets, tourniquets among other things.

  2. Map and compass

    Since time immemorial, a compass has been used by hunters as their primary navigation tool. Regardless of the change in technology where you can easily use a wrist GPS, it is important that you tag along with your compass just in case. A compass combined with a map is the only fail proof navigation gadget you can get.

  3. Food/water

    Whether you are going hunting for days or just for a hike, easy to eat food and water is a must have for all hunters. Stainless steel utensils are also highly recommended since you can use them for cooking purposes as well.

  4. Knife

    Just like a pen is to writing so is a knife to hunting. The importance of this tool can never be over emphasized. Before leaving for hunting, ensure that your knife is sharp. A knife is a Multi-functional tool that you can use as a weapon, for cutting rope, skinning game, opening packages, or even creating a fire starter. A knife should be kept on your person as opposed to keeping it in your backpack. Also, when cutting, ensure that you do not cut towards yourself as this may cause an accident.

  5. Communication tool

    A fully charged cell phone, its power bank and a two-way radio are a must have for hunters. These tools provide a way for hunters to communicate with other people incase an emergency arises. Unfortunately, due to poor network coverage or damage to this items, they may not be in a condition to help you convey messages. In this case, a whistle or a glass mirror will come in handy. Blowing a whistle or using a glass mirror to reflect rays of light are other ways you can communicate with the outside world as well as ward off animals.

  6. Fire Starters and flashlights

    Although easy to forget, flashlights are highly essential when going out to hunt for days. A heavy duty AA flashlight is not only bright, but it can last a long time. A flashlight may help you find your way through the night or on that dark morning. A flashlight may also help you to get your bearing at night and scare off animals.

    When you are out hunting for days, a means of making fire fast is also essential. Disposable lighters will aid you in quickly lighting up a fire to cook, for warmth, to melt snow and also to find your way through the darkness in case your flashlight runs out of battery. Ensure that you carry matches as backup lighters in a waterproof container.

  7. Cordage

    Although making a rope out of plant material is possible, bringing along a strong 50-feet cord is highly essential for hunters. You can use it to build shelter, secure loads to your backpack or to navigate through steep paths and inclines. A paracord is highly recommended because it does not add too much weight.

Once you have all these items in place, ensure that you pack them in a sturdy and durable backpack. Make a checklist where you can cross out all things you put in your bag to prevent yourself from forgetting an important item. In addition, before going out on that hunting expedition, ensure that you are geared up in appropriate clothing. Depending on the season, you may opt for some light or mid weight clothing. However, hunting boots are a must wear regardless of the season.

Remember that in order to survive adverse situations, you need to be prepared at all times. Bear in mind that preparedness is an ongoing thing that involves acquiring new survival tactics and adapting to new situations.

Author Bio:

Kevin Steffey is an avid hunter and freelance writer. He loves spending time in the field with his rifle more than almost anything else, and occupies his off-time discussing deer and their habits online. He is a founder at www.deerhuntingfield.com

When can you carry a knife – The Loose Cannon

Click here to view the original post.

http://www.sportingshootermag.com.au/gun-law/when-can-you-carry-a-knife-the-loose-cannon?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter%2028%20April%202017&utm_content=Newsletter%2028%20April%202017+CID_1cf5de6f24c86c7db68643a88369f8e3&utm_source=Email%20marketing%20software&utm_term=When%20can%20you%20carry%20a%20knife

Survival Movies. Surviving An Outbreak. Isolation.

Click here to view the original post.

I have not finished watching this video to date, but it has been very good so far. I have a dislike for Zombie movies, & this one is based on a similar scenario, but it is done very well. Well worth watching, set in England.

What You Need to Know About Arrowheads for Your Survival Bow: Types, Care & Advice

Click here to view the original post.

Editor’s Note: Although you might see many articles on archery, building a bow for survival or hunting, you rarely see articles on the various types of arrowheads.  A short walk through the archery section in any sporting goods store will show you that there are many types to select from.  Not only are there many to choose from, but there are care and maintenance considerations too.  I hope this article will shed some light on the subject and spur more dialogue on something that is rarely discussed on preparedness websites. To enhance this article, I added videos to elaborate on the specific topics discussed.. This is a guest post.

 


Choosing the correct arrowhead

Before making the decision to purchase arrowheads it is a very good idea to know how you are going to be using them. This may be your first time buying them or perhaps you may be trying to decide if a different type will work better for you. In either case, it is beneficial to understand the three basic categories.  

Target

These are typically the beginner’s choice as well as a good pick for those who want to get in some extra practice without the added expense of more sophisticated arrowheads. The tips of this type are constructed with a straight shaft and no barbs. The reason for this is that they are much easier to remove from a target and are typically strong enough for multiple shots. This doesn’t mean they are without risk. Target arrowheads can range from flat (blunt) tips to fine bullet points. In any case, they can cause injury or death when shot from a bow.

Blunt

Similar in some respects to flat tipped target arrowheads, blunt tips used for purposes other than hunting have a very different configuration. The purpose of this type is not necessarily to enter their intended target, but rather to hit with a force strong enough to cause enough trama to cause paralysis or even death depending on the size and location of the hit. One of the most popular of these is the JUDO point which has several spring loaded arms located just behind the tip. The advantage to the JUDO is that unlike other tip types, the arms stop the arrow from digging into grass or leaves. This makes the arrow better able to be recovered. Blunt heads are for the most part used in hunting small game.

Broadhead

There are many varieties of the broadhead, but each of them stems from a basic design idea. The characteristic shared by tips in this category are several razor-sharp blades that extend outward from the shaft center. The obvious purpose of this configuration is deep penetration and internal lacerations. The back end of the broadheads is typically pointed backward, or barbed so that it is less likely to fall out of an animal once it hits. There are specialized broadheads whose blades are retracted before shooting them, but once they are loosed from a high rated bow, the blades extend outward. In either case, broadheads are the tip of choice (and often required) for hunting large game animals.

 

Equipping for Survival

When in a survival situation, broadheads are typically going to be the best type to carry, but it wouldn’t be a bad idea to also equip yourself with a small number of blunt heads. If you find yourself in need of meat and the only game you can find are small squirrels or the like, broadheads may simply be over the top. Besides, broadheads can be somewhat fragile and the chances are greater of missing a small target and thus ruining your broadhead. This characteristic of broadheads is particularly important to remember in that the blades can separate once they hit their target. This will leave razor-sharp pieces of shrapnel inside the body cavity so take great care when dressing out your game until you are absolutely sure you have found every piece of the arrowhead.

On the other hand, while target and blunt tips can theoretically take down small game, they will only cause minor injury to large game and you will undoubtedly lose your kill. Just make sure that when you carry this type of arrowhead that you keep them in a closed container. Broadheads that are ready to be used for hunting are extremely sharp.

Sharpening Arrowheads

It may come as a surprise, but even some of the best broadheads are not sold razor-sharp. The main reason for this is safety in shipping and handling, not because manufacturers are lazy. Razor sharp blades would create a considerable hazard to those responsible for getting them from the maker to the retail store.

Like sharpening knives, being able to repeatedly ensure razor sharp edges on broadheads takes considerable practice. There are many techniques to choose from, but the simple process of hand sharpening with what is known as a bastard file would be an excellent skill to master. While many modern hunters enjoy the convenience of bench grinders or other power tools to sharpen their arrowheads, if you find yourself without power, those tools become essentially useless.

 

Filling your quiver

Once you have decided which tip or tips will work best for your application, the next question to answer is how many arrows to carry when you are in the field. There is no standard or official answer to this kind of question and the best teacher is, of course, practical experience. Some hunters find they need to carry only two arrows while others may carry much more than that. Perhaps the best advice is to take more than you think you may need on your first few hunts and work your way down to the number you typically use on a regular basis. The mixture of arrowhead tips on these arrows is also dependent upon the type of game being hunted as well as experience.

Make sure that you also consider the type of arrows you will carry. Just as there is a variety of arrowheads available, arrows come in their own varieties of material such as wood, aluminum, and carbon. The carbon arrow is likely the most popular choice among hunters because it is strong, durable, and lightweight. Even so, some of the best carbon arrows are susceptible to damage over time.

Always make sure to inspect all your arrows long before you decide to use them. Arrows with splinters and cracks can be very dangerous because they can split or even shatter. The idea is to fire a strong, safe arrow at your target, not to injure yourself or others in the process.

Editor’s Note: I added this video because it is just cool to watch! 🙂

 

Author Bio:

Kevin Steffey is an avid hunter and freelance writer. He loves spending time in the field with his rifle more than almost anything else and occupies his off-time discussing deer and their habits online. He is a founder at www.deerhuntingfield.com

 

 

The Essential Things All Hunters Should Have!

Click here to view the original post.

The Essential Things All Hunters Should Have! Hunting is not just all about having high-end weapons and other equipment, but it is also about overcoming the harsh and most inconvenient environment. Thus, to be an effective hunter, you should be prepared for whatever is ahead of your hunting venture. You should take note of these … Continue reading The Essential Things All Hunters Should Have!

The post The Essential Things All Hunters Should Have! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Different Types of Bows And Their Benefits

Click here to view the original post.

Bows are essential tools in hunting and games. They exist in different forms and shapes. Over the years, bows have evolved and are now made of components like carbon fiber and fiberglass with improved shooting mechanisms. There are different types of bows namely; compound bows, recurve bows, crossbows and traditional bows with their distinct benefits.

Compound bows

A compound bow is a modern form of a long bow. It is easy to use, highly versatile, adjustable, more compact, longer life and extremely powerful and thus preferred by many people. A pulley system is used to draw back the arms which are stiff when drawn by brute force. This bow is considered better than the other bows for its draw weight that is less than half of the original weight. They are made of aluminum alloy that does not distort or warp in the case of temperature, humidity, and moisture. Its developed stabilizers cause less vibration in the release of an arrow. These bows are mostly used in 3D archery, bow hunting and some in target archery.

Recurve bows

These are the only bows allowed by the Olympics and historically they are known to be used by the horsemen. Recurve bow is known for its standard draw weight, low maintenance and highly versatile. Its lower and upper tips curve away from the archer allowing it to store more elastic energy. Less power is needed to use the bow thus a tactical advantage to the user. Recurve bows with a bare bow recurve made of a string, bow limbs, a riser and an arrow rest are mostly used to train the beginners. Some archers also use them in 3D archery and field archery. One can also use them in bow hunting with higher poundage bows.

Crossbows

Modern crossbows resemble firearms with a short bow attached horizontally to the muzzle. For the archer to fire, the string is attached to the trigger mechanism and locked in place. Crossbows have the best bow sights and their shooting range is longer than all the other types of bows. This is a modified bow and arrow mostly use in 3D archery, target field and sometimes in bow hunting.

Traditional bows

A traditional bow is also known as long bow or self-bow. It is the oldest form of a bow with a long piece of wood that is either straight or curved having a bowstring fixed on each end. These bows are easy to make since their materials are locally available. They are easy to maintain, easy to carry and easy to use. It requires a very clear environment to fire a target. When used in bow hunting, it is usually at higher draw weights.

Conclusion

There is a total of four types of bows; compound bows, crossbows, traditional bows and recurve bows. They are useful in hunting, shooting the target, shooting on a course, and competitive shooting. The purpose of the course determines the type of the bow to use. For instance, a recurve bow is instrumental in field archery such as Olympic Games, compound bows in target archery and crossbow in 3D archery with their best bow sights and traditional bows in bow hunting.

Joseph Gleason is the founder of Captain Hunter. CaptainHunter.com is a site dedicated to the sport of hunting. We have a deep respect for nature and for the environment, and we therefore take the sport of hunting very seriously. Never think that you are alone in the woods again. Our goal is to share what we know with who needs it most.

Best Animals to Hunt During SHTF

Click here to view the original post.

Best Animals to Hunt During SHTF Host: Highlander “Survival & Tech Preps “ Audio in player below! As with most topics we have a lot of what if’s? Food storage with preppers is a big deal and we think we have enough. We prepare for so long the amount we think we’ll need, but alas … Continue reading Best Animals to Hunt During SHTF

The post Best Animals to Hunt During SHTF appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Spring Scouting for Deer

Click here to view the original post.

Spring Scouting for Deer Springtime is one of the best times to get out! After a winter of hiding and shivering its time to get back to work. This is a short article and a great video on scouting for deer. If you plan on having any hunting success the scout is so important. There …

Continue reading »

The post Spring Scouting for Deer appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

The New Range in Cross Bows

Click here to view the original post.

“Modern crossbows offer comfort and performance far beyond that of their predecessors. Here’s now manufacturers have changed the game.” Every time I hear how crossbows provide an advantage in the woods, I roll my eyes and shake my head. Chances are, folks who claim and preach such fallacies have never hunted with a crossbow or…

The post The New Range in Cross Bows appeared first on The Weekend Prepper.

How to Get Started with Hunting

Click here to view the original post.

A lot of survival sites advise “learn how to hunt for food” in the event of a collapse.  Indeed, in Venezuela, where there is widespread hunger, desperate people are killing animals that are not normally considered as food.  However, unless you have a family that hunts, many city dwellers would not know the first thing about hunting.  I thought it would be interesting to find out how do you get started with hunting for readers who are curious about what’s […]

The post How to Get Started with Hunting appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

How to Hunt Deer with a Bow Effectively

Click here to view the original post.

Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

4.4/5 (5)

Editor’s Note: This post has been contributed by Joseph. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter the Prepper Writing Contest today.


Deer hunting can be done in two ways; either by using rifles or using bows. If you are one of the many hunters who prefer the latter option, this is the perfect article for you to know the practice tips to hunt deer with a bow. Dedicated hunters will know that practice sharpens your skill on shooting a bow with precise and accurate shots. Thus, here are a few tips to pave your way to become a skilled bow hunter.

Practice during unfavorable conditions

Obviously, a good hunt is scheduled during the peak seasons when the weather is favorable for hunting and trekking. However, weather can be a greatly unpredictable thing, and while out on a hunt, it’s better to be prepared for anything.

Practicing in windy conditions where the direction and force of the wind can greatly affect your accuracy can improve your bow skills. Think of this way; if you can shoot well in crappy weather, then you can do so better in normal conditions. More importantly, you are prepared for any kind of situation when you’re out hunting.

Take it slow

If you’re planning to shoot your first buck from a tree stand, you cannot do so successfully without learning how to shoot from a higher position.

 

It’s not wise to push your limits while at the beginner stage of bow hunting. The best strategy to gauge your skills is to start slow. Start shooting at small distances until you can perfect your shot at that distance. Only then should you further increase the increments.

This strategy can also minimize frustration because it will let you know the farthest distance where you can shoot most accurately. On the field, it will help you gauge your Effective Kill Range (EKR), or the distance range wherein you are most likely to take down a deer without messing up the shot.

Learn how to use a bow sight

A bow sight is an essential tool when shooting long distance. The best bow sight can greatly enhance your long-distance shooting by a tenfold. Basically, it has pins set at different distances which can help you shoot long-distance targets from stagnant position, such as a tree stand.

Other than a bow sight, you should also use other essential bow accessories such as a bow stabilizer. A bow stabilizer, on the other hand, is an accessory that helps minimize torque, stabilize shots, and increase the accuracy of your shots.

Know how to shoot from a higher position

If you’re planning to shoot your first buck from a tree stand, you cannot do so successfully without learning how to shoot from a higher position. Because the trajectory will change once you shoot from an elevated place.

So one of my tips is to practice shooting dummy targets from a tree stand. Once you get a hold of this skill, you’ll find tree stand hunting an easy task.

Target for easy-kill areas

The most humane way to kill a deer is to shoot it in the chest area, where the arrow can pierce through the lungs or heart and deliver almost instant and painless death. To practice this skill, you can use target print-outs of a deer in order to enhance your ability to kill instantly.

Moreover, this will also minimize the possibility of the deer running away because of a shot in the belly, hind, or legs. With accurate shots to the chest area, you can harvest your kill easily.

Don’t hesitate to ask questions

If you’re not sure about something, ask a more experienced bow hunter than you. Remember that it’s not a competition of who is best. Every great bow hunter starts somewhere, and while you’re a beginner, it’s best to take advice from experts and use it to work on your weak points.

Other than constructive criticism, you can also form bonds with other bow hunters and potentially join them on their next bow hunt. This will be a big plus for you: because not only do you have new hunting buddies, you also have a lot of people to help you work on your skills.

Practice with your bow in low-light conditions

You can also master shooting with it during near sunset or near dawn conditions.

Most often, whitetail deer make an appearance before sunset when the light is dimming and your bow sight is getting difficult to use. Although most bow sights come with a glow-in-the-dark pin feature, it will be much wiser and a skill-builder to practice shooting in low light.

If you have a bow sight with a low-light feature, you can also master shooting with it during near sunset or near dawn conditions. In this way, you won’t need to fumble with your bow sight while on the field.

Adjust your bow according to the wind

The wind plays a big role in the accuracy of your shot because, as said before in this article, it can affect the direction and/or trajectory of your shot. When hunting deer with a bow, you’re also most likely confined to shooting from far distances. Therefore, it’s better if you learn to adjust your aim with the wind.

Most importantly, with this skill you can reap rewards when a supposed to be sunny day turns into a windy one. Remember: the weather is completely unpredictable, and as a hunter, don’t expect it to always be in your favor.

Work on your form

As a beginner, the best form for archery is one of the most difficult aspects to master. It’s imperative that you work on your form every time you practice shooting. Moreover, you can also ask an experienced bow hunter to evaluate your form and tell you the mistakes that you’re making.

Why does this need to be done? Well, a great form will directly affect the accuracy of your shot and help you shoot better. Otherwise, a bad form can lead to inaccurate and imprecise shots that will just leave you discouraged. Thus, remember to work on this aspect along with everything else.

Learn how to wait for the perfect shot

In deer hunting, timing is everything, whether you shoot with a bow or a rifle. The proper timing of your shot will decrease the chances of a botched kill. Since deer are highly receptive of sound, you can scare away a bunch of them if you have off timing with your shots and they end up on a nearby tree or the ground.

Unfortunately, the only way to practice your timing is to do it on an actual deer. Because automated practice targets have predictable movements, they aren’t great options for practicing timing. Unlike with deer, you can learn how to assess their movements and make it predictable to you.

Conclusion

Here, we’ve highlighted the best practice tips to hunt deer with a bow. It’s not the actual camping and hunting that’s the most difficult part, but the practice on shooting a bow. Thus, the best option you have in order to be the most prepared hunter in the world is to practice at every chance you get.

Did you like this article? If you did, leave us a comment below and tell us what you think. You can also share this with your friends. Thanks for reading!

 

About the author: Joseph Gleason is the founder of Captain Hunter. CaptainHunter.com is a site dedicated to the sport of hunting. We have a deep respect for nature and for the environment, and we therefore take the sport of hunting very seriously.

Never think that you are alone in the woods again. Our goal is to share what we know with who needs it most.

If you liked this article, please rate it.

The post How to Hunt Deer with a Bow Effectively appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Why The Rangefinder Binocular Is The New Must-Have Tool For Hunters

Click here to view the original post.

Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editor’s Note: This post has been contributed by Daren. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter the Prepper Writing Contest today.


There are many things that can cause you to miss the target when hunting, one of which is a misjudged range. Speaking of underestimated range, have you ever tried to measure a target’s range and field miserably? If you have, then it might be time to invest in a rangefinder binocular.

The best rangefinder binoculars give you the best of both worlds. It is for this reason that I consider a rangefinder binocular to be an infallible asset to any hunter. Rangefinder binoculars are becoming more mainstream as more and more hunters continue discovering their usefulness.

So why are they so important to hunters? To answer this question, we have to look at what you get from a rangefinder binocular, which is,

Ease of use

Ask any hunter who uses rangefinder binoculars, and they will probably tell you that they are easier to use than laser rangefinders. Rangefinder binoculars weigh more compared to ordinary binoculars. The added weight gives them stability and makes them easier to hold. The two-hand grip of these binoculars guarantees more accurate range readings. Additionally, with a simple push of a button, you are able to get the range of your target within seconds.

Two-in-one

As a hunter, you will have to carry some accessories to aid you in your hunting. These accessories can include a rifle or bow, a binocular or a scope, and a rangefinder. Transitioning from one device to another can be time-consuming.

For example, let us say you have spotted an animal with your binocular but do not know how far away it is from you. The logical thing to do is pull out your rangefinder to measure the range. This process can be time-consuming.

With a rangefinder binocular, you spot the animal and are able to know how far it is when you spot it. Binoculars with a built-in rangefinder often have an impressive range. There are rangefinder binoculars that will offer you a 1000 to 2000 range. Thus a rangefinder binocular is a two-in-one device that will serve you exceptionally well.

Overcome rangefinder shortcomings

A rangefinder functions by sending out a laser beam. The beam hits the intended target, and the rangefinder measures the distance of the beam’s reflection. This essentially means that rangefinders do not work well in thickly forested areas. With a rangefinder integrated into a binocular, this problem is solved.

With a binocular, you can scope an area before turning on the rangefinder. Scanning the area first helps you know if there is anything that might be in the way of the laser beam. This increases your chances of hitting the target and getting an accurate range.

Also, you will be able to identify vantage points where you can get a more accurate range. The binocular’s ability to give you a clearer view of your surroundings enhances the rangefinder’s performance. Thus, the two devices built into one gadget complement one another and improve your hunting skills and reduce the chances of you missing.

Angle compensations & ballistic information

Apart from having a built –in rangefinder, most rangefinder binoculars come fitted with an angle compensator feature. This comes in handy when you are aiming from a tree stand. Some models come with pre-programmed ballistics charts that will be useful in your hunting.

This information allows you to adjust your shot based on the ballistics curve of your firearm’s bullet. This information integrated into the binocular improves your accuracy and minimizes guesswork. The ballistics technology found in some models consider factors such as temperature, air pressure, and ballistics curves. This is the kind of information that professional snipers rely on when making a shot. Therefore, with a rangefinder binocular, you will have this information at your fingertips.

Preparation

Most animals are creatures of habit. This means that they frequent specific parts. This is a weakness that you can exploit. To do so, you will need first to scout the specific areas where your prey frequents. Next, you will need to identify the perfect vantage point to take the shot.

With a rangefinder binocular, you will be able to scan and get a range simultaneously. You will need to identify a good spot from where you will stalk your prey. The binocular will come in handy when measuring the range between this spot and your prey’s preferred spot.

This preparation is best done during the day, and the hunting is done at night or dawn. At night, light conditions are not so good you will be able to know where to go to make a kill.

Avoid getting close

One of the biggest mistake you can make as a hunter is getting too close to your prey. Animals have heightened senses and can hear things at longer ranges than we can. With a rangefinder binocular, you will be able to stalk an animal from a safe distance.

Some of the best rangefinder binoculars out there offer a range of up to 1300 yards. It is hard to spook an animal off at 1300 yards. Average rangefinder binoculars normally have a range of between 600 and 800 yards. Thus, a rangefinder binocular minimizes the chances of you getting too close to make a shot. Also, this binocular helps improve your long-range marksman skills.

Continuous scoping

Every second count when you are hunting. Thus, taking your eyes off your prey for even a minute can change things. The rangefinder binoculars are designed to be sophisticated. Thus, there are models that feature an in-view LED display. The latter display usually resembles a fighter jet’s display area or HUD. All crucial information is displayed on the LED display. This way you can keep your eyes on your prey for a longer period of time.

Additionally, binoculars have a wider field of view compared to rangefinders. Thus, a binocular’s eyepiece can accommodate more information than a rangefinder’s eyepiece. Therefore, you get all the information you need clearly.

Conclusion

Rangefinder binoculars are the future, and it is estimated that in the next decade or two, rangefinder binoculars will render conventional binoculars obsolete. In summary, as a hunter having a rangefinder binocular will make work easier for you.

 

About the Author: Daren Rifen Founder of Binoculars Guru is an enthusiastic hunter with over 10 years’ experience. A native of Texas, Daren hunts everything from whitetail deer to ducks. Daren has mastered different hunting techniques including archery, using rifles and handguns. As a native of Texas, Daren learned his hunting skills from his father, who learned from his grandfather. He possesses an extensive knowledge of everything firearms, hunting binoculars and riflescopes. When he is not hunting, Daren is either hiking or fishing.

If you liked this article, please rate it.

The post Why The Rangefinder Binocular Is The New Must-Have Tool For Hunters appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Top 5 Rabbit Hunting Tips with Bow

Click here to view the original post.

Is rabbit bow hunting becoming a lost art these days with the obsession people have towards the latest firearms? Do not just count out rabbit bow hunting yet as it is very crucial in a survival situation. Learning to use your bow and make a kill is one of the greatest survival skills to learn. One of the tastiest meals you can have in the wild when lost is meat from a rabbit.

Using a bow to hunt a rabbit is a real challenge but also a rewarding one filled with excitements. The odds of killing a rabbit with an arrow and a bow are extremely low when you compare to the gun hunting. However, in a survival situation, a bow and arrow might be the only things available that can be made with easy. In fact, you don’t want to waste your precious ammo on a rabbit when you can use arrows that are reusable.

Let me share with you five rabbit hunting tips with a bow and arrow. Make no mistake; getting a rabbit from the field to a meal on the plate is no easy job. You need to be patient, understand their habits and have the best compound bow and hunting arrow.

Here are five rabbit hunting tips

Find the hidden food sources

If you need to hunt rabbits effectively, you must know where they feed. This means knowing the hidden food sources where rabbits are more likely to feed. Places with lots of green plants, vegetables and weeds are ideal places to start your hunt. Even if you don’t find rabbits, hung around they will come with time. Sometimes when hunting for rabbits, you have to wait for them to come to you. This requires an understanding of the feeding times and their best foods. Most rabbits will feed early in the morning when the sun has just risen. Getting to their feeding grounds early enough gives you a good hiding spot and a clear angle to make a clean shot.

Patience

Bow hunting is a waiting game that requires you to be patient at all times. In several ways, hunting rabbits is like fishing with a crankbait where you have to maintain rhythm at all times. Do not rush anything. When walking through the evergreen boughs, fence rows and brush piles, maintain a steady pace. Make 10-18 steps before stopping and surveying around for any movement and the glistering dark eyes of rabbits. If hunting with your dog, keenly observe his cues.

Practice makes perfect

Shooting with your bow is not that easy as most people think especially when in the wild. Real preppers practice out of their comfort zone. The way you shoot your best hunting arrow in the comfort of your backyard while smoking a cigar does not happen in a real survival situation. When in the wild and in need of a kill, you’re most likely going to botch the shot. Real archers know how to hit the target from a long distance, and this only happens with good practice. Practice for a real survival situation trying to hit the target with just a few seconds of setting the arrow, aiming and releasing. Learn to shoot your arrows in all manner of position. In the wild, you sometimes have to go vertical which takes us to our next tip.

Go vertical

Walking a level ground while hunting for rabbits looks pretty simple, but climbing can maximize your chances for a kill. Look for a brush pile, forgotten stack of cordwood or anything that you can climb on and observe the hunt area properly. The vibrations and noise above you can help you notice a rabbit and have a shooting opportunity.

Take care of things that indicate your presence

Rabbits are among the swiftest animals in the wild and run away with the slightest of hint that there is a human presence. You must learn to remain hidden at all times and never expose your arms or face. Try and be natural avoiding things like perfumes that alert the rabbit that there is someone around.

Try and avoid obstacles on your way like flowers and grasses that affect your aim. You can remain still and wait for the rabbit to move to a clear place instead of you changing positions. The most productive time to hunt for a wild rabbit is when the weather is cloudy, damp and cold. A foggy morning is also ideal when the air is filled with mist and woods are real quiet. This allows you to sneak close to the rabbits stealthily and get a good shot.

Final Verdict

Knowing how to hunt for rabbits in the wild using a bow and arrow can mean the difference between surviving and dying. Rabbits are a tasty meal that can provide you with proteins and get you going. You just need to learn how to stalk rabbits, stay still and motionless waiting for the rabbit to come to you.

Brandon Cox is the founder of StayHunting, who is passionate about all things of hunting and fitness. Through his hunting website, he would like to share tips & tricks, finest tech that will excite all of the intricacies of hunting whether you be an amateur or a professional.

Gun control explored at Clark University program.

Click here to view the original post.

Ms. Schwoerer said firearms were around in England since the late 13th century, but didn’t play an important role in society until the early 1500s, when Henry VIII ramped up production of guns with the hopes of proving his prowess on the battlefield by making war with France. He purchased artillery from elsewhere in Europe and encouraged gunmakers to set up shop in Britain. In addition to bolstering the military, the focus on production eventually put guns in the hands of people “up and down the social scale,” she said.

Guns helped people hunt more effectively, putting more protein on the table. There was an early interest in hunting for sport and protection, but early on, increased access to game meat was a major factor, she said. In a less practical sense, the gun was a novelty and carried with it an aura of power and authority.

How to Use a Wire Snare

Click here to view the original post.

How to Use a Wire Snare Many people think that hunting is a pretty easy endeavor. In fact, I have been in arguments about how unfair the hunters advantage is. For those of us who hunt we know it couldn’t be further from the truth. In a true survival situation you will want to focus …

Continue reading »

The post How to Use a Wire Snare appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

A Preppers Guide to Prepping for the Hunt

Click here to view the original post.

After the SHTF, let’s assume you picked out a hideout spot far enough off the grid to avoid other hunters and in a region well populated with deer and other wild game. If you don’t have any experience hunting but plan to harvest game that you’ll ration throughout the year, consider these steps you to ensure a successful harvest season after season and year after year.

Location, Location, Location

Every region is different, and finding wild game can be difficult if you don’t know where to look. One of the best ways to locate top hunting spots is to break down these areas by elevation, including low, middle and high. Once you locate the mule deer based on elevation, you’ll be able to hunt across different terrain using the altitude as your reference.

Lay of the Land

Familiarize yourself with the area in which you plan to hunt. You’ll need to lay out a grid of the landscape and understand how to navigate the entire area. Memorize wind patterns and locate watering holes and well-traveled game trails, so you know where these animals might move if spooked. In other words, use the terrain to your advantage.

Additionally, stick to southern-facing slopes and areas with preferred vegetation for hunting mule deer. Plan out your hunting movea, as many mule deer will bed down on hillsides or against breaks. This activity protects them from attack above and allows them to scan for predators below. Pay attention to the weather as you get ready for your hunt. Something as simple as rain can move mule deer out of an area altogether.

Game Behavior

Familiarize yourself with the movements and behaviors of the deer you hunt. Mule deer tend to reside within a few miles of each other until it’s time to move feeding grounds. Pattern your game so you know their summer, fall and winter feeding grounds and when they make their move. Take note of the herd’s size and when they go into rut so you’ll know if more deer are in the area.

The hour before and after daylight is when deer move most, so plan your hunts at dawn and dusk. You won’t see much movement during the hottest portions of the day, so glassing hillsides or posting up by a watering hole is a great way to extend your hunt.

Your Weapon and Gear

Optics can help you spot mule deer from up to four miles away. When glassing, train your eye to look for the flick of an ear or the sun shining off the tip of an antler. Once you find your weapon of choice, learn everything about it and acknowledge your limitations. For example, you’ll want to be able to answer these questions:

  • From what distance are you most accurate?
  • Are you comfortable hunting with your weapon in all weather conditions?

Ethical Hunting Practices

The quickest way to hunt a species to extinction is to make that animal the only source of sustenance for a large population of hungry, desperate and panicked people. If you are far enough off the grid, then you won’t need to worry as much about hunting your local herd to extinction. Still, it’s important to consider the benefits of ethical hunting and where to draw the line.

Animal Harvesting

Learning how to properly harvest your animal is critical so that you waste little to no meat. If you’re hunting in hot climates, make a kill and quickly retrieve it before the meat spoils. You’ll then want to cool it down as quickly as possible. Be prepared with the right gear so you and your vehicle can navigate in even the most difficult off-road conditions. That means ensuring your vehicle has quality off-road tires, which will make your life easier if you find yourself in a difficult spot.

Casea Peterson: Creative copywriter and content marketing specialist living in the PNW.

The Backwoods Hunting Weapon You Can Make In 1 Hour (No, It’s Not A Bow)

Click here to view the original post.
The Backwoods Hunting Weapon You Can Make In 1 Hour (No, It’s Not A Bow)

Image source: YouTube/Nat Geo screen grab

 

When suddenly confronted with a wilderness survival situation, finding or building shelter from the elements should be your first priority. However, once you have either located or constructed suitable shelter and found a source of fresh water, obtaining enough food to maintain your heath is of paramount importance — and obtaining sufficient protein is essential. Thus, knowing how to construct and use primitive hunting tools, such as a sling or an atlatl and darts, is extremely beneficial, since they require very little construction time and can be easily made from the materials at hand.

Many if not most survivalists would say a self-bow — any simple bow made from a single piece of wood – should be constructed first. But this requires a significant amount of time to make, because you first have to find a straight sapling of an appropriate species and cut it down, and then you have to remove the bark and wait for the wood to dry before carving it to shape. Also, there is the issue of finding appropriate material from which to construct a bow string that does not stretch.

Consequently, constructing an atlatl (a “spear thrower”) and darts is often a far better strategy, because an atlatl can be built with as little as an hour’s work, and atlatl darts need not be nearly as sophisticated as arrows for a bow; atlatl darts are not subjected to the same stresses that firing an arrow from a bow produces. This is the weapon used by our ancestors to kill small animals, long before there were bows.

Let’s Get Started

In order to make an atlatl, start by finding a straight sapling, approximately 1 1/2 inches in diameter and preferably one that is of a very lightweight species of wood, such as poplar. Cut a section from it, approximately 24-28 inches in length. Use your camp knife and a baton to split the sapling down the middle, into two halves. You will need to choose the thicker of the two halves and proceed to use your bushcraft knife to flatten and smooth the split surface while leaving the other side half-round. Next, find an appropriate tree limb with a symmetrical fork, and then cut the fork from the limb, leaving approximately two inches below the fork and then cut each fork to a length of approximately one inch. Then cut a peg, approximately two inches in length.

Story continues below video

Next, drill one hole in the end of the flattened section of sapling using an auger or bow drill with sand for an abrasive and, once the hole is drilled, insert the peg firmly into the hole so that it extends approximately one inch above the flattened surface. Carve a handle on the other end of the sapling section by first rounding the edges and then carving shallow groves in either side for your index finger and thumb to help you retain your grasp on the atlatl when using it to launch a dart. Once you have the grip and finger grooves carved, drill a second hole in the flattened side, approximately one inch above the point where your thumb and index fingers meet when grasping the handle section of the atlatl, and then firmly insert the fork into that hole and you will have a completed (although very primitive), fully functional, atlatl.

Ultimate Tactical Self-Defense And Hunting Weapon That Doesn’t Require A Firearms License!

Now you need to make atlatl darts. They can be made as simple as cutting a reasonably straight section of sapling to approximately 36 inches in length, removing the bark, sharpening one end, and then cutting a nock in the other end that will mate with the peg on your atlatl. Then, to launch your dart at a prospective target, all you have to do is place the dart’s nock against the atlatl’s peg and then lay the shaft into the fork and hold it in place by positioning your thumb and index fingers over the dart’s shaft. Raise the atlatl over your shoulder, point the dart at your intended target, and then move the atlatl forward in an arc while releasing the dart’s shaft from your fingers. This will cause the dart to launch with great speed and momentum. If you’re confused, then watch the video below.

Story continues below video

With more time to work with, you can make much finer atlatl darts by cutting an appropriate sized sapling to length, removing the bark, and then straightening the shaft by suspending the dart over a fire for a short period in order to cause the moisture contained within the wood to heat. Also, you can harden the tip of the shaft by placing it in the coals of a fire for a short period and removing it. Then, sharpen it with your bushcraft knife.

So, although an atlatl and darts may not be as sophisticated a hunting tool as a bow, it requires significantly less time and effort to make it – and yet is every bit as effective at harvesting both small and large game animals. The range over which they can be cast is mainly dependent on the strength of the hunter, but the average person can easily cast a dart 50 yards using an atlatl and, with a little more effort, 100 yards.

What advice would you add on making an atlatl and darts? Share your tips in the section below:

If You Run Out Of Ammo, What Would You Do? Learn How To Make Your Own! Read More Here.

How to Be a Marksman Year-Round For Less!

Click here to view the original post.

How to Be a Marksman Year-Round For Less! Shooting an air rifle is a great hobby to keep your marksman skills sharp. While shooting .22 caliber ammo can chew through your wallet quicker than a honey badger, air rifle pellets are about as cheap as they come. There is nothing quite like picking up a heavy …

Continue reading »

The post How to Be a Marksman Year-Round For Less! appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

What You Need To Know For Hunting During Winter

Click here to view the original post.

Winters can be harsh and if hunting is a hobby you enjoy, it is important to be aware of the equipment requirements, hunting laws, gun certifications and proper apparel necessary to have a successful hunting trip in the winter.

Hunters aren’t required to have a degree, ACLS certification or CPR training, but they should be familiar with the basic demands of hunting.

This sport in the winter can be enjoyable, if hunters prepare by studying the different types of animals and birds, know the right clothing and equipment they should use, and understand other important techniques of hunting.

Any activity is dangerous if the participants are not aware of or do not understand rules and regulations surrounding that activity. Hunting, specifically, can be a very dangerous game if you aren’t aware of its basic guidelines and procedures.

Here are our top tips for understanding the do’s and don’ts of hunting when it comes to the winter hunting season.

Licensing and Certifications

We know it’s basic, but let’s state it again. All states require a hunting license or a tag that allows people to hunt. Whether they are using a gun or traps, all hunters need licenses in order to go out and hunt. Certain states also require licenses to set out traps for different animals.

Before leaving for a weekend trip, hunters must gain a license or certification showing they are able to own a gun and/or set a trap. Getting the correct paperwork can prevent hunters from paying hundreds of dollars in fines.

Animal and Bird Seasons

As winter continues, it’s important that hunters know the rules and regulations regarding animals and their hunting seasons. Depending on the state, specific animals and birds aren’t allowed to be hunted during certain months of the year.

Each state has different regulations when it comes to the hunting of animals, so it’s important that hunters are familiar with state regulations wherever they are.

Never leave for a hunting trip without having a hunting license and knowing which animals are in season. Before starting a weekend of living in tents and hunting food, hunters should do their homework and find out what animals and birds they are allowed to hunt to avoid paying a few hundred dollars in fines.

Fighting the Weather

Keeping warm is essential in the winter, especially for those who spend hours tracking and hunting animals. The cold can make it harder to concentrate. When it is bitterly frigid outside, the weather is often all people can think about.

Focusing on the weather instead of the gun in your hand can be dangerous to yourself and those around you. When planning hunting trips, look at the weather forecast. It is best to be flexible and adjust your plans when there are clear signs of a storm.

Think about the Donner Party and how that brutal snow storm found our forefathers trapped in the mountains. They learned the survival lesson the harsh way, but you can prepare now and don’t repeat their mistakes.

Discover the secrets that helped our forefathers survive in the wild! 

If you do need to hunt during a storm, there are three time periods that are safe for hunters: before the storm, mid-storm, and post-storm.

Hunting ahead or behind the storm will allow hunters to know if they need to stop or if it is safe to keep going. Mid-storm can be a more dangerous time to hunt in, but if you watch the storm you can track where it is going or when it starts to lighten up.

A mistake many hunters make on their winter hunting trip is thinking they need several layers. The more layers a hunter wears, the more they will perspire and the harder it will become for the hunter to move about quietly and efficiently. Adding layers will keep you warm, but the layers can often add unwanted bulk.

Mobility while operating any type of weapon is essential. If you cannot move efficiently, the risk of someone getting hurt increases. As important as dressing warm is, it is good to keep in mind the question whether you can move efficiently or not.

There are several options of clothing that keep you warm without adding bulk. Below are listed six useful pieces of clothing that provide warmth and protection while still giving hunters the mobility that they need.

Parkas

Purchasing a parka that is designed to keep in the warmth, but also cut down the bulk, will help the hunter stay warm without having to worry about cutting out mobility. Proper insulation doesn’t have to mean a bulky jacket. A simple layer of fur on the inside of the jacket can keep a hunter just as warm as if they were wearing several layers.

A parka will help keep out the cold without adding resistance to the hunter’s movements.

Elevation jacket

At any elevation, weather can change and fluctuate drastically. In addition to keeping warm, hunters often need to find ways to keep dry. An elevation jacket is a lightweight jacket that can stay that way even in the pouring rain. With water-repellent fabric, it is able to keep heat in while keeping water out.

An elevation jacket will allow the hunter to stay warm, dry and able to still move without limiting mobility.

Coldfront Bib Pants

Legs need just as much coverage as the upper body. Hunters need pants that use the same technology and fabrics as their jackets to keep them warm and dry without preventing mobility. Coldfront Bib pants are meant to do just that. With micro-grid fleece lining, these pants administer an extra layer of insulation to keep a hunter’s legs warm. This material also helps keep legs dry in snow or rain.

Not only do coldfront bib pants keep legs warm and dry, they also have the ability to shield against harsh winds.

Hunter Extreme Overalls

Hunters looking for clothing that covers their whole body and helps keep them warm should look to the 70’s trend of overalls. Hunter Extreme Overalls are built to trap body heat, keeping the hunter warm even in extreme weather conditions. They give the warmth needed and also the room needed for hunters to move properly.

Some overall designs contain removable hoods, removable hand muffs, and hand warming pockets designed to withstand rain, snow, and wind.

Wooltimate Ninja Hood

Covering the mouth and nose is important for keeping a person warm and preventing frostbite. A Wooltimate Ninja Hood covers the head, mouth, and nose. With a blend of wool and fleece, a ninja hood has the abilities to block out rain, snow, wind, or any other extreme weather condition. The hood also covers the neck so a hunter is truly covered top to bottom. Due to the eyes being left uncovered, pairing a Wooltimate Ninja Hood with goggles or glasses can provide the best results.

Infrared Scent Control Gloves

With jackets sporting extra layers, pants to keep out the wind, and a hood to cover the face, all that is left for a hunter to keep warm as they hunt is protection for their hands. Hunters need gloves that keep their hands warm without taking away mobility.

Infrared scent control gloves take it one step further. Animals can detect a human from several miles away based on their distinct human scent. Scent control gloves eliminates natural body odor which can allow hunters to sneak up on their target. These gloves also absorb body heat and radiates it back into the gloves to keep hands warm.

Tracking Tips

When tracking animals, hunters can find them by their footprints, broken twigs and places where they have slept. Another way hunters can find a group of animals is by looking for water. Wherever there is water, animals are not far from the source.

An animal’s main goal in the winter is to stay warm. This means wherever the sun is shining is where animals tend to be. They can often be found on hills or ridges facing the sun to keep warm. Hunters should try to hunt in sunny areas and avoid shady spots.

Snapping twigs in the woods is unavoidable. When it happens, hunters should wait a full minute before continuing their hunt. By waiting a full minute, it will give the animal time to forget about the noise and go back to what they were doing.

When deciding on a location, keep in mind that putting yourself in a single location and expecting animals to come to you is unrealistic. Moving about will increase your possibility of coming across an animal to hunt, especially in cold weather.

Animals don’t stay in one place and neither should you. Animals also tend to shift to different resting places every day. When deciding where to hunt or when, hunter’s should study the animals they’re tracking and take notice to how they react to the cold.

Winter causes many animals to switch into survival mode where they begin to find food more carefully. If hunters study different animals and how they behave in the winter, they can find ways to catch the animal without scaring it off.

Whether you’re hunting ground consists of green trees or snowy mountains, learning game-scouting techniques will help the hunter find animals in any type of environment.

Click the banner below and discover how to prepare traps and hunt wild animals, the old way!

This article has been written by Ryan Thompson for Survivopedia. Follow Ryan on Twitter – @ryan_thompson03

References

https://acls.com/

http://www.fieldandstream.com/node/1006033160#page-2

Preppers and Survivalists Must Be Hunters and Gatherers

Click here to view the original post.

woods_hunting_deer

empty_grocery_shelvesIt just isn’t realistic to think all of our prepping supplies will hold out forever. My family, friends, and I may have devised the best survival plan there is, even better than most of the selection of “you can make it” books at the big box book store.  But, as time dwells on, the supplies will dwindle. Maybe our Bug In survival scheme has enough food stocked for the millennium.  Good for us.  Tell me again how long that is?  Not unlike the Lord’s return if you believe in that survival book, we know not when the end comes.  So, how do you plan for it?  

By Dr. John J. Woods, a contributing author to SHTFBlog & Survival Cache

Likewise, my loved ones and I had the forethought and the financial commitment to branch out to secure a designated Bug Out backup survival location.  This comes complete with a farmhouse, water well, and rural power.  A backup generator with a 1000 gallon fuel tank surely ought to last long enough until stability returns.  Well, we hope so anyway.

At the Bug Out, our panty is chocked full of long term foods, a mix of food types, and tastes.  With the available water we can mix up just about any variety of menu concoctions for breakfast, lunch, and dinner with a few snacks thrown in.  We are among the lucky ones to have provisioned so well for the long haul.  

Time Bears On

We’re six months into the SHTF and doubt is starting to creep in.  The food stocks have gone past the first three rows in the cabinets, and now variety selections are waning.  Everybody is getting tired of canned meats, and if they eat another helping of tuna, they may start to grow gills.  Everybody’s eyes are not green with envy, but green from all the green beans and green peas.  Sure we are fine, but we all want something more, something different.  

Our Bug In residence is only two blocks away from a wooded area, and open sage fields teeming with natural life, both plant and animal.   The Bug Out escape house is near a huge forested area.   So far, neither area seems to have been approached by anybody else in the immediate area.  Scouting hikes provides good Intel that nobody seems to be using these available resources.  It’s time to take advantage of this situation.  

Hunting Becomes Necessity

squirrel_hunting_meatThis section is not so much about how to hunt, but more emphasis on the why we should.  Apart from whatever food supplies we laid by in store, we should be mixing in available game meat to supplement our diets.  Actually this should be done from the get go.  This makes our pantry supplies extend further well into a longer period of unrest or instability, or no new food supplies at the usual outlets.  We have to learn to supply some of our own food resources. The argument here too is for the value of this supplemental food source.  I am not a nutritionist, but everything I read about food recommends that protein is a good thing.  In a SHTF survival situation, adding meat to a diet would seem to be a very wise move.  

Read Also: Fallkniven Professional Hunting Knife 

What will you hunt?  If you have never hunted before and nobody in the group if there is one has never hunted, then you need to start to learn how now.  Books, videos, hunting television, seminars, and other participation activities can bring you up to speed fairly quickly.  I highly recommend a good library of hunting books, and everything to do related to the subject.  

Now, if you are an experienced hunter already, then you know what to do.  Generally this activity is initiated by on the ground scouting to inventory what game might be available to harvest.  This can be done by simple stealth hikes into prospective hunting areas.  Maintain as secret and as low a profile as you can.  Once you fire a gun to hunt, then you have given notice of your presence.  Archery is also an option to consider.   

Scouting can also be accomplished to a certain degree by observing via optics from a distance away.  You must have good binoculars and or a spotting scope to do this part well.  You are looking for obvious signs of game movement, tracks, deer rubs, and other game sign.  Visual confirmation of game in the areas is a really good start.  

hog_hunting_survivalWhat game might you expect to find?  Naturally this essentially depends on where you are in the country.  The United States is very blessed with a long list of wild game species available for pursuit via hunting.  The short list is white-tailed and mule deer, elk, antelope, goats, sheep, big bears, big cats, wild hogs and wild turkey.  Small game could be rabbits, squirrel, raccoon, and such.  Upland game will include all kinds of bird species from quail, dove, woodcock, pheasant, grouse, and the list goes on.  If water is around, you may find waterfowl in ducks and geese.  Find out what is normally available where you live and where your Bug Out site is located.  Your state wildlife agency will have a web site and likely pamphlets for this information.    

For hunting you will likely already have the necessary firearms including a decent, accurate, scoped rifle, one of at least .30 caliber, but a .223 or others can be used with the correct hunting type ammo.  Small game can be hunted with a rimfire rifle or handgun.  A shotgun will be useful for birds, waterfowl and small game.  Have a variety of shotshells on hand besides self-defense type loads. Certainly, you can add all types of hunting gear and accessories including hunting clothing, camouflage, knives, game bags, and everything else to help you secure the game meat you need.

Sport Fishing for Sustenance

fishing_survival_nutritionWhen we highlight hunting, we do not mean to slight or ignore the freshwater or saltwater fishing opportunities where you might reside during a SHTF.  As you have prepared for hunting, also prepare for fishing.  Fish are a high priority, good quality food to add to the menu. As with game animals, research what fishing opps are available to you and which types of fish can be caught.  I won’t list all the possibilities here, because the variety is so regional.  You should know your area well enough to know about fishing lakes, rivers, streams, and even small rural farm ponds, any water source that might hold edible fish.  Take the same advice on fishing as with hunting, if you do not know how.

Stock up on basic fishing tackle, rods, reels, line, lures, tackle supplies, hooks, weights, etc.  Have the whole shooting match on hand.  Again, a good book on general fishing will describe what to buy, and how to use it.  You may find also like hunting that fishing is a good recreational activity as well.  You’ll need that as well to support mental health during trying times.  

Gathering

survival_garden_forage_foodThis is my own weakness beyond knowing how to grow a garden.  By all means make plans and provisions for growing a garden of any size.  As you know Mother Nature also provides many sources of plant life that can be eaten raw, added to salads, or cooked. Again a good regional resource book will be valuable for finding greens, flowers, seeds, legumes, mushrooms, wild fruits, and other plant-vegetable life that is indigenous to your area.  This resource will be valuable so you’ll know what to gather and how to process it for food.  

Related: Tree Bark as an Emergency Food

So, obviously this was a quick treatise just skimming the bare essentials of food harvesting skills you will need to acquire and practice.  Ideally, you have stored up enough food stuffs to grind it out over a long period of time.  However, it is just smart to learn to supplement these supplies with fresh foods found in your local habitats.  Learn now what these resources are in your area, how to harvest or gather them as supplemental food sources.  

Photos Courtesy of: 

John Woods
OakleyOriginals

Visit Sponsors of SurvivalCache.com

300-x-250-hope-for-the-best

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the_survivalist_podcast

 

 

 

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Survival Deer Hunting Techniques

Click here to view the original post.

The deer hunting season is always so brief yet so intense that it calls for any deer hunter to be thoroughly prepared for it so as to take advantage of each situation that will present itself. The aim is to become a deer hunter that has all the tricks and skills that are necessary to […]

The post Survival Deer Hunting Techniques appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

What Is a Crossbow And How Are Crossbows a Great Hunting Weapon

Click here to view the original post.

Every hunter out there who hunts regularly must have heard of or is familiar with Crossbows.  Crossbows date back to medieval times, about two thousand years and still thrive well in today’s market, among hunters, artifact, relic and weapon collectors alike. A crossbow is a type of bow that consists of horizontal bow-like assembly mounted […]

The post What Is a Crossbow And How Are Crossbows a Great Hunting Weapon appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

$3 DIY Bamboo Longbow

Click here to view the original post.

$3 DIY Bamboo Longbow The long bow! One of the earliest weapons made by man. You can make your own from Bamboo for around 3 bucks! This is pretty powerful and will be plenty adequate to hunt small game and maybe even mid size animals. I found a great tutorial that shows you how to …

Continue reading »

The post $3 DIY Bamboo Longbow appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

How To Make An Archer’s Thumb Ring From Bone, Antler Or A Spoon

Click here to view the original post.

How To Make An Archer’s Thumb Ring From Bone, Antler Or A Spoon I am no expert what so ever on archery or hunting with bows… That being said I did a little research and learned that you can have a steadier aim and hold the bow drawn longer than most people who do not …

Continue reading »

The post How To Make An Archer’s Thumb Ring From Bone, Antler Or A Spoon appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

6 Solid Reasons to Invest in a Survival Bow and Arrow

Click here to view the original post.

6 Solid Reasons to Invest in a Survival Bow and Arrow

Modern day survival enthusiasts are never without a trusty rifle or handgun. These weapons are often used for hunting game and for self-defense, which may become a very real necessity when you’re trying to survive in the wild. Of course, guns are easy, convenient, and powerful. But if you’re a survival specialist that’s looking for a real challenge, it’s probably better that you invest in a survival bow and arrow instead. In fact, a survival bow and arrow isn’t really something you should ever be without.

If you’re thinking you can get by without a bow and arrow, and you’re questioning whether you should really get one or not, this list of solid reasons should swing you towards the right decision.

  1. Lightweight and Portable – It’s any survivalist’s priority to maintain the lightest possible weight when in the wild. That’s because a heavy pack will make you feel more tired much faster, and can restrict the movements you can comfortably make. With too many guns and ammo in your bag, you might find yourself panting heavily before midday.

A survival bow and arrow can be very lightweight, collapsing into just three pieces or less, depending on the model you choose. This means you can easily fit it into a standard backpack or carry it around without working up a sweat.

  1. Versatile – The different parts of a survival bow and arrow can be easily adapted to perform several other functions. For instance, the bow can be used as a makeshift fishing rod, arrows themselves can be used as part of your shelter, and you can even utilize your bow to start a fire much easier. All that said, it’s easy to see that when you take a survival bow and arrow with you, you’ve got more than just a weapon.

 

  1. Silent – The best way to hunt down as much game as possible would be to take each one down without scaring off the others. When you shoot a rifle or a handgun, the reverberating noise can startle any other game in the area, meaning you’d have to go through the entire luring and calling process all over again. With a bow and arrow, you can take down your game without causing too much of a commotion, so you’d have more chances to hunt more down in the same proximity. Throw in the shooting rest you can find, and you can spend hours in the same spot, shooting down game without getting noticed.

 

  1. Endless Ammunition – When your rifle or handgun runs out of ammo, you become nothing more than a sitting duck. That’s why it’s any shooter’s priority to make sure they make the most of each bullet they have. With a survival bow and arrow however, you can have access to an endless supply of ammunition. Even so, if you don’t bother to retrieve your arrows, you can make your own from twigs, sticks, and wood you find around you. So you can be sure there’s always something you can use to make the most of your bow.

 

  1. Less Limited – Depending on where you live, there could be a plethora of different gun rules that you’d have to follow unless you want the cops at your doorstep. What’s more, buying a gun isn’t all that simple. There are lots of paperwork, documents, and requirements you need to submit just to register a gun to your name, and it could take weeks before you get your hands on your purchase.

With survival bow and arrows however, you won’t have to worry about the same issue. You can literally walk into a store and purchase one without any questions, and you can even have it shipped straight to your home when you buy it online.

  1. Adaptable – When using a gun for your hunt, you’d have to consider the size of your chosen game and select a corresponding gun caliber. If you’ve only got a few firearms in your possession, you may not be able to hunt down other sizes of animals because of the inappropriate caliber of your available gun.

With a survival bow and arrow however, you can screw on different arrow heads to allow you to take down literally any size animal you want to. Simply interchange the attachments to adapt your arrow to your chosen target and you’re good to go.

Another plus when it comes to adaptability is the endless number of attachments you can purchase for your bow. For instance, if you feel that your bow isn’t accurate enough or if you struggle to aim with a bow, you can purchase other attachments to make it easier to use. Often, the best bow sight can be bought for a very reasonable price, making the bow itself an economic choice compared to guns.

A survival bow and arrow can be a major investment, especially if you take your time to learn the ropes and master this uncommon survival weapon.

So, what are you waiting for? Up your hunting game and become a true blue survival expert by purchasing your own survival bow and arrow today.

 

About the author : 

Kevin Steffey is an avid hunter and freelance writer, the founder of Deer Hunting Field. He loves spending time in the field with his rifle more than almost anything else. He also occupies his off-time discussing deer and their habits online. But more than anything, he wants to teach and educate about hunting …
 

                    WHAT TO READ NEXT !!

The post 6 Solid Reasons to Invest in a Survival Bow and Arrow appeared first on .

5 Techniques To Preserve Meat In The Wild You Should Practice

Click here to view the original post.

5 Techniques To Preserve Meat In The Wild You Should Practice There are several methods to preserve meat in the wild and before we look at them below. I’d like to remind you that while a preservation method or technique you use to keep your meat safe for days, or even weeks, it’s ultimately pretty …

Continue reading »

The post 5 Techniques To Preserve Meat In The Wild You Should Practice appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Bow and Arrow vs. Guns: What is the Best Weapon when SHTF?

Click here to view the original post.

Bow and Arrow vs. Guns: What is the Best Weapon when SHTF? For thousands of years, humans relied heavily on archery as their means of survival for both hunting and combat. After civilization kicked in and we no longer had to rely on game for our survival, archery fell terribly. Well, it was the introduction …

Continue reading »

The post Bow and Arrow vs. Guns: What is the Best Weapon when SHTF? appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

While Hiking or Hunting You May Discover Human Remains: What Do You Do

Click here to view the original post.

While rare, it does happen, hikers, hunters, and others out enjoying the day do stumble upon recent and not so recent human remains. What would you do in this case, what is the law, and what should you do as a practical matter.

In some states, like Utah, for example, it is a felony in the third degree for anyone besides an archaeologist, a Medical Examiner, law enforcement or a licensed mortician to disturb, remove, or conceal human remains. Many states have similar laws regarding this, in particular when it comes to ancient grave sites and sacred sites of Native Americans.

What are you required to do by law? In Washington State, for example, you are required by law to notify the County Coroner and local law enforcement, and you must do it in the most expeditious manner possible if you find suspected human remains. Of course expeditious can be subjective. You may not have cell service in that area, so you have to wait until you get back to notify anyone, and this could take hours, so your best judgment would have to be sufficient.

The law in Washington State goes on to state, “Any person engaging in ground disturbance activities that resulted in the exposure of human remains must cease all activity which may cause further disturbance to the remains” (Washington State Department of Archaeology & Historic Preservation, 2017).

Documenting the scene, without disturbing the scene, with pictures or sketching a map of the area may make sense in some cases, as well as, noting GPS coordinates. You may have to lead law enforcement back to the scene. Some people simply would not, or could not wait for police and others to arrive if they called the authorities from the scene. If you call and identify yourself, and then leave, it is likely the police would want to talk to you in person about the discovery and/or ask for you help in locating the remains.

States have various laws so it is a good idea to know what they are. Of course, if you are alone and do stumble upon a body or bones you have a decision to make. Discoveries of this nature are traumatic and it takes some time for the fact to register. A body or bones on the ground in a place you do not expect them is incomprehensible for the first few minutes. It is shocking, and some may actually run from the area. Some may want to avoid any involvement altogether, and others may even decide it’s an inconvenience and simply do not want to waste time dealing with it and leave without notifying anyone. It is decision time, if you find remains, and what you decide is up to you.

As a practical matter, however, you need to keep your wits about you from this point on. Is this a crime scene, how recent is it if that is the case, and are you in any danger. Hikers, hunters and others do die in the woods from natural causes, and from accidents, and their remains may lay there for months or even years, or they may have passed on just minutes before you arrived.

On the other hand, remote areas are ideal dumping grounds for those wishing to get rid of a body. People that commit murder may drive for miles to dispose of the body, or two or more people out hiking or hunting may have gotten into a fight resulting in the death of one, so you want to ensure you are safe first and foremost. The person or persons responsible for the dead body may still be in the area.

Remains that have been in the woods for months or years are someone’s loved one. Someone disappears and the body is not found, so perhaps, you finding remains in the woods would solve a cold case file that could bring closure to a family. It doesn’t mean there was a crime committed. The person may have gotten lost and fell victim to the elements, a heart attack, or a bee sting and so on.

Coming upon human remains will leave you with a feeling of horror in some cases, unease at the very least, and with other feelings, you cannot quite describe. It also reminds you of your own mortality. For some, the feelings will remain for weeks, months or even years. They will diminish over time, however. You are human and there are things such as this in which you may have to deal with as you go through life.

Washington State Department of Archaeology & Historic Preservation. (2017). Retrieved 2017, from http://www.dahp.wa.gov/programs/human-remains-program/what-do-i-do

The post While Hiking or Hunting You May Discover Human Remains: What Do You Do appeared first on Preparing for shtf.

The World’s Most Versatile (And Underappreciated) Firearm?

Click here to view the original post.
The World’s Most Versatile (And Overlooked) Firearm ...

Image source: Pixabay.com

 

The shotgun is perhaps the most versatile firearms on the face of the planet. From big game to small game to game birds, a shotgun will do the job. For home defense, the shotgun is more than capable and intimidating. Need a survival gun? The shotgun can cover it all in the most adverse conditions.

The choices of action types, gauges, barrel lengths and stock configurations are also an added incentive for owning a shotgun. Pump action, semi-auto, single or double barrel and even lever actions. The most commonly used gauge today is the 12 gauge, with the 20 gauge being a close second. There are others, but the old 16 gauge seems to have lost its popularity. Another, the 28 gauge, is primarily used by upland game bird hunters. The 10 gauge is a rarity in today’s times.

Let’s take a look at some specific uses for the shotgun today and my top choice for an overall shotgun.

Hunting

No surprise here. The shotgun has been used in this realm for more than 150 years. I personally have taken everything, including small game, varmints and big game. While the hunting of game birds is probably the most thought-of use for a shotgun when hunting, there are numerous other hunting uses. Use buckshot and you now have a viable option for critters such as coyotes, foxes, hogs and even big game at close distances. Deer hunters have long used a shotgun coupled with rifled slugs. Slugs are completely capable of taking larger game to include bear and elk. Distance is the only limitation for the shotgun and slugs, but the 100-yard mark is certainly within its capabilities.

Self-Defense

It has been in use for decades by police and military and the everyday citizen to protect and defend. The fact that the shotgun comes in so many configurations and offers such a wide range of ammunition choices makes it hard to beat.

Be Prepared. Learn The Best Ways To Hide Your Guns.

The World’s Most Versatile (And Overlooked) Firearm ...

Image source: Pixabay.com

Consider adding an ammo carrier, sling and a light to your home defense shotgun. These add-ons will greatly enhance the defensive use of your smoothbore, but in the end these items are not absolutely critical for the home defender. It would benefit the defensive-minded citizen to obtain some credible training and recommendations in this category before proceeding too far down the road.

Survival  

It should be apparent that the shotgun has to be a top contender for an all-around survival gun; there is one in my vehicle at all times.

Consider the following. With the right selection of ammo, I can take winged game, small game, big game, defend myself and home from all manner of unwelcome visitors out to a distance of at least 100 yards, breech a door, launch tear gas (within legalities, of course) and create a high level of anxiety in anyone determined to do harm to me or my family. Another viable attribute is the durability of a good shotgun. It is generally very weather and harsh condition resistant — a good quality for any survival gun.

Other attributes include switching out barrels, chokes and the addition or deletion of any tactical option with ease. Areas of concern surrounding the shotgun for some folks could be weight, recoil and length. But in today’s world there are enough variations to fit most any person’s needs and abilities.

My personal pick for one shotgun to do it all: a Remington 870 pump action, 18-inch barrel, 3-inch chamber, extended magazine tube, interchangeable chokes with a ghost ring-style iron sight system. I prefer a butt stock ammo carrier and a two-point sling. A side rail or comparable attachment point for a light would be a nice option. I can live without a red dot or other optic system.

In today’s world of short-barreled rifles and high capacity magazines, the shotgun is often overlooked. Even many police agencies have eliminated it from their armory – which is a mistake, in my opinion.

Don’t have a shotgun? Get one!

Do you believe the shotgun is the ultimate survival gun? Share your thoughts in the section below:   

Pump Shotguns Have One BIG Advantage Over Other Shotguns For Home Defense. Read More Here.

7 Best Bow Hunting Tips

Click here to view the original post.

In order to be a great bow hunter, you’ll have to go through years of training and experience. It’s just like playing a musical instrument; at first, you don’t know what you’re doing, but with a lot of practice and determination, you’ll find yourself playing sonatas. It’s just the same with archery and bow hunting, but sometimes, you can’t improve by yourself. Thus, I’ve put together this article on bow hunting tips for all beginner hunters. Enjoy!

Weigh between speed and accuracy

Sometimes, you have to choose between the two. And as a beginner bow hunter, you’re bound to have trouble accomplishing a shot with both. Personally, I recommend practicing accuracy first. You’ll need to be more experienced with hitting a target dead on that hitting it at a fast rate.

On the other hand, speed is something that comes naturally (at least for me). I’d say speed will come when accuracy is improved. In other words, once you start hitting those bulls-eyes dead on, your speed is bound to improve as your confidence increases as well. Vice versa, speed will help your accuracy, as faster arrows bound to fly straight at the target.

For beginners, it’s important to master both. But not necessarily at the same time. When you’re out hunting, however, accuracy is more important, but speed weighs in a good amount, as well.

Pick a bow and stick with it

When it comes to archery and bow hunting, mastering your weapon is the best way towards experience. Choosing the right bow is a little bit of trial and error, so I don’t blame you for switching between bows. However, keep this in mind: the right bow will just feel right in your hands, and you’ll know when you have it. Under this, we consider weight of the bow, style, design, length, and these factors relative to your own dimensions and preferences.

If you do, however, find a bow that you can stick with, I highly suggest that you do so. Mastering your weapon will make your bow more of an invaluable friend than a hunting tool, and shooting an arrow will feel like a second instinct.

Generally, the more you master your bow and practice with it, I’d say that your accuracy and precision will improve as well. This is especially important if your target is to go bow hunting soon.

Work tirelessly on your form

The better the form, the higher the accuracy, speed, and precision of your shots. Find and practice the right form, with the proper stance, torso position, and grip relative to the target.

On this matter, I recommend asking an experienced bow hunter or bow hunting expert to assess your form. Ask for an evaluation afterward, which you can use to point out the things you need to do right/better. It also helps to watch Youtube videos wherein you can see bow hunters demonstrating a proper form.

Tip: practice in front of a mirror and compare your stance, torso position, and grip to a standard.

Practice in different settings

Actual bow hunting entails practice shooting in different situations and settings. For instance, you need to know how to keep your bow straight on a windy day, as much as you need to know how to shoot in low light.

It’s best if you practice when the weather is not that good, maybe a little windy. That way, you get to practice your aim in the wind. Another example is practicing near sunset, which will allow you to train with your bow sight in low light settings.

The trick here is to set yourself in a little diversity. After all, you never know what you’re going to expect in the wilderness.

Study, study, study

Reading goes a long way. When you’re a beginner bow hunter, it immensely helps if you read on your niche. Deer hunting tips, bow sight usage, accuracy and precision tips—all of these stored in your mind can help you apply them on the field and in practice.

Also, I emphasize the importance on reading about survival tips. These are the bits of information that you need stored at the back of your head at all times, especially in risky hunting situations and seasons.

 

Invest in high-quality equipment

When I was a beginner hunter, I wore all the wrong things and hated myself while freezing on the field. So, take it from me and choose the right equipment and clothing to take with you on your hunting trips.

 

 

My major recommendation is to splurge a bit—on your first pair of hunting boots or hunting knife, for example, because these are practical investments. When you choose the right products, you will get the quality that you paid for.

Choosing the right equipment also goes for hunting backpacks, kits, knives, clothes, and other gear that you take on a hunting trip. As a beginner, you tend to be not used to the wilderness and discomfort can come creeping up on you unexpectedly. So, choosing the right type of equipment can get you a long way.

Practice being stealthy

When you’re a bow hunter, you have the advantage of silence unlike gun users. When hunting skittish animals like deer, most especially, it helps a great deal if you know how to carry yourself, stalk, and shoot the target in a stealthy mode altogether.

For beginners, it may be a little hard controlling your footsteps and movement in order to make the noise as minimal as possible. It’s also a bit challenging to master the way on how to carry yourself and stalk your prey effectively. However, this skill can be learned just like any other.

The key is to practice in the field. You may not succeed on the first tries, but experience is the best teacher when it comes to stealth. Just make sure to take note of your mistakes and think of ways on how you can improve them afterward.

Under stealth, you also need to learn how to be unseen. This includes masking your scent against the sensitive noses of deer and bears, as well as wearing the right color of clothing. On this matter, you can read up on tips on how to do that and apply it the next time you go buck or bear hunting.

Conclusion:

We all start somewhere, and in bow hunting, it takes more than just a little bit of practice to master your weapon and shred in the field. This article is meant to open you up to the basics of bow hunting, which are useful if you want to learn fast in this area. To conclude, I give you this quick rundown of our tips to remember:

  • Practice both your accuracy and your speed, with accuracy as your priority. Speed will follow soon after
  • Stick with one weapon if it feels right, then master it
  • Work on your form tirelessly
  • Practice shooting in different situations and settings (e.g. low light, windy, high up on a tree stand)
  • Study on the field of bow hunting to find all the best tips and basic information you need to know
  • Invest in high-quality weapons and equipment
  • Acquire and practice the skill of stealth

 

That’s all for this article, and I hope you learned a lot of tips. If you liked this piece, don’t forget to share it with your hunter friends. Leave a comment below, too, if you have questions or anything to add to this post. Thanks for reading!

Joseph Gleason is the founder of Captain Hunter. We provide guides on how to hunt effectively, answer reader questions, and reviews of the latest hunting gear. We specialize in providing expert information that does exactly what it claims.

Our dedicated staff members are each seasoned professionals with a passion for hunting built upon years of in the field experience.

 

 

The post 7 Best Bow Hunting Tips appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Using A Slingshot As A Survivalist Hunting Weapon

Click here to view the original post.

Using A Slingshot As A Survivalist Hunting Weapon

Is a slingshot right for your preps? Learn why and see how to use a slingshot for survival, hunting (small and large game!), fishing, and as a weapon.

When you think of survival weapons you probably don’t immediately think of slingshots.

In fact, when you think of slingshots, you probably imagine Bart Simpson causing havoc in his neighborhood. The story of David and Goliath also probably comes to mind.

However, a slingshot could be a great survival weapon for hunting game and for a little self defense.

When we say slingshot, we mean the rubber band type. Various types of slingshots can be bought or even bushscrafted out of vines, but for the purpose of this article we mean the classic “Y” shaped or over-arm type of slingshot that uses a rubber band.

In a survival scenario, you never know what you’ll face or how long it’ll be before you get home. In this situation, it is essential that you have an easy to carry weapon on your person at all times.

If you need some convincing, we have great reasons you should add a slingshot to your bug out bag.

Ammo Is Everywhere

Unlike pretty much every other weapon, you don’t need to bring any ammo when you plan to use your slingshot. Slingshot ammo is literally everywhere, every little rock you see can be ammo.

In comparison, if you bring a gun, you’ll eventually run out of bullets and you’ll have to scavenge for more. With a slingshot, all you have to do is find a pile of rocks and you’ve got a hundred pieces of ammo that will work.

While nearly any rock will work as slingshot ammo, ball bearing slingshot ammo works much better. They are smooth and aerodynamic, making them much more predictable to aim with. And boy do they penetrate!

If you want smooth rocks that are guaranteed to fly well, you should look near riverbeds.

They Are Lightweight And Small

Slingshots don’t take up much room in your bug out bag and they’re easy to use, even for a beginner, and they are also lightweight.

You can always fit a slingshot and a few extra rubber bands into any bag.

Slingshots are Self-Defense Weapons

While everyone thinks of slingshots as a kids toy, a shot to the head can crack a skull or knock someone out quite easily.

Slingshots can also be used as self-defense weapons. David, Goliath, and Bart Simpson all showed us how powerful a slingshot can be during a conflict. So can the many youtube videos of backyard slingshot shenanigans on watermelons and cinder blocks.


RELATED : Compound Vs Recurve Bow: Which is The Best For SHTF Scenario?


In fact, slingshots are a great way to defend yourself against aggressive humans and animals alike, if you can trust your aim.

Other Advantages To Using A Slingshot

Slingshots are easy to conceal because of their small size. You don’t have to worry about it getting wet, it will work just as well. And for the most part they are completely silent when fired, making stealth hunting easier.

How to Use a Slingshot in Real Life Survival Scenarios

In a real life survival scenario, you can use a slingshot for self-defense and hunting. A slingshot may not seem like the perfect hunting weapon, but they work well.

It gives you an active, stalking approach to hunting small game. With the right pellets, you can kill small game like a bird, rabbit, or squirrel at distances as far as 30 feet away.


RELATED : What’s the Best Close Quarters Weapon: Knife or a Gun?


Obviously you won’t have your scope with you, so you’ll have to aim the slingshot based on your best guess from experience. This is why practice is so important.

You could use other weapons you may have brought with you, but every weapon has its own issues. For instance, you could set a snare, but not use the right bait or just be unlucky (you’ll need a dozen of them and a lot of luck actually).

Can You Take Down Larger Game?

You can feed a couple of mouths hunting small game with a slingshot, but if you have a large group, you’re going to have to knock down a bunch of squirrels to feed them.

So what about larger game?

If you can snag a buck or a wild hog, you’ll be able to feed more people and fill up their bellies better. But will a slingshot take out larger game?

Find out more about using cold weapons for survival on Bulletproof Home.

Yes, you can. It’s a bit harder, obviously, and requires good aim, but a slingshot can take down large animals (and people). You can do it with ball bearings or rocks, but it’s a lot easier with arrows.

With some simple modifications your slingshot can also fire arrows, typically called a slingbow mod. You can also buy pre-made slingbows, but the DIY mods are easy and it is significantly cheaper.

All in all it’s a whole lot easier to stick with small game and craft a bow or bring something like a crossbow if you really expect to hunt large game on a regular basis, but if the opportunity presents itself and all you have is a slingshot you should know that it can be done.

It just takes a bit of patience, practice, and the right opportunity. You’ll have to get closer than a bow, but that’s a small (but dangerous) sacrifice for a slingshots portability.

Usually you will stun the animal if you’re only firing rocks, so aim for the head and be ready to finish it off with a spear or knife while it’s down.

Slingshot/Slingbow Fishing

You can also take your slingshot fishing in shallow water. Remember that, just like bow fishing, the water will refract the light and the fish will actually be in a slightly different position than it looks.


RELATED : 3 Deadfall Traps That You Should Know How To Make


 

Since the water will slow down the velocity of your ammo, the fish will likely only be stunned. After you stun the fish, you can grab it with your hands.

You can adapt your slingshot to shoot arrows as discussed above, and adding a fishing reel to make hauling in the fish easier is just as easy.

Build Your Own Slingshot

If you don’t have a slingshot in your arsenal when the manure hits the fan, you can always make one.

Here’s a great DIY video that shows you how to build a slingshot from scratch.


RELATED : Wilderness Survival Skills: When You’re Lost in the Woods


All you need to create a slingshot is a Y shaped base, small forked hardwood saplings are great for this, so are split and melted PVC pipes. You’ll also need some sort of rubber or latex band (rubber first air tourniquets are perfect), and some rocks.

if you don’t have the luxury of going to a store for these supplies, most of these items can be found in abandoned buildings, lying on the ground, or put together from other items in your bug out bag.

Disadvantages of Using a Slingshot

To be fair, there are disadvantages to using a slingshot as a survival weapon and tool.

A slingshot is not very predictable, especially if you’re using rocks of various weights and aerodynamics instead of ball bearing slingshot ammo. With practice and repetition you can guesstimate where to aim with excellent accuracy, but it’s always a little bit of a guess.

Another disadvantage revolves around the band used in most slingshots, usually made of latex. Over time, latex will harden and wear out all by itself. The more you pull and shoot the slingshot, the faster the band will wear out. It will also wear out quickly if left in the sun all the time.

However, if you’re lost in the woods for a few days/weeks this obviously isn’t a concern, but the band could break. Similarly, if the SHTF, looking for alternatives while you scavenge for other items won’t take much effort. Having a few backup bands stored up will allow you to be proactive in case your band snaps unexpectedly.

The other disadvantage to using a slingshot as a survival tool is eye, teeth, and facial injuries. They do happen, hundreds every year actually. As the band is pulled back, it is very near the shooter’s face. If you’re unlucky enough to have one break it’s going to come back at your face and hands.

Final Thoughts

Slingshots can be used by anyone – male, female, young, and old preppers. The weapon is a formidable weapon after you’ve trained with it and can hit a target reliably.

Slingshots are not a kids toy, a shot to the head can crack a skull or knock an animal or someone out, and they can easily kill small game. They are an extremely good choice for anyone that isn’t comfortable using firearms.

However, using a slingshot isn’t easy, you will have to practice…. a lot!

Practice makes perfect after all.

Source : besurvival.com

About the author :

Brandon Cox is the founder of StayHunting, who is passionate about all things of hunting and fitness. Through his hunting website, he would like to share tips & tricks, finest tech that will excite all of the intricacies of hunting whether you be an amateur or a professional.

The post Using A Slingshot As A Survivalist Hunting Weapon appeared first on .

How To Butcher a Rabbit

Click here to view the original post.

How To Butcher a Rabbit Whether you’re homesteading or prepping for when SHTF, you are undoubtedly sharpening your hunting., trapping, and foraging skills. Rabbit traps are fairly easy to set up, and these creatures provide an excellent source of protein that will see you through all of your chores. While you may be able to …

Continue reading »

The post How To Butcher a Rabbit appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Bugging Out. Carrying all that weight.

Click here to view the original post.
You can travel light and carry all you need for long term wilderness living/survival, all that is accept perhaps enough water and food! If there are water holes on your route then there is no problem. If you are able to hunt & forage on the way then there is no problem. But what if you get diverted have to by-pass those water holes? What if you are trekking in winter and there are few edible plants to find and the game is scarce? Then you have a problem. You can survive for three days without water, but this also depends on how hard you are working. You can survive three weeks without food, but again, this is dependent on your exertion level. You probably know as well as I that when you are working hard your need for water and food increases. You are drinking all the time to stay hydrated and come lunch time you are very hungry. To go without water and food is dangerous, because the lack of water and food effects how you perform, mentally and physically. One minute you think you are doing fine, the next minute you are feeling sick. Keep going and you will collapse.
Sharing the load with a partner is fine, you can carry the shelter, kettle, arms and ammunition, your partner can carry the water. But water is heavy, and to be safe and practicle your partner also needs to carry at least some of her/his own equipment. Simply put, you can never really carry enough water for a long trek unless you can find a water source along the way to refill your water bottles. Even then to be safe you will need to stop and boil that water before you can drink it.
So what is a simple and practicle alternative? Using a trekking trolley. A trekking trolley can carry a lot of weight, and there is a wide variety of different trolleys to suit your needs. On a level surface pulling a trolley is easier that carrying a heavy load, but going uphill you will need to pace yourself. Even so, when you stop for a rest on the trail and take a drink of water, you are not still bearing that load. If you are travelling with a partner or a group, you can use a rope to link you to another trekker who can help pull the load up steep inclines. If you can afford it, you can purchase a trekking trolley, if you don’t have the funds, then you can make your own without too much trouble.
An Australian made trekking trolley.
A trekking trolley that the author made from old wheelbarrow parts and bush timber. This one only has one wheel, but the author plans to make another one from an old golf trolley.

When you reach your destination this trolley will still be of use, and can be used for: transporting game, transporting water from a water source, carrying firewood, transporting rocks for a fireplace, moving camp if needs be. Perhaps you can think of further uses?
Keith.

Comfort Equipment.

Click here to view the original post.
Comfort Equipment.
Definition of Paleolithic. Of or relating to the earliest period of the Stone Age characterized by rough or chipped stone implements. Merriam Webster Dictionary.
Humans have been surviving for thousands of years, back in the Paleolithic period life was hard, even so these people must have had some creature comforts, perhaps local flora placed on their beds to make it softer and keep them up off the ground. Tools were very basic being made of wood, stone bone, horn or antler, and yet these people survived.

Make no mistake, most of the equipment we carry today is for comfort, to make life easier, but we could survive as a people without the equipment we carry. Some items I deem essential, a good medical kit for instance. But as for the rest, no it is not a necessity, just a preference. So why all this modern so called “survival gear”? Does it add to our comfort? In some cases perhaps, but it also has drawbacks. Take the sleeping bag for instance. Great until it gets wet, then it will not retain as much of your body heat as an ordinary pure wool blanket! I am not going to list all the fancy gadgets here that are basically designed to attract people that like gadgets, people that have no real sense of what is needed to survive long term in a wilderness situation. But I would like you to think about this. Every time you add a piece of equipment to your pack, ask yourself these questions: Do I need this? Is this piece of equipment sustainable? If it breaks can I fix it? Will this piece of equipment serve a needed purpose, or is it just taking up room where I could be carrying something else that is more important, such as water, food and ammunition?

Think about the tools that you carry or are about to purchase, think about their purpose. The knife, what is it used for? Skinning and butchering game, and for defence; Is the blade long enough for defence use? Can I kill with this blade or is it too short? The axe, used for many tasks that involve the cutting and shaping of wood as well as for defence and possibly needed for hunting. How easy would it be to replace a broken helve? How heavy is it? Can I use the poll as a hammer to drive stakes into the ground? And so on and so on. Your equipment needs to be versatile & sustainable, it needs to be able to perform the function that it’s namesake was originally designed for. Paleolithic flint knives were not used for cutting down small trees; they made flint hand axes for that purpose. In today’s modern world of survival equipment manufacturers seem to have forgotten this common sense approach that those primitive people in the Paleolithic took for granted. Think about that, your life may depend on it!
Keith.

By David Wright.

Silent Hunting After The Collapse

Click here to view the original post.

Pick any post-SHTF scenario. Maybe from your favorite novel or maybe from your imagination… One of the major points of post-SHTF survival is staying off the radar, staying of the ‘X’, laying low, being the gray man, blending in, keeping silent. While many or most of you reading this may have an adequate (or more) […]

Survival, Then and Now.

Click here to view the original post.
Survival, Then and Now.

What do you think has changed  in the last 300 years regarding our survival needs? Anything? Whether it be long term wilderness living as it was for the New World settlers in the 17th and 18th centuries or whether it be a lost in the bush survival situation, I don’t see as though anything has changed. Our requirements are still the same, sensible tools, good survival provisions and primitive survival skills. Yet here we are in 2016, and people are obsessed with using dryer lint. stubby so called “bushcraft knives”, camo clothing, ferrocerium rods, pop-up nylon tents, RAT packs and freeze dried foods, special hiking boots, fuel stoves, battery operated equipment and no skills to speak of except invented ones like “battening”, making Vaseline cotton balls and other “homemade” fire starters and inventing new ways to lay a fire so they can take photos of it for their favourite forum!

300 years ago the main tools you needed to survive were the gun, the axe, the knife and flint and steel for making fire. You could even survive without the flint and steel if you had to because you could use the lock on your flintlock gun to make fire. You needed skills such as trap making and the knowledge of trapping. You packed only the essential equipment and provisions, and if you made mistakes in packing too much useless gear, then you ditched it along the track and learnt a hard lesson. Generally you asked experienced people for their advice, some ignored that advice to their own peril, and others profited by it. Today many so called survivalists and preppers also seek advice on internet forums, or at least they appear to. Most though have already made up their minds, and really all they want to do is share on the forum what they have chosen and carry. Giving correctional advice to these people is usually a waste of time, and in some cases you will be answered with rudeness and ridicule. Most of us, who have been there and done that, had a lot of experience in long term wilderness living simply ignore this and perhaps go to the persons profile and click the “Ignore” button. After all, we don’t have to put up with abuse, and the less people that survive after tshtf the better for us, less hunting and foraging competition.

For those of you that are serious about survival, and genuinely think that a shtf situation could arise in the future, here is my advice, take it or leave it: Think about your needs, think about the tasks you will be faced with if you have to survive in a wilderness situation. Choose you tools carefully. You will need a tool or tools for hunting, you will need an axe for cutting wood for shelter construction and trap making, you will need blades for skinning and butchering, camp chores and trap making, and perhaps a spare just in case. You need a hunting knife with a blade long enough to be used in self defence. You do NOT need a tool for skinning and butchering that was designed to cut wood, and you don’t want to have to cut saplings down with a knife! Each tool should have a specific purpose, don’t skimp on tools to save weight, you need the right tool for the specific job in hand.

Think sustainable, if you purchase something that is going to break, wear out or run out and you are unable to repair it, then it is just extra weight in your pack you don’t need, and it is going to compromise your safety. Carrying good sustainable gear may mean that you are carrying extra weight, and may mean that you will have to travel slower and take more breaks, but long term it will pay off.

Learn the skills you will need now. Having a good pair of hiking boots may help you initially, but what happens if they break or wear out? Do you know how to make a moccasin pattern? Do you know how to make moccasins? Do you know how to tan an animal skin to make leather? If you make a pair of moccasins now, then you will not only have learnt the skill, but you will have the moccasins and the pattern for another pair. This is the way you need to think. A modern firearm is great providing it remains functional, but what if it ceases to work? Can you fix it? How much weight in ammunition can you afford to carry? How much ammo do you use on an average hunting trip? You may shun primitive hunting tools such as the traditional bow, the crossbow and the muzzle-loading gun or rifle, but these tools have certain advantages over the modern firearm for long term wilderness living. By all means if you are travelling in company have someone carry a modern firearm, but make sure it is not the only hunting tool you are taking with you.

Keith.



How Much Ammo is Enough For SHTF?

Click here to view the original post.

ammo_how_much_featured

bullets_mass_stockpileIf you have ever spent any time at all on a survival or firearm forum, you are bound to come across the phrase “Buy it cheap, and stack it deep”.  This phrase is, of course, referring to the amount of ammunition one should have if disaster strikes. After years in the shooting community, I have heard many reasons people stockpile ammunition for emergencies.  There are really only a few loons out there who prepare for impossible and downright foolish reasons.  One guy, I met really believed in an alien invasion followed by an Illuminati takeover.

By Zach Dunn a Contributing Author to SHTFBlog and SurvivalCache

Sure, there are always a few crazies, but there are many normal people who do have a fear of what could happen in our increasingly volatile world.  Like it or not, we have to admit that this is not the 1990s anymore and we are seeing an increase in danger daily. The economy can be compared to a savage ocean. ISIS is rampaging through the Middle East and their sympathizers are attacking innocent people in the USA, Europe, and Canada. Iran’s nuclear program.  The riots following Trump’s election.  I could go on.

shells_bucket_rifleIn fact, I can’t tell you how many times I have heard the question, “how many rounds should I have on hand in case something happens?”   If you read the forums and even some articles, a lot of armchair generals and self-described “experts” say you need to amass 100,000 rounds per caliber, minimal.  And while 100,000 rounds is an impressive amount of ammunition, enough to fight a small war, it is completely insane to think you will ever need that much ammunition. Well, if you are going to invade a small Caribbean nation, go ahead and pursue your 100,000 rounds.  With the price of ammunition today, you’ll go broke.

Related: Surviving Alone

In all truth, it is impossible to see the future and know how much ammunition you will need.  My crystal ball stopped working a long time ago.  But I doubt you will be engaging in a firefight after firefight with gangsters or looters every day in a survival situation.  Even if you did, what are the odds of you surviving dozens of gunfights?  I have done my best to put together a realistic minimal goal for ammunition needs during a survival situation.  The focus here is of course hunting and defense.  

.22LR

22_lrA .22 is about the most versatile firearm when it comes to food procurement you can own.  From squirrel to a feral cat, a .22 can put meat on the table for you and your loved ones during hard times.  I strongly suggest everyone have at least one reliable .22 for emergencies.  The bare minimal I believe you should have is around 1000 rounds of .22 ammunition.  Ideally, 2-5,000 rounds are best.  Buy .22 in bulk, in tubs of at least 500 rounds to purchase cheaply.

The Shotgun

shotgun_stock_ammoA .12 gauge or .20 gauge should be something every gun owner owns in addition to a .22 long rifle.  A shotgun can be used to kill waterfowl, turkey, game birds, and with a slug or 00 buck loads can be used to kill the larger game and be used in home or self-defense.  I strongly recommend pump action guns as they are by far some of the most reliable. To be wise, I would say one should have 2 barrels for each shotgun unless the shotgun is a dedicated home defense weapon.  If it is a hunting shotgun, you should have a longer “bird barrel” for shooting bird shot, and a smoothbore “slug barrel” for shooting slugs and 00 buck loads. I suggest at least 300 rounds of game loads such as number 6s or 7s, 50 turkey loads, 200 slugs and 200 rounds of 00 Buck.

The Big Game Rifle

If in addition to a shotgun and .22, you are blessed to own a game rifle, this can be a real tool in keeping your family fed.  If it all goes downhill, a game rifle can, of course, be used to hunt game, and it can also be used to hunt feral cattle, pigs and other such domesticated animals that tend to go feral in dark times. For every game rifle I own, I like to have at least 100-200 rounds of game loads. More if you can afford it.  If your rifle is properly sighted in, 100 rounds can last you years of procuring larger animals for food.

The Semi Auto Sporting Rifle

ak-74_ammo_prepIn the USA, this includes AR-15s, AK-47s, AK-74s, and so much more.  These are not the true assault weapon. In Canada, these usually mean the SKS, M1A/M-14, M1 Garand, and maybe an AR-15 kept for target and competition shooting.   A true assault weapon by the true definition is a rifle chambered in an intermediate cartridge that has the ability to switch between semi-automatic and full automatic gunfire.  In truth, the inner-workings of these firearms are no different than a semi-automatic hunting rifle.

Read Also: Quick Buyer’s Guide to Imported AK Market

These rifles are highly versatile and can fill the role of both home defense firearm, personal defense weapon, game rifle and varmint rifle.  If you only have 1 gun, one of these are your best options.  If you have a rifle with a detachable magazine, be sure you have at least 12 magazines.  That is my minimum. If the firearm you have is an SKS, M1a, Garand, or any other semi auto that uses at least a 5 round magazine, you probably have noticed they are bullet eaters.  In fact, a semi auto can eat more ammunition than a college kid eats pizza.

Photos Courtesy of:

Brett
momsquared
John Woods
Joshua Engler

Teaching Your Children to Homestead

Click here to view the original post.
Kids in hayfield

Kids learn fast – this might save their life

Homesteading originally referred to the federal government granting land to families who were willing to work it. In modern times, it does not happen that way anymore and homesteading is about families who have decided to live off the grid and grow their own food. Modern-day homesteading involves cooking, farming and fixing things around the house on your own.

Most homestead parents understand the importance of passing on these vital skills to their children.

Why Should Your Children Know How to Homestead?

Children of this current generation have become over-reliant on the system. They get their food ready-made, their clothes already sewn and their water already piped to their homes with no knowledge of how to get these things for themselves. If the system was to crash then they would be left helpless with no idea of how to survive on their own.

Homesteading instills in them an attitude of self-sufficiency. It gives them the information and experience that they would need to fend for themselves in any situation. With such an attitude, they are well-prepared to cope should the world change in an unexpected manner.

As a parent, it is your duty to ensure that your child has all of the skills required to make it in a world whose future is uncertain. Most parents opt to give them regular schooling, but that education is sorely lacking in survival skills.

What Skills Will They Need to Learn?

Sewing and knitting were skills traditionally left to women, but there is no room for gender bias in the 21st century. Your sons need to know how sew, knit and do their laundry and your daughters should know how to change a tire or learn which way to turn a screw to open it.

Fixing things around the house is another job that both boys and girls need to know how to do. The time may come when your daughter is the only one on the homestead and she can’t afford to wait around for someone else to come and fix the leaky faucet. All it takes is the right tools and the right mindset and she can get it fixed on her own.

Hunting is a tough job and not just as simple as chasing down rabbits. Children in the homestead must be taught how to track animals through the forest and bait them so that they can become efficient hunters. Along with hunting they also must know how to butcher the kill, clean and salt it if necessary so that it can be preserved.

Hunting is good if the animal stocks are low but animal husbandry is there to provide a more convenient source of animal produce. Teach your kids how to milk cows, water them and muck out their stables. These are simple jobs that even a young child can learn to perfect.

Naturally, they will love some chores more than others. Your outdoorsy children will prefer working on the farm, while some will be more comfortable with household chores. This is great opportunity to teach them how to work together. As long as you have taught them how to do each job individually, then you can let them share out the responsibilities among themselves.

How to Get Them Motivated

Children who are born on homesteads adjust easily to the rural way of life. If your family has just moved to the homestead from the suburbs or the city, then your kids will have a hard time adjusting to the new lifestyle.

If your children grew up in the city before they moved to live on a homestead then you can expect a fair amount of resistance to the hard, physical chores. They are used to how their lives were before and probably don’t understand the values of what you are trying to teach them.

Cash allowances will get them motivated at first. However, personal responsibility is one of the forgotten traits that you are trying to teach them so try not to make their learning how to homestead too reliant on rewards. You want them to know why they have to learn those skills so always take the time to talk to them and explain to them why it is important to learn how to homestead.

Hold them accountable for all of their responsibilities and stick to strict ‘no excuses’ policy. If a job needs to get done then it has to be done. That’s the reality of how hard life can be and the sooner they learn it the better adapted they will be to handle whatever crisis comes their way.

The post Teaching Your Children to Homestead appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

10 Turkey Hunting Tips And Tactics

Click here to view the original post.

10 Turkey Hunting Tips And Tactics Wild Turkey numbers today are at an all-time high; hunters across America have a great opportunity to enjoy this highly assessable, wonderful renewable resource. High turkeys densities mean more hens to compete for gobblers, Turkey hunter numbers are at all-time highs, yes, additional competition for gobblers. Turkey hunting has …

Continue reading »

The post 10 Turkey Hunting Tips And Tactics appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Hunting For Survival in the City When the SHTF

Click here to view the original post.

Wildlife in the city, well yes, and Merriam-Webster defines wildlife as living things and especially mammals, birds, and fishes that are neither human nor domesticated. That definition covers a lot of ground.

How many of you have spotted or been harassed by geese in a city park, have had to yield to geese and ducks in roadways around city water features, have seen squirrels begging for food near park benches, and who has not been tempted to feed the pigeons some of their sandwich whiling lunching in a city square. Wildlife indeed abounds.

Dr. Merritt, the Mayor of Oakland, declared Lake Merritt a National Wildlife Refuge in 1869, the first in North America. There are wildlife sanctuaries close to or actually inside some city limits. Places where people go to feed the ducks, and to view wildlife in its natural habitat. In 1925, the first bird island was constructed and four additional islands were erected in 1956. These are the largest of the artificial islands that house hundreds of egrets, herons, Canada goose, and many other species of birds (City of Oakland, n.d.).

Lakes of course in city parks or near a city’s borders may very well be home to fish and other marine life that can be a food source, and water attracts mammals that are a food source as well. Some less appetizing, and yet a food source would be rats and mice.

All mammals in North America are edible, but keep in mind for example, that the Polar Bear and Bearded Seal while both are edible as far as the meat goes, the livers can be toxic to humans, because of their diet the livers may contain toxic amounts of Vitamin A.

Yes, Polar Bears and Seals do invade urban areas, but Polar Bears are dangerous to humans so use extreme caution and always have a firearm up to the job of bringing one down if it comes to that.

If you live in an urban environment you can hunt, not in the traditional sense maybe, but hunt you can for food.

A quality air rifle, a longbow or crossbow, as well as a hunting slingshot,  would be ideal weapons inside the city limits if ducks, geese, rabbits, squirrels, rats, and mice are your food sources. Keep fishing in mind, as well, when packing your survival kit for urban hunting, a survival fishing kit needs to go in the kit. 

You have to consider the safety of other humans as you hunt and the stealth factor as well. In most cases, you will not want others to know you are out hunting for food, so noise discipline is important. Avoid firearms if possible, but this is a judgment call that will have to be made at the time.

Rats and mice can be trapped in the traditional way using traps designed for rodents or you can use your slingshot, stones or throwing sticks. The same would apply to ducks and geese, rabbits and squirrels.

Certain birds can be netted, but keep in mind ducks and geese and even squirrels that are used to being fed by humans may present themselves as a meal without much effort on your part.

You should not consume any animal that you did not kill by your own hand. Finding a dead animal or a washed up fish may seem like an easy meal, but you don’t know if the animal or fish died of a disease.

Nocturnal animals like raccoons, typically come out to forage at night, so if they are found wandering during the day there may be a problem. Rabies can be transmitted to humans if you are exposed to the saliva or brain tissue. Of course, getting bit by a rabid animal can transmit the virus to you.

Handling a dead animal that has rabies may mean you become exposed if you have an abrasion or broken skin. Rabies does not transmit through unbroken skin, however, and the virus does not survive long in the saliva, once exposed to air, but can remain in the brain tissue after an animal has died. Reptiles and marine life do not carry the rabies virus.

Rabies travels from the brain to the salivary glands during the final stage of the disease—this is when an animal can spread the disease, most commonly through a bite (The Humane Society of the United States, n.d.)

Less than 3 people a year die from rabies, but be careful regardless, so you do not become number 4. Only 28 people have died in the last ten years in the United States from rabies (The Humane Society of the United States, n.d.).

Keep in mind that cats and dogs are edible, but just the thought of this is enough for most people to lose their appetites, but remember dogs and cats are raised in some countries as a food source. During a survival situation, all options should be on the table, and then you can eliminate some as the situation unfolds. To avoid moral dilemmas such as this, you should be as prepared as possible.

What Do You Need As Far As Tools and Gear?

Bacteria grow most rapidly in the range of temperatures between 40°F and 140°F, in some cases doubling in number every 20 minutes (PennState Extension, 2016).

During a crisis, refrigeration may be a quickly fading memory so it is important that you understand that your way of thinking and the way you do things must change just as quickly.

If you kill any animal for food and you do not have refrigeration the animal must be processed literally on the spot. Eviscerate the animal as soon possible, and in most cases discard the organs and do so in such a way as to keep larger predators away, and to prevent the spread of bacteria and reduce odor. Burying is the best method.

Field dressing your kill immediate allows for rapid cooling because the body cavity is opened up. This also discourages the growth of surface bacteria, and of course, improves the overall quality of the meat.

What You Need

  • Several Sharp Knives ( Skinning Knives Are Ideal) For Skinning,  One For Small Game And One For Larger Game
  • Whetstone, Honing Steel or Some Other Device or Method For Sharpening Your Knives
  • Hatchet For Larger Game
  • Cheesecloth, String or Rope
  • Cooler Or Some Other Storage Container
  • Disposable Medical Gloves For Handling Raw Meat
  • Alcohol Swabs and/or Clean Cloth and Alcohol To Clean Your Blade After Field Dressing To Prevent Carrying Surface Bacteria Into The Meat As You Process It
  • Water, soap, and/or Alcohol Swabs For Your Hands

If you are lucky, enough to have snow on the ground, then you pack the meat in snow, or fill up jugs of cold water from a lake or pond to help absorb the heat from the fresh kill. Remember heat always conducts to cold.

Wrap the meat in cheesecloth and pack around the cold jugs in a cooler or even a box if that is all you have available to pack the meat home. You can, of course, process, cook, and eat the meat on the spot if it is safe to do so.

Minutes count when handling fresh meat, therefore, it is recommended that you kill and eat, unless there is snow or ice available from frozen lakes or ponds to chill the meat below 40 ° F.

You simply cannot kill game today and expect to be able to consume it in a few days unless it has been chilled and stored at or below 40 degrees. You can get sick or worse.

If the game is more than you can consume in one meal then smoke the remaining meat to preserve. This is not a foolproof method and the smoking process will take hours to ensure the meat is cooked and smoked sufficiently enough to slow or to prevent the growth of bacteria.

The things you have to consider when hunting in an urban area include your safety and the safety of others. You may spot game but is it safe to kill it, process it, and then cook it on the spot or do you need to transport the game to a safe location. You have to make decisions based on what is happening in real time.

We cannot sit here and tell you what you should do because we don’t know if the people in the area would be a threat. Most likely, anyone in the area that sees you cooking a meal would want in on the feast, and if you are unwilling to share, you may have to wait for a more opportune time.

Carry a firearm whether you plan to kill game with it or not. It is for your personal protection more so than for killing game in most cases. You do not want to advertise you are out hunting a meal.

PennState Extension. (2016). Retrieved 2016, from http://extension.psu.edu/food/safety/educators/fact-sheets-brochures-books/game-meats/proper-field-dressing-and-handling-of-wild-game-and-fish

City of Oakland . (n.d.). Retrieved 2016, from http://www2.oaklandnet.com/government/o/opr/s/Parks/OAK032395

The Humane Society of the United States. (n.d.). Retrieved 2016, from http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/facts/rabies.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/

The post Hunting For Survival in the City When the SHTF appeared first on Preparing for shtf.

Have You Considered Bow Hunting For Survival?

Click here to view the original post.

Why should I spend my time learning a traditional skill – bow hunting – while we’re living in an era where we have powerful tools for survival such as firearms and the like?

This is a question that goes in the mind of preppers every time the idea of bow-hunting crosses their mind. If you also tend to undervalue the use of bow hunting for survival due to its antediluvian nature, pause and think again.

Acquiring bow hunting skills is as important as I was centuries ago. You never know when you’ll be left with no choice but to use what nature provides a method of hunting. When you’re stuck in the wilderness survival situation, you can bet on a bow and a set of arrows to save you.

Indeed, there are many more benefits that come with learning archery skills for hunting.

Let’s take a closer look at some of the Top reasons why should start learning this valuable skill today…

SIX Reasons Why You Should Start Learning Bow Hunting For Survival Today

  1. Bows Operate Quietly

In most hunting for survival situations, silent weapons are always the best. For instance, you don’t want to shout your location to fellow survivalists as they might follow run with your catch you get on it. For this reason, we highly recommend you to consider using bows which guarantee you of 100% noiseless operation. What’s more, they’re as deadly as the modern day, high-tech hunting tools and will take down your target with a single blow.

 

  1. Bows Are Economical

You can acquire a simple takedown bow at a reasonable price of several hundred bucks. One interesting thing about bows is that if you get a high-quality, well-made bow, it will serve you for a lifetime – making your investment worthwhile. Other than the bow, the arrows are also cost-effective; when you’ve polished your archery skills, you’ll find it easy to retrieve and reuse your arrows again and again. Besides, you can also learn to craft your arrows using natural wood or wooden dowels-another quite affordable option.

 

  1. Enjoy High Degree of Versatility

The modern day bow has undergone tremendous changes over the past years, centuries, to give you the best regarding performance. You’ll find the modern-day carbon-fiber arrow is incredibly lightweight and features a versatile tip that can accommodate different hunting tips. In other terms, you can use an extensive collection of different tips (including the small game stunner tips, standard practice tips, and so on) on the same arrow for various hunting games.

 

  1. Bows Are Incredibly Portable

Look at a simple take-down bow – it only weighs several pounds which make it extremely lightweight for transporting to your hunting spot. The tale gets better when you learn that you only to turn some lug screws to take down your bow. A typical bow comes with three main parts: two limbs and a middle grip section. This further enhances the portability of your bow – you can easily pack it in your survival backpack alongside several arrows (say 5-6).

 

  1. Multi-Purpose Weapon

Yes! A bow is highly versatile in the sense that you can use it for various things other than hunting. Simply disassemble the bowstring and use it different situations such as bow drill (for making a fire), make traps and snares, trot line fishing, and so much more.

 

  1. Extremely Careless Weapon Laws

And given that the rules and regulation of using these weapons are pretty lenient, you’re freed from the ordeal of the cumbersome paperwork and permits required for other hunting weapons such as guns and pellets.

 

Expert Tips on How To Get The Most Out of Bow Hunting For Survival

Now, allow me to share with you some great bow hunting tips and strategies that will help you hunt with your bow successfully…

– Strive to be an efficient hunter (that is, know where and when to hunt, and where to keep off). They might sound simple, but if you follow these things, you’ll experience significant changes in your hunting exercises. If possible, use trail cameras to help you determine the hot zones for hunting. This will magically increase your hunting success rates

– Develop patient skills; Bow-hunting is simply a waiting game. Preparation and constant practice will make a huge difference, but if you can’t develop this simple attitude, you might not be one of the best bow-hunters.

– Practice like you’ve never done before. Practicing shooting arrows at a fixed target in your backyard as you sip some beer or smoke a cigar isn’t enough. You need to get real-life shooting experience that will adequately prepare you for a real-life situation. Try to practice out of your comfort zone at all times – instead of shooting 30 yards, do 60. While still at it, it’s important to make ever shot count by being as much accurate as possible. Using a single pin bow sight is one of the coolest ways of dramatically increasing your accuracy!

– Learn to make target acquisition a few seconds exercise. Don’t take more than 4-5 seconds to settle your pin and shoot the target. This is all that matters in real-life hunting situations. Practice holding your bow at full draw as long as you can to prepare yourself to confront that deer the moment it shows up!

– Never wait for the deer to come to your stand. Go where they are. Always be versatile, even if it means putting extra effort. You might even need to climb trees or hide behind logs but know that you’ll be handsomely rewarded at the end of it all.

– One more tip: when hunting try to find hidden food sources of food of the game you’re chasing. If you locate carrots, you’re guaranteed of finding the rabbit there as well. Remember that using lures to draw in the game always work like a charm, so try to be as much imaginative as possible while in the wilderness.

 

Final Thoughts

Bow-hunting for survival is a vital skill every survivalist should have at their fingertips. Your guns and rifles might fail, but if you’ve got these skills, they will save you in any survival scenario. Although bow-hunting requires perseverance, lots of practice for you to master it, it’s worth doing all this. It will make you the most skilled prepper who can easily survive in almost any wilderness out there.

Assuming you’ve got the right choice of the bow with you, follow the above bow hunting tips and strategies, and you’ll have a successful hunt!

 

Author Bio:

Jennifer is the founder of BuckWithBow, a great blog that focuses on helping you learn how to hunt deer with a bow. As an experienced bow hunter, she will guide you through the Do’s and Don’ts of the bowhunting world and transform you into a better hunter. Whether you are an experienced bow hunter or an absolute beginner, you will find BuckWithBow a gem!

The post Have You Considered Bow Hunting For Survival? appeared first on American Preppers Network.

The Theory and Practical Application of the “Walking Around Rifle”

Click here to view the original post.

shtfblog_survival_cache_best_survival_rifle_ar15_sako_l-46_featured

shtfblog_survival_cache_best_survival_rifle_ar15_sako_leupoldI’ll admit it readily; I’m a gun snob of the highest accord. I like my guns classy, old, and made of walnut and blued steel, forged and carved by craftsmen from a different era. I’m not saying that I don’t have and use ARs and polymer-framed pistols – I do; they are my “oh shit” guns, and I use and abuse them properly. What I am saying is that if I don’t need to be using that high-capacity new-age gun at a given time, I’m not gonna. Though the AR platform is great for a small-to-medium-game hunting platform, I’d rather ditch the “Rambo” vibe and carry something with a “soul” when I decide to head into the woods for an afternoon of scouting, hiking, or snowshoeing. A well-used and -loved decades-old rifle on my shoulder feels to me like it’s bringing company; call it corny, but I like to think that a small part of every man, woman, and child who ever had that gun in their hands comes with me when I carry these old firearms around. It’s comforting and warming to me – and modern milled-and-molded aluminum and plastic guns just don’t give me the same warm and fuzzy feeling.

By Drew, a contributing author to SHTFBlog & Survival Cache

To that end, I get picky on the guns that I buy; I’m not an accumulator like many other self-proclaimed gun snobs I know. I buy quality items sparingly, and use every gun that I buy. If a firearm doesn’t perform, just isn’t quite what I had in mind, or falls by the usage wayside, it gets sold or traded off. Too many guns is wonderful, but it’s a maintenance and security liability I don’t want to deal with. So I only buy firearms that I connect with – both literally and figuratively.

The “Walking Around Rifle” 

coljeffcooperLike the infamous “Scout Rifle” concept idea put to words by the immortal Jeff Cooper, the idea that came to be dubbed my “Walking Around Rifle” probably needs some explanation. While my conceptualization wasn’t quite as specific as Mr. Cooper’s to-the-letter explanation, the idea in my head had to fulfill certain requirements. The idea was kick-started by my sighting of a rifle at a local gun shop – a rifle I didn’t know I needed until I saw it. It was a Savage 23D, a featherweight middle-sized sporter in the elusive and under-appreciated .22 Hornet caliber, manufactured somewhere between 1923 and 1942. The smooth, warm oil-dark walnut with the worn checkering called to me, as did the detachable magazine and slightly worn bluing. The rifle sported an inexpensive Simmons 3-9x scope, probably weighed all of six pounds, and wore a price tag of $350.00. It was lust at first sight. Soon, visions of popping deer-chasing nuisance winter coyotes with the quick-handling rifle were dancing in my head.

I then committed a major gun-buyer faux pas: I didn’t put money down on the rifle. Heating season was coming up, the baby needed winter clothes, and I just couldn’t justify putting bill money down to nab the rifle. (being an adult sometimes isn’t all it’s wrapped up to be). So I put it back in the rack and justified my actions by thinking “surely nobody will want an old .22 Hornet”.

I was wrong. I went back a couple weeks later to find that surely someone did indeed want an old .22 Hornet, and they had wanted it the day before I walked in the door with money. So I was back to the drawing board to come up with a snazzy, lightweight firearm to fill the new hunting/hiking void I’d created in my head.

I sat down and listed my criteria. The needed requirements were few, but relatively specific.

  • Caliber – centerfire, flat-shooting, capable of downing small and medium-sized game. I hand-load, so ammunition availability wasn’t too much of an issue as long as I could find brass and it was in a common bullet caliber.
  • Bolt-action or break-open, for less moving parts and lower potential for breakage/wear. Likely higher potential accuracy as well over lever actions, pumps, and semi-autos.
  • Provision to mount optics, namely a high-quality fixed low-power scope.
  • Provision for backup fixed sights – because optics can fail, even good ones.
  • Light(er) weight – I didn’t want to pack around a 9 pound rifle – so I was looking for a scaled-down action and lightweight makeup
  • Unique if possible, made up of blued steel and walnut – I had to assuage the inner gun snob, after all. I could have sourced a new Remington Model Seven Synthetic in .223 and it would have fit this bill to a T – but it just doesn’t appeal to me. I wanted something less than commonplace.

Why Did I Want a Walking Around Rifle? 

I realize some may not see the need for this rifle, and I can understand that. Why carry around a rifle that really is somewhat limited in purpose and versatility, especially when the bug-out AR-15 fits the bill? Why not a bigger rifle/caliber combination, like a .308, that is more capable over a wider array of situations?

Related: The Katrina Rifle 

This rifle requirement all stems from what I like to do. My woods time is usually comprised of keeping up to date with bug-out locations, exploring, hunting coyotes, or – most frequently – scouting deer patterns for an upcoming whitetail deer season. A rifle is handy to eliminate pests, use as a signalling device, or even provide security. The rifle has range and accuracy capabilities that far surpass even the most precise handgun, at the price of added bulk. However, when snowshoeing and scaling mountainous countryside with a pack, the added bulk can be a burden – so I needed to be picky about the size and contours of the rifle. Semi-auto firepower wasn’t a requirement – in all likelihood, the rifle won’t even be fired on most excursions – so precision and unobtrusive carrying qualities take precedence over lots of fast follow-up shots.

To sum things up: My rifle’s mission was to be portable,and have more punch and range than a .22 Long Rifle or similar rimfire caliber. The .22 LR works well as a small-game foraging rifle, but just doesn’t possess the additional horsepower I wanted to have available.

So Why These Requirements? 

223remingtonCaliber – Here in Maine, the need for a large caliber to pull anti-animal duty only runs a couple of months – usually September, October, and November, when black bear and whitetail deer season are open, to the delight of local and imported sportsmen. The remainder of the year, most traditionally edible game animals are not legal quarry. Porcupines, woodchucks, coyotes, and red squirrels are the only critters that Maine allows sportsmen to pursue year-round. For these animals, a large caliber rifle just isn’t needed for clean kills. Certainly, a .22 Long Rifle can be considered viable for vermin dispatching duties at appropriate ranges. However, once the ranges open up past 50 yards, the stalwart .22 LR’s and even the .22 Magnum’s meager ballistics start becoming a hindrance, and clean kills are not certain. So we need to start looking at the centerfire family of cartridges to carry the fight to undesirable fur bearing creatures (or even emergency anti-deer use) at longer distances. The .22 Hornet, .222 Remington, and .223 Remington/ 5.56x45mm are all cartridges that were squarely in my sights. Surely, the .22-250, .220 Swift, .204 Ruger, and .17 Remington would have all been good, even excellent, at what I wanted – but since I reload, I wanted smaller, efficient calibers that didn’t burn a ton of powder (eliminating the .22-250 and .220 Swift), and were in bullet diameters that I had on hand – namely the common .224” bullet (there goes the .17 Remington and .204 Ruger.). I briefly considered older-though-still-cool-and-sort-of-useful calibers such as the .218 Bee, .25-20 Winchester, and .32-20 WCF, but the difficulty and expense of finding brass cases to reload, plus their lackluster long-range performance, put them out of the running once my brain overrode the romanticism of using the old calibers. So .22 Hornet, .222 Remington, and .223 Remington/5.56mm were the main focus. Rifles chambered in these smaller cased-cartridges also have the benefit of sometimes of having the action scaled down to the caliber – so you’re not lugging around a full-sized rifle that’s just a modified version of a full-sized short-action rifle meant for the .308 class of calibers.

shtf_survival_cache_shtfblog_windham_weaponry_308_ar10_r18fsfsm-308_aimpoint_comp_ml3_outdoors_midwest_industriesAction Type – Again, though I had an AR-15 that would fill this made-up mission quite nicely, I just didn’t want an AR over my shoulder while hoofin’ it. I’ve shot deer with a Windham Weaponry AR-10, and while it worked very well on a certain 5-point buck, it just didn’t feel right to a guy who grew up carrying leverguns and bolt actions in the woods. Also, once I shot said deer, carrying the AR became a whole bunch of not-fun: the brass deflector and charging handle kept digging into my body, the Picatinny rails caught clothing and abraded it, and the tall profile just made sure there was more surface area to get in the way. Purpose-designed traditional hunting rifles are generally lower-profile, smoother, sleeker – easier to carry once you don’t need them anymore and you’re dragging 170 pounds of dead ungulate weight behind you.

Also – a reasoning that has somewhat more validity – bolt-action and single-actions are USUALLY more accurate than their semi-auto, lever, or pump counterparts. Yes, I know that there are hideously accurate semi-autos, and I’ve shot running deer at 150 yards with a lever action – but the bolt gun will be a bit more effective on little target critters at further distances due to its higher level of intrinsic accuracy. There are always exceptions to rules, but this is a statement I decided to bank on, based on personal experience and expected usage for the rifle.

Optics/Sights– This is a no-brainer. I need to be able to scope the rifle for longer-ranged shots. However, I like redundancy in my firearm sighting methods, so I’d like to be able to have the provision for iron sights. Scopes fog up, batteries run out, slips and falls leave firearms crashing to the ground (probably onto the largest, harshest, most abrasive rock in three counties) and optics get jarred out of alignment or damaged. A backup set of iron sights – no matter how rudimentary – is just a nice piece of security to have.

Lighter Weight– Again, another no-brainer. The less your rifle weighs, the more likely you will have it with you, and the more convenient it will be. The scaled-down action size of the smaller calibers I was looking at help a lot in this department.  I almost bought or sought several different firearms that neatly fit the bill; they were all quite capable and fully met my needs…I just never seemed to pull the trigger (pun intended).

I was drawn to the CZ 527. A nifty little scaled-down carbine with a detachable box magazine, it comes in .22 Hornet and .223 (and interestingly, 7.62x39mm Russian…interesting…). But they are difficult to find ‘round these parts due to their popularity and immense handiness, and I ended up finding my solution before I found one of these.

The H&R Handi-Rifle was a great option, too – and I almost ordered one up. They are rugged, dependable, no-nonsense, inexpensive break-open single-shot rifles that feature interchangeable calibers by swapping out the barrels. I’ve had a lot of fun with these rifles over the years, and they certainly hold a special place in my heart. They come in .22 Hornet and .223, (and lots of other calibers and gauges) with black synthetic stocks that lend themselves well to a beat-around rifle. I know it wasn’t walnut or terribly unique, so I kept looking despite the utility.

The Remington 799 is a scaled-down version of the fabled Mauser 98 action, and if I had seen one in .22 Hornet, .222, or .223 (all standard calibers for the rifle), I might have scoffed one up in a heartbeat if it was of decent quality – I had never actually seen one, but the specs look good.  Of course, another Savage 23 or a Winchester 43 would have been lovely – but alas, not for sale in my neck of the woods.

The Solution Presents Itself 

After the mildly devastating loss of the vintage Savage .22 Hornet, I was on the hunt. No gun shop in the locale was safe from my perusal. There were lots of options that would have fit the bill, but Captain Gun Snob was being fussy. I wanted something a bit different….

Read Also: Sig Suaer MPX-C Review 

One day, my wife and I were skimming through the local Cabelas, and somehow she actually followed me into the gun library (it hasn’t happened again since, I’ve noticed…). She was present at my side when I sucked in a deep gasp and quickly opened one of the upper glass cases to reach for the gloriousness of a rifle that had caught my eye.

Sako L-42 in .222 Remington

A 1950’s-manufactured Sako L-46 “Riihimäki” in .222 Remington, complete with graceful full-length “Mannlicher” style stock, detachable 3-round magazine, and vintage steel-tube El Paso Weaver K4 fixed 4x scope in Redfield Jr. rings had my complete and undivided attention. I fell in such instant and complete lust with the trim, beautiful little rifle that I didn’t even care if my wife saw the $1,199.00 price tag (which she did). I put the rifle on layaway, and a few too-slow weeks later, the rifle came home with me. My wishes had come true and the fun began.

I stocked up on factory ammo and empty brass where I could find it, and I’ve spent a very joyful past few months developing a handload that shoots well. I also replaced the charming (but prone to fogging) Weaver K4 with a vintage Leupold M8 fixed 4x scope that is a perfect match for the rifle. A canvas sling was added, and the rifle has reached “perfection” status in my eyes. It propels a 50-grain Hornady soft-point varmint bullet at 3200 feet per second out of the 23-inch barrel, and can group 5 of them into a neat 1-inch cluster at 100 yards. The rifle has a hooded front sight, and I found an ultra-rare Redfield scope mount with an integral flip-up aperture rear sight. It rides delightfully next to a pack on my shoulder or in my hand,and fulfills every one of my requirements. I’m a happy camper, mission accomplished!

Yeah, But Does This Have Anything to do With Survival?

Sako and a BOB

Some of you may just view this as bombastic gun bragging, and maybe it is to a small degree. But more than that, I’m trying to portray that there are other options – quality, graceful options – out there to fulfill the needs of the forager/scout/pest control mission. I know that for many individuals, the AR-15 or other military-type platforms are distasteful, impractical, unneeded, or unwanted, and commercial hunting rifle offerings punch the ticket nicely. The AR and other platforms are truly versatile and may be a better way to go if you’re on a one-gun budget for SHTF-type needs, but if you have other plans for scouting, small-to-medium game hunting, or pest eradication post-SHTF, why not have another rifle that doesn’t use your stockpile of “oh no” ammo? Why not have a rifle that says “Hunter” or “Rancher” instead of “Prepper” or “Survivalist” or “Military”? And truth be told, the day may come when your AR-15 or similar rifle may not be able to see the light of day due to legislation; you’ll still want to be able to have a quality, accurate rifle on your shoulder that is capable of pulling off multi-mission duty and not set off alarms. A rifle that shares a common caliber as your SHTF rifle may be a great idea too (like the CZ527 carbine in .223 to compliment your AR). Just food for thought.

What do you think? Do you have a secondary/scouting type rifle in your plans? Or does your situation and prepping make a rifle such as this unnecessary? Sound off in the comments!

Photos Courtesy of:
Drew
Lauren Nicole Photography 

SHTFBlog.com T-Shirts Now Available
SHTFBlog-com-T-Shirt_For_Blog

 

 

 

 

Support SHTFBlog.com by shopping @ Amazon (Click Here)

Visit Sponsors of SHTFBlog.com

 

 

 

 

 

the_survivalist_podcast

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

5 Reasons to Learn Bow Hunting for Survival

Click here to view the original post.

5-reasons-to-learn-bowhunting-for-survival

Learning how to hunt with a bow and arrow, especially with a focus on stealth hunting and tracking, is one of the most valuable skills a prepper can have.

Not everyone plans to become a survivor someday, so learning survival skills isn’t something most people worry about.

Many would rather roll over when the lights go out. Chances are, if you’re reading this, that isn’t you.

What if the unthinkable happens and you have to figure out how to hunt for your own food? Bullets eventually disappear, and sometimes you need stealth instead.

Times like this a bow is your best option. Learning archery, especially with a focus on stealth hunting and tracking, is one of the most valuable skills a prepper can learn.

Here are 5 good reasons to learn bow hunting for survival situations.

You’ll Never Starve

First and foremost, if you have a bow and know how to hunt, you’ll never starve. The best part is you can kill just about any animal with a bow, so you won’t face a life of spam in a can and Twinkies.

Large animals like whitetail deer can feed large amounts of people and are easy to cook and clean in the wild.

If you get sick of wild game, the best bow hunters can use their weapon to catch fish as well. If they’re not good at shooting fish in the water, they can use an arrow as a spear.

You Have Protection

If the world changes in a heartbeat, first responders such as police and fire will be extremely busy. In these types of situations even ordinarily honest people will loot, steal, and misbehave, if they think it will help them and theirs survive.

A bow and arrows probably wouldn’t be someone’s first line of defense in normal society, but when your only goal is trying to survive a bow and arrow can be a good line of defense.

It’s A DIY Project

One of the greatest things about a bow and arrow is you don’t even have to own one to use one in a survival situation.

They are easy to make, and if you’re smart enough to learn how to shoot a bow, you can learn how to make one. Basically, you only need a few materials to make a bow and arrows that will help you protect yourself and hunt for food.

To make a bow in a survival situation, you just need some hardwood to make the bow itself. Items like cattails and small (straight) sticks can be used to make arrows, and broadheads can be made out of stone chips.

Another great source for broadheads is glass. You can break a glass bottle, look for shattered windows, or just look at debris laying near the edges of roadways. Wherever there is rocks, there’s usually glass. Just chip it away to that it’s even on both sides. Keys, computer parts, and many more things can be broken and shaped into arrow heads.

Finding string for the bow can be a bit more challenging. Examples of places to look for string material include vines, strong plants or the thread of clothes you or someone else in your group is wearing.

Bow Strings Are Multi-Purpose

Whether you have a traditional bow string or you’re improvising with items you find in the wild, you can use the bow string to do many other things as well. For instance, you can use bow string to make a snare, use in traps, or even start a fire via a bow drill.

Also, if you find a good source of materials to make bow strings you can create many things. And nothing is stopping you from using the string you are using for a bow to build something else with as long as you don’t damage it.

If you are planning on using string like substances for your survival needs or gear, you should make sure you know how much is available to you and use it accordingly.

Long Range Damage

Not many weapons are as accurate as a bow and arrow when you’re in a long-range situation. With practice, you can accurately use a bow and arrow from 50 to 100 yards away, and good luck trying that with a spear.

Without stating the obvious too much, what this means is you don’t have to get close to something or somebody to either scare it away or kill it, if necessary.

Final Thoughts

Now you know why you should consider a bow and arrow for survival situations. With a bow, you’ll have a way to hunt prey, you can defend yourself in intense situations, the weapon can be made out of supplies and materials you’d likely find in the outdoors, the bow string can be multi-purpose, and most of all it can be used from long distances, so you don’t have to get to close to something to be able to wound or kill it. So next time you and the family are going over your survival plan, consider learning archery and how to make a bow and arrow from scratch too.

Saving our forefathers ways starts with people like you and me actually relearning these skills and putting them to use to live better lives through good times and bad. Our answers on these lost skills comes straight from the source, from old forgotten classic books written by past generations, and from first hand witness accounts from the past few hundred years. Aside from a precious few who have gone out of their way to learn basic survival skills, most of us today would be utterly hopeless if we were plopped in the middle of a forest or jungle and suddenly forced to fend for ourselves using only the resources around us. To our ancient ancestors, we’d appear as helpless as babies. In short, our forefathers lived more simply than most people today are willing to live and that is why they survived with no grocery store, no cheap oil, no cars, no electricity, and no running water. Just like our forefathers used to do, The Lost Ways Book teaches you how you can survive in the worst-case scenario with the minimum resources available. It comes as a step-by-step guide accompanied by pictures and teaches you how to use basic ingredients to make super-food for your loved ones. Watch the video HERE .

Source : besurvival.com

The post 5 Reasons to Learn Bow Hunting for Survival appeared first on .

How to Hunt with a Slingshot for Survival

Click here to view the original post.

Getting lost or stranded in the middle of the wilderness is a real case scenario for which every outdoor enthusiast should be prepared. Such an event could happen to you when you’re hiking through a new path, mountain biking over a trail, or out camping with your family. And no matter the amount of food you take with you, eventually it is bound to run out. When that happens, living off the land can make the difference between surviving or starving in the woods.


Hunting is one of your best options if you are lost in the wilderness, which is why you should always carry a Slingshot when you go outdoors. Slingshots are small and easy to carry, but they are also powerful hunting weapons that you can use to kill small game like squirrel, rabbits, pheasants, geese, ducks, or even fish (provided that they are near the surface). Carrying a slingshot in your pocket or backpack will give you a reliable hunting weapon that you can use to feed yourself, provided that you know how to use it.

Old Slingshot

 SLINGSHOTS, THE PERFECT SURVIVALIST HUNTING WEAPON

To most civilians, and casual survivalists, a Slingshot is nothing more than a kids’ toy. It takes a real survivalist to recognize the qualities that make Slingshots such a formidable hunting tool. Sure, firearms are superior in range and accuracy, but when it comes to convenience it is much easier for you to take a Slingshot in your pocket, while you’re hiking, rather than carrying a heavy rifle on your shoulder.

Slingshots are also stealthier than even the quietest airgun, which means that you can shoot at an animal without scaring away other potential preys lying nearby. Slingshot hunting rabbit is particularly easy because rabbits tend to have bigger heads than other small game, are easier to spot, and are an easy target everytime they sit quietly and raise their ears to scout the area. Always go for headshots, but even if you miss rabbits are easier to track than smaller animals and being wounded they are unlikely to go too far.

Survival Slingshot

Getting ammunition for your slingshot is really easy and cheap, so much that you can buy it in almost any convenience or hardware store. A lot of people like to use marbles because they are cheap and do the job. Even a cheap slingshot can throw a projectile faster than 150 feet per second, which is enough to fracture a small animal’s skull and kill it instantly. You could even use regular stones, though their highly unpredictable trajectory makes them almost useless as a hunting ammunition. Steel balls make the best ammo and are the most efficient in killing small animals.

A Slingshot’s effective range is small, but this is unlikely to be a problem for you since many small game animals that live on trees, like birds or squirrels, are unlikely to feel threatened by a human standing below their tree. But even at short distances it takes skill to hit a target, so if you don’t want to starve to death in the forest you might want to start practicing now.

HOW TO SHOOT A SLINGSHOT FOR SURVIVAL

The average slingshot that you can find at Walmart can throw a projectile at a speed that is anywhere between 150-300 feet per second. Speed varies widely from one slingshot to other, and even with the ammo you use, but at this speed even small aiming mistakes can throw off your projectile by several meters and with it your chance to get a meal. As with everything else, practice makes perfect.

The targets you’ll be hitting won’t be moving, but they are so small that you should take your time to practice your skills. You should always hold the slingshot’s pouch lightly and hold it lower in the grip. Many beginners hold it too high, or too tightly and end up shooting their ammo everywhere but unto the target.

Accuracy is key when using a slingshot to hunt in a survival situation. Getting a headshot isn’t only a humanitarian concern, if your ammunition actually hits your prey’s body you will cause internal bleeding, and the meat will most probably be ruined. Some animals, like rabbits or squirrels, will even be able to get away, even though the body shot you scored was a deadly one. Stranded in the wilderness without a dog is not the best scenario to be tracking animals

Slingshot Hunting

HOW TO HUNT WITH A SLINGSHOT

Small animals are fast and agile, so getting them while they’re on the run is highly unlikely. So don’t waste your ammo. Wait until they stopped to rest or scout the area and have your slingshot at hand. Opportunities can disappear just as quickly as they present themselves. Your best chance to get some food is if you manage to find the hole or nest where your prey lives. Underground burrows, like those used by rabbits, can be hard to find, but birds and squirrels are easier to spot on the trees. Most bird species use some type of call to communicate with each other which makes it easier to know where they’re at.

Slingbow Hunting

(Via: http://mensgear.net/)

Rabbits are some of the biggest animals you can kill with a slingshot. If you can catch them while they’re lying still and scouting the noises in the area, then you have a good chance to hit one. Make sure to use steel ammo because this will increase your chances of successfully hitting and killing a rabbit. A well placed headshot will kill the animal instantly and give you plenty of much needed protein and energy for several days.

Squirrels are easy to find in many forests, and sometimes you might catch them descending from a tree, which is the perfect opportunity to kill one. Even if you miss its head you might be able to hit it in the spine, and if not kill it at least stop it from running. But beware of hitting the body. Squirrels have tough skin so even if your ammo wont tear it, it will waste the meat inside.

Birds are also a great target, and if you are near a lake or a quiet river you can probably find ducks. A single one of these animals can easily feed you for 5 days, so if you are lucky enough to find a flock of ducks don’t waste the opportunity. Take your slingshot, aim and fire away.

Author Bio:


KevinKevin Steffey is an avid hunter and freelance writer. He loves spending time in the field with his rifle more than almost anything else, and occupies his off-time discussing deer and their habits online. He is a founder at www.deerhuntingfield.com

The post How to Hunt with a Slingshot for Survival appeared first on Preparing for shtf.

Bow Hunting!

Click here to view the original post.

Bow Hunting! Josh “7 P’s of survival” This show in player below! All things bow hunting with Signal 11 and Muddy Outdoors Pro Staffer Scott Koedam. I have known Scott since he was in grade school hanging out at the fire department with his father. Scott has been successfully hunting in each season ever since before … Continue reading Bow Hunting!

The post Bow Hunting! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Keep Those Whipper Snappers Safe: Gun Saftey And Kids

Click here to view the original post.
gun-449783_1280

Image Source: Pixabay.com

By The Survival Place Blog

The topic of children and guns has been a hot one, over the last few years. With accidents claiming the lives of children across the world, it’s easy to see why. But, most people’s reaction to this, is to never expose their kids to guns at all. This doesn’t work very well, though, if you’re a gun owner. Or, even if you just want your kids to be as safe as possible.

It’s important to be aware of the dangers of having guns around your little ones, so this post will go through some of the things to think about. Obviously, it’s ultimately your choice as a parent, as to how you treat your children. So, just use this for reference.

Safety In The Home

If you keep guns at home, there are certain measures you need to take. Keeping a gun in a draw or under a bed doesn’t really cut it. If you want to keep guns at home, ideally you should have a gun safe. Obviously, these are expensive and mainly to deter theft. If you want a more affordable alternative, you can look into other lockable containers.

Any guns that you carry, keep in the car or have to leave out, should all be unloaded with ammo far away. A young child will find it very hard to load a gun; but older children, with some experience, can be a much bigger danger. Keeping ammo and the weapon separate limits the risk dramatically.

Education

Starting from a young age, you should educate your children surrounding gun safety. Teaching your children that guns are dangerous, and should only be used in emergencies, will give them a good respect for the risks involved. You should also teach them that the guns in your home are off limits. Let them know where the guns are kept, under lock and key, but assert that they are never to be played with.

As your child gets older, you’ll want to give them some hands-on education. It is better to start with a BB gun or Airgun, before moving on to a real one. This will give you an opportunity to teach your children to handle guns correctly, without the danger of a real gun. You won’t struggle to find airsoft guns for sale, and they’re very affordable.

Teaching your children early on and throughout their lives will build their confidence. Confidence is key in avoiding accidents. Someone with more confidence will handle a weapon with greater precision and purpose.

Observation

Once you have taught your children, you need to watch them. Study how they operate and handle the weapons they use. This will give you a good insight into how you should proceed with further education.

Never leave your children alone with a weapon. Most accidents involving children and guns are as a result of no supervision. Children rarely want to hurt themselves or others; you just need to watch that they don’t make a mistake.

Hopefully, this will give you somewhere to start. Make sure that you research the laws and regulations that apply to your home. You can seek advice from your government and professionals if you’re still concerned.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Keep Those Whipper Snappers Safe: Gun Saftey And Kids

Filed under: Hunting, Prepping

21 Situations Where Paracord Can Save Your Life!

Click here to view the original post.

21 Situations Where Paracord Can Save Your Life There are simply hundreds of little things that can go awry on any given day. This is especially true following a SHTF event when resources are scarce and things are chaotic. When you begin to understand this, you realize that you cannot possibly carry every piece of … Continue reading 21 Situations Where Paracord Can Save Your Life!

The post 21 Situations Where Paracord Can Save Your Life! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

How To Field Dress A Pheasant In Under Two Minutes

Click here to view the original post.

pheasant_clean_how_to

When calamity strikes and grocery stores become barren, it will be imperative for people to produce their own food. Many individuals who have never hunted will be forced to learn quickly. In my own experience, I’ve found field dressing, not shooting, to be the most challenging part of the hunt. Among those who have never hunted, the prospect of cleaning a bird is probably intimidating.

By D-Ray a contributing author to SHTFBlog & Survival Cache

Thankfully a YouTube user, Shawn Woods, has an informative video on how to clean a pheasant in under two minutes.  Whether you’re a seasoned hunter or a novice, this video is impressive. Novice hunters will learn how to expertly field dress and more seasoned hunters can appreciate a speed run.

A Breakdown of the Process

To begin, it is important to understand you are working with six components for removal: head, tail, two wings, and two feet. First, let’s take a look at the legs of your pheasant. The lower, scaled half of pheasant legs connects to the feathered top at a joint. In a circular motion, cut just below this joint and snap the leg of the pheasant back. At this point, the leg should be hanging on by a few tendons. Cut any excess tendons and remove the lower portion of the leg.

Related: Compound Bow Choice For Archery Deer Hunting 

Next, you’ll want to focus on the wings. Pheasant wings are separated by a joint dividing primary and secondary feathers. Grab pheasant_feathers_cleanthe primary section of the wing and bend back sharply breaking the joint. Once the joint is broken, pull back to reveal any connecting tendons. In a similar fashion to the legs, cut these connections to remove the primary  section from the secondary. With the primary section off, you can leave the secondary section to wait for later. This will addressed during the skinning process.

Now for the good part. Grab the base of the pheasants neck and cut. Without too much effort, this will come right off. Remove the pheasant head and use this opening to peel back skin and feathers. With the exception of the remaining secondary feathers, removing this skin should not be too difficult. For the most part, this should be a quick process.

To conclude, cut the pheasant tail at the base and remove. Next, make a small cut along the lower breast portion; this will create clean_pheasant_process_easya hole underneath the breast to allow for access to intestines, heart, gizzard, liver, and other organs. Insert two fingers into this hole, get dirty, and pull out the pheasant guts. In a couple of tries, you should have a pheasant largely removed of all organs.

At the end of this process, Shawn Woods produced a cleaned Pheasant in 1:44 seconds. Perhaps the most impressive part of his process is meat retained. Very little was wasted in this process. Although he did not mention it, pheasant liver and gizzard can be consumed as well. In a survival scenario, you will want to hold on to these for consumption.

What the Video Missed 

While I was impressed with this video, I must throw in a few caveats. You should not emulate the haphazard process of organ removal used in this video. Take a bit of time to carefully remove intestines and other internal organs. Rupturing these inside the pheasant is messy, unhygienic, and smells god-awful. Nobody wants to clean pheasant meat that has been covered in bird feces.

Also Read: Survival Shotgun Selection

A less important note: when removing the legs, don’t sever the tendons outright. Take a bit more time to pull them out of the cooked_pheasant_how_tobird. While this process will make the cleaning more time consuming, it will expedite your cooking process. Speaking of which, the skinning process used in this video could have been a bit more thorough. Rather than frantically pulling at feathers, a slower approach on skinning yields a cleaner, more hygienic bird.

It’s also important to mention that a thorough cleaning process involves looking for shot embedded in the meat. You don’t want to start digging into your pheasant meat to chew down on a mouth full of metal. The bird in this video seemed to be killed in a pretty clean fashion. This isn’t always the case. From time to time, you will kill a pheasant that is, at points, too mangled by shot to be consumed. In these instances, you will be forced to toss ruined meat.

Wrapping It All Up

As this video demonstrates, cleaning a pheasant isn’t an overly difficult or time consuming practice. If you remember to cut your six components and take time to skin, you will produce a cleaned pheasant ready to cook. Also, if you’ve never been hunting, I recommend you go. Bird hunting is a great deal of fun and a valuable skill in survival scenarios.  If you need an excuse to take a few days off and shoot a shotgun, bird hunting is the perfect activity. I challenge you to find an unhappy hunter after a trip out to the woods. The old adage ‘a bad day of fishing beats a good day at work’, is also applicable to hunting.

For the seasoned hunters out there, what is your process? While I think a two minute clean is a little hasty, I was still impressed with the speed clean. Let me know what you think in the comments. Also, feel free to share your hunting experiences.

Photos and Video Courtesy of:
Shawn Woods 
California Department of Fish and Wildlife
Lukasz Lukasik

 

SHTFBlog.com T-Shirts Now Available
SHTFBlog-com-T-Shirt_For_Blog

 

 

 

 

Support SHTFBlog.com by shopping @ Amazon (Click Here)

Visit Sponsors of SHTFBlog.com

 

 

 

 

 

the_survivalist_podcast

Save

Save

Save

Save

Book Review: Air Rifles: A Buyer’s and Shooter’s Guide

Click here to view the original post.

air_rife_great_quality_prep

I’ll say from the outset that I’m less familiar with air guns than “traditional” guns. Air rifles, to me, have always fallen into the christmas_story_markwith_airrifle_bbguncategory of a BB gun, the “Red Rider” type that Ralphie wished for in the classic movie, A Christmas Story. A “rifle” that kids use as a precursor to getting a rimfire rifle, something they can use to understand the principles of gun safety while knocking soda cans over with an air-powered BB.  This book, along with some independent research, shattered my preconceptions of the air rifle. As it turns out, the air rifle has a rich history and a variety of applications. As much as it hurts to admit, the air rifle may be a valuable tool in skirting gun control laws.  As bleak as it may sound, plinking around with an air rifle may be the only option in the future.

By Mark Puhaly, a contributing author to Survival Cache & SHTFBlog

In any event, let’s dispense with the gloom and doom and get into the world of air rifles. Exploring the details of miscellaneous weapons types is always fun.  It’s even more fun when it brings you back to the days of plinking around the backyard as a kid.

Overview 

The modern air rifle, in case you’re unaware, is vastly different from its predecessor. The first air rifle, it seems, dates back to around 1580 air_rife_book_markwith_survivaland now sits in a museum in Stockholm.  After a bit of cursory research, I learned early, advanced air rifles were used for hunting wild boar and deer.  Of course, these rifles were a bit more hardcore than your traditional BB Gun.  In fact, old air rifles were used in military applications as well.  Today’s more modern air rifle can do just that in a survival situation.  And with what seems like ever-increasing risks of additional gun control measures and expensive ammunition, the air rifle makes sense to add to anyone’s collection of survival firearms.   The book covers air rifles from start to finish. All types are covered: CO2 powered guns, spring guns, multi-pump pneumatics, single-stroke pneumatics, and pre-charged pneumatics. The book then moves into the many types of projectiles (more than a novice might think).  For preppers, there’s even an entire chapter devoted to “The Survival Springer”.  These include models of all types and price ranges.  The book also covers sights, scopes, velocity, accuracy, range, targets, training tips, and accessories. Truly, this book seems to cover everything on air rifles.

Related: Back to Basics – Rifle Accuracy 

After reading “Air Rifles: A Buyers and Shooter’s Guide” by Steve Markwith, I’m much more familiar with the versatility of the air rifle and have a newfound respect for them. I’m even itching to buy one (or two) now.  The modern air rifle could serve as an excellent, low-cost training tool for people that live in more suburban environments where shooting bullets off your back deck is less of a… neighborly thing to do.

Likes & Dislikes 

Rich in photos and description, Markwith’s conversational yet informative writing style from his Survival Guns – A Beginner’s Guide holds true here, too. This should be a go-to book for, as the title suggests, anyone thinking about buying an air rifle or anyone that shoots one. I don’t care if you’re a beginner or an expert air rifleman, there’s something in this book that will help.

Also Read: The Evolution of the Black Rifle 

My biggest complaint is that, like Survival Guns, the images are informative but are presented in black and white. The book would be richer if they were in color. The writing is better than the image presentation. $12.95 seems fair for the paperback, but $7.95 for a Kindle version feels a bit high. I generally prefer paperback anyway, particularly where this one is in 8×10” size, but Kindle buyers should be able to get this book for something more like $5.95.

The Verdict 

If you’re new to air rifles, or are even a moderate user, there’s something of use for you here, I’m certain of it. This book would, however, best serve the individual that’s thinking about getting an air rifle, because the money spent on the book up front would save you money many times over by both helping you choose the right air rifle to suit your needs from the outset, and also help you get the most out of it.

Photos by:
Christmas StoryPrepper Press

Survival Cache T-Shirts Now Available

Survivalist T-Shirt

 

 

 

 

 


Support SurvivalCache.com by shopping @ Amazon (Click Here)

Visit Sponsors of SurvivalCache.com

 

 

 

 

 

the_survivalist_podcast

How to Squirrel Hunt with a Bow Tips And Tricks For You

Click here to view the original post.
How to Squirrel Hunt with a Bow

squirrel hunting

 

How to Squirrel Hunt with a Bow

 

Learn how to squirrel hunt with a bow today with this guest post.

A good way to practice your skill or get ready for an upcoming season is to spend some time in the woods hunting squirrel. Like much small and big game, you have lots of weapon options.

Using a bow to hunt squirrel is a popular choice that requires skill and patience in order to be successful. A compound or recurve bow is a wise choice for squirrel hunting, but a compound bow could be used if you really wanted. Believe, we’ll go over tips on how to squirrel hunt with a bow.

 

Reasons to Kill a Squirrel with a Bow 



There’s always going to be hunters and anti-hunters that think using a bow to kill squirrel is overkill. But, those that love it know there are several reasons to do it. Here’s just a few.
 

– Arrows can be reused
– Virtually silent (allows you to hunt more squirrel at a time)
– Great way to train for upcoming seasons

 

Know the Regulations 



Nobody wants to risk getting in trouble because they don’t know the regulations regarding squirrel hunting. Make sure you get a small game license. When you purchase the license, you’ll get a hunting regulation booklet. It’s important to read the pamphlet, even if you’ve read it before. Regulations, bag limits, season dates, time limitations, and more can change from one season to another, so it’s important to always read the information and make note of changes.
 

 

Choose Your Choice of Bow 



Now that you’ve got your duck, er squirrels, in a row, it’s time to decide what type of bow you should use while deer hunting. Obviously, the bow of choice would be a recurve or compound bow. But, as hunting technology keeps getting better and more hunters keep pushing for better ways to hunt, the compound bow has become a good choice as well.
 

When you choose the type of bow you want to use bow hunting, it’s important to think about what your purpose is. Are you just trying to pass time, or are you training for the upcoming season. If you’re training opt for the bow you’re going to hunt with in the spring or fall. If you’re introducing a young or new hunter to squirrel hunting with a bow, consider a compound or recurve bow. 

 

What You Need to Know About Bows and Squirrel Hunting 



You don’t need a ton of power to kill a squirrel with an arrow. If using a compound bow, you probably don’t need much more than a 25-lb draw. If you’re using a crossbow, think about the shots you’re going to take. A squirrel has a tiny kill zone and a small body. Missing the mark could guarantee you end up with a mangled arrow. Just think smart and shoot straight no matter what type of bow you use, and you shouldn’t have any problems.

As you would imagine, squirrels have teeny tiny attention spans. What this means for hunters is that you can be doing everything right and come home from a morning of squirrel hunting empty-handed. Strong winds, nasty weather, and the threat of a nearby predator can cause squirrels to hole up in a tree for hours, which means you won’t see a thing unless you have tons of time and patience. In fact, having time and patience is one of the best hunting skills you can take into the woods with you when hunting small game. Another bonus is having a bit of skill with the bow. 

 

How to Squirrel Hunt with a Bow

squirrel hunting bow tips

 

Bow Hunting Squirrel Tips 



Squirrel hunting isn’t all about perfect aim and instinct. Sometimes, it’s just about being in the right spot at the right time. In most areas, squirrel is the most active in the early morning and late afternoon. If you schedule your squirrel hunting endeavors during those times, you’ll likely have better luck than any other part of the day.
 

Another tip to help you provide the meat for your stew later in the day is choosing the right spot to stalk or move through. It’s good to know that squirrels go crazy for acorns, beechnuts, and hickory nuts. So, for the best chance to hit the bag limit for the day is to choose a location near hickory, beech, or acorn trees. 

Next, you need to know when a squirrel is close. Falling leaves, changing colors, and camo help hide you from squirrels but it also helps squirrels hide from hunters. What this means is you can’t just count on your eyes to let you know where the squirrels are hiding. Instead, you need to locate squirrels with your ears just as often as you see them with your eyes. Specifically, you need to listen for “cutting.” Cutting is a term to describe the sound squirrels make when they are eating. 

If you can hear squirrels eating nuts nearby, you know you’re in a good spot to get some squirrels. It’s a good idea to keep some leaves to rustle in your hunting day pack to try and cover any sounds you may make in the woods to cover your tracks.

 

squirrel shoot head How to Squirrel Hunt with a Bow

squirrel shoot head

 

Know Your Kill Zone 



It’s hunter’s responsibility to take out their prey as humanely as possible. In terms of hunting squirrels, there is one way to do this – a kill shot to the head. There’re several reasons to aim for the head and not everyone is going to agree on how and why you should do this.
 

First, a kill shot to the head ensures the squirrel doesn’t have time to scurry away. If you hit the squirrel in the body, it may have a few seconds to scurry around, which means they could find a hole and bury themselves in. At this point, it could be nearly impossible to retrieve the squirrel and means it would take the animal longer to die as well.
 

Another reason to always aim for a squirrel’s head during hunting is to preserve the meat. If you hit a squirrel in the largest mass area, it might not die right away. You may even have to fire a second shot to knock it down. With one or more shots to the body, eatable meat could be destroyed. When aiming for the head, you can preserve as much meat as possible. 

Know you have tips to make you a better squirrel hunter with a bow. Get out there and start knocking them down.

About Author:

Brandon Cox is the founder of StayHunting, who is passionate about all things of hunting and fitness. Through his hunting website, he would like to share tips & tricks, finest tech that will excite all of the intricacies of hunting whether you be an amateur or a professional.

 

 

It’s Fall and that means Pumpkin Spice! Check Out My Ebook On Paleo Pumpkin  Recipes

Subscribe to the show

Want to hear yourself on the podcast? Call in with your questions at (615) 657-9104 and leave us a voice mail. 

Like this post? Consider signing up for my email list here > Subscribe

Think this post was worth 20 cents? Consider joining The Survivalpunk Army and get access to exclusive

 content and discounts!

The post How to Squirrel Hunt with a Bow Tips And Tricks For You appeared first on Survival Punk.

How to Cook a Raccoon

Click here to view the original post.

How to Cook a Raccoon via Preparedness Advice

When was the last time you cooked a raccoon?  For most people that would be never. Yet for many years, raccoons were on the menu for the Native Americans and the pioneers. In parts of the south, raccoon hunting is still popular.

Raccoons have a wide range, living all over North America. They are easy to trap; my neighbor has caught quite a few when trapping to cut down the skunk population. He uses live traps and most of the time just releases the raccoons. These traps are humane and quite inexpensive.

But raccoons are edible, and if cooked right, they’re quite tasty. Most of us aren’t used to eating many wild animals with deer and elk being the major 2 exceptions. This book explains not only how to cook many different types of wild game but how to butcher them as well. It would be a good addition to your collection of survival related books.

When you dress the raccoon, be sure and remove the brown bean shaped glands under each front leg and on both sides of the spine. Then remove as much visible fat as possible. Then go ahead and roast it or make a stew.  Here is a recipe for roast raccoon.

  • 1 raccoon cleaned and cut up
  • ½ cup flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper
  • ¼ cup cooking oil
  • 2 medium onions peeled and sliced
  • 2 bay leaves

Set several boney pieces aside and bread the rest in the flour seasoned with the salt and pepper.  Then brown the pieces in the cooking oil in a good frying pan.  Drain off the excess oil.  Put the meat in a roasting pan; add the onions and bay leaves.  Cover and bake for two hours at 350 f or until tender.

Take the boney pieces that you set aside and cover them with water. Simmer the pieces until the attached meat is tender.  Use this broth to make gravy.

As with any animal, if it looks sick or in poor condition do not eat it or skin it. Raccoons do carry rabies.

Howard

The post How to Cook a Raccoon appeared first on Preparedness Advice.

Bowfishing with a Recurve Bow – The 5 Best Techniques You Need to Know

Click here to view the original post.

Bowfishing with a Recurve Bow The 5 Best Techniques You Need to Know Bowfishing has become a popular off-season sport for hunters and fishermen alike. When fishermen started bagging fish with arrows tied to bows, the most common weapon choice was a compound bow. Mostly because that’s what serious hunters had on hand, and it’s …

Continue reading »

The post Bowfishing with a Recurve Bow – The 5 Best Techniques You Need to Know appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

3 Deadfall Traps That You Should Know How To Make

Click here to view the original post.

3-traps

3 Deadfall Traps That You Should Know How To Make

Trapping is a tradition way to catch game and should be part of your survival strategy. They are all pretty simple to set up but each have their little quirks, advantages, and disadvantages.

You should set up several traps in different locations that you check regularly. Look for locations that show signs of animals, like some tracks that indicate that animals pass by regularly.

You should also try to set the traps away from your camp or shelter so as not to exhaust the game near your camp. The idea is to catch things further out while you can so that if you become weaker you can still obtain food near your camp. (Be flexible and pragmatic about it – don’t hike out 5 miles just to set your traps if it makes you too tired!)

NOTE: Trapping is strictly regulated in most places. So research your local laws and only use these traps in a survival situation or when they are expressly allowed by law.

How to Make a Split Stick Deadfall

The idea is that a stick is cut in two pieces and a bait stick, usually smaller is in between them. The two sides of the stick are balanced vertically.

When the bait stick is moved, the structure falls quickly and the prey is injured or killed.

How to Make a Paiute Deadfall

The Paiute Deadfall trap has a very quick trigger mechanism. It was made famous by the Paiute tribe, out of the Western U.S. It is simple and made with natural materials that will almost always be available.

How to Make a Figure 4 Deadfall Trap

The trap looks like the number “4” and that is where the name comes from. You’ll notice a lot of similarities between this trap and the others.

Conclusion

Practice. Practice. Practice.

None of the traps are particularly difficult but when you’re tired and hungry, you will get frustrated fast. So practice this stuff now when you have the time and resources to learn.

The Lost Ways is a survival book that shows you how to survive a crisis using only methods that were tested and proven by our forefathers for centuries. The best way to survive the next major crisis is to look back at how people did things 150 years ago. This book is a far-reaching book with chapters ranging from simple things like making tasty bark-bread—like people did when there was no food—to building a traditional backyard smokehouse.

 

Source : prepperzine.com

About the author : Billy is a Outdoor and Survival enthusiast. He loves camping and hiking, and he has a garage full of gear to prove it! Billy hasn’t been prepping for very long so he’s far from an expert in the prepping area. You can follow along as he earns his stripes here at PrepperZine. Billy’s Fun Facts: – Lives in the southeast, Georgia to be specific. – Been to 49 of the 50 states. Idaho is the only one left and the target date is June 2015. – Drives a beat up Ford F150 – Enjoys the shooting range way too much Catch up with Billy on the PrepperZine Facebook page.

 

The post 3 Deadfall Traps That You Should Know How To Make appeared first on .

What Survivalists Get Wrong About ‘Living Off The Land’

Click here to view the original post.
What Survivalists Get Wrong About ‘Living Off The Land’

Image source: Flickr

As I’ve talked to various people about their survival plans, the same themes keep cropping up over and over again. That makes sense, as we all need the same things to survive. On the other hand, some of these common themes contains some really bad ideas.

The bad idea I’m referring to here is those who think that they can just go hunting to feed their families. If what they mean as “hunting” is what they do every fall, then their families are going to starve. But the fact is that while you can’t feed your family by hunting, you can augment your food supplies with it.

The biggest problem is that what most people think of as hunting is sport hunting, not survival hunting. While it’s always nice to get some game while sport hunting, it’s not necessary. If you miss your shot, that’s OK, you can always pick up some steaks at the supermarket. But when you’re hunting for survival – or “living off the land” for meat — a missed shot might very well mean that your whole family goes hungry.

Today’s sport hunting really isn’t all that fair, either. When I was growing up, we weren’t allowed to use feed corn as bait. In fact, we weren’t allowed to use anything as bait. But now, most of the people I know use corn all the time. Without it, I doubt they could get anything.

So, what’s so different about survival hunting? What do you have to do that you wouldn’t normally do?

Hunt for Whatever

In sport hunting, the idea is to go hunting for a particular type of game. In deer season, you hunt deer. In duck season, you hunt duck. But when you’re hunting for survival, you hunt for whatever you can find; even if what you can find is not something you’d normally hunt for. You’re after food and if it can be eaten, then it’s fair game. This could include domesticated animals.

Learn The Secrets and Tricks Of The Word’s Top Survivalists!

Actually, this points out a huge moral dilemma that few of us have thought about. There are many things you and I can do to survive which may not be strictly legal. The question is, where do we draw the line? That’s not an easy question to answer, especially when you consider that there will be an “after” to the crisis, in which people will be charged with crimes they committed during the crisis. You sure don’t want to put yourself in the position of having to go to jail for feeding your family.

Size Matters

While you will need to be hunting for whatever you can get, you want to avoid hunting for small game. That doesn’t mean that you want to cross small game off the menu, though. Rather, you want to try and trap small game, so that you don’t have to spend a lot of time on it. You’ve got to get enough for your time to make it worthwhile.

I recently went dove hunting with a couple of buddies. While we did fairly well, I couldn’t help but think that we couldn’t have fed our three families one meal with the meat that we’d harvested on that hunt. Dove aren’t very big and you don’t get much meat off of them — maybe a taco or two worth out of each dove. If we had been hunting for survival, that day would have been a net loss.

Accuracy

What Survivalists Get Wrong About ‘Living Off The Land’ Few hunters actually practice shooting with their guns. Most of them dig their hunting rifle or shotgun out when it’s time to go hunting, and then put it away for next year. How do any of them expect to be able to shoot accurately, without at least some practice?

I’m an avid shooter who goes to the range about once per week. As such, my shooting skills are fairly descent. This showed in that dove hunt I just mentioned, as I got the first three doves before either of my buddies bagged one. It wasn’t that they didn’t see any birds or didn’t take any shots, but it was that I had been practicing.

Every bullet has to count in a survival situation. Back in the pioneering days, the standard was one shot, one kill. It didn’t matter if dad was out hunting or one of the kids were. Each bullet needed to bag something for the pot. Bullets were too precious to waste.

Knowing the Game and Their Habits

In survival hunting, you can forget about baiting the game with feed corn; you won’t have any. Nor will you be able to spend days on end hunting for one deer. Hunting will mean going out in the morning or evening and returning with game after a couple of hours. Anything else would be an inefficient use of your time.

Survival is too demanding to spend the entire day on one task. Many different things need to be done each and every day. Finding food is one of those things. But it can’t take over the day. So, you’ll need to learn how to hunt efficiently, bagging what you’re after in just a little time.

That means knowing the animals and their habits. Where do they sleep? Where do they eat? What watering holes do they use? When can you expect to find them at those watering holes? Those are important things to know so that you’ll know where to find the game that you so desperately need. The easiest of those to know is when they water. Most animals will water near daybreak and dusk, so those are the best times of day to hunt.

Fortunately for us, most animals are creatures of habit. They will often have a daily circuit where they water and feed in certain areas at certain times. So once you know their habits, you’ll know where to find them.

Don’t Waste a Thing

The Native Americans were great hunters. They were great at making use of what they had hunted, as well. There was no waste, as everything was used in one way or another. The meat they didn’t eat was dried, the skin tanned and even some of the internal organs that weren’t eaten were put to use.

You and I are going to have to learn that, as well. More than anything, we’ll need to be ready to preserve any meat that we bring home if it isn’t eaten immediately. That generally means smoking or drying it, although it is possible to can meat. We’ll also need to know how to tan the hide, as we’ll need that leather for shoes and clothing.

A Final Thought

Mankind domesticated animals because it was more efficient than hunting. And that was back when there was much more game available. In today’s world, finding game is nowhere near as easy. That’s going to be especially true in a time when everyone is out there hunting, because the grocery store shelves are empty.

If you expect to live off of hunting alone, you might have a very unpleasant surprise waiting for you. Unless you live in a very remote area, where there aren’t many others hunting the game, you might very well have trouble finding enough meat for the pot.

What advice would you add about survival hunting? Share it in the section below:  

Learn How To ‘Live Off The Land’ With Just Your Gun. Read More Here.

Wilderness Survival: How To Catch Edible Frogs

Click here to view the original post.

How To Catch Edible Frogd

Frogs are considered a delicacy or as a routine food in many parts of the world. Remember that fact when forced to survive in the wilderness and the idea of hunting frogs for eating gives you chills.

Even though many frogs are on the verge of extinction, there are others with so many members that they can serve as a food source in time of need. Read the following article to learn which frogs are safe for eating, and how to catch and turn them into a tasty meal.

Frogs to Avoid

As a rule, most of the frogs in the United States are safe to eat. That being said, as global weather patterns shift, it is entirely possible that poisonous frogs will move into areas where they don’t normally live.

Poison Frog

Here are some frog characteristics that may indicate they have poisonous skin or other body parts that make them unsuitable for eating:

  • Blue, red, yellow, orange, or other brightly colored frogs. As with many other animals in nature, one that is brightly colored tends to signal danger. They are not trying to hide or camouflage themselves because anything that may try to eat them will see the colors and leave them alone.
  • They tend to be active during day hours. Most frogs that are safe to eat will be out during dark hours when their predators are more likely to be asleep or would have a harder time seeing them.
  • They are observed eating prey that consume plants with high alkaline content.  For example, if there are poison ants in the area, and you see frogs consuming them, these particular frogs may be able to take the poison and store it in their skin. With the exception of one species of frog in South America, known poisonous frogs do not make their own poison. Instead, they consume plants with high alkaline content and then store the poison in their skin. It should be noted that the muscle meat from these frogs may still be safe to eat as long as you know how to get the skin and poison sacs off without contaminating the meat.
  • You should also be aware of the differences between frogs and toads, since toads can be poisonous without showing indicators that you would see in frogs. In order to tell the difference between frogs and toads, remember that frogs have smooth skin, while toads will have bumps on them. Frogs also have longer, narrower faces while toads have shorter, wider ones. If you watch a frog capturing its prey, you will notice that it has a sticky tongue that extends easily. By contrast, a toad will actually have to capture its prey in its mouth. Finally, if you watch their motions, frogs will only hop (they also have longer legs than toads) while toads can run and jump as well as hop.

Parts You Can Eat and Parts to Avoid

Typically, most people only eat the back legs of the frog because that is where you will find the most meat. If the frog is especially large, you might also try for the front legs. Even though frogs have a good bit of skin, it is best not to eat it for the following reasons:

  • If the frog is poisonous or going to cause you to get sick, the greatest concentration of poison will be in the skin.
  • Since frog skin is always moist, it is also a prime breeding ground for bacteria. You can easily come into contact with salmonella and several other diseases.  If you must eat frog skins and know that the species is safe, be sure to cook the skins at a high enough temperature.
  • Many people feel that frog skin is a bit strong tasting and a bit hard to swallow. Needless to say, if you are very hungry and very little food is available, you can find ways around these issues.

Insofar as the frog’s internal organs, remember that they consume all kinds of insects. You can be exposed to all kinds of poisons and diseases if you ingest the digestive and related organs. In addition, you will also find that frog organs aren’t very large. You are likely to be wasting more time and effort trying to consume the organs than it’s worth.

Testing to See if the Frog is Edible

Consider a situation where you are an experienced camper, have seen the world, and feel that you know just about all there is to know about living off the land. Perhaps you have eaten frog meat as a delicacy, and have even captured and eaten them on your outdoor adventures. To you, it may make perfect sense to consume frogs in the post crisis world, and it is likely that you will look to them as a valuable source  of nutrition. Now, let’s add one more point in your favor and even say that you know the local species of frogs quite well in many areas of the United States and feel confident that you know which ones are safe to eat and which ones aren’t.

Under these circumstances, you may feel that you don’t need to perform a modified Universal Edibility Test in order to determine if the meat is safe. You, and anyone that you are traveling with that trusts your judgment on these matters can become very sick or even wind up dead for the following reasons:

  • As with any other species on this Earth, offspring can be produced between species that may or may not produce offspring. In this case, as poisonous frogs move from one region to another, they may just produce poisonous offspring that aren’t as colorful or have traits that cause you to mistake them for safe frogs. If you do not run some kind of Universal Edibility Test, you will have no chance to find out the truth before consuming too much of the meat.
  • Nuclear attacks aside, there are many other sources of man made nuclear contamination in the environment. Aside from causing all kinds of mutations, the nuclear material may also have a large impact on insects and other food sources for the frogs you are planning to eat. Even if the frog is from a non-poisonous species, that does not mean it isn’t harboring increased levels of radiation that will pose a risk to your health.
  • Heavy metals, pesticide runoff, fertilizer runoff, and many other industrial poisons find their way into the water where frogs spend most of their lives. As a result, if you don’t pay careful attention to the area where the frogs are living, and the quality of the water, you may wind up consuming all kinds of hazardous materials that have nothing to do with the species of frog you are trying to consume.

When evaluating the safety of frogs (and many other kinds of game) it is best to do a modified form of the Universal Edibility Test that accounts for modern hazards. Bear in mind that there may still be other factors that you will need to consider and account for in adaptions to this basic method:

  • Start off by making sure that you know what region  you are in. Find out if there are nuclear facilities, industrial dumping grounds, old factories, or factory farms within 100 miles of the area where you plan to catch frogs. If any of these factors apply, then be extra careful when evaluating each animal that you are planning to consume.
  • Next, study look at the soil, water, grass, trees, insects, and animals in the area where the frogs are living. Does the water or soil have an unusual odor to it? Dig into the soil and see if there is an unnatural or chemical smell to it. Is the vegetation healthy, or does it show signs of plant tumors, unusual growth patterns, or sickly development? Are there a lot of dead birds, animals, or other insects around? Do you see signs of unusual growth, deformed limbs, erratic behavior, or anything else that might indicate chemical or nuclear poisoning?  If you see sick animals, insects, or plants in the area, you can rest assured the frogs are also contaminated.
  • Now study the frogs. Are they healthy and active during their normal hours of being awake? If so, then you may have a safe, viable source of frogs to hunt.
  • After capturing one frog that you believe safe to eat, study the bones, skin, flesh, and organs for signs of abnormal growth or poisoning. Make sure that you know enough about frog anatomy and diseases so that you can spot the kinds of illness that might indicate the animal and those in the surrounding area may have been exposed to heavy metals or other toxins that might be harmful to you and other survivors. If you see signs of these illnesses, do not capture any more frogs unless you intend to use them as bait.
  • Once you have determined the frog is safe from an environmental perspective, it does not hurt  to make sure you haven’t captured a frog that is a poisonous hybrid. For this, you can follow the more conventional points of the Universal Edibility Test. Carefully skin the frog and separate it into hind legs, front legs, organs, and skin.

If you only intend to eat the hind legs, then just use them fully cooked for the test. Just remember if you decide to try and eat frog organs or skins later on, you will need to the Universal Edibility Test all over again.

Where to Find Frogs

Almost all edible frogs will be found in or near a pond or other shallow bodies of fresh water.  If the body of water has a muddy bank, reeds, or logs dipping into the water, look in these spots first for frog hiding places.

If you are scouting an area at night, listen for the sound of something jumping into the water, as this is likely to be frogs. To draw frogs to your area, you can try making waves in the water to mimic insects or other prey that would be of interest to frogs.

3 Ways to Catch Frogs

With the exception of making a trap for frogs, the other two methods for capturing them usually have to be done at night when the animals are out and searching for prey of their own.

Method 1:  Catch Frogs By Hand

As surprising as it may sound, catching frogs by hand is actually the easiest of the three methods. Once you have spotted a frog, start moving towards it. As you approach the frog, move one hand in circles.

Keep moving your hand with a circular motion, and then simply grab the frog with the other hand when you are close enough. It is best for your catching hand to come from behind the frog since it won’t be able to see your hand that way. You can also aim a flashlight at the frog to stun it temporarily.

Just make sure that you act quickly to grab the frog or it will get away on you.  Once you have hold of the frog, be sure to hold it by the hips and let the rest of your hand support under its armpits. The frog will be unable to get out of your hands.

Method 2: Catch Frogs in a Net

After locating a frog of interest, you can use a flashlight or the circular hand motion to slow down the frog’s attempt to escape. Instead of putting your hands around the frog’s body, use the net to capture it instead.

As with catching frogs by hand, the net should come from behind the frog and swish under it. If the frog is on land, the hoop of the net should fully surround the frog. Try to get your hands onto the frog’s body as quickly as possible.

Do not forget that frogs are strong jumpers. If you have one captured in a net, it can jump around quite a bit and make its escape before you know what is happening.

When choosing a net for catching frogs, make sure that the holes in the net are small enough to prevent the frog from through it. It is also better to choose a net with a shorter handle because you will be less tempted to rely on the mesh of the net to hold the frog until you can a better hold of it.

Method 3: Make a Frog Trap  

Since you may need several frogs to make a good meal,  it is likely that you will want to use traps as well as hunt for them. There are many different ways to make frog traps.

One of the most common ways is to simply get them to fall into a pit or waiting tin that they cannot jump out of easily. In this case, you may set a bucket or something else into the mud bank of a pond, and then cover it over with twigs and leaves. When the frogs land on the twigs, they will fall through and be unable to get out of the pail.

You can also try making a frog trap similar to the way you would make a mosquito catcher. Simply take a plastic bottle, cut the top off, and then invert it into the bottle.  Set a cricket or some other suitable bait inside the bottle. Even though the frog will be able to squeeze into the bottle opening, it will not be able to get back out.

Video first seen on Amber Haines.

How to Prepare Frogs for Cooking

Unlike a fish out of water, a frog won’t simply suffocate and die in a matter of minutes. No matter whether you capture a frog by hand, in a net, or in a trap, you will have to kill the frog and then do a bit of work to make what little meat there is ready for eating.

Dispatching the Frog

As fragile as frogs may seem, they can actually be difficult to kill. The fastest and most humane method is to behead the frog. Some people prefer to pith the frog (basically stick something sharp through the brain case so that the brain is destroyed). Other people crush the frog’s skull by bashing it into something hard or using a hammer.

Skinning the Frog

Skinning a frog is actually much easier than it looks. Follow these steps:

  • Start off by taking a sharp pair of scissors and cut off the feet at the ankles.
  • Next, cut across the lower part of the frog’s belly. Continue cutting until you have made a line all the way around the frog. If you want, at this stage, you can also sever the spine and remove the legs. It is easiest to take them off in pairs so that you do not lose any of the valuable muscle meat. Set the legs aside so that you can check the internal organs for signs of disease.
  • Cut from the bottom of the abdomen up to the throat, and then across the shoulders. Open the flaps and observe the organs.  Do you see signs of tumors, abnormal swelling, or anything else that might indicate the frog had some kind of disease or exposure to hazardous chemicals?
  • If it seems that the frog was healthy, go back and look at the skin from the belly area on the part that is still attached to the legs. You should be able to see a clear color difference between the skin and the flesh beneath it. Take the sharp point of a knife, or even a scissor and gently pry between the flesh and the skin. It will loosen fairly easily. Keep prying until you find something like threads that hold the flesh and the skin together. They will pull apart easily, or snip them with the scissors.
  •  Once you have enough of the skin pulled away from the flesh, just go ahead and pull the skin straight down over the frog’s legs.  Even though frogs skin can be slimy and moist, you should be able to pull the skin with your bare hands. If you are having problems, go ahead and use a pair of pliers.
  • Before cooking the legs, you can cut between them. If there are any organs or other material besides bone and muscle, remove it before cooking.
  • Do not forget to wash the frog legs in clean water to remove bits of the organs or other unwanted residue that may have come from the skin or other parts of the frog.

Video first seen on Crawdaddy Kings

Basic Ways to Cook Frogs

You can cook frogs just as you would any other kind of meat. They can be fried in oil, boiled as for soup and stew, roasted, or baked. Do not forget that frogs also carry bacteria just like any other animal. Make sure that the flesh cooks thoroughly, especially in areas near the bone.

Does it Pay to Grow Edible Frogs?

If you have a homestead or are planning to raise smaller animals for meat, you may be very tempted to try raising frogs instead of fish. Here are some advantages and disadvantages to consider:

  • Even though frogs are fairly easy to care for, it can take several years for them to grow large enough to eat.
  • Since frogs are considered a delicacy in many parts of the world, you can purchase frogs that are specifically bred for human consumption. Depending on your needs, you may want to start off with about 6 or 7 pairs of frogs and then calculate how many you will need for routine nutritional needs.
  • If you have a homestead and outdoor ponds, you can keep edible frogs around to control the insect population. In fact, if you also have larger animals that tend to draw flies and other insects, a few frogs may be quite useful.
  • There are few, if any municipal codes that would prevent you from keeping frogs as pets. As such, you can more than likely keep several dozen of them indoors without may problems. Just remember that you will have to keep a fairly large number of if you expect to have a steady diet of frog legs.
  • When it comes to alternative meats, frogs taste like chicken.  Once they are skinned and cooked, they also don’t look all that different from conventional meat. As a result, adapting to frog meat may be easier and more palatable than trying to adjust to insects. You use them as a “gateway” alternative food if you already know that you will need to make the jump to indoor insect farming.

Right now, there are many species of frog that are plentiful to the point of being a nuisance in some areas. This, in turn, leads more than a few people to believe they will make a viable source of food in a crisis situation.

Even if you are an experienced hunter or camper, and have consumed frogs before, it is important to exercise caution. In these times, our society is not the only thing that is changing. There are subtle, and not so subtle changes happening to the climate and temperatures on this planet. Animals, including frogs, will adapt as quickly as they can. These adaptions may include mating with neighboring poisonous species that will make it harder to determine which frogs are safe to eat.

When consumed with care and awareness, frogs can make a valuable and nutritious meal that should not be overlooked. You may also want to consider the advantages and disadvantages of raising frogs so that you do not have to hunt them or be as concerned about consuming poisonous or diseased specimens by accident.

If I missed something in this post or you’ve tried this wild delicacy, leave a comment in the section bellow and share your experiences and tips with all the readers.

Our ancestors’ experiences serve as a great lesson for those planning to survive any hard times to come. Click on the banner bellow to discover more lost pioneer survival skills!

TLW_banner1

This article has been written by Carmela Tyrell for Survivopedia.

References:

https://www.reference.com/home-garden/build-frog-trap-6735e7119bb5979b

2 total views, 2 views today

Rate this article!


[Total: 0    Average: 0/5]

Skills Needed in a Survival Group

Click here to view the original post.

Do you know what skill sets you have accumulated within your survival family? Think about it for a minute. What does each person bring to the survival group that is beneficial and needed in some way or another?

These are thoughts that have been in my mind for a few weeks now. So I sat down and did some research and put together a list of skill sets that are almost a must have for any group. One of the great things about this list is you can mark off what you have mastered and pick something else to work on. In doing this you become multi-beneficial to the group which is fantastic. Not only would you have the skill sets but you can teach the children.

Below are a few things to consider adding to your group or personal skills:

  1. Perimeter Security
  2. Plant Identification
  3. Gardening Skills (includes winter gardening, herbs)
  4. Butchering Skills (includes salting, smoking and curing meat)
  5. Food Preservation (canning, drying, dehydrating, smoking, grains)
  6. Raising Livestock (Chickens, ducks, rabbits, goats, pigs)
  7. Hunting/Fishing
  8. Medical Skills/Dental Skills
  9. Electrical Knowledge
  10. Carpentry
  11. Plumbing
  12. Welding
  13. Sign Language
  14. Mechanical Skills (cars, appliances, lawn equipment etc.)
  15. HAM Radio Skills
  16. Bee Keeping
  17. Candle Making
  18. Sewing Skills (Clothes & Blankets)
  19. Soap Making
  20. Shoe Making
  21. Baking Bread
  22. Churning Butter
  23. Charcoal Making
  24. Martial Arts
  25. Marksmanship/Weapons
  26. Brick Making
  27. Tool Making

These are the things I can think of and some I found doing research. I hope this helps you out and please feel free to comment on what you would add.

 

The post Skills Needed in a Survival Group appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Would ALL Wildlife Be Wiped Out If Society Collapses? The Answer May Surprise You

Click here to view the original post.

hunter-2-publicdomainpicturesdotnet

All hunters complain, at least one, about having to buy a hunting license. For that matter, they’ve probably complained that they were limited to hunting only during a few short weeks a year. But in fact, there is a very good reason why we need hunting licenses and we need a hunting season. That is, that without the restrictions that hunting season and hunting laws place on “We the People,” there wouldn’t be any game.

The History

When this country was first settled, it teemed with game. Early explorers were unanimous in their praises for both the quantity and the quality of wild game, ready for harvest by European long guns. Who hasn’t heard the reports of buffalo covering the Great Plains? The herds were so vast that they went on for miles.

Yet where are those vast herds of buffalo today? What has happened to the deer? The truth is that there have been times in our nation’s history where the game were all but extinct due to overhunting. Without proper controls, it could easily happen again.

In the early days of our country, wildlife flourished, especially deer. Reports dating from the early 1800s indicate that there were more deer in Illinois than there were when the nation was founded. Wolves and other predators had been hunted ruthlessly by farmers in order to protect their livestock. This allowed deer populations to grow, as the predators which killed them were nearly hunted to extinction.

Learn The Secrets Of A Veteran Hunter As He Demonstrates How To Quickly Field-Dress Game

But by the late 1800s, the deer population in Illinois had dropped to the point where they were virtually eliminated. Hunters, who were allowed to hunt year-round, without a bag limit, had killed off the deer. [1]

It took a major conservation effort on the part of the state of Illinois to repopulate the deer in their state, including importing white tail deer from other parts of the country. Now, deer are plentiful once again and hunters are once again harvesting deer in the fall. But restrictions are in place to ensure that overhunting doesn’t happen again.

Illinois isn’t the only state where this happened. As settlers moved westwards, they cleared out much of the wild game population in state after state. This was the result of not only hunters harvesting the game, but also of farmers taking much of the game’s natural habitat. Time and time again, animals were killed nearly to extinction, before conservation efforts were put in place.

The Problem Today

Would Wildlife Be Wiped Out If Society Collapses? The Answer May Surprise You

Image source: Wikipedia

Many survivalists and preppers talk about living off the land, following a societal collapse. But the population of the United States is much higher than it was in the 1800s. In 1800, the entire U.S. population was only 5.3 million people. A century later, it had grown to 76.2 million people. But today, we have about 319 million people.

Less than two percent of our population has a stockpile of food in their home. So, it’s reasonable to assume that most people will be looking for whatever food they can find. Without their normal food sources to depend on, people will be looking for everything from stray cats to edible house plants. Many, having heard of our ancestors hunting for food, will naturally assume that they can, too.

Just 30 Grams Of This Survival Superfood Provides More Nutrition Than An Entire Meal!

To even think that the current game population could support the current population of people is somewhere on the far side of foolish. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service, we have more than 13.7 million hunters in the United States (as of the 2013 hunting season). With that number of hunters, it wouldn’t take long at all to lower game levels to a near-extinction point once again; and that’s without everyone else out there trying to hunt for food as well. (This is why it is so important to grow and raise your own food.)

But we have to remember: Not all gun owners are hunters. With somewhere over 300 million privately owned guns in the United States, there are many more people who will be out there trying to hunt, than the “real” hunters in our society. Even if those people are ineffective hunters, their mere presence will make the game go deeper into the woods.

Let me throw one more monkey wrench in the works here. The vast majority of our population is concentrated on the East and West Coasts, especially the Northeast and Southern California. Yet those aren’t the areas of highest game density. In fact, the areas of highest game density are where the population is lowest. So, the people with the greatest need will find that they will have the least possibility of hunting for their food.

This means that if anyone in the country would have a chance of living off the land, it’s the people who live in the lowest density areas of the country, especially Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and the Dakotas. Perhaps those people can depend on game to help them survive, but the rest of us are going to need other sources for our food.

What is your reaction? Do you think there is enough wild game to support America, post-collapse? Share your thoughts in the section below:

[1] http://web.extension.illinois.edu/deer/historyofmanagment.cfm

Learn How To ‘Live Off The Land’ With Just Your Gun. Read More Here.

Firearms Safety for Newbies

Click here to view the original post.

Firearms Safety for Newbies I put up an article a few days ago about 9 Dangerous Mistakes That New Gun Owners Make, basically what NOT to do when it comes to guns. Now it’s time to learn about gun safety, for those of you who are new to the subject. It seems guns are always in the …

Continue reading »

The post Firearms Safety for Newbies appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

How To Disappear In The Wilderness: A Natural Camouflage Tutorial

Click here to view the original post.

How To Disappear In The Wilderness: A Natural Camouflage Tutorial Knowing how to disappear in the woods is a vital bit of survival knowledge we all think we can do until it’s time to actually do it. When I was in the army many years ago, they issue you camouflage paint to cover your face, …

Continue reading »

The post How To Disappear In The Wilderness: A Natural Camouflage Tutorial appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

How To Make A Powerful Slingshot Crossbow

Click here to view the original post.

How To Make A Powerful Slingshot Crossbow I want to share this amazing tutorial with you today because I just love this slingshot crossbow. It is very powerful and can even crush bone. This would be a very handy tool to have for a back up protection weapon or for silent (or as close as …

Continue reading »

The post How To Make A Powerful Slingshot Crossbow appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

All You Ever Need To Know About Eating Roadkill

Click here to view the original post.

All You Ever Need To Know About Eating Roadkill This is a touchy subject for some people but for preppers, survivalists and homesteaders this is a great source of meat for their diets. Roadkill has been here ever since the horse and cart and probably been around longer than that, I wonder if the Romans …

Continue reading »

The post All You Ever Need To Know About Eating Roadkill appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Best Bow Sights for Compound & Recurve Bow Hunting in 2016: Optics Reviews

Click here to view the original post.

Your success when hunting game depends largely on your ability to use your bow.  Unlike hunting with a crossbow, every aspect – aiming, drawing and firing – requires a complete commitment from both your body and mind. Whether you are hunting deer with a recurve bow or a compound bow, you need a sight you can rely on.

Which sight is the best? That depends on how and where you like to bow hunt. We will jump into some of the aspects you should consider before purchasing, as well as Five of our favorites in more detail below.

Selecting a Bow Sight – The Basics:

First, let’s cover some of the basics. You’ll likely be using either a recurve or compound bow.

A recurve bow is a “traditional” bow. While the materials may have changed a bit over the years, these are the same types of bows you’d find centuries ago.

A compound bow is a modern bow. This type uses levers and pulleys to bend the limbs. This is an energy efficient method which allows the archer to deliver a lot of force.

Both types of bows require skill to use and require that you select the appropriate draw weight for your strength level and type of prey.  You can see compound bow draw weights here, and recurve bow draw weights here.  Tuning your bow regularly is also something else to consider as different types of bows have different tuning requirements.

While not every sight fits onto every type of bow, there are some characteristics which apply to every type of sight. Here are some things to look for:

Bow Sight Ease of Use:

Hunting with a Bow SightSights are going to need adjustments in the field. You’ll adjust both vertical and horizontal settings. This includes individual pins which will need to be adjusted. If the pins aren’t easy to re-tighten after adjustment, your string won’t stay taunt and your aim can be off.

Lock settings need to have two characteristics. They need to be easy to access, even outdoors under wet and dark conditions. They also need to be large enough to withstand repeated vibrations. Taking a set of wrenches along with you is usually a good idea so you can tighten bolts and screws as necessary.

Many hunters like a level. This helps steady your bow vertically. While looking at a level might not be very practical when out in the woods, it’s great to have when practicing. You can get a feel for how a level bow feels which, in turn, can help develop good habits you’ll then take with you into the outdoors.

You’ll also need to consider the number of pins. Pins are small metal pieces which hold fiber optics within the sight aperture. This is how you line up the target. Pins can be either vertical or horizontal. Sizes vary but can be changed in single models. Thick pins usually have a tendency to obscure small targets, so most archers and hunters prefer thinner pins.

Some sights have also have a Glo-ring around the pin housing perimeter. This illumination increases clarity and helps define the field of vision. Many sights also include an optional light which can also be installed in order to use the sight in darkness.

Archer Optics Light Enhancement:

Whether you’re in the deep woods on a sunny day, hunting deer in poor weather or hunting coyotes at night, light levels are bound to change. There are a few ways you use add illumination to your sight.

The earliest, simplest innovation is basically a miniature flashlight. This illuminates the pins. This is a relatively low-tech, inexpensive method but there are some downsides. First, it requires battery power, which isn’t very dependable. Also, the light is very visible which could make camouflage difficult.

Fiber optics are another option, and many prefer this more high-tech method as they are incorporated in more modern optics like rangefinders and compact hunting binoculars. Fiber optics create light without batteries. They work in both dark and daylight conditions.

Finally, the third popular lighting option is Tritium. This is a radioactive element added to the paint. It gathers light similar to the luminous dial you’d find on a glow-in-the-dark watch. Some sights use a combination of Tritium and fiber optics. (And don’t worry, even though the phrase “radioactive element” doesn’t sound great, Tritium in a bow sight is perfectly safe.)

The Optic Peep:

A peep sight is a small aperture which sits on your bowstring. You align your signs pins to determine the correct distance (elevation can impact your aim as well, so make sure you use an altimeter watch to measure how thin the air is where you are). This is your anchor point.

Peeps come in various sizes. Smaller peeps are hard to use in low light. However, large peeps increase the margin of error. No peep is also an option. This is especially useful if you wear glasses. There’s no 100% correct answer when it comes to peeps. You simply have to go with what works best for your needs.

Cost and Budgetary Constraints:

There’s usually no need to buy the most expensive, deluxe sight available. At the same time, the low-end product lines on the market tend to be too flimsy for heavy use in the woods. Most mid-range bows are going to be suitable for hunting and recreational archery.

If you’re a competitive archer, you’ll likely want a top-of-the-line model.

If you are a deer hunter setting up at your base camp nearby where you’ve got your game cameras stashed out, you’ll probably be safe with something in the mid-range, price-wise. Just make sure the sight is strong enough for your needs. You’ll want a sight made from solid, machine-manufactured aluminum or aluminum composite. This type of material will be lightweight, durable and resistant to long-term exposure to harsh weather.

The Five Best Bow Sites for Recurve and Compound Bows For The Money:


Trophy Ridge React 5 Pin Bow Sight:

Trophy Ridge 5 Pin Archery SightZero in on game with the Trophy Ridge React 5 pin bow sight. This sight includes a built in sight level with .019 Fiber Optic Pins.

Trophy Ridge is one of the top bow hunting scope manufacturers on the market and the Ridge React 5 is no different.  It has a reversible site mount and a Rheostat light, making it a great choice for any hunter.

While having an illuminated spirit level can be something that some hunters may want, the most important thing to remember is that you need to have a level shot before you have anything else and the included sight leveler helps make that happen.

Note that bow sights for bows aren’t legal in every state or county. Be sure and check your local laws.


TruGlo Carbon XS 4 Pin .019 Bow Sight with Light:

TruGlo Carbon XSLooking for a great value? You should consider this sight. This ultra lightweight carbon sight is durable without being cumbersome. The Tru Touch technical coating provides a soft feel.

You’ll be able to sight with accuracy from long distances with 1.8 inch inner diameter aperture. The sight is also adjustable for both left and right handed shooters.

Vertical adjustability is enhanced by a reversible bracket. A glow-in-the-dark ring helps align the peep sight in all conditions, even darkness.

This sight doesn’t have a ton of bells and whistles but it’s easy to set-up and adjust. The light works well, too. And all at a price which won’t break the bank.


Field Logic IQ 5 Pin Sight:

Field Logic IQ 5 Pin SightThis sight makes some bold claims: You’ll shoot longer distances and tighter groups or they’ll refund your money. While we’re not sure about their marketing style, the sight itself is pretty interesting. Simply put, this sight is a little different.

The main feature here is the Retina Lock instant feedback technology. This helps control muscle memory, form and consistency. You don’t stare directly at the Retina Lock.

Rather, the placement and brightness mean you see the Retina Lock peripherally. This basically forces you to use the proper grip.

Retina Lock sounds like a gimmick but it’s actually a useful, quality addition. If you’re struggling with proper form, the Field Logic IQ sight is worth consideration.


TruGlo Archers Chocie Range Rover Pro:

TruGlo Archers ChoiceReliable and accurate, the Range Rover Pro is a great choice for any budget.  Suitable for both recurve and compound bows, this sight has a tracking design not found on other sights.

You’ll have hunting-level accuracy with the constant vertical movement.

The slider has an adjustable yardage stop and an elevation adjustment.  The scope housing has an illuminated green dot to make acquiring your prey easier. Don’t let the low price fool you – this is a well-made sight with unique aiming capabilities.

It’s also adjustable for both left and right handed shooters.


Great Deals LLC 3 Pin Bow Sight – Fiber, Brass Pin, Aluminum Machined:

3 Pin Bow Sight Great Deals LLCStrong, steady and easy to adjust, there’s a lot to like about this sight from Great Deals. Made from 6061-T6 machined CNC aluminum, this sight can handle rain, mud and snow.

It’s still lightweight enough to carry with you all day. A bubble level with two vertical bars helps keep your aim true.

The sight has clear markings for elevation and windages. The fiber optic diameter is .029. The sight is also adjustable for both left and right-handed shooters.

The pins are a bit on a thick side. Also, this sight isn’t the best in low-light condition. Still, this is a reliable, accurate bow with a reasonable price.


Final Thoughts:

Bowhunting takes patience, tact and practicality.  It’s just as important to know your own limitations versus the limitations of your prey.

Setting yourself up for success means giving yourself an edge.  Starting off with the right bow sight can be a welcome addition to any bow hunter’s arsenal.

After you’ve carefully considered your budget, use and brand – you should be well on your way to filling up your tag limit on your next outdoor expedition.

The post Best Bow Sights for Compound & Recurve Bow Hunting in 2016: Optics Reviews appeared first on Wilderness Today.

How to Make a Fishing Spear The Primitive Way

Click here to view the original post.

How to Make a Fishing Spear The Primitive Way This fishing spear is not only a proven way to spear fish, it could help you out as a pretty mean weapon in a pinch! This primitive spear is fantastic to use when catching fish. The 4 spears in one help secure the fish and aids …

Continue reading »

The post How to Make a Fishing Spear The Primitive Way appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Under Armour Turns on Hunters: Ends Contract with Hunters over Legal Bear Hunt

Click here to view the original post.

It looks like Under Armour has turned on the people who have spent millions of dollars on their products and sided with anti-hunters and the demented PETA idiots.. […]

The post Under Armour Turns on Hunters: Ends Contract with Hunters over Legal Bear Hunt appeared first on Monster Fish and Game: Fishing and Hunting tips, tricks and techniques.

Hunting, Fishing, Trapping kits on 7P’s of Survival

Click here to view the original post.

Hunting, Fishing, Trapping kits Josh “The 7P’s of Survival” This week we will discuss my favorite budget friendly items to build your own outdoor sportsmen’s kit. This kit is similar to my long-term self-reliance kit. I spoke about it a few months ago but it’s much more budget friendly, adaptable, basic and generally a good … Continue reading Hunting, Fishing, Trapping kits on 7P’s of Survival

The post Hunting, Fishing, Trapping kits on 7P’s of Survival appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

The Incredible History Of The Ever-So-Versatile .30-06

Click here to view the original post.
The Dependable, Ever-Ready, Versatile .30-06

Image source: AllOutdoor.com

An old saying goes, “There is not very much that a man can’t fix, with 500 bucks and a .30-06!”

For more than a century, the caliber .30, year of 1906, has been America’s cartridge. From the trenches of World War I, to the battlefields of World War II, to the Korean War, the deer stand, and the rifle competitions at Camp Perry — the ’06 has been there.

The story of the versatile .30-06 actually goes back to the 1890s, a decade before its introduction. The US military was desperate to get away from black powder and the trap door, single shot Springfields that fired the massive .45-70 cartridge. At the time, nations all over the world were adopting smokeless powder and bolt-action rifles for their respective militaries, and there was no reason for the US to be left behind.

After a few years of trials and much political haggling, the US Army adopted the .30-40 chambered Krag-Jorgensen rifle, a Norwegian design. The rifle was obsolete from the get-go. It had to be loaded one round at a time, and it had a magazine cut-off. These two features encouraged the rifle to be employed as a single shot, with the magazine held in reserve if needed. This was utterly foolish, and proved just as stupid as it sounded on the battlefield during the Spanish-American War.

Another weakness was the ammunition. It was a short-ranged round and did not have the power equal to the ammunition used by the Spanish and their fine Mauser rifles. The US suffered enormous casualties at the Battle of San Juan due to the superior Spanish rifles and ammo.

Be Prepared. Learn The Best Ways To Hide Your Guns.

After the war, the US copied the Mauser, in the form of the M1903 Springfield. It was a beautiful rifle and was originally chambered with a .30-03 cartridge. This was updated in 1906, much to the credit of then President Theodore Roosevelt. The new cartridge was based on the 8mm Mauser round used by the German army and was just as powerful. Thus, the .30-06.

The cartridge saw its first action in the Philippines, Mexico and France during WWI. After the war, soldiers brought back their Springfield and US Enfield rifles (also chambered in .30-06). Many were sporterized by hunters and taken afield, where the .30-06 proved a very capable hunting cartridge. The ’06 could handle any game animal in the US, and most other game around the world.

Another World War came, and afterward millions of rifles and billions of rounds of surplus ammunition flooded the civilian markets. By now, civilian hunting rifles chambered in .30-06 became more and more common. Deer, elk and moose hunters especially carted .30-06-chambered firearms into the woods to bash their hoofed quarry into submission and fill the freezers back at home. In fact, the .30-06 was the most popular sporting cartridge after the venerable .30-03 in the post-war years in America.

The .30-06 also has served as the parent cartridge for many equally successful loads, especially the .270. In fact, between the .270 and .30-06, more elk have fallen to these two cartridges in the past 70 years than any other chamberings, other than perhaps the .30-30.

In the 1960s, Remington introduced the model 700 hunting rifle, millions of which are chambered in the ’06. The age of mass-produced, relatively cheap hunting rifles had arrived and has not stopped. Today, the .30-06 maintains its place as the king of American hunting cartridges, long after its military service has ended.

The .30-06 can be found in many different bullet weights and powder loads. There are loads tailor-built for whitetail or mule deer hunting. There are loads for elk and larger game. There are even loads for sportsmen to take to Alaska and Africa to take dangerous game such as the coastal brown bear. Just about every gun shop or sporting goods center carries .30-06 cartridges. While more expensive than it has been in years past, it is still affordable. Cheap import ammunition still is available and makes the price much more affordable for the budget-minded shooter.

More than 100 years after its introduction, it’s clear why the .30-06 remains one of America’s favorite calibers.

What advice would you add about the .30-06? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Tired Of Losing Freedoms — And Looking For Another Country? Read More Here.

Do Deer Move In The Rain and Wind? Whitetail & Red Deer Bad Weather Hunting Tips

Click here to view the original post.

Regardless of whether or not we like to admit it, we humans are creatures of comfort. After all, we build nice, cozy, houses to keep us warm in the winter, cool in the summer, and dry when it rains.  We like to sleep on nice, comfortable mattresses or sleeping bags. Also, we have pantries, refrigerators, ranges, and microwaves in our kitchens so that our favorite foods are readily available any time we want them.  We bring sleeping bags, camping stoves and large family tents on our hunting or outdoor trips in order to keep ourselves in the highest levels of comfort.

Whitetail deer have no such luxuries. Instead, they live outdoors where it’s hot in the summer, cold in the winter, and wet when it rains. Also, unlike we humans, deer have neither pantries nor refrigerators, so they have to eat what is available in their area at any given time of year. Deer are quite accustomed to a level of hardship that most humans avoid like a stranger that wants to borrow money!

All of this translates to the fact that deer hunting is not only viable in bad weather conditions, but sometimes even preferable depending on the area.

Whitetail deer are also far better adapted to a life outdoors than humans are. They not only have metabolisms that enable them to withstand cold temperatures that would freeze most humans to death, they also have their own fur coats whereas, we humans have to appropriate ours from other animals or make them from synthetic fibers.

Because we humans tend to studiously avoid hunting in bad weather, we are amazingly adept at convincing ourselves that whitetail deer feel the same way that we do about it! But because deer live outdoors twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week and have warm, waterproof, fur coats, as well as a need to feed daily – the fact is that they have far less aversion to traveling and feeding in bad than we humans do.

Many an experienced hunter has also observed that deer seem to have some innate sixth sense that warns them when a storm is approaching about as far ahead as our modern weather forecasters can predict and thus, they do tend to feed more actively during the couple of days prior to the storm’s arrival just in case the weather does turn out to be severe enough that it prevents them from moving beyond their bedding areas.

This can make for an exciting crossbow hunting trip in the most daunting conditions.  When hunting deer, you have to keep in mind that adverse weather will impact your hunting tactics more if you are compound bow hunting versus if you are hunting with a 308 or a 30-06.  Hunting Binoculars will come in handy as will rangefinders to ensure that you are measuring the most accurate distances while taking wind into calculation of your shooting trajectories.

Let’s look at how deer move around during adverse weather conditions.

Deer Movement During Windy Conditions:

Deer seldom seem to mind a light breeze that simply rustles the tips of ground level foliage a bit, they do tend to avoid moving during periods of high winds because this type of wind makes it very difficult to detect and identify predators since it shreds their scent and makes it difficult for them to determine which direction it’s coming from.

This makes it very difficult for them to hear a predator approaching over the rustling of the brush.  This makes spotting predators difficult because of all of the moving foliage also hides the predator’s movement.  On days when the wind is light and, especially when it’s steady from a single direction rather than swirling first from one direction and then another, they tend to move and feed very actively.

They are not only able to use the steady breeze to approach their favored food sources from downwind while detecting any predators waiting in ambush, but the slight rustling of the bushes helps to cover the sound of their steps as they travel; thus increasing their level of stealth.

Keep in mind that if you are bowhunting, you absolutely must make the right judgment call on accounting for the wind in your aiming trajectories.  Not doing so will likely cost you a clean kill.

Deer Movement During Rainy Conditions:

Deer moving around in the windThe same can be said for light rains versus torrential downpours. In fact, during periods of heavy rain, deer also have difficulty smelling, seeing, or hearing predators approach and thus, they also avoid moving during these periods until the rain either slackens or quits. The same can be said for light rains since a light rains tends to soften the leaf litter under hoof.  This silences their footsteps and it helps to prevent their scent from traveling and alerting predators to their movements as well.

Rather than pass away the hours dreaming about deer hunting while remaining warm by the fire during periods of inclement weather, experienced hunters have instead learned to use bad weather to their advantage. In fact, simply by watching your local weather report, you can actually predict when the best time to go hunting for whitetail & red deer is!

Deer have an incredible, innate, ability to sense approaching storms (probably by noting the smell of the air combined with subtle differences in barometric pressure) and thus, they are forewarned that the weather will soon turn. While deer don’t seem to be bothered much by light winds and/or light rains, they do tend to bed down in both heavy winds and heavy rains.  A good altimeter watch can help you notice differences in air pressure as well, so you can pickup on incoming storms in the same fashion as the deer you hunt.

Because deer are forewarned of approaching storms, they tend to feed lightly both prior to and after minor storms and to feed heavily prior to and after major storms.  Deer are fully aware that minor storms are little hindrance to them but, major storms may very well force them into their beds for an undetermined period of time.

Below is a great video HamBrosOutdoors put together of hunting out in the rain:

Deer Movement During Snowy Conditions:

White Tailed Deer in the snowSimilar to heavy rain and other hard weather conditions, deer act similarly in both light and heavy snowfall and most especially for blizzards.  This behavior has been seen and documented well on different trail and game cameras.  Deer will often feed lightly prior to and after the first few snows of early winter.

Just as soon as they sense a major snowstorm arriving, they will drastically increase their feeding activities.  Deer can often be seen feeding throughout the day prior to a storm so that they can consume and store as much food as possible before the storm arrives and drives them to their deep woods havens.

Deer have a high metabolic rate and use up energy at a much faster rate than humans.  They have no way to gather and store for food for convenient consumption at will like humans do.  So when deer are forced to stay in their beds for extended periods of time by extremely harsh weather, they are often ravenously hungry when the weather finally passes.  As a result, they also tend to feed heavily after the passing of a major storm.

Both prior to and after the arrival of a major storm are both excellent times to go deer hunting because the deer will be not only be feeding actively, they will also be single-mindedly focused on their task making them less wary than usual.

Deer Movement During Periods of Severe Cold:

 Red Deer in Freezing ColdWhile we have so far discussed how whitetail deer react to wind, rain, and snow, we have not yet discussed their reaction to extreme cold.  The fact is that human hunters use excessively cold temperatures as an excuse not to go hunting just as often as wind, rain, and snow!

Deer live outdoors twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week and, because they have a thick fur coat made from course, hollow, hairs combined with relatively thick skin and a thick layer of subcutaneous fat.  They are not bothered by the extremes in weather that so discomfit humans with our thin skins and lack of fur. But, that is not to say that deer are altogether unaffected by cold weather.

In fact, their reaction to cold is very similar to their reaction to both wind and rain in that as long the cold is relatively mild, they tend to be significantly more active.  They are more active in feeding than earlier in the year because their bodies require more calories to generate heat in cold weather.  Just like days when the wind is howling at gale force and/or the monsoon rains have arrived and the whole forest sounds like the Amazon Jungle in a downpour, during periods when the overnight lows dip down to single digits and below due to an arctic blast from the north,  deer then tend to stay in their beds until mid or late morning.

They do this in order to conserve valuable body heat and then rise and move out to feed once the Sun has been up for a while and the ambient air temperature has risen a bit. They also tend to feed most heavily just prior to the arrival of such air masses so that they can store enough energy to allow them to be able to lounge in their beds until the air warms a bit.

Wrapping Up:

As you can see, while many whitetail & red deer hunters find inclement weather to be both inconvenient and uncomfortable with good reason, the fact of the matter is that the couple days just prior to the arrival of a major storm or cold air mass as well as the first couple of days after its passing can actually provide hunters with the best possible opportunity to fill their tags for the season.

Rather than disparage bad weather, deer hunters should instead learn to embrace it since both its coming and going herald some of the best days of the year to go hunting!

 

The post Do Deer Move In The Rain and Wind? Whitetail & Red Deer Bad Weather Hunting Tips appeared first on Wilderness Today.

How To Make A Survival Bow

Click here to view the original post.

How To Make A Survival Bow Knowing how to make a survival bow is a great skill set to have. Making one is so easy even your kids should learn this. Having a bow and arrow in an emergency will increase your chances of survival significantly. In fact it could mean the difference between no …

Continue reading »

The post How To Make A Survival Bow appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Purify Water Using Chemical Treatments

Click here to view the original post.


Water purification tablets are a great back up form of water treatment. They are excellent Bug Out Bags and survival kits because they are light weight and inexpensive. Water purification tablets are also great to store in your vehicle or your bug out location to disinfect water on demand.  If the water supply I am drawing from is extremely shady I combine both a filter and the tablets to ensure my safety. Also, be aware that water purification tablets have a shelf life. Check the expiration dates on your tablets and replace any that are expired.

Water purification can come in tablet or droplet form. The tablet form is better because it is a lighter weight that droplets and easy to use when in a stressful situation.

Two water born pathogens that commonly found in untreated water- Cryptosporidium and Giardia.

Cryptosporidium is a genus of apicomplexan protozoans that can cause gastrointestinal illness with diarrhea in humans. According to the CDC it is one of the most frequent causes of waterborne disease among humans in the United States. In a disaster situation where government maintained services are effected, it is highly likely that this protozoa parasite will find its way into our water supply.

Giardia attached to the wall of the small intestines. Giardia is also an infectious protozoa and it is a big deal in emergency preparedness because it can have such a dramatic effect on your health. The symptoms of Giardia, may begin to appear 2 days after infection, include violent diarrhea, excess gas, stomach or abdominal cramps, upset stomach, and nausea. 

The typical infection within an individual can be slight, resolve without treatment in about 2–6 weeks, although sometimes longer and sometimes the infection is more severe requiring immediate medical attention. 

There are three main types of water purification tablets on the market (Chlorine (NaDCC), Iodine and Chlorine Dioxide) . Not all are equal as each one has its strengths and weaknesses. Choose the purification tablet that works the best with your situation and location.



Chlorine Dioxide Tablets (Potable Aqua, Katadyn and Aquamira Brands). Even though the word “chlorine” is in the name, chlorine dioxide is neither iodine nor chlorine. It uses a highly active form of oxygen to purify water so it leaves absolutely zero taste. As a nice bonus the action of chlorine dioxide causes a lot of sediment to drop out of suspension (fall to the bottom) leaving the container of water more clear and further improving flavor. Chlorine dioxide tablets are a good choice for those allergic to iodine, with thyroid problems, or on lithium. Always follow product usage instructions.

Chlorine NaDCC Tablets (Potable Aqua, Oasis Plus, Aquatabsand Rothco’s Military “Chlor-Floc“ Brands). NaDCC, also known as sodium dichloroisocyanurate or sodium troclosene, is a form of chlorine used for disinfection. NaDCC tablets are different and improved over the older chlorine based (halazone) tablets. When added to water, NaDCC releases hydrochloric acid which reacts through oxidization with microorganisms and kills them. Many tablets advertise no chlorine after taste. Unopened NaDCC tablets have a shelf life of 3-5 years, if opened they should be discarded after 3 months. Always follow product usage instructions. 

Iodine Tablets (Potable Aqua,Coleman, and Coghlans brands). Iodine Tablets use iodine to purify contaminated water. Most iodine purification tablets tend to leave a funny taste to the water and some discoloration, however vitamin C or ascorbic acid can be added after the treatment time to improve the taste and remove the color. This often comes in the form of two bottles with two separate tablets. Iodine water treatment has been proven to be somewhat effective against Giardia and not effective against Crytosporidium.  Always follow product usage instructions. 
[Source:www.swordofsurvival.com]

How To Make And Hunt with a Paracord Sling

Click here to view the original post.

How To Make And Hunt with a Paracord Sling This how to make and hunt with a paracord sling is just pure genius, David killed Goliath with a sling so why wouldn’t we be able to kill some rabbits or squirrels with one. I personally have never tried hunting this way, I have seen others …

Continue reading »

The post How To Make And Hunt with a Paracord Sling appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.