Cooking Alternatives Off Grid!

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Cooking Alternatives Off Grid! Host: Denob “The Prepared Canadian” Over the last couple of years, I have had the chance to try a lot of different off grid cooking options. From home made solar ovens to open fire methods and everything in between, I found out a lot about what works and what doesn’t. Actually, … Continue reading Cooking Alternatives Off Grid!

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A True Homesteader!

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A True Homesteader! Host: Bobby “MHP Gardner There is a lot of interest in being self-sufficient these days. People are looking for information on how to grow and store their own food, provide their own meats, go off-grid with solar setups… get out of the system so to speak. We see a lot of these … Continue reading A True Homesteader!

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Gman “Off Grid” Grumpy with a smile!

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“Off Grid” Grumpy with a smile! Host: Glen aka “Gman” For the first time in over 5 years Gman picks up the mic. With a lot to unload on this show, topics include what is it truly like to live “off grid”? Rants and raves on several prepper related topics will be on the agenda. The … Continue reading Gman “Off Grid” Grumpy with a smile!

The post Gman “Off Grid” Grumpy with a smile! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Getting hooked on tiny houses

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Meg with husband in tiny house

Now that is real cosy

American architect and designer Meg Stevens was “immediately hooked” on tiny houses when she discovered them five years ago. She set a plan in motion to design and build her own tiny house – which was realized last year when she moved into The Lucky Linden, a tiny house RV measuring about 170 square feet.

Meg grew up in Michigan in a neighborhood under construction. Spending her spare time helping her dad with building projects, her interest in architecture, design and building was piqued at an early age. When she became interested in tiny houses in 2013, she purchased a ticket to a workshop at Tumbleweed Tiny House Company, an organisation focused on designing tiny house RVs, in order to learn more about the process. She ended up being hired as an architect, and her Lucky Linden RV design is one she created for the company – with a few changes made to suit her (and her husband Dan’s) personal living style.

“We decided to build a tiny house about five years ago, and immediately started planning (and saving up money),” Meg said. “We didn’t want to go into debt for the house, so I would work on the build as we had the funds, and put it into storage while saving up for the next phase. It took three years to build this way, and it was in storage for stretches of time from six months to over a year.”

“While we were building, we gradually downsized until we were living in a 330 sq ft studio apartment,” she said. “The apartment was just a bit over double the size of the tiny house, so when we finally finished the build and moved in to the tiny house it wasn’t much of an adjustment at all. We love it!”

Tiny houses can be anything smaller than the normal for family size, according to Meg. A four-person family living in a 600 sq ft house is tiny, because there is only 250 sq ft per person. But conventionally – at least in terms of the growing Tiny House Movement across the US – a tiny house is between 100 and 400 sq ft. And the majority of them are built for off-grid living.

Meg, a prominent member of the Tiny House Movement – a community of like-minded individuals across the US advocating tiny houses as energy efficient living spaces – says the American tiny house community has experienced “rapid, almost exponential growth” in the last four years, owing to environmental concerns, financial issues as the cost of living rises, and the desire for more time and freedom.

“Designing especially is more difficult in a small space, but it’s rewarding. Efficiency is everything, and really considering ‘needs’ vs ‘wants’ vs ‘nice-to-haves,’” Meg said.

“Tiny houses are more energy efficient just because of their size, but also I think the general tiny house community is more interested, aware and/or educated about energy and efficiency, so it compounds into having tiny houses that are both energy efficient and more environmentally friendly,” Meg said.

“Tiny houses use much less energy to heat and cool because of their size. Occupants of a tiny house also have less possessions, so both of these make tiny houses perfect candidates to go off grid!”

She estimates that a third of people interested in tiny houses or tiny living are also interested in going off grid – herself included.

“The Lucky Linden is powered from a big house on the same property, and the big house has solar panels that provide most of the energy needed,” she explained. “In the winter, when there isn’t much sun, we do draw a little bit from the grid. Our goal for 2017 is to purchase our own solar panels and setup, and try to go 100% off-grid.”

The Lucky Linden has a sleeping loft area overhanging the kitchen, with a front storage loft made slightly larger than the original Linden model to accommodate a twin sized mattress if wanted. Meg also changed the position of the front door to create a bigger footprint for the porch area. The adjustment also expanded the living room area. The sleeping loft is smaller than the plans show, but it still holds a regular king size mattress.

Meg and Dan step directly on the couch to the kitchen counter and up to a set of three steps in order to get to the loft area, after deciding it would take too much space to build in dedicated steps. They don’t have a washer or dryer, preferring to use a nearby laundromat in winter and hand wash in summer. They also don’t have an oven, but have the option of visiting friends and using their facilities if needed. Storage shelves are built into most available wall space.

In late 2016, the Tiny House Movement successfully submitted an appendix to the International Code Council (ICC) for inclusion in the upcoming 2018 building code for American houses. An optional “guide” that cities can adopt into their local codes, it gives a guideline for building safe and reasonable tiny houses on foundations. With more than 160,000 votes, the Tiny House Appendix passed in December last year – a stepping stone to building tiny legally in the US.

“The Tiny House Appendix creates a pathway for building tiny legally, which is huge for the tiny house community!” Meg said. “Currently the only legal way to build tiny is to put it on a trailer and call it an RV.”

The post Getting hooked on tiny houses appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Doomsday Preppers? You’ve GOT to be kidding me…

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This post was written exactly 4 years ago, on my Facebook page. I still stand by it. Rich Fleetwood – February 7, 2012 · Riverton · Watching “Doomsday Preppers” on NGC this evening, with an as objective as possible viewpoint. I’ve been doing this stuff myself for 20 years, and in my position and experience, with the […]

The post Doomsday Preppers? You’ve GOT to be kidding me… appeared first on SurvivalRing.

Interested in Living Off-Grid? This Book will Tell You How

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    Living in an apartment in a big city, I wondered what it would be like to make a complete change and live off grid in a nice piece of land somewhere.  That’s why I was excited to read Tammy’s Trayer’s new book, How to Embrace an Off-Grid Lifestyle. Who is the author? The author of the book, Tammy Trayer, blogs  at TrayerWilderness.com.  She is also a radio show host at Mountain Woman Radio. Tammy and her family live […]

The post Interested in Living Off-Grid? This Book will Tell You How appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

Off The Grid Limitations That No One Tells You About

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Off The Grid Limitations That No One Tells You About Living off grid is the ideal type of living for many Americans, but only few manage to fulfill this dream and adjust to what it all implies. Living off the grid is not as easy as seen in movies and it requires a certain mindset …

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Vulnerable But Prepared: Off Grid Living & Winter Storms

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Vulnerable But Prepared: Off Grid Living & Winter Storms If you’re living off the grid, or just in an area prone to harsh winter storms, preparation is key to survival.  In the event that you are stranded by a big snow or ice storm, having access to essentials can become a challenge.  There are several …

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Larry Roberts: After Alone on History Channel

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Larry Roberts: After Alone on History Channel Karen “Lil’ Suburban Homestead” This show in player below! Lil’ Suburban Homestead interviews Larry Roberts Primitive Skills expert and Outdoorsmen, Contestant on History’s Alone, and an Instructor at the Pathfinder School. Karen previously interviewed Larry for her Primitive Skills show on the Prepper Broadcasting Network. To take a listen … Continue reading Larry Roberts: After Alone on History Channel

The post Larry Roberts: After Alone on History Channel appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Homesteading and balancing all that weight!

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Homesteading and balancing all that weight! Renee “The Homestead Honey Hour” Chances are, if you homestead, you also engage in several of the following activities. Work off-farm, have a family, take care of livestock, keep a large garden, preserve and put up food, heat with wood, and home school, Maybe you also run a home … Continue reading Homesteading and balancing all that weight!

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Life In The Remote Wilderness!

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Life In The Remote Wilderness – Could You Do It? Karen Lynn “Lil’ Suburban Homestead” Could you live in the remote wilderness?  Karen Lynn says she could rough it for a while but doesn’t know if she is as tough as Ron’s wife Johanna. Ron Melchiore is an Outdoorsman, Pioneer, Homesteader, Remote Exploration Camp Manager … Continue reading Life In The Remote Wilderness!

The post Life In The Remote Wilderness! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Experiences in living off grid!

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Experiences in living off grid! DJ Cooper “Surviving Dystopia” On this weeks episode of Surviving Dystopia DJ Cooper welcomes John Milandred to the show.  John has been a Preparedness, Survivalist, and Prepper Consultant to individuals and companies alike. Having been involved with The Prepper Podcast Radio Network, Radio host of Pioneering Your Way to Freedom, co-founder … Continue reading Experiences in living off grid!

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5 Overlooked Challenges To Off-Grid Life That You Better Learn Before It’s Too Late

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5 Overlooked Challenges To Off-Grid Life That You Better Learn Before It's Too Late

Image source: Pixabay.com

Previously on Off The Grid News, we   the five biggest challenges to moving off-grid.

So now you’ve successfully faced the challenges to moving off-grid. You’ve found a place with enough land and water and have an off-grid power source. You’re comfortable with other people that may be living nearby, and are ready to live on your new homestead. For those with the homestead up and running, here are the five biggest challenges to living off-grid.

1. The dark hours

Many off-the-grid homes have limited power and are located in the north, where winter nights are long. So you can go a little stir crazy if you’re sitting in a dark house on those long winter evenings. Called “cabin fever” or “winter malaise,” symptoms include being irritable, lethargic and unmotivated. Cabin fever is real, and millions of Americans suffer from it during the winter.

So be prepared for this and plan on activities and hobbies that can help keep your mind fresh and your attitude positive. Here are some tips for minimizing the effects …

Get Free Backup Electricity — That Works Even During Blackouts!

First, choose one of the many relaxation techniques that help reduce stress and anxiety. A simple breathing exercise is fine.

Second, avoid the mistake that millions of Americans, Russians, Scandinavians and others that live in worlds with cold and dark winters make – drinking too much alcohol. Health impacts aside, abuse can make relaxing and sleeping soundly much harder.

Third, invite friends or neighbors over. Simple interaction, whether over a meal or while playing a game, provides comfort and helps ease anxiety. It may not be easy – cabin fever can make you want to avoid contact with others – but it may be just the thing you need.Variation of diet

2. Variation of diet

Many off-the-gridders incorporate as much self-sufficiency as possible when it comes to food. A robust garden and source of meat, whether from small animals or larger livestock such as pigs or cattle, can provide most of the food a family needs. But smaller homesteads can be limited in variety. For example, the winter pantry may store potatoes, squash, onions and a few canned goods. And many homesteads have one source of meat, such as a flock of chickens or a few rabbits.

Eating the same food day after day can lead to a reduction in appetite, and frankly is no fun. Instead of enjoying the bounty of your hard work, a diet with little variation can quickly make you dislike the food you’ve worked so hard to produce.

5 Overlooked Challenges To Off-Grid Life That You Better Learn Before It's Too Late

Image source: Pixabay.com

So plan ahead to avoid this. For example, if you raise chickens, look for someone with which to barter. Trading a few chickens and eggs for some rabbits or a side of beef will add to your protein options. Same with the garden. If you’re overflowing with potatoes, maybe you can trade some with a neighbor with fruit trees, so that you can preserve some applesauce or peaches for the winter.

Also, if you can afford it, don’t be afraid to spend a little money to get some variety in your diet. Chances are, you live somewhere that allows you to grow some vegetables, but not others. If you live in the north, splurge on some tropical fruits for variety. Or if you live in the south where it’s too hot to grow raspberries, buy some fresh ones during season. Enjoy them in season and freeze some for a change of pace in the winter.Technical know-how

3. Technical know-how

Some people are mechanical geniuses and can fix anything. If that’s you, skip this section. But if you’re like me, learning to diagnose and repair machinery is a life-long learning process. So get to know the equipment you rely on. Make sure you can sharpen that chain saw blade or replace the spark plugs. If you’re fortunate enough to have a solar power system, understand how to program the inverter or troubleshoot it.

Produce Boiling Hot Water, Anywhere, Anytime With Absolutely No Power Whatsoever…

Regardless of the piece of equipment, understanding it and repairing it are essential to successfully living off-the-grid.Disease diagnosis

4. Disease diagnosis 

Equally important to fixing machinery is being able to diagnose and mitigate or cure disease, both in the garden and with animals. Nothing’s worse than some unknown insect destroying your corn crop or having worms show up and suck the life out of your goats. Be ready to understand how to respond if your plants start dying or your animals get sick. This can take a lot of time but at the end of the day, it’s crucial for off-grid living.

5. Health and injury

We’ve already discussed the mental impact of cabin fever, but your physical health is just as important. Living off-the-grid is hard work. Debilitating illness or an extended hospital stay can irretrievable damage the off-the-grid dream.

No one is immune from a serious injury or illness like cancer. But you can take steps to minimize these. The risk of serious injury can be reduced with simple precautions like wearing safety glasses and proper lifting techniques. The risk of illness may be reduced by regular doctor visits and avoiding alcohol or tobacco abuse. The key is to reduce risk.

Final thoughts

Living off the grid is awesome. But it is a lifelong learning process and full of challenges that can test your resolve. Good luck!

What challenges would you add to the list? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Are You Prepared For A Downed Grid? Read More Here.

5 Ways That Living Off-Grid Makes You Happier And Healthier (And Even Extends Your Life)

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5 Ways That Living Off-Grid Can Make You Happier And Healthier (And Even Extend Your Life)

Image source: Pixabay.com

 

There are many reasons that people choose to live off-grid. One benefit we all share, however, is that an off-grid life actually can make us happier and even help us live longer.

There are many reasons for this. Here’s five:

1. It impacts what you eat.

Many off-grid homesteads grow, raise or catch a lot of their own food. This includes a robust garden and animals for meat. So we end up eating a lot of healthy food. Lots of fruits and vegetables, as well as protein from meat. This type of diet, low in refined sugar and low in processed food, is highly regarded by nutritionists and is recommended by experts for a healthier lifestyle.

2. It impacts what you don’t eat.

Conversely, by eating food raised naturally and locally, there’s a lot of bad stuff you don’t eat. For example, your fruits and vegetables aren’t drowning in pesticides. Your meat likely has been raised on wholesome foods and has no growth hormones or excess antibiotics. Your body thanks you.

3. It increases your physical activity.

America currently suffers from an epidemic — obesity. One-third of Americans are grossly overweight, while another third is slightly or moderately overweight. Obesity increases the risk of life-threatening health problems, including high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

Get Free Backup Electricity — That Works Even During Blackouts!

Since 1962, the number of obese people in America has doubled.

This is no surprise, as society left the rural lifestyle for the easier city life. But those of us who live off-grid maintain the type of lifestyle that reduces the risk of obesity. From chopping wood to shoeing horses to digging in the garden, our active lifestyle reduces the likelihood of life-threatening diseases.

5 Ways That Living Off-Grid Can Make You Happier And Healthier (And Even Extend Your Life)

Image source: Pixabay.com

Physical activity also increases our mental health. It decreases the level of stress hormones while increasing feel-good endorphins like serotonin and dopamine. Physical activity makes us off-gridders feel good about our lifestyles.

4. It provides a boost of fresh air.

Most off-grid homesteads are in rural areas, away from the air pollution of modern cities. Elevated levels of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and industrial air contaminants have been linked to many health issues. These include cancer, neurological and reproductive disorders, chronic eye and skin irritations, chest pain and breathing disorders.

5. It gets you out of the rat race.

Many off-gridders once had busy lives in modern society. But a hectic life in a fast-paced society can create stress. More than 40 percent of Americans say their stress levels have increased over the past five years. Stress can lead to physical symptoms like high blood pressure, chest pain, trouble sleeping, headaches and digestive disorders. It also worsens the symptoms of pre-existing physical conditions.

Just 30 Grams Of This Survival Superfood Provides More Nutrition Than An Entire Meal!

Stress is harmful in another way. Sometimes people try and cope with stress by abusing alcohol or drugs. However, these narcotics tend to increase stress, along with all the health issues associated with drug abuse.

Final thoughts

Thousands of people have escaped the rate race and settled into a more rewarding and less stressful lifestyle. Not only does this make us feel better in general, but it also lowers the risk of long-term health issues.

What would you add to this list? Share your ideas in the section below:

Are You Prepared For A Downed Grid? Read More Here.

Dropping Out Of Society: How To Prepare For A Solo Life Off-Grid

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Dropping Out Of Society: How To Prepare For A Solo Life

Image source: Flickr

Many of us dream or desire to live off-grid by ourselves, enjoying a peaceful life of solitude. But it’s easy to underestimate the difficulty of this. Living off the grid is hard enough if you have family and other homesteaders around you. Going it alone is even more challenging. Here are some things to think about before deciding to live alone on your off-grid homestead:

1. Consider your physical strength

An off-grid lifestyle requires a lot of physical labor. Tilling the garden, delivering a calf, or chopping firewood are all common tasks on the homestead. So if you’re going it alone, be prepared to do all the hard work yourself.

2. Review your technical knowledge and skills

Most off-grid homesteads generate power from the land’s resources. Typical power sources are the sun for solar power, the wind for wind power, and flowing water for hydropower. Many times these primary power systems are backed up with a diesel generator.

New Solar Generators Deliver 4 Times More Power Than Previous Models!

The common power generation technologies can malfunction or simply stop working. For example, solar power is a great technology. However, it generally entails electronic controllers like an inverter to convert captured energy into a form usable by modern appliances and equipment. You’ll need to know how to program, maintain and troubleshoot the inverter. Generating power from the wind or water rely on mechanical parts that can wear down, stop working together, or simply break. Finally, while diesel generators are reliable workhorses, many years of experience with them have taught me that the smallest issue can make a diesel generator come to a crashing halt.

So learn how to maintain, troubleshoot and repair the power generation equipment you rely on. Sure, you can get experts to come out and fix things, but this is expensive, especially if you live a long way from metropolitan areas.

3. Prepare for medical emergencies

For the solo off-gridder living in a remote location, it is critical to have first-aid knowledge and access to emergency medical care in case of a serious injury.

Dropping Out Of Society: How To Prepare For A Solo Life

Image source: Flickr

For first-aid knowledge, take both the standard and advanced first-aid courses available through local schools or government agencies. After mastering the skills, make sure the homestead is fully stocked to handle everything from a minor burn to a gunshot wound to a severed limb.

You also need access to emergency medical care. If you live far away from a hospital, look into plans where you can pay a small annual fee to get helicopter transfer to the nearest hospital. Research the plans carefully to understand how they work and their limitations.4. Don’t forget security

4. Don’t forget security

Living by yourself on an isolated property is a dream come true for many — including me. But it’s not a safe world out there. There are those who have no compunction about stealing what is yours, whether or not you’re home at the time.

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So learn self-defense, and get the guns you need to protect your life in the case of robbery or home invasion. You’ll also need to consider the wildlife around you, and select the right firearms to protect yourself against curious bears, mountain lions, or any of the other predators out there that roam sparsely populated areas.

5. Cultivate working relationships

I get it. You want to live on your off-grid homestead alone and take care of yourself by yourself. But things happen when you’ll simply need someone else’s help. For example, there are probably a lot of chores around the homestead — tending the garden, feeding the chickens, milking the goat — that really need to be done every day. If you seriously hurt yourself and end up bedridden or in the hospital for a few days, it’s good to have someone you can trust who can competently care for the homestead during your absence. So get out there and make some friends and build some relationships, even if it’s the last thing you want to do.Conclusion

Conclusion

Living alone is hard work. Learn the right skills and build the right relationships to be successful at it. Taking the right steps now will allow you to continue your solitude, even after a major injury or other incident prevents you from caring temporarily for the homestead.

Related:

A Survivalist’s Dream: Dropping Out Of Society

What advice would you add to this story? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Are You Prepared For Blackouts This Winter? Read More Here.

7P’s of Survival & Karen Lynn

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January 19nth 2016 7P’s of Survival with guest Karen Lynn

7P's of SurvivalTonight we will have Karen from Little Suburban Homestead on the show completing the cycle of our friend ship. For those of you who don’t know she had me on her show as a guest before I started my own show here, I then took over her Tuesday time slot as she moved to Thursday and now as she has moved on from the Prepper Broadcasting network she has come back almost a year since I was on her show to be on mine.

Tonight Karen and I will be talking about several issues related to the beginning homesteader. We will stare out the night talking all things chickens. My father recently became a backyard chicken farmer so I thought it would be good to talk with Karen and give everyone a few tips and tricks for keeping chickens for both fresh eggs and also meat. We will discuss what you need to start, how many chickens you would need depending on your goals, what to build (coop) and how to design it, free range vs. feed , roster or no rooster, what type of chickens are best, how to deal with neighbors, best practices for eggs collection, how to care for chicks, determining when its time to eat a laying hen and much more!

We will then turn to some simple tricks for backyard gardening/farming with minimal land discussing several tips and tricks at increasing your overall output. We will discuss multi-season gardening, indoor herb gardening and winter gardening. We will then turn to preserving your harvest via root cellars and canning where Karen will give you several tips tricks and maybe a few recipes to help you on your journey to becoming your own grocery store.
Join us for 7p’s of Survival “LIVE SHOW” every Tuesday 9:00/Et 8:00Ct 6:00/Pt Go To Listen and Chat

Listen to this broadcast or download “7P’s of Survival with guest Karen Lynn of Lil’ Suburban Homestead” in player below!

Get the 24/7 app for your smart phone HERE! 
Put the 24/7 player on your web site HERE!
Listen to archived shows of all our hosts . Schedule tabs at top left of page!

The post 7P’s of Survival & Karen Lynn appeared first on The Prepper Broadcasting Network.

Building your own systems!

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Building your own systems. Why buy?

Makers on Acres 160x160On this episode of the Tech, Build and Grow show, Brett is discusses new build ideas for our preps, homesteads and more. Moving beyond the greenhouse with our automation and build ideas where can we better our lives and make them more efficient?

Building fireBeing now in the heart of the cold weather season, we should be focusing our attention on backup heat options for our homes, greenhouses and livestock facilities. The question that many may have is where do I start?

12-26-2015 chipsCreating heat options and systems can be fun and challenging at the same time, and now is time to get the creative engineering juices flowing. We can take a simple wood stove idea and put it on steroids to run all on its own, send us updates and heat more efficiently.

12-26-15 Straight-tube_heat_exchanger_1-passWe will discuss how to transform our thinking from “What do I buy?” mentality, to “What do I build?” mentality. Getting to the point where you start designing and building your own systems is a huge step forward.

By building and creating all your new systems you start to learn the ins and outs of all the components, science and technology involved. Learning all the aspects of each build creates more knowledge for the next build and creates an awareness in the mind for troubleshooting and problem solving in the systems. Transforming in to a “Maker” is a one way street and once you get the building bug, it’s usually with you forever!
Makers On Acres Website: http://makersonacres.com/

Join us for Makers On Acres Website “LIVE SHOW” every Saturday 9:00/Et 8:00Ct 6:00/Pt Go To Listen and Chat

Listen to this broadcast or download “Building your own systems!” in player below!

Get the 24/7 app for your smart phone HERE! 
Put the 24/7 player on your web site HERE! 
Listen to archived shows of all our hosts . Schedule tabs at top left of page!

The post Building your own systems! appeared first on The Prepper Broadcasting Network.

OPSEC The Quiet Life!

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OPSEC The Quiet Life!
D J Cooper “Surviving Dystopia

12-8-15 WonderMill-Electric-Grain-MillSo, you just bought a shiny new  WonderMill grain mill. You ordered it online and it finally arrived in the mail today. Hastily you open the package and excited with your new prepper gadget you swiftly break out the grain and whip up a lovely loaf of bread. Thrilled you immediately begin snapping photos with your phone and plaster them all over your Facebook and Twitter.

OPSEC The Quiet Life!These are the things we all love to share with one another and without even thinking we could have just shared exactly how the “Other” kind of prepper will find their preps. By seeking out YOU. The thing I want to talk about today is OPSEC. OPSEC? What is that?

12-9-15 imagesMany know the meaning but for those who don’t, OPSEC is short for OPerational SECurity. This is important because of the guy who thinks that when TSHTF he is going to take the road most closely related to Mad Max and just seek to take the preparations you collected, worked and paid for.

Your phone is constantly asking to know your location, maybe you’re using the GPS or looking for a restaurant, no matter how it is on if it is then there is likely a little tidbit of information attached to your photo of that brand new grain mill you just plastered all over the internet. This information is called geotagging, it attaches the GPS location of where the photo was taken and a tech savvy Mad Maxer might just find out where you keep your precious new prep.

Operational security is an important part of our preparedness plan and should be something we consider as such.
Visit Surviving Dystopia Blog: www.survivingdystopia.com

Join us for Surviving Dystopia “LIVE SHOW” every Wednesday 9:00/Et 8:00Ct 6:00/Pt Go To Listen and Chat

Listen to this broadcast or download “OPSEC The Quiet Life” in player below!

Get the 24/7 app for your smart phone HERE! 
Put the 24/7 player on your web site HERE! 
Listen to archived shows of all our hosts . Schedule tabs at top left of page!

The post OPSEC The Quiet Life! appeared first on The Prepper Broadcasting Network.

How Rob Greenfield lives off-grid in the City

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Today I talked to tiny home YouTube sensation Rob Greenfield for his tips on how to go off the grid. Greenfield by name and Greenfield by nature!

Amazingly in his ritzy part of San Diego the neighbours living in $1m homes LOVE the fact he has found a near-free way to join them. Rob advertised around the city and was inundated with offers to set up a shed in backyards all over town.

In between talking about composting his homemade toilet, his rain catcher and life in a tiny home in the back of someone’s yard in San Diego, Rob also gave very valuable tips on how anyone can go off the grid in the City.

Thousands, nay millions, should be doing it..

Vlogger Rob Greenfield is an American adventurer, environmental activist and entrepreneur. He has made it his life’s purpose to inspire others to work for a healthy earth, often with attention-grabbing tactics. He’s a writer, speaker, world traveler,and plain-speaking Homeboy.

The post How Rob Greenfield lives off-grid in the City appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

What is it to live Off Grid?

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What is it to live Off Grid?
DJ Cooper “Surviving Dystopia

What is it to live Off GridFirst, right now I do not live off grid… While wishes I do think come true…there is much that must be overcome sometimes to get what we hope for. A favorite saying of mine is the 7 p’s (a military adage) “Proper Planning and Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance”

As I said “right now” I do not live off grid, this does not say never have I!

12-2-15 green (720x540) (720x540)I have to an extent prior and am pretty well versed in many aspects of the lifestyle.
Circumstances sometimes place us in a position where what we wish and what we must do come in conflict. This is what I might like us to talk about on this show. Right now I live in a big old farm house that I rent with lots of acres but that is NOT where I’m going, just where I am paused! I think many of us are often times in the same place. Knowing where we want to be but unsure of how to get there.

12-2-15 horses (604x453) (604x453)With the 7 p’s it is clear, I feel, that one cannot simply “go off grid” at least not and hope to be successful…Money makes the world go round, whether or not we like it…we need it…
UNLESS….your off grid land is fully paid for and taxes paid in advance… you have all the materials and needs taken care of prior to, and even then you need to have an established means to take care of your future needs be it a job or business that will pay the mortgage or taxes & buy things like for example canning lids….

12-2-15 tree (960x540) (960x540)I know many skills from gardening to canning it…critters, cheese making, soap ect… Walked the path all my life, spent years researching concepts I wish to implement such as solar, wind and hydro power… solar water heat and even geothermal technologies and how they work… will again use grey water reclamation with rain water catchment along with other things such as utilizing the south face of the home. But again the 7 P’s keep me in check.. gotta work to make the money to get what I want in the end.

I have done a show in the past on things like this, I’ve explored intentional communities and found many good points and many flaws… There must be an outline and things set in stone…flying by the seat of ones pants….And while I am a well-known pantster in my writing and even on this show… in some cases this would be a recipe for little more than disaster.
I’ve had the opportunity to view a number of different styles on such topics and this week would like to try and establish some ideas as to how we can implement these without being “The Pantster”.
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…and we’re back…News from Rich and SurvivalRing…

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Hi folks, It’s been a while since my last post, although I’ve been in the backroom of SurvivalRing every day for months, keeping things tuned, tight, backed up, and secure. I’ve thought about posting a lot of things, and often I was poised and ready to add my thoughts to the blog, and at the […]