SHTF Dental Care: These Are the Supplies You Need To Survive a Post-Collapse Dental Emergency

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As far as preppers are concerned, the majority of you guys and gals have already probably stored up about a half a pallet of toothbrushes and toothpaste for shtf dental emergencies.  Yes?  No?  Well, in any event we’re going to cover some field-expedient methods to clean up the teeth.  The reason for this is that it’s hard enough in a normal environment to keep those teeth cleaned and healthy.  In a grid down collapse, there will be no dentist and there are going to be a lot of problems that will affect the teeth and gums, so the more you know about oral hygiene now, the better.

Firstly, it is in your best interest to pick up the reference guide entitled, Where There is No Dentist,” by Murray Dickson.  It will be money well-spent, as it covers all of the different procedures to follow for abscesses, tooth extraction, and other “niceties” of oral care when you will not find a dentist, as the title suggests.  A manual such as this is just what your preparedness library needs.

Alternatives to Toothpaste

That being mentioned, what about things such as toothpaste and floss?  Well, many of your aromatic mints can be crushed up and used as toothpaste, such as spearmint and peppermint.  Follow this up with baking soda, and you’ll find a good clean set of teeth after brushing.  Charcoal powder is also an excellent dental cleanser, as well, a strong salt water solution will also be of use.  Cloves, in particular are good for swollen or abscessed gums, and clove oil itself can be used as a topical analgesic with excellent results and can easily be made.


To Make Clove Oil: Dried cloves can also be chopped up to be placed in a jar with 50% ethyl alcohol.  Make sure you cover over the pile of chopped cloves by about ¼ inch.  Tightly close the jar, and shake it vigorously several hundred times a day, once in the morning and once at night.


Keep the clove mixture in a cool, dark place, and after two weeks, you’ll have your solution.  Cloves contain eugenol, which is both an anesthetic and an antimicrobial.  Don’t drink it.  Use it as an oral rinse: a more effective one than most supermarket-brand mouthwashes.  It can also help to prevent and to aid with swollen gums.

Keep this rule in mind: The main causes for tooth problems are poor nutrition and then poor hygiene. 

This does pose a problem, and there are certain foods that can do a number on your teeth. This will be a challenge for you to be able to find not just food, but healthy and nutritious food after a collapse.  Vitamin C is necessary to prevent scurvy, a disease of the gums that eventually leads to tooth loss if unchecked.  Protein deficiencies are also a big problem that can cause teeth to loosen and gums to rot.  Clean water is very important, not just for the care of the teeth, but also to prevent any microorganisms from entering an already unhealthy oral cavity post SHTF.  Boil the water for at least 3 to 5 minutes after you have strained and filtered it in every way that you can.

How to Make Your Own Toothbrushes and Floss

Toothbrushes can be fashioned out of sticks with the diameter of a pencil.  Notch the ends and then hammer the end, spreading out the wood and softening it somewhat.  With these you’ll have to be a little more careful, as there not your “Oral-B” store-bought toothbrushes.  Floss can be made from cotton or nylon thread that you can wax beforehand to strengthen it somewhat.  Just take the start of your thread and press your thumb on top of it, crushing/pressing it into the wax, and then just pull the thread through.  Do this several times to give it a light wax coating that smooths out the thread through the teeth and strengthens the fibers.

Above all else, make sure you have some post-collapse dental supplies. Anything that you can pick up before the disaster is a plus, and you may wish to practice with several of these techniques to find out which are the best for you personally.  The reason is that everyone’s mouth is different, and genetically many are predisposed to having either teeth without a long lifespan or other problems.  As well, have an understanding of how to mitigate dental pain should something arise in a disaster. Prior to taking any actions here, consult with your friendly, certified, government-approved dentist for his or her friendly approval.  Take care of those teeth, and stock up on stuff you need…before the SHTF.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Natural First Aid: 5 Items To Put In Your Emergency Medical Kit Today

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 When the SHTF and a medical situation does occur simultaneously, things can go to absolute turmoil very quickly. Most medical situations that will arise during this time may not be considered life threatening, but can quickly become one if not appropriately treated. For instance, a simple cut that makes contact with tainted water (a very typical scenario following floods and hurricanes) can quickly become infected. That said, as preppers we need to prepare for medical emergencies and not only learn basic first aid, but also know how to use natural alternatives to care for the wounds themselves.

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5 Items To Put In Your Emergency Medical Kit Today

1. Books

One cannot become proficient at something without study and application. Going as far as to take medical courses in community colleges, local county extension offices, local fire departments, and with veterans groups, along with other civic clubs and organizations can give you a great edge on acquiring knowledge on medical emergencies and how to treat them. It should go without saying, but stock up on medical manuals like:

2. Kitchen Staples

Since most of us have limited shelf space, it is only logical to find shelf stable foods and products that will perform multiple jobs for us. And some of your kitchen staples can do just that – including medical care. For instance, did you know you can make an antiseptic (first discovered during World War I) made of a diluted solution of baking soda and bleach? It’s called Dakin’s Solution and has been proven to kill most bacteria and viruses.

3. Honey

As well, honey has become a poster child for an alternative to antibiotics. In fact, numerous studies have shown that certain kinds of honey can fight multiple species of bacteria, fungi, and superbugs, making it a viable alternative to antibiotics.

As Ready Nutrition writer, Jeremiah Johnson recently wrote, “Honey is also good for wounds/abrasions/cuts of the mouth, as it is a demulcent that soothes abraded tissues, and it also is a medium that microbes do not live in.  Who doesn’t remember the time-honored honey and lemon mixture for a sore throat?  The thing of it is: it works, and if it works it should be employed. Read more on how to use honey to treat wounds.

4. Medicinal Herbs

Having access to health-inducing herbs is another essential for wound care. Herbs such as oregano, garlic, lavender and thyme can help protect a wound from infection and promote healing. Along those lines, writer, Jeremiah Johnson recommends every prepper have the Three G’s: Ginger, Garlic and Ginseng in their natural medicine cabinet. Further, knowing which herbs can be used for natural pain killers is also paramount in your medical preparedness knowledge. Some pain reducing herbs to add to your herbal first-aid kit are:

  • Aloe (Aloe vera)
  • Calendula (Calendula officinalis)
  • Comfrey (Symphytum officinale)
  • Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica)
  • Tea (Camellia sinensis)
  • Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

Common pantry items can also be used to help bleeding wounds clot. Many have found that cayenne pepper is an effective alternative and natural version of QuikClot. Cayenne pepper contains an active ingredient, called capsaicin, which has analgesic (pain relieving) properties and various other medicinal uses.

5. Essential Oils

In an extended disaster, bacterial infections and viruses are likely to be one of the reasons that people will die. Historically, essential oils  have been used as a natural therapy to relieve symptoms when modern-day medicine was not available. The most amazing aspect of essential oils lies in their ability to effectively kill bad bacteria while leaving good bacteria alone! Rather than targeting one symptom, as Western medicine does, it targets multiple symptoms. There are two types of essential oils you should stock up on for SHTF planning:

Antibacterial – Due to the increase of antibacterial resistant illnesses, many are turning to essential oils such as basil, cassia, cinnamon, clove, cypress, eucalyptus, geranium, lavender, lemon, marjoram, melaleuca, myrrh, orange, oregano, peppermint, rosemary, tea tree and thyme.

Antiviral – Oils that have been studied to help control viral infections include: basil, cassia, cinnamon, eucalyptus, frankincense, lemon, lemongrass, marjoram, Melaleuca, myrrh, oregano, and thyme.

I started out with a simple beginner’s essential oil kit and have found it of great use! Some more popular ways of using essential oils are aromatherapy, herbal soaks, compresses, tinctures and salves.

Things can go awry very quickly when a medical emergency occurs during a disaster. Having resources to turn to, skills to treat wounds, along with items you have around you can be lifesaving.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Post-Disaster Wellness: Why Drinking Alcohol in High Stress Environments Should Be Avoided

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Hey there, ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals!  We are going to discuss how alcohol affects your physical training, and what physiological effects you must take into consideration.  Please understand: I am not “demonizing” alcohol or alcoholic beverages, and am not scoffing or scorning anyone who partakes in them in a normal, healthy manner.  Indeed, the scope of this article is not “moralistic,” nor am I a spokesperson for abstinence.  The intent is to explain how alcohol diminishes your recovery time and performance regarding your physical training.

You, the readers are a very demographically-diverse group from all walks of life and all ages, some with special health care needs.  I implore all of you to analyze your status and with your doctor come up with an exercise program for yourself.


Physical training and exercise are your best tools for preparation, along with proper study, diet, and rest.


Why You Should Avoid Drinking Alcohol in High Stress Environments

That being said, why am I writing about alcohol affecting training?  I do so because the proverbial “two drinks,” as well as the “after dinner drink,” and the “after work drink” are pervasive in our society and culture.  The Super Bowl just finished up, with hardly anything in the ads for your physical training, but a barrage from Budweiser to drink beer.  Consider me a quiet voice on the sideline, little more than a whisper in your ear recommending the physical training.

Alcohol deposits fat in your midsection, and also has a wasting effect on the thigh and gluteal muscles.  There was a study in 2000 done published in the Journal of Applied Physiology that found cortisol (a hormone we discussed in previous articles) rose 61% when alcohol was consumed after strenuous physical activity.  The reason for this significance: many people have physically-demanding jobs and wish to “wind down” with a beer or two, or a shot after work.

The cortisol (usually produced with stress) has an adverse effect on muscle maintenance and muscle growth.  See, alcohol has an effect that has gravitated man toward it throughout history: it holds similar effects to the drug Valium (or Diazepam, if you prefer) with calming, anxiety-relieving effects.  It also releases dopamine and endorphins within the first 20 minutes of consumption, substances that enhance pleasure when released by the brain…and in this effect, alcohol is almost akin to opium.

With low doses, alcohol increases stimulation in certain brain areas and the central nervous system, leading to feelings of euphoria.  So, with all of this, you may be thinking…shouldn’t I be taking an occasional drink of alcohol in conjunction with training?  The answer is an unequivocal “No!” on all counts.

Alcohol has the ability to severely depress brain function by interfering with the ion channels needed to fire neurons…that is, allow your brain to communicate to and with other important parts of your body…such as respiration, heart, motor control, and so forth.  Far from being a “sleep aid,” it can rob you of REM.  No, not the band from the late 80’s to early 90’s…but Rapid-Eye Movement sleep.  Alcohol can hurt your sleeping habits.  To say nothing of your love life.

Chronic consumption of alcohol is a libido-killer in both men and women.  It seriously lowers testosterone levels in men, and causes the testicles to shrink, as well as promoting impotence.  If you read the article I recently wrote for men on the importance of maintaining healthy levels of testosterone with weight and physical training, you’ll understand just how negative these alcohol-induced reductions are.

Alcohol increases the amount of recovery time that you need to heal and restore your muscles after hard physical labor or exercise.  Your liver works hard to excrete the alcohol and the toxins associated with it.  A substantial amount of energy is also needed to break down the molecules and process them.  If you work out for an hour in the gym and then go and have a beer or a glass of wine, you have just ruined or severely cramped the gains you may have experienced.

Tissue repair and the uptake of amino acids are also severely hampered by alcohol consumption.  Studies in the past have shown that a glass of wine will lower the triglycerides in the bloodstream and help prevent blood clotting.  This is true, but guess what?  So will a regular exercise program!  You can lower those triglycerides and build yourself up!  Alcohol also tends to reduce the uptake of essential vitamins and minerals, such as Vitamin C and calcium with long-term consumption.

Will it kill you or cripple you to have a drink every now and then, such as once a month?  Consult with your doctor first, but it probably will not harm you.  I still stand by the fact that you don’t really need it, and it can cause your training and physical fitness regimen to suffer.  I haven’t even mentioned the other negative effects that heavy drinking can cause, but you can figure them out if you haven’t experienced them yourself.

To summarize, alcohol has its uses and is not a “villain,” and neither are people who consume it responsibly villains.  Just keep in mind that this piece is not designed to “excoriate” alcohol, but to keep you informed of the negative effects it can have on your physical fitness training when it is consumed.  Feel stressed?  Put on the bag gloves and beat up the heavy bag for ten or fifteen minutes.  If you still feel that you need a drink, well, then down a big shake full of amino acids…that’ll serve you better!  Stay healthy, make gains, and keep in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Here’s Everything You Need to Know About First Aid for Your Eyes

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There probably isn’t any part of your body that is more sensitive, exposed, or crucial to your survival than your eyeballs. You use these soft, delicate organs during every waking moment and for just about every task, but unfortunately the only thing that protects them are a few eyelashes and 1mm thick eyelids. Evolution is cruel like that.

So given the vulnerability of our eyes, it would be wise to brush up on the first aid measures that should be taken in an emergency to protect them. Below are the most common eye injures and the protective procedures that you need to take to prevent further damage, at least until you can see a doctor:

Chemical Exposure

If a caustic chemical ever gets splashed into your eyes, your first knee jerk response will probably be to close them. In this instance however, that’s a bad idea. You want to keep your eyes open so that the chemical doesn’t get trapped under your eyelids. Find a source of water and rinse them out for 15-20 minutes while keeping your eyes open the whole time, and seek medical attention.

Foreign Debris

We’ve all had some kind of debris in our eyes at one point or another. It’s a situation that your eyes are normally capable of correcting themselves by tearing up and washing the debris away. But if the condition persists, refrain from rubbing your eyes. It’ll only irritate them more. Pull your upper lid down and blink repeatedly. If that doesn’t work, you need to pull open both eyelids and roll your eye around before rinsing it out. You can repeat that process a few times if it doesn’t work right away.

Embedded Foreign Object

If you have a foreign object embedded in your eye, the measures you need to take aren’t what you might expect. Unlike the previously mentioned first aid procedures, you’re not supposed to wash out your eyes (this also applies to any cut or puncture wounds to the eye). You’re also not supposed to remove the object. Find something that you can place over the eye without applying too mush pressure to it, such as large, loose-fitting goggles or a plastic cup; then seek medical attention.

Blunt Force Trauma

The most important thing to do if you suffer a blow to the eye, is to reduce the swelling. Apply a cold compress or ice to the eye for 5 or 10 minute intervals. You can also take ibuprofen for the pain and swelling. After a 24 hour period, begin using a warm compress instead. You need to look out for any bleeding or vision problems. Or if it hurts to move your eyes, there may be damage to the eye socket. In those cases, you need to find a doctor.

Welder’s Flash

You probably already know that the light from a welding arc can hurt your eyes. This is called “welder’s flash”, and it’s why every welder has to wear a mask with tinted glass. However, there’s a good reason why this condition goes by many names, including “snow blindness” and “corneal flash burn.” It can be caused by any overexposure to ultraviolet light. Sunlight that reflects off of snow, sand, or water can also cause the condition.

The symptoms may include eye pain, severe light sensitivity, bloodshot eyes, blurry vision, and a gritty sensation under the eyelids. To treat the condition, you need to stay indoors in a dark room and wear sunglasses as much as possible for 1 or 2 days. You should also be applying artificial tears on a regular basis. If you wear contact lenses, remove them until your eyes heal. Most victim’s of welder’s flash find that a cold compress helps alleviate the symptoms. If your symptoms continue for more than a couple of days or worsen after 1 day, then you should see a doctor.

 

References:

http://www.healthline.com/health/first-aid/eye-care#blows-to-the-eye

http://www.webmd.com/first-aid/eye-injuries-treatment

http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/snowblind.htm

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Prepared Home: 50 Essential Items to Put in Your Ultimate Survival Medical Kit

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 Would you have the supplies you needed to stop a severe bleed? Do you know what household items you could use if someone was suffering from dehydration? What will you do if someone in the home has shortness of breath?

Short-term disasters can bring on a myriad of medical situations and they can occur very quickly. Because of the disaster, roads may be impassable, or in some cases, the hospitals may be at capacity and cannot take in any more patients. With that in mind, it is important to know what the most common medical emergencies are and prepare accordingly for them. In 2006, The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) released a 2006 Emergency Department Summary that gathered statistics of emergency department use, including the most common reasons adults and children sought medical care and treatment. Having medical supplies that could assist in these common medical emergencies would be proactive on your part.

    •  Children fever
    • Childhood earache
    • Various injuries such as sprains, strains, broken bones
    • Chest pain
    • Abdominal pain
    • Back pain
    • Shortness of breath

In short-term disasters, prepare for water-related illnesses. This will be very common given the close proximity to contaminated water sources. In The Prepper’s Blueprint, it states, “The relationship between communicable diseases and disasters exist and merits special attention. When there is a short-term emergency, there is an increased number of hospital visits and admissions from common diarrhea-related  diseases, acute respiratory infections, dermatitis, and other causes. These type of medical issues are due to those coming in direct contact with flood waters contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage. These contamination factors will cause irritation to skin and a host of other medical conditions.”

In longer-term disasters, burns, cuts, rashes and secondary infections will also be very common medical emergencies to prepare for. Folks, these are the disasters you will likely face and it is imperative that you prepare for this with proper medical supplies and knowledge.

I realize that there are a lot of medical conditions to think about. The best approach is to look at the basics and prepare for those. Many medical items can be used for multiple disasters, so take comfort in this and prepare accordingly.

Build the Ultimate 1 Year Medical Supply with These First Aid Basics

Experts suggest that each home have a basic medical supply that is unique to your family’s needs. Therefore, keep any preexisting conditions and allergies any family members may have, as well as the above list of the most common medical conditions that hospitals see. It is within your best interest to ensure that you have any and all necessary medications that require prescriptions before an emergency happens.We all have our fair share of band-aids and antibiotic ointment, but do you have medical supplies that can help with true medical emergencies? The following list is your basic medical preparations broken into sections of need to help in your organization.


Hygiene

  • Liquid antibacterial hand soap – 20
  • Disposable hand wipes – 20
  • Antibacterial hand sanitizer – 20
  • Feminine items – 12 packages
  • Extra baby needs (diapers, wipes, pacifiers, bottles, medicine, etc.) – in quantity
  • Exam gloves – 5 boxes

Essential Medical Tools

  • Trauma shears
  • Pen light or small flash light
  • Scalpel with extra blades
  • Stethoscope
  • Irrigation syringe
  • Tweezers
  • Thermometer
  • Foam splint – 2 per family member
  • Thermometer

Over-the-Counter Products

  • Aspirin or non-aspirin pain reliever (for adults and children) – 5 bottles
  • Stool softener – 5 bottles
  • Electrolyte powder – 3 boxes
  • Cold/flu medications – 2 boxes per family member
  • Expectorant/decongestants – 3 per family member
  • Hydrocortisone – 3
  • Miconazole/anti-fungal – 3
  • Syrup of Ipecac and activated charcoal – 2
  • Eye care (e.g., contact lens case, cleansing solution, eye moisture drops) – 3 per family member

Natural Supplements

Wound Care

  • Disinfectant (Betadine, isopropyl alcohol, iodine, hydrogen peroxide, etc.) – 2 per family member
  • Band-aids – 3 large boxes in assorted sizes
  • Antibiotic ointment – 5
  • Instant cold and hot packs – 10
  • 1 week of prescription medications – as many as you are able to get with your prescription
  • Ace bandages – 10
  • Non- stick gauze pads in assorted sizes (3×3 and 4×4) – 10 boxes
  • Sterile roller bandages – 5
  • Surgical sponges – 5
  • Adhesive tape or duct tape – 5
  • Steri-strips – 5
  • Moleskin – 3
  • Respirator masks – 4
  • CPR microshield – 1 per family member
  • Suture kit – 3 per family member
  • QuikClot® compression bandages – 2 per family member
  • Tourniquet – 2
  • Thermal Mylar blanket – 1 per family member
  • Antibiotics

*These are your minimum quantities. If you are able to do so, prepare for more.


Customize Your Supplies

Many believe that a basic store-bought medical kit will provide for all of  their medical needs, but these kits tend to be overloaded with unneeded items (i.e., 500 band aids). Buying your own medical supplies allows you to customize your kit to fit your family’s unique needs and is more economical. In fact, you can purchase many of these items at your local Dollar Store to save money.  Customizing your family’s medical supply gives your family members the best chance at being cared for when a medical emergency arises. Further, take your preparedness a step further and organize your medical preps and create medical response packs for quick acting.

Storing Medical Supplies

How you store your first aid supplies is every bit as important as having the supplies in the first place.

Medicines can lose potency or spoil if they are subject to moisture, temperature fluctuations, and light.  For example, aspirin begins to break down when it is exposed to a slight amount of moisture.

Unless the instructions indicate otherwise, store medications in a cool, dark place that is out of the reach of children.   However, you still want to store the medical supplies in a place that is easily accessible to adults, who may need to respond very quickly in the event of a medical crisis.

Check expiration dates periodically to ensure the medicines are still good to use.  While most medicines lose potency once they’re past the expiration date, there are a few that will actually make a person extremely ill if taken after it spoils.  For example, tetracycline antibiotics that have spoiled can cause a severe, sometimes deadly, kidney ailment.

Signs of Expired Medicines

Although there is data that states most medicines can last longer than their expiration dates, it is important to understand that using medicine years past its expiration date can lose effectiveness and in some cases, change its chemical makeup. If you are in a survival situation where your life depended on an outdated drug, then it is wise to follow the cliché “better safe than sorry”.

Knowing the signs of expired medicine can help indicate when new items are needed.

  • Creams or ointments which are discolored or have changed in texture.
  • Creams or ointments which have cracked or separated.
  • The medicines smell has changed since it was opened.
  • Tablets are broken or chipped and have changed color.

Source – www.generalmedicine.suite101.com

Bear in mind, there are some medications that should never be used after their expiration and could have severe consequences for patients. These include:

  • Anticonvulsants – narrow therapeutic index
  • Dilantin, phenobarbital – very quickly lose potency
  • Nitroglycerin – very quickly lose potency
  • Warfarin – narrow therapeutic index
  • Procan SR – sustained release procainamide
  • Theophylline – very quickly lose potency
  • Digoxin – narrow therapeutic index
  • Thyroid preparations
  • Paraldehyde
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Epinephrine – very quickly lose potency
  • Insulin – very quickly lose potency
  • Eye drops – eyes are particularly sensitive to any bacteria that might grow in a solution once a preservative degrades.

Source

Don’t limit first aid supplies to your home

Store a first aid kit in the car (being careful with heat sensitive items) and also tuck some medical supplies into your 72-hour bag. This way, you can be ready to deal with medical emergencies wherever they happen to occur.

To conclude, there will always be the threat of completely unanticipated disasters, but your overall preparedness should enable you to effectively deal with those situations when they arise. This year supply of first aid items will enable you to prepare for medical emergencies when the hospitals aren’t an option.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Emergency Wound Care: When All You Have is in Your Pantry

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 Without access to hospitals and emergency medical care during off-grid emergencies, a simply infection from wounds can become life-threatening. Having knowledge of alternative medical treatments using natural wound therapies could save a life.

 

Years ago, the Mrs. and I made a major move.  We had a specific timetable to adhere to, and as we were moving ourselves, efficiency was the word that exemplified our overall goals.  About an hour before we were going to batten down the hatches and hit the road, she slipped and slammed her shin on the edge of the moving van’s bumper: a combination of a laceration and abrasion, as well as potential for a broken bone.

What to do on something such as this?  Well, we certainly had enough antibiotics and (if it was broken) the hospital was close by.  She/we decided on some ice, a bandage, and (so as not to go into our antibiotics) herbal aids.  Oregano is one of the best herbs to have on hand for natural medicine and an astringent can  be made from oregano tincture to wipe down the abrasion.


Oregano Tincture

  • Add handfuls of oregano flower and leaves to a pint-size jar and cover them with 80-proof alcohol, such as vodka.
  • Allow the jar to sit for 3-6 weeks out of sunlight.
  • Strain the mixture and transfer to a tincture bottle, or proceed to make a double-strength infusion.

For oral dosage: The standard adult dose is 1/2 to 1 teaspoon up to three times a day, as needed. Children usually get 1/4 to 1/3 of the adult dose.

To make astringent: Add 1 tablespoon oregano tincture to 1 cup of distilled water.

Learn more ways to disinfect wounds using pantry staples


Wound Care Made with Sugar and Honey

Once we applied the astringent to the wound, we made up a sugar formula that was common during the Napoleonic era:

  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon of honey

Mix sugar and honey together and pack the laceration with it, spreading it liberally upon the abrasion and dressing it.

Monitor and change dressing daily.


Why Sugar and Honey Is Great For Natural Wound Care

We’re talking about plain white sugar, here: the same kind vilified for the diet is actually very beneficial with regard to wound therapy.  The sugar promotes tissue repair, while fostering an antimicrobial, anaerobic environment regarding the wound.  The sugar can be mixed with honey or glycerin (honey is cheaper and easier to get a hold of).  On some kind of laceration, you can pack it with the mixture after cleaning out the laceration with clean water and/or a mild astringent (such as the one I first mentioned).

The dressing needs to be changed once every day, and the packed laceration monitored for signs of swelling and tenderness.  Also, put fresh mixture to cover the overall wound, and then redress it with a fresh dressing and bandage.  The sugar will also reduce the amount of scarring and enable the wound to heal at a faster rate.

Sugar can also be used as an Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS), in combination with table salt.  Take a one-quart bottle (remember how I advised to save those empty Gatorade and Power-Ade bottles, the 32-ouncers?  This is why.), and fill it up with water, leaving a little space.  Put ½ cup of your sugar into it, and about ½ tsp of salt.  Voila!  You have effectively made your own field-expedient “Gatorade,” minus the potassium.  The reason this is good is that the sugar will provide quick sugar to the bloodstream, while the salt will help to replace what you have either lost from sweating or from trauma.

Your sugars and honeys (yes, honey is a form of sugar) can be used to sweeten up a tincture that you might have to take in water.  If you have ever had Lomatium (Lomatium dissectum), it is one of the worst-tasting substances you can imagine.  We adults can grin and bear it, but when you’re administering a tincture to a kid, it is a big help to make it taste not quite so bad.

Honey For Wound Care

Honey is also good for wounds/abrasions/cuts of the mouth, as it is a demulcent that soothes abraded tissues, and it also is a medium that microbes do not live in.  Who doesn’t remember the time-honored honey and lemon mixture for a sore throat?  The thing of it is: it works, and if it works it should be employed.  For the wound-packing mixture I advised above?  Honey is the medium that keeps the sugar from falling out of the wound and congeals it to keep the dressing viable longer.

The reason these should be kept in mind: when the SHTF they are easily found.  You’re much more likely to find either of these two (sugar and/or honey) in a gas station or convenience store out in the middle of nowhere than a Cephalosporin such as Keflex (Cephalexin, if you prefer) for a soft tissue injury.  That’s what this is all about: winning with the weapons you have and tailor-making things you can rely on.  Practice with them sometime for something minor.  You’ll see results and build confidence in what you do.  That’s the way!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Ditch Medicine with The Herbal Prepper!

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Ditch Medicine Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Audio in player below! This episode is all about “ditch medicine”. Ditch medicine makes due with what you have on hand. The idea is to stay alive (or keep someone else alive) with whatever is available, until you reach help or help finds you. Sometimes this includes herbs, … Continue reading Ditch Medicine with The Herbal Prepper!

The post Ditch Medicine with The Herbal Prepper! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

When Seconds Count: 5 Items for Quick-Action Response

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1FIRST RESPONSE KITS

Picture This:

  1. You just hit a deer on the road about halfway between work and home on your 30-mile one-way commute. As you tried to avoid him, you swerved and hit a patch of ice and went off of an embankment.  Ramming a tree, you went unconscious.  You came to only to find a large laceration about 4” long running across your forehead
  1. You are just about to leave work when suddenly the entire building shakes. You’re up on the fifth floor, and a ceiling joist gives way, and half of the 6th floor of your workplace is now also on the fifth floor.  Even worse: you’re pinned under a beam and a big piece of jagged wood has gone right into your thigh.
  1. You’re in a very packed and congested shopping mall and suddenly, two guys with masks turn the corner with AK-47’s yelling in Arabic, firing their weapons in all directions. One of the bullets ricochets and hit you in the calf.

ReadyNutrition Readers, hopefully you are never in one of the examples…and really hopefully, not the same guy or gal in all three of them (that would really be bad luck, wouldn’t it?).  The point is that weird things, such as auto accidents, earthquakes, or terrorist Jihadists assaulting Chic-fil-A happen virtually all the time, now.  You may be just the innocent bystander or unwilling participant mentioned in one of these tragedies.  We hope that isn’t the case.

But if it is?  You had better be as ready as you can.  Let’s talk about some things that could give you a winning edge that you may be able to tote around on your person, either in your pockets or in a small bag.  We’re going to address some common problems that these unlucky individuals are facing in each of these scenarios.

Bad wounds – laceration, impaled wood, and a bullet.  All are serious, and each of them will require immediate medical attention.  The problem is you may not have the time to wait until trained personnel reach you, and (in the case of a SHTF event) they may never reach you.  But maybe you have these, for starters:

  1. Outdoor Wound Care Kit: with Celox, made by Total Resources, Int’l, accessible via totalresourcesintl.com.  The Celox clots the blood within 60 seconds.  The whole kit is about $8.00 at Wal-Mart.  Great for bullet wounds and lacerations…. think “Stop Gap,” and stop that bleeding, while you’re sealing up the gaps.
  2. The Army Field Dressing: Seriously, this one is a good one that you really need to pick up.  It’s listed as Dressing, First Aid, Field, Camouflaged, 4” x 6 ¼ to 7 ¼ inches NSN 6510-00-159-4883.  It has its own “tails” to tie it off and bind up that wound.
  3.  Fish Mox Forte: Fish Amoxicillin, comes in 500 mg capsules of 100 per bottle at about $40 per bottle. Good to throw a course of antibiotics on immediately when faced with a dirty wound.
  4. Electrolyte Stamina Power Pak: This electrolyte made by Trace Minerals Research is a type of ORS (Oral Rehydration Solution) that you mix with about 6 ounces of water. Provides all of your electrolytes, such as Sodium, Potassium, and Magnesium.  If you’re conscious, you can drink fluids with any of the above examples, and if so, these packets will give you a super-helping of electrolytes, as well as other essential minerals you need.
  5. St. John’s Wort: available at Wal-Mart under Spring Valley Brand, 300 mg capsules with 150 capsules per bottle, at about $8.00 apiece. St. John’s Wort is great for dealing with depression and stress.  It is also a powerful antibiotic that is effective against bacteria and viruses.  Take some according to the directions on the package.

To summarize, these are a few things you can tote around with you in a jacket or cargo pocket that will give you an immediate edge when a situation arises that calls for you to work on it immediately.  Spread it out and make kits as such for your family.  Remember: when something happens to them and you’re working on the problem, use their stuff…your stuff is for you, and if you “go down,” they can go to it and treat your problem…with your supplies.  Stay ready and rock steady!

A little bit of that prep beforehand goes a long way.  Familiarize yourself with it and all of the capabilities at your disposal.  A pile of supplies that you don’t know how to use is just a pile of supplies.  Keep fighting that good fight, drink coffee, make pemmican with my recipe, and have a good one!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Avoid a Sprained Ankle

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In an emergency situation, it is imperative that you are healthy and strong enough to remain alert, prepared, and most of all, mobile. You have no way of knowing if your home base will be compromised or not and/or if a natural disaster or other circumstance will have you on the run. Something as seemingly innocuous as a sprained ankle can mean the difference between making a getaway or getting stuck.

History Repeats Itself

Many people will tell you that they have suffered from a sprained or twisted ankle at some point in their lifetime. However, more than half of those people who have done so never seek professional medical treatment because it is “just a sprain” and they don’t see how a doctor can help them. This is risky because the majority of ankle sprains will occur again at some point later in life. A sprained ankle that does not receive the appropriate physical therapy during and after healing often results in a weaker joint. This can lead to a myriad of issues, including problems maintaining proper balance, developing a slight limp or altered gait, and having a joint that is unstable and more likely to twist or collapse again. In very serious cases, a sprained ankle left untreated can result in a lifetime of pain and immobility.

Bad Advice Following a Sprain

There is a lot of really bad advice out there about what to do following a sprained ankle. The worst of all is the adage to “walk it off” or ignore a sprain. You must immediately stop doing whatever exercise or activity caused the sprain and take all weight off of the ankle. The moments following a sprain are the most critical when inflammation and swelling put the joint at risk. If possible, head to the ER for a medical consultation, especially if the pain is severe and lasts for more than a few days. Although in most cases, an X-ray or M.R.I. is not needed to make an accurate diagnosis, you need to rule out the possibility of a more severe injury. A doctor can give you a plan for therapy to strengthen and heal the joint.

Prevention is the Best Plan

Your best bet is to not get an ankle injury in the first place. This means wearing appropriate shoes for your activity, protecting your joints, and making sure that the ground surfaces you are using are level and clear of all debris. A majority of ankle sprains occur not during intensive sports or activities, but in everyday walking situations. Don’t put your health at risk for fashion trends—keep your shoes low-heeled with sufficient tread. Hold onto handrails when walking up or down stairs, and limit walking in icy or very wet conditions if possible.

The stronger your ankles are, the more you can avoid getting an ankle injury in the first place. The muscles around your joint help to protect and stabilize, so building up those muscles with the following exercises can be very beneficial.

Three Exercised that Strengthen the Ankle

Ankle Alphabet

Sit on the ground with your knees up and your legs bent in front of you. Cross one leg over the other and “trace” the shape of each letter of the alphabet with your ankle. This will feel very easy at first but by the end of the alphabet, you might have trouble remaining steady or completing the shapes. This means it’s working! Switch to the other leg and repeat.

Calf Raises

This exercise is the single most important strengthening exercise you can do to build up the muscles around your ankles. Simply stand with your feet apart, and shift weight off of your heels and onto your toes (like you are on tiptoe with both feet). Do 25 reps and work your way up to 50 (do not exceed 50 reps without consulting your doctor first–you want to build strength but not over-fatigue the muscles, which can lead to injury)

Tree Pose

This balancing yoga pose is simply standing on one leg with the other one bent and placed on the knee. Beginners might have trouble getting the bent leg up to knee height, so simply lifting it off the floor will suffice. This is a balancing pose that requires core strength, so beginners might also want to have a wall or rail nearby in case they begin to fall. Your body will shake as it stabilizes itself—this is a sign that the muscles are working.

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

These are the Building Blocks of Survival

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amino-acidReadyNutrition Readers, we are going to cover a few tips and pointers you can use in your preparedness stance.  I word it in that manner because you are never truly done with preparedness.  Even if you had every supply known to man, you still must work on yourself, on other perishable skills (shooting, first-aid, etc.), and on your procedures (SOP’s if you will).  As a survivalist and preparedness adherent, you must always keep this in mind: you’re a work in progress, and neither the work nor the progress ever stops.

We’re going to mention protein and amino acids because they are both so important for you.  When I had surgery about 6 years ago, my recovery time was cut in half from the doctor’s original prognostication because of my intake of protein supplements and amino acids.  When you have traumatic injury, surgery, exercise, or conditions of physical and emotional stress and trauma, the supplements will aid your recovery and ability to weather the storm.

I’m not going to delve into categories of vegan discipline, gluten free diets, or non-GMO foods.  Such is not within the basic scope of this article and would require attentions that would detract from the main message: how to obtain and use protein and supplements effectively.  You will face (in a SHTF scenario) a great deal of difficulty in obtaining protein that you have not already stocked up beforehand.

Proteins themselves are essential in the formation of cellular tissue and virtually every hormonal and endocrine function in the human body.  Proteins degrade, and this means that they wear out, or fall apart over a certain period of time, dependent upon the particular tissue in the body.  Protein turnover is how they break down and then are recycled to form new protein structures.  The average protein lifespan in our cells is 1-2 days; the protein is constantly being broken down and then replenished.

In order to maintain itself, the body must also take in protein, and amino acids are the basic structures that are needed to manufacture proteins.  There are nine amino acids that are considered essential.  By this term essential, these amino acids cannot be synthesized (or manufactured) within the human body, but must be taken in through food/diet.  These nine are histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine.

The highest sources of amino acids in food include watercress and spirulina (which even exceed meat), pumpkin, leafy greens, hemp seeds, chia seeds, soybeans, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds and sunflower butter, almonds, avocados, figs, raisins, quinoa, and wheat.

In addition to these nine are six conditional amino acids: arginine, cysteine, glutamine, glycine, proline, and tyrosine.  This means their synthesis (production by the human body) is limited by physical condition and/or environmental condition (to include diet and trauma).

Then there are BCAA’s (branched-chain amino acids) and these are, in particular, the proteinogenic BCAA’s…and there are three of them: isoleucine, leucine, and valine.

These three are very important, because as you may have noted, they are also three of the nine essential amino acids that cannot be synthesized by the body as mentioned earlier.

When it comes to weight training and bodybuilding, these BCAA’s are essential to help with tissue repair and (eventually) muscle growth.  Many doctors discount them as not having the effects that weightlifters claim.  I can personally shoot that down, as I bench press 4 sets of 6 with 350 lbs. and max over 400 lbs.  I’m doing seated behind-the-neck military presses 4 sets of 6 with 225 lbs.  If the learned doctor prefers to “teach” me how the BCAA’s are not of use, let’s see if his physical training regimen stacks up to mine.

All of the theories in the world are worthless unless they can be placed into practice.

Protein works, both for your physical training intake and for tissue repair following a workout scenario, or a traumatic event/series of events.  I am recommending what I use.  I supplement my meals with 2-3 “shakes” of milk and protein powder.  I prefer Target’s brands of Market Pantry whey powder with 25 grams of protein per serving.  These have all of the amino acids I need.  I also use Rapid Drive Amino Series BCAA 5000, the 12.32 oz. size with 50 servings, running about $30 a can.  This gives the three BCAA’s that are also essential; I mix it with water and drink it post-workout and one before bed on days I lift.

The protein requirements are different for men and women and differ also by physical condition and needs.  Average daily requirements can be looked up in with differing numbers in just about every text.  I have found that as a man weighing about 200 lbs., I need between 200-300 grams of protein per day.  Not all of this is meat, and as I said, I supplement with the shakes which give me about 40 grams per shake when I add milk and peanut butter.  The time to store up your supplements is now, along with high-protein foods: canned meats and fish, peanut butter, canned chicken.  Believe me, under adverse conditions of physical and emotional stress, your needs per day shoot up akin to a rocket.

You will need to work up an exercise and dietary regimen in order to prepare yourself for situations in the days to come.  Consult with your doctor on any exercise program or fitness regimen, as they have the legal authority to advise on health treatment in our Soviet-style society.  Keep in mind that these guys do have investments in companies whose business it is to make sure you’re “well,” such as drug companies and other “prescribed” remedial treatments.

I’m here to tell you, it’s important to keep in shape, have supplies of proteins and supplements, and plan a fitness and exercise program that will properly sustain and maintain your body’s physical needs.  Keep up the good fight and don’t stop the training!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Eyes Have It: Eye-Protection in the Winter Wilderness

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File:06March-Sunshine 07.jpgReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this special segment of reporting for Winter First-Aid Trauma has to do mainly with preventative measures in dealing with eye protection, something that most people do not consider until after they have problems.  Your eyes are, arguably, the most important sensory organs that you have.  The eyes are (for what they are) fairly durable; however, there are limits for their function.  One of those limits is imposed by extreme cold and hazards associated with winter weather.

Prepare for any disaster with this step-by-step manual

Firstly we must understand what the eyes are and how they function.  The eyes are mostly comprised of water; therefore, it can easily be seen (no pun intended!) how frozen temperatures can adversely affect the eye.  The vitreous humor (the actual fluid portion of the eye) is kept warm by the ambient body temperature and also the vessels that supply the eyes with blood.  In periods of extreme cold, this temperature can be greatly reduced.  Blinking is one of the actions of the eye that both moistens it and also allows accessory muscles to give off heat that keep the eyes warm.  In addition, the closed and clenched eyelids can help to hold in some of the heat and protect against cold.

Now, here in Montana goggles (at some point) are a must.  I prefer lightly tinted wraparounds that allow outward “breathing” of the eyes (yes, the eyes do give off heat and moisture) and that are fog-resistant.  These goggles lock in the eyes’ ambient heat and protect them from the gale force winds and frigid temperatures.  When you are looking around outside (no pun intended, once again!) and the temperature is -25 degrees Fahrenheit or colder, you better be sure to have eye protection.

There are many different brands.  I do not have a personal favorite.  Just take note of this: the tinting on your goggles must afford UV protection (400 is the guideline you can work off of, indicating the percent of UV rays shielded).  This factor is important because if they are just tinted without providing the protection from ultraviolet rays, the eye and the retina can suffer damage.  This is because tinting in itself (because of the darker view) allows the pupil to expand.  Such will let in more light; however, more UV rays also penetrate, and this can lead to retinal damage and/or snow blindness.  Make sure they have UV protection (minimum 100%).

When it is cold, but not below freezing, I highly recommend sunglasses.  The sun is lower in the sky in the winter, and this allows for the human eye to pick up more light, especially in the form of the aforementioned UV rays.  Once again the same principle applies as with the goggles.  The sunglasses should have (as your guideline) a 400% UV protection factor.  Remember, these will help immensely against snow glare and potential snow blindness.  Among the problems besides direct or snow-reflected light are reflections from icy or shiny spots when you’re hiking or climbing.

Snow Blindness

Snow blindness occurs when a partial (or permanent) injury to the retina by prolonged or intense light exposure renders the eyes incapable of normal vision.  Prolonged light exposure would include long hikes without any eye protection as mentioned in the previous paragraphs.  In a survival situation where there are no sunglasses in the survivor’s first aid pack, this can (and often does) occur in flat, open areas when crossing in the daylight hours during peak sunlight exposure times.

Signs and symptoms of snow blindness are as follows:

  1. The sensation of sand/grit within the eyes, accompanied by pain and soreness both in and over the eyes. This pain is exacerbated when you move your eyeballs.
  2. Runny/watery eyes
  3. Redness of the eyes and the rims/edges
  4. Headache (increased duration usually increases the severity)
  5. Increased light sensitivity/pain in the eyes from the increased light

Treating Snow Blindness

The immediate first-aid actions to be taken are to remove your eyes from the light source/get out of the light.  Taking shelter in a darkened area can do this.  Another thing to do is to cover both eyes with a dark or thick cloth.  You can substitute anything that will interfere with exposure to the light…bandages, dark glasses, a knit hat doubled up and pulled over the eyes…use your imagination.  Of course, before you do this, make sure you’re in a safe area that you can rest and alleviate the exposure of the eyes to any light.

In this vein one can see that it is best to travel in either the backcountry of the Alaskan Yukon or in the ice flats of the Dakotas in the winter months with a field-partner.  One can assist the other in time of trouble and thereby cut down on the risk of something else happening.  With few exceptions, all types of winter tragedies and trauma can be prepared for to a certain degree with a minimum amount of funds and efforts.

To conclude, the eyes are very sensitive and precious instruments that need to be maintained and protected.  Should you suffer from any eye injuries as mentioned in this article, I highly recommend having an eye exam after you return home to make sure that no further complications may be underlying.  Plan and prepare, and in this manner you stand the best chance at making your outdoor excursions productive and enjoyable.  You’ll be able to rest assured that you have taken steps to take care of trouble before it turns to tragedy.  Have a good one, and “keep an eye out” for one another!

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Build a Prepper’s Medical Emergency Kit on a Budget

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first-aid-dollar-photo-clubWhen disaster strikes, you want to know that you have done what you can to prepare for the worst. If an event such as a hurricane or nuclear disaster forces you and your family to leave your home without warning, you could easily find yourself in a serious situation where you will need first-aid medical attention. However, during natural or unnatural disasters, emergency medical attention might not be able to come to your location, so having the resources and knowledge to help yourself and your family members at a time like this can be the difference between life and death.

In the midst of a catastrophe, having a functional medical emergency kit is essential for survival, and sometimes you have to plan for it on a limited budget. In this case, the best approach is to build your own, while utilizing only the most critical items you need for your survival.

Prepare for any disaster step-by-step

Build Your Own: Four Essential Medical Categories to Concentrate On

The four general categories you will want to take into consideration for your medical kit preparations are: ointment, bandages, tools and medicine. Knowing the necessary components for each category will help you to form the most cost-effective kit.

Ointment

The first and most important in this category is antiseptic wipes, like iodine wipes or alcohol-based wipes. In addition to wipes, you may also want to include an antibacterial ointment, like bacitracin.  These are other ointments you may also find valuable:

  • Hand-sanitizing gel
  • Insect repellent
  • Insect sting relief treatment
  • Iodine liquid
  • Sunscreen
  • Lip balm
  • Biodegradable soap
  • Collapsible water sink or basin
  • Water-treatment chemicals

Bandages

You want to have bandages that can address any possible injury that may arise. Keep in mind that a person can die after just 10-15 minutes if they are bleeding from a major artery; you will want to have sufficient bandages to stop blood flow and close the wound. Remember, the best thing you can do for an actively bleeding wound is to apply pressure until you are able to apply ointment or bandages. The Israeli Battle Bandage is a first-aid device commonly used for major wounds, and it’s only $9. You will also want to include the following bandages in your medical kit:

  • Blood-stopping (hemostatic) gauze
  • Triangular cravat bandages
  • SAM splint and finger splint
  • Stretch-to-form bandages
  • Liquid bandages
  • Medical adhesive tape
  • Band-aids (various sizes)

Tools

You are definitely going to want a suture kit as well as scissors and fine-point forceps to deal with critical injuries. You may want to consider buying paramedic shears in order to cut through clothing for injuries that require fast response time. Cotton-tipped swabs will be helpful for applying iodine liquid to wounds. In addition to these items, here are a few other tools that will likely be useful:

  • Multi-tool (or pocket knife)
  • CPR mask
  • Emergency heat-reflecting blanket
  • Headlamp (or flashlight) with extra batteries
  • Safety pins
  • Industrial gloves (preferably non-latex)
  • Needle-nose pliers

Medicine

There are a number of medications and treatments that you will want to consider packing in your medical emergency kit. Aloe Vera can be helpful as both as sun screen and a treatment for sunburns. You may also want injectable epinephrine, commonly known as an “Epipen” (only $7), to treat allergic reactions. Here are a number of other medications or treatments that one may require:

  • Antihistamines for allergic reactions
  • Prescription medications
  • Glucose to treat hypoglycemia
  • Eye drops
  • Aspirin
  • Iodine tablets for water purification
  • Multivitamins

Take into account the above mentioned items and each of the general categories as you compare prices on medical emergency kits that are prepackaged versus individual items. Many of the prepackaged kits have a great variation of items, but they may be lacking on some of the critical components previously mentioned, and this is why it often the most cost-effective strategy to build your own.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Dealing with Gunshot Wounds in SHTF

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Written by Huples on The Prepper Journal.

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Editor’s Note: This post is another entry in the Prepper Writing Contest from Huples. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today.


The mantra of Guns, Bullets, and Beans is a reasonably common one but bullets go both ways. Almost everyone who has served in active duty involving gunshot injuries or has been involved in treating them will tell you never to engage in a fire fight unless you have no other choice. Rather than focusing on building a fortress to defend your supplies it is safer to build a home you can walk away from without compromising your supplies or getting on the wrong end of a gunshot wound.

Rule One: Do not get shot.

Rule Two: Get shot in a leg or arm without any bone involvement.

Rule Three: If you have to be in a fire fight make sure you kill them all before they can return fire.

I have never been shot and I have only had two guns pointed at me but I have nursed a fair number of shot ICU patients over the years. In SHTF things will be different and trauma care for shooting patients (I dislike the term ‘victims’ as it implies powerlessness) needs a hard look at especially if you live in an area of the world that has a lot of armed people around you. This article will have some biology (science is fun!) and I am not talking about body armor or types of ammunition (not my specialty but here are penetration estimates. If Pat uses them there will be graphic photos and I hope these will not trigger anyone but knowledge is power.

infographic-of-gunshot-injuries-for-writing-fiction

The article is long and I am not going into lung, abdominal, brain care as basically you are likely dead. Please look up lung injuries as knowing what tension pneumothorax, septic shock, and paralytic ileus are good ideas.

Basic Field Care if you are Shot

Avoid being shot again. Disengage and get to the safe area. All home and bug out locations should have a stocked and safe area away from the main buildings that is believed to be safe in the event of an attack.

A wounded man is helped to get away from gun shots Picture: AFP

A wounded man is helped to get away from gun shots
Picture: AFP

Do not scream “medic!” or “I’m hit!” There is a fire fight going on so do not give tactical information to the enemy or distract your side. Everyone on your team is a field medic and has practiced for this so no one helping you needs to be screaming for help either. You and/or they deal with it until after the fire fight. Stay off the radio until the fire fight is over and give no tactical details if summoning help. “Jimmy I’m at X and I’d like to see you” is better than “Jimmy! They shot me in my leg. It hurts. I need help now”

Look for the entrance area and check if there is an exit area. Survey yourself quickly for other injuries. Entry wounds can look insignificant and exit wounds can look dramatic. The actual issue is what was in the way and what is happening beneath these entry and exit points.

gunshot-wound

Exit wounds can look dramatic

Cover the wound’s entry and exit points with thick cloth or blood stopper bandage as soon as you can. Limit the blood flow by partial or a full tourniquet if you have knowledge to safely use one. Blood looks dramatic and it is hard to assess the amount. Pulse rising, blood pressure dropping, consciousness failing are signs of massive blood loss. Without intravenous infusions and/or blood transfusions you will likely die. I know some are prepping to give blood transfusions but this is a really dangerous and specialized intervention. Giving a basic intravenous of normal saline (0.9% sodium chloride) is simple and easily learned. Both are illegal to use but not to learn unless you are a medical doctor.

Leave this initial thick pad on no matter how wet it gets. Add more and do not remove any. I do not feel a blood clotter like the Israeli Bandage should be applied at this stage unless you have several in reserve. If you have one only consider using it after the next phase of care or buy more than one. Technology keeps evolving but if you use it can you remove it without an Operating Room?

If possible elevate the wound above your heart. This lowers the blood pressure locally and should decrease bleeding. Realistically it probably will be easier to raise your heart above the wound site.

If bone is injured splint it as it is for transport and apply the initial pad over the splint.

If it is not an abdominal injury drink as much water as you can and keep drinking one pint an hour. Sports mixes are a good idea as well. If abdominal you will likely die but stay nil by mouth (NPO) as you might get lucky and abdominal trauma is always worse if you take anything by mouth.

It is going to get painful quickly so use the brief pain-free period to move away from the bullets and get to safety.

Basic Field Care if you are the Medic

Yeah! We won and all the bad guys and girls are dead. As in all First Aid situations assess the area for possible threats prior to giving care. Any snipers waiting as your team-mate was screaming for help giving away his location? Has the shooter who did the hit been dealt with or are you next? Consider dragging the injured away from the scene before doing anything else.

When safe have a look and verify if they are alive or just barely alive? If dead or barely alive then do not waste time, energy, and supplies.

If you can see bits of their bowels, chances are slim for survival.

Reasonable signs of potential viability are that they are conscious and can talk to you in sentences. If they are able to do this has the wound caused abdominal contents to become free?

Sorry but without a surgeon and a good hospital/surgical set up your friend’s dead if you can see bits of their bowels. Brains oozing out of the wound, eyes, nose, or mouth are equally untreatable in SHTF so do not waste supplies on a futile attempt.

Then follow the steps you would take if you had been shot. Starting to go beyond these in the field is just not a good idea. Get them to the safe zone.

Safe Zone Preliminary Care

Everyone in your group should know how to do this as you might have to do it for yourself.

 Emergency War Surgery: The Survivalist's Medical Desk Reference

Emergency War Surgery: The Survivalist’s Medical Desk Reference

Unlike every film you have ever seen getting shot is extremely painful and shock is likely for the pain alone even if blood loss is minimal. Get calm and practice deep breathing techniques to slow and steady your breathing and your heart rate. If you have alcohol available do not drink it if you are shot. If you are the medic have a small amount. Seriously, I have a small bottle of brandy in my kit for me to swig if I am facing a major injury and it can also be used to sterilize instruments and your hands.

Okay. Now what are we facing here? If they are unconscious check for other wounds as there are many cases where the obvious and none fatal wound gets all the care while the insignificant and overlooked wound slowly kills the patient.

Strip them naked. Use scissors or a knife but get them fully naked unless they are conscious and are sure they have only one wound. Even so I am stripping them and doing a quick body search. Note where all the wounds are and where you see swelling and bruising. Is this survivable? If there is flank and/or side deep bruising from an abdominal wound likely means the spleen is damaged if on their left side or the liver if on their right side. Frankly they are going to die unless you can do surgical repair which is highly unlikely and is highly skilled. Wounds that go through the body are more survivable than those where the bullet remains inside but a through shot going through the deep abdominal area or chest is likely not one you can treat. No worries they will die quickly from blood loss or lack of oxygen.

If the decision to treat is made then clean the area around the wound and your exposed arms and forearms with something. Clean water if that is all you have or use the remaining brandy to clean your hands carefully. Soap and water is awesome hence having a stocked safe area previously set up for major injuries away from the areas likely to be in a fire fight is a good move. You can use multiple different liquids but the aim is to pour the external stuff AWAY from the wound and never towards it.

Having done that move them onto a fresh laundered sheet or have one placed under them. If possible have the room warm to avoid cold shock but you need the area naked to do this care. Avoid using beds as they are too low and the mattress will be ruined. A massage table or a folding plastic table is a good idea.

Using a powerful flash light (have a head lamp if you cannot get an assistant) pick out and remove everything you can see in the wound that is unattached to the patient. Clothing and bullet and bone fragments have to be removed or infection will occur for sure.

Now reassess blood loss. Is it arterial (bright red maybe but you can see it pulsing) or venous (dark for sure and steady stream)? If arterial use a tourniquet between the wound and the heart if possible, get sterile gloves on, and go in. Find the sight of bleeding and suture it. This can result in limb loss but most arteries can be sealed and blood flow can take alternative routes. At a pinch you can seal it with a hot piece of metal from a fire but frankly you likely will have the patient die of shock. This is not the movies. Still I’d consider it for a wound in a limb that cannot stop bleeding no mater my digging around in there.

Yes you can use back powder but only if it is a limb and the bleeding cannot be stopped. This will hurt and inflict a severe burn on top of the other injuries.

Set bones if you can and have to at this stage. The wound is as clean as you can get it and you have flushed it out with loads of cooled boiled water after adding a bit of salt. 0.9% sodium chloride is normal for the human body but flush it out a lot until most of the bleeding has stopped. You have removed every bit of dirt, clothing, and bullet you can see in there. You have stopped all major bleeding. Doing this on yourself is unrealistic despite the movies so everyone in your group needs to know how to do this not just the doctor or the nurse. They might be the one shot.

Start broad spectrum antibiotics and ensure 3-4 liters so fluid intake a day. Use the intravenous if you have to but keep them hydrated.

Broad Spectrum Antibiotics:

  • Amoxillin
  • Levofloxacin
  • Gatifloxacillin
  • Streptomycin
  • Tetracycline
  • Chloramphenicol

If bone involvement it is very important to use a broad spectrum antibiotic to avoid issues later on with chronic bone infection. If you have antibiotics then use them if the wound penetrated deep into the body. Hopefully their tetanus is up to date especially if soil has entered the wound which in SHTF is likely from clothing in a fire fight. Antibiotics will not help tetanus and it basically kills people horribly.

Ongoing Care

Evacuate them to a hospital with a trained doctor as soon as possible. If you can do this within 60 minutes you dramatically increase their chance of living. Okay if you cannot then try this!

Wound Care

If the outside of the dressing is clean and dry and there is no obvious smell, swelling, or severe pain then leave it on for 7 days. Do not peek!
Change the dressing using clean materials if sterile ones are unavailable. Laundered sheets work fairly well for this so have a supply kept aside for health care use. Unopened packs of baby wipes can also be considered very clean. Wash your hands and arms well with soap and water before and after giving all care and especially wound care. You do not need a face mask but do not breathe into the wound even if you are wearing one. The outsides of face masks are extremely contaminated and the human mouth is as well even if you floss frequently. Use cooled boiled salt water to soak and dressing that are stuck and take them off gently.

If the wound is bulging or leaking pus (yellow smelly stuff) then remove one or two sutures and let it be open to drain. Be aware that 7-14 days afterwards this can occur and the entire wound site might burst open. Flush everything with loads of cooled boiled salt water and attempt to push gently back into the body and then suture really well. Probably will die but worth a try if you have got this far. Open it carefully being sterile if possible and remove obviously dead tissue and wash everything out. Have a good look for any debris you missed the first time you treated this. This is a wound infection and needs 12-24 hour dressings until it heals (once or twice a day). Change the antibiotic given if you can at this point.
Do not use triple antibiotic cream, honey, or anything inside the body. Just don’t ever no matter the temptation. Flush with cooled boiled water and if open and you need to pack it use cooled boiled water-soaked sterile gauze.

General Care

Use limited bed rest. However sick they are turn them every 1-2 hours in bed and get them up in a chair as soon as possible and totally ignore their complaints about this. Immobility kills. Keep them hydrated well and use higher protein foods if available. Add a stool softener into the mix early on if they are immobile. Metamucil works fine if used early on. Let them rest a lot and avoid strain on the wound area but also make them feel useful. They can cut up clothing for toilet paper and other chores so make them earn their keep.

They will out of commission for a long time so have stored food available and firewood and drinks they can reach even in a weakened state. You might not be able to do this for them.

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Prepping for Medical Emergencies

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Written by Laura Johnson on The Prepper Journal.

Editor’s Note: This post contributed by Laura. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter the Prepper Writing Contest today.


Planning for medical emergencies is one of the biggest challenges one faces. This is especially true if the situation will occur with limited outside resources on which to rely. There are several things you can do to improve the odds for yourself and your loved ones, including solid medical knowledge, the leadership skills necessary to create a makeshift hospital, and a comprehensive medical stockpile.

Education

Many people underestimate the immense value an education in a practical field like medicine will have in emergency situations. These types of skills can be bartered for goods and services in addition to being beneficial for yourself and those in your party. Training as a nurse or doctor is obviously going to be at the top of any resident wish list. However, any medical training will include basic skills that could be valuable.

Any career in the medical field will pay well and allow you to make interpersonal connections, receive continuing education, and give you access to information earlier than the general public. All of these are important considerations when preparing for an uncertain future. Be sure to keep any textbooks and potentially useful class materials with your supplies to use for reference.

Medicinal foraging and herbalism are other medical skill sets that will be indispensable for the long-term maintenance of medical supplies. There are local courses in most regions that will teach participants to identify plants native to the area and the best places to find those plants with medicinal and nutritional value.

Herbalism studies will teach people to prepare those plants as effective treatments and remedies for a variety of medical concerns. While many natural remedies are not as effective as their modern-day counterparts, they are far more effective than no care at all. The ingredients to prepare them will also be more readily available if modern amenities are unavailable.

Makeshift Hospital

One’s leadership style will play a significant role in how well any makeshift hospital is organized and run, as well as the type of patient outcomes it produces. In times of disaster, everyone looks for one person to take control and make them feel safe. That person will wield substantial power within the community, and knowing how to competently care for others is an excellent starting point.

The list of supplies needed, and the organizational effort required to run a field hospital are immense.  Start with basic supplies and build as your training and budget allow. The most important component of successful adaptation will be in the training and implementation of any plans you make. Make an effort to have quarterly or annual preparedness training for everyone who will be working together in the event of a disaster. If everyone knows their role, where supplies are located, and how to handle specific scenarios the real event will go much more smoothly.

Medical Stockpile

It is important to have a portable medical kit as well as a more comprehensive stockpile for larger emergencies. The portable kit should contain everything necessary for basic survival. The American Red Cross is a great place to find resources on a personal kit with basic components. The CDC and the WHO have excellent resources for planning on a much larger scale.

Don’t let the larger preparedness options overwhelm you initially. They are only appropriate after personal planning has reached maximum capacity. However, it is a good idea to begin looking ahead to create a plan for those who think they will want to take the initiative for their personal or local communities.

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Store Your Child’s Baby Teeth for Later Medical Use

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 A new study has shown that children’s baby teeth are a rich source of stem cells. Stem cells, as you may know, are important because they are a kind of “blank” cell that can be grown into multiple kinds of cells as necessary. This comes in handy when cells are lost or damaged due to illness or disease. Though it’s not without controversy, doctors are excited about the growing role of stem cells to treat injury, illness, and tissue deterioration due to age.

Most moms and dads store their child’s baby teeth as a keepsake, but merely throwing these tiny teeth in a box isn’t going to cut it for later medical use.  Like the stem cells that can be found in cord blood samples, the cells in baby teeth must be collected and preserved in a particular way.

A new company called Store-a-Tooth offers state-of-the-art storage and maintenance for these baby teeth. Using a solution of liquid nitrogen, these teeth are securely frozen in a laboratory where they are monitored and maintained until use. Though it isn’t cheap, for a little under $2000, Store-a-Tooth will set up and maintain your samples for you. It’s important to collect stem cells while a person is still young, because our cells become compromised by environmental pollutants and normal degeneration with age. Storing teeth may be potentially beneficial for parents who did not bank their children’s cord blood for whatever reason.

Learn more about the process of harvesting dental pulp stem cells here:

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Upcoming Health Crisis? 4th Incident of Superbug Gene Found in the United State

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 This week a toddler in Connecticut was found to have the superbug gene MCR-1, which makes E. coli resistant to most antibiotics. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have been closely monitoring cases like this one since the superbug gene first appeared in China. The toddler had been traveling to the Caribbean with her family when she first became ill. She was treated for E. coli once she returned to her home in Connecticut and that’s when the superbug gene was detected after her condition worsened.

The superbug is primarily spread through the consumption of food (the first case of the bacteria was discovered on a Chinese pig in 2015). Analysis of the child’s diet while in the Caribbean showed that she had eaten chicken and goat meat from a live animal market and also that she interacted closely with a pet dog and cat.

MCR-1 has been found in 30 countries on all 5 continents and it spreads rapidly in various types of bacteria. We’ve long known that taking antibiotics when you aren’t really ill is a leading cause for “growing” superbugs. There may also be a connection between antibacterial soaps and gels. Scientists warn that if the superbug is not discovered early enough, it could make humans resistant to multiple drugs. In May, a woman showed antibiotic resistance in Pennsylvania but was eventually successfully treated after much trial and error. The source of that woman’s infection was never identified, but experts were able to determine that contamination due to exposure from colonized patients was extremely rare (since this woman had the superbug for some time and did not infect even her close family members living in her home).

Still, researchers wonder if at some point, a superbug will be resistant to all modern antibiotics. If this were to happen, medicine as we know it would degrade beyond recognition. Antibiotics are the basis for most medical advancements—cancer treatment, surgeries, and childbirth become extremely risky when there is no way to treat infection. The CDC is watching and waiting and hopefully they will be able to stay one step ahead of the bacteria. This is one SHTF scenario we certainly do not want to happen.

How to Protect Yourself

  • Wash you hands with soap and water: Experts recommend singing the “Happy Birthday” song as you lather. Traditional soap mechanically removes germs from your skin, so time and motion and your friends.
  • Avoid antibacterial soaps: they aren’t more effective than regular soaps, and many of them have also been recently banned by the FDA. They also tend to be drying, which leads to small cuts in the skin, which is how germs get into your body.
  • Moisturize your hands: see number 2. Well moisturized hands offer more protection against germs.
  • Avoid hospitals: Hospitals are breeding grounds for germs. Malingerers and those who use the emergency room for general treatment are at extremely high risk.
  • Avoid taking unnecessary antibiotics: studies show that those who are most at risk for contracting a superbug are people with compromised immune systems (the elderly, children, and pregnant women) and people who routinely take antibiotics.

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Junctional Tourniquets Can Be a Lifesaver. Here’s How They Work

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ambulanceLearning how to apply a tourniquet and when it is appropriate to do so, is one of the first things taught to anyone who is trying to learn first aid. It’s a pretty simple procedure, and is extremely effective at stopping traumatic blood loss. But unfortunately it doesn’t work in all cases. There are certain parts of the body that you simply can’t apply an ordinary tourniquet to.

For instance, you can’t use a tourniquet on a wound in the gut or in the chest. You also can’t use a tourniquet on a wound that is located too far up on a limb, near the pelvis or the shoulder.

When that happens, in most cases you’ll have to apply pressure to the wound with one or both of your hands, which isn’t always ideal. If you or someone you’re with is suffering from a grievous injury, chances are you’re in a survival situation of some kind, and you’ll need your hands free for other tasks. Or if it’s going to be a long time before help arrives, your hands could get tired.

Fortunately there’s a fairly new invention that tackles this problem. It’s called a junctional tourniquet, which is capable of cutting off circulation in places that an ordinary tourniquet can’t reach. It’s so effective that even the US Army is giving these devices to their medics. Here’s how the junctional tourniquet works, according to the manufacturer:

Unfortunately, the junctional tourniquet is quite expensive at the moment. It can be bought new for around $350, but these devices can also be found slightly used on ebay for around $100.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Identify Sepsis as Quickly as Possible

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emergency careDo you know what sepsis is? Sadly, if you answered affirmatively to that question, you’re in the minority. Most people don’t really know anything about this condition. At best, the general public has heard some actor mention it in passing on a medical drama. They don’t really get what it means, or how big of a threat it is.

Which is unfortunate, because sepsis is very common. About 750,000 people with sepsis are hospitalized every year (of them, over 250,000 people die from it), and at any given time, about 1 and 10 patients in US hospitals have the condition. Over half of patients who die in hospitals have the condition in some form, and sadly, the number of people who die from it is increasing every year.

So what exactly is sepsis? For starters, it’s a condition, and not a disease as many people think. It’s basically what happens when your body responds to an infection, but that response is so severe that it damages your own tissue. It’s usually caused by a bacterial infection, but fungal, viral, and parasitical conditions can also cause it.

As for who’s the most susceptible to sepsis, a wide range of people can come down with it. On the one hand, it tends strike people with weak or compromised immune systems. That includes the very young, the very old, those undergoing chemotherapy, or people with chronic ailments like AIDS.  On the other hand, anyone can get it. Even if you have a healthy immune system, a traumatic injury, infection, or surgery can cause it. The most common infections that lead to sepsis are pneumonia, kidney infections, bloodstream infections and lung infections. In half of all sepsis cases, the lungs are found to be the source.

By now you may be wondering how you can identify and treat sepsis. Unfortunately there isn’t an easy answer to that, because to properly treat sepsis, it first has to be identified very quickly. With every hour that sepsis goes untreated, your chance of death increases by 7.6% percent. Once the most severe form of sepsis sets in (aka septic shock) there is about a 50%-70% chance of death.

And it’s very difficult to identify. Even highly trained doctors struggle diagnose the condition early on, because many of its symptoms can look like complications from other diseases, and not everyone suffers from the same exact symptoms. But if you do know the early symptoms, you have a fighting chance at identifying the condition quickly.

One of the biggest indicators is low blood pressure, which is usually accompanied by an elevated heart rate, rapid breathing, and a low body temperature. Though oftentimes, a high body temperature is found instead (you can see why this may be tricky for a doctor to diagnose). If caused by an infected wound, severe swelling, intense pain, and redness can be seen. Edema and decreased urination are common as well. And finally, a rapidly deteriorating mental state resulting in confusion is very common.

Sadly, those are pretty much the only symptoms that you as a layman can look for to identify sepsis early on. If you understand what makes someone more susceptible to it, and you know what the symptoms are, you can try to put two and two together, and that’s about it. You’d be fortunate to catch it early on, so it’s best not to take any chances. If there’s even the slightest possibility that you have it, go to the hospital immediately. Once there, the only treatment is antibiotics, intravenous fluids, and lots of prayers.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Reasons Why Some Are More Prone To Mosquito Bites Than Others

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mosquitoMy husband always jokes that mosquitos like him because he’s so sweet (thereby implying that I am mean because I almost never get bit). It’s a joke, but there’s definitely something to it. We can go outside and I’m completely fine while he’s covered in bites.

This begs the questions, why are some people more prone to mosquito bites than others? It turns out there are reasons why and knowing what they are could prevent future bites. In this time of the Zika virus and other serious mosquito-borne illnesses, it pays to understand a little about what make someone a mosquito magnet.

5 Reasons Why Some Are More Prone To Mosquito Bites Than Others

Clothing

Mosquitos are visual insects and they are drawn toward the color red, along with darker colors like black, navy, and brown. It may be to your advantage to wear light colors, especially during dusk and other times when mosquitoes are more active.

Blood Type

Research shows that people with Type O blood attract more than twice as many mosquitos as those with Type A blood (Type B blood attracted a med-range of these two).  I’m type A- and my husband is O, so this definitely explains some of his popularity with mosquitos.

Beer

In one study researchers found that significantly more mosquitoes landed on people who had recently imbibed a beer than on those who did not. Maybe choose a glass of wine or refrain altogether at that next BBQ if your goal is to avoid mosquitos.

Warm Bodies

Mosquitos are attracted to warm bodies. They are drawn to the heat and also the scent of sweat, so if you tend to run hot, beware.

Pregnancy

Mosquitos love pregnant women. Researchers believe this is largely due to the fact that pregnant women secrete more carbon dioxide that non-pregnant people and the mosquitos use CO2 as a way to determine the location of their hosts. Pregnant women also tend to have higher temperatures, which goes along with the warm body point above. This is particularly alarming since the recent Zika virus outbreak. Pregnant women are encouraged to wear long sleeves, bug repellent, and to avoid being outdoors in areas where mosquitoes congregate.

So my husband may be sweet, but it’s more a matter of these particulars that make people mosquito magnets. Stay safe and exercise caution at that late summer BBQ. It’s not just annoying—mosquitos could seriously affect your health

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

6 Natural Remedies for Sunburn That Aren’t Aloe Vera

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sunburnAs proactive as some of us are at trying to mitigate the harmful effects of the sun, sometimes those warm rays are just too much for our skin, and sunburns occur. While aloe vera is our first go-to product to start the healing process, there are a few other remedies to consider.

The best defense against sunburned skin is prevention—try to avoid being outdoors between the hours of 10am and 2pm, when the sun’s rays are the strongest. Make sure you wear at least an SPF 30 sunscreen and a large hat for shading your face. But when it’s too late and you come home looking like a lobster, there are some home remedies beyond aloe vera that you might want to try.

6 Natural Remedies for Sunburn

  1. Oatmeal: soaking in an oatmeal bath (whole oatmeal, not instant) can take the sting out of sunburned skin. Oatmeal has anti-inflammatory properties and is also a skin soother. Run a cool bath and add a couple handfuls of oats to the water. Soak for 30 minutes or until your skin feels cool to the touch. Pat yourself to dry off, making sure not to rub your skin too vigorously with your towel.
  1. Black Tea: soak a few teabags of black tea in a pitcher or bowl of warm water and then apply to your skin with gauze or a wash cloth. The tea will ease the itch of the sunburn and should provide immediate relief. Make sure to use a washcloth that you don’t care about and you might want to do this in the nude (black tea will stain your clothing).
  1. Witch Hazel: witch hazel provides an instant burst of cool to your skin and has been shown to prevent peeling and flaking while speeding up healing time. Simply saturate a few cotton balls with a 1:1 solution of witch hazel and water and apply to your sunburn.
  1. Yogurt: For sunburns on your face, the solution might be in your refrigerator. Applying yogurt to your skin like a facial mask for a few minutes can ease the sting and hydrate to prevent peeling. After a few minutes, rinse off with cool water.
  1. Vinegar: Apple cider vinegar is another one that soothes and prevents blistering and peeling. Be sure to mix 1 part vinegar with 2 parts cold water because vinegar is highly acidic. Soak a washcloth or towel in the mixture and swab over your sunburn. There’s no need to rinse it off.
  1. Coconut oil: You’ve no doubt heard about the myriad uses of coconut oil—well, now you can add sunburn soother to the list! Coconut oil is tremendously moisturizing and when mixed with a few drops of essential peppermint oil, it will cool burned skin. Slather on as much as possible and continue to do so for several days after sun exposure. It will help heal and relieve discomfort.

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Dangerous Medical Myths That You Don’t Want to Fall For

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defibMost people have a lot of really stupid ideas about what to do during a medical emergency. 90% of these ideas are probably gleaned from what we see on television. Even though we know deep down that movies and tv shows do not reflect reality, after seeing our favorite characters perform the same medical procedures over and over, we start to assume that they must be based in fact. The rest are old wives tales that simply refuse to die.

So if you don’t have any medical training, leave it to the professionals. And if a professional isn’t available, take note of the following:

Don’t Induce Vomiting

Most of you probably remember a time when it was normal to have a bottle of ipecac lying around the house, on the off chance that you would need to induce vomiting. It’s not so common anymore. In fact, ipecac has been discontinued. That’s because it’s no longer recommended as a treatment for accidental poisoning. Trying to vomit up a toxic substance is likely to cause even more damage to the esophagus, mouth, and lungs.

Granted, there are times when vomiting is the right thing to do. That’s why you should call poison control if you, a pet, or a child consumes a dangerous substance. They’ll tell you if you need to induce vomiting, let the substance pass, or go to the hospital.

Defibrillators Aren’t Magic

Based on how defibrillators are portrayed in movies, you’d think these machines run on the same principles you’d find in a Frankenstein movie. With enough electricity, just about any unconscious or near dead person can be jolted back to life. The reality of the matter is quite different.

Defibrillators are only useful in cases of cardiac arrest. Specifically they’re used to treat an irregular heart beat. In a nutshell, they temporarily stop the heart which gives it an opportunity to restart, hopefully with a healthy heartbeat. And unlike what you see in the movies, where doctors can bring a flat-lining patient back to life with their electric paddles, in the real world defibrillators don’t really work on someone without a heartbeat. In that case, CPR is probably in order rather than defibrillation.

Concussed Patients Need Sleep

For decades movies and TV shows have propagated this idea that a concussed person should never be allowed to sleep, lest they die or slip into a coma. However, the media didn’t necessarily pull this notion out of thin air. It was widely believed by the medical community until recently.

And it’s still true, but only to a small degree. If you have a concussion and you’re struggling to speak and walk, or your pupils are dilated, then you should avoid sleep and see a doctor ASAP. But most of the time that isn’t the case. For mild concussions, sleep is actually the best medicine.

How To Really Treat Nosebleeds

You’ve probably had a severe nosebleed at some point in your life, and I’m willing to bet that when it happened, someone told you that you need to tilt your head back. This is actually the exact opposite of what you should do to treat a nosebleed. You should lean forward and pinch your nose (unless it’s broken) for 5 minute intervals. You might have also been told to lay down, which again is terrible advice. It’s best to sit upright, which will reduce the amount of blood pressure in your nose.

It may not sound dangerous to lean your head back or lie down, but in some rare cases you can die from blood loss, or choke on the blood from a nosebleed (or pass out from blood loss and then suffocate). Nosebleeds are rarely serious, but they should always be treated as such.

Don’t Remove The Bullet

Whenever someone gets shot in a movie, this event is usually followed by a dramatic race against time to remove the bullet before the victim perishes. It’s never really explained why this needs to be done. In reality, trying to remove a bullet from someone is the last thing you want to do if you want them to survive.

For starters, once a bullet is lodged in the body, it’s probably done all the damage it can do. It’s not going anywhere. It’s probably not going to cause lead poisoning. And since bullets reach a very high temperature as they leave the barrel, it’s going to be completely sterile. If you were shot, you could probably leave the bullet in there for the rest of your life without experiencing any complications.

On the other hand, trying to remove the bullet outside of a hospital setting could lead to an infection. And bullets aren’t exactly smooth after they punch through soft tissue and bone. There are usually plenty of jagged bits that could easily rupture blood vessels upon removal. Taking a bullet out of the human body is a very delicate procedure that is almost always unnecessary; and when it is needed, it’s best done by a professional in a sterile surgical room.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Why Aspirin Should Be In Every SHTF Medicine Cabinet

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Hey there, ReadyNutrition Readers!  We’re going to sing a little ditty about Aspirin, and it’s many uses.  Why?  Because it is an inexpensive treasure-trove available just about anywhere that can be added to your supplies.  It is safe and effective, and has a heck of a long shelf life if you protect it from moisture and the elements.  A good supply of it is not hard to build up, and you can always FIFO your supply to utilize it as needed. This simple little prep is highly recommended for your preparedness supplies and can be found at the Dollar Store and most drug stores. For those of you who may not know, FIFO means “first in, first out,” in accordance with inventory: use your oldest bottles first, and rotate your newest replacements to the back of the stack.

The origin of aspirin

Willow, Poplar, and Myrtle trees have a component known as salicin in them.  This chemical (a derivative of salicylic acid) has the ability to reduce pain, fever, and relieve small-scale maladies (such as headache and fever).  A German chemist (the Germans have always been great chemists and are world-leaders, FYI, in the field of Herbalism) named Felix Hoffman in 1895 first successfully employed salicylic acid to help his father.  Felix did this at the ripe old age of 29.

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was a synthetic version of this salicylic acid, and that had been discovered by a French chemist in 1853 by the name of Charles von Gerhardt (OK, he was a French citizen, but he was of German descent!).  Not much was done with this synthesized version of the natural acid taken from the trees.

But Hoffman learned about it.  One of the problems with the salicylic acid he gave to his dad was that it upset the elder man’s stomach.  When Hoffman expounded on von Gerhardt’s discovery, however, he found that ASA (yes, aspirin) was a lot less harsh on the stomach, and Hoffman is credited with giving Aspirin its name.  But that company Felix worked for (a dye and pharmaceutical firm) took the young man’s discovery a step further.  They patented it and developed a process for manufacturing it in 1899.

That company was Farbenfabriken vorm. Friedr. Bayer & Co.  Yep, you guessed it: Bayer, as in Bayer Aspirin!

Here is how aspirin can help

In your body are prostaglandins, a twenty-dollar word for substances that work in your body to do all sorts of functions, from regulating your body temperature to helping your blood clot.  Aspirin works by reducing these prostaglandins.  This has the effect of reducing pain and inflammation, and also thins the blood to reduce clotting.  It does this by disabling an enzyme called COX (cyclooxygenase) that turns acids found in your cells into prostaglandins.  Pretty intricate, huh?  The primary effect is to lower inflammation, and thereby pain is lowered.

Regarding the circulation, aspirin also helps fight against coronary artery disease and does it by lowering the amount of platelets that can attach themselves to the arterial walls and preventing clotting.  In the event of a heart attack, the Mayo Clinic advises taking 162 mg of aspirin and chewing it up, enabling it to be broken down and more readily absorbed and transferred by the bloodstream, after calling 911.  It also helps with angina pectoris.

Aspirin has been found useful in the prevention and treatment of breast and colon cancers, osteoporosis, dementia and other forms of Alzheimer’s disease, prostate cancer, and to neutralize viruses.

Looking for a more natural approach?

From an herbal perspective and naturopathic viewpoint, white willow bark is a healthy and natural alternative to synthesized ASA.  White Willow (Salix spp.) is also interchangeable with the American Willow (Salix nigra).  The only ones contraindicated for its use are pregnant or nursing mothers, very young children, or people with allergies to salicylates.  It comes in a liquid or powder in your better health food stores.  Follow the directions on the package, as the manufacturer, hence formulating the correct dosage, knows the exact salicin content.

The standard for powder is 1-2 grams several times a day as needed.  This is not denigrating the manufactured aspirin by any means.  As I wrote earlier, aspirin is a safe and cost-effective supply for you to have in your preps.  In addition, if you stock up on some extra?  Post SHTF, it can be more valuable than gold for barter and trade.

Another thing: if you have a battery that you suspect of being dead (maybe you left your lights on) pop a couple of aspirin into the battery, and wait a few minutes.  The aspirin will react with the nitric acid in the battery and produce a weak charge, enough to start up the engine with.  And if it doesn’t work, you can take two more yourself for any headaches you may suffer while you’re awaiting triple-A and a tow truck.

To summarize, aspirin does many wonderful things.  It is an affordable asset that you can store up in large quantities in your preps and not come anywhere near to hurting your billfold.  It has a high degree of safety, and helps with many different ailments.  Because of all of these things, it will be highly valuable, both for your family and as a bartering commodity when the bottom drops out and our society comes crashing down.  On that happy note, hope I didn’t give you a headache, and you have a great day!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

PREPARING FOR THE NEXT ATTACK: HOW TO SURVIVE A NUCLEAR MELTDOWN

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nuclear-power-plant3

Over the years, the public’s perception of nuclear power has gone from being viewed as the most economical source of energy in the world, to being an existential threat to humanity. Most recently, the Fukushima disaster has provided the perfect example of how dangerous nuclear power really is. Despite the assurances of scientists and governments, it’s clear now that even in a developed nation, these facilities can melt down under the right conditions.

And when they do, the damage they can cause to civilization and the environment would rival the destructive capacity of a nuclear weapon, and perhaps even surpass it. The former Prime Minister of Japan recently admitted that if the Fukushima Power Plant had completely melted down (which it almost did), the government would have had to evacuate 50 million people, including the entire city of Tokyo.

And it’s frightening when you realize that there are so many ways to destroy these power plants. There are of course natural disasters that we have to worry about like earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanoes, and unfortunately many of America’s power plants are incredibly old and decrepit, and may not withstand these threats. There is also the possibility that these facilities could be hacked or otherwise sabotaged, which the citizens of Belgium are unfortunately all too aware of after the recent terrorist attack in Brussels. And finally, there is the ever looming threat of an EMP knocking out dozens of our power plants en masse, and causing them to melt down.

So if you happen to live in the Eastern United States or Europe, where you’re most likely to be living downwind from one of these nuclear power plants, at this point you might be asking yourself about what you need to do to survive such a disaster.

In this scenario, bugging out is going to be your best bet, even more so than if you were dealing with a nuclear blast. Many of the same rules apply for surviving a nuclear meltdown and surviving a nuclear attack, but at least with the latter of those two, the radiation levels would significantly diminish after about 2 weeks. But nuclear power plants often contain radioactive materials with a half-life that lasts for decades or more.

In other words, hunkering down in your home is more feasible during a nuclear holocaust (depending many different circumstances of course) than it is if you’re downwind from a nuclear meltdown. You can’t really hunker down if there are going to be dangerous levels of radiation outside your home for a few years. And before you leave, pay close attention to weather alerts, which should be able to give you an idea of where the wind is going to take that radioactive cloud. Its direction could vary depending on what time of year it is, so make sure you have more than one bug out location in mind before any of this happens.

On the other hand, if you’re not in the direct path of the fallout, your home may receive much lower levels of radiation. In that case you can survive by staying, though it would still be a good idea to leave at some point since any amount of radiation can be harmful. If you must stay then it would be prudent to seal off all of your doors and windows, and perhaps try to build a kearny air pump, which will keep air circulating throughout your room while still keeping radioactive particles outside.

Regardless of whether you decide to stay or bug out, there are a few items you should strongly consider adding to your prepping supplies. Aside from the usual stuff like food, water, tools, weapons, and medical supplies, you’ll probably need the following:

You’ll find that everything on this list will also be useful for other scenarios like nuclear war and dirty bomb attacks. Truth be told there are countless ways that you or family could face a radioactive threat, but with the right mindset, gear, and supplies, you can survive even the worst nuclear disasters.

Delivered by The Daily Sheeple

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Vaccine Maker Admits On FDA Website That DTaP Vaccine Causes Autism

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baby-84626_960_720By Catherine J Frompovich

A HUGE hat tip and shout out goes to Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, for finding pharmacological admittance and written proof that at least one vaccine causes autism as an adverse reaction.

According to the U.S. FDA’s online Biologics Blood Vaccines publication, Sanofi Pasteur’s Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Adsorbed (DTaP) package insert information under the section for Adverse Reactions, which runs from page 6 to page 11, we find the following declared admission that DTaPcaused autism “during post-approval use of Tripedia vaccine.” See the copy and paste information below. So, why all the denials that a vaccine hasn’t or can’t cause autism?

Parents, here’s your proof!

Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Adsorbed

Tripedia

Additional Adverse Reactions

Adverse events reported during post-approval use of Tripedia vaccine include idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, SIDS, anaphylactic reaction, cellulitis, autism, convulsion/grand mal convulsion, encephalopathy, hypotonia, neuropathy, somnolence and apnea. Events were included in this list because of the seriousness or frequency of reporting. Because these events are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequencies or to establish a causal relationship to components of Tripedia vaccine.[2,1]

The reference 2 above refers to Sanofi Pasteur Inc., Data on File – 072503. Personally, I’d love to examine that Data on File 072503! [2]

It should be noted that

Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Concentrates (For Further Manufacturing Use) are produced by The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University (BIKEN), Osaka, Japan, under United States (US) license, and are combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur Inc. Tripedia vaccine is filled, labeled, packaged, and released by Sanofi Pasteur Inc.[3]

What’s in Tripedia that probably can interfere with brain chemistry and neurology? According to the Tripedia’s package insert, some ingredients include: Bovine extract, formaldehyde used to inactivate microorganisms a couple of times, ammonium sulfate, aluminum potassium sulfate, 2 growth mediums: modified Mueller and Miller is one; the other is Stainer-Scholte medium.

Mueller and Miller medium, according to the information I found, contains:

glucose, sodium chloride, sodium phosphate dibasic, monopotassium, phosphate, magnesium sulfate hydrate, ferrous sulfate heptaphydrate, cystine hydrochloride, tyrosine hydrochloride, urasil hydrochloride, Ca-pantothenate in ethanol, thiamine in ethanol, pyridoxin-hydrochloride in ethanol, riboflavin in ethanol, biotin in ethanol, sodium hydroxide, beef heart infusion (de- fatted beef heart and distilled water), casein [milk protein] solution[4]

basically a mixture of sugar, salt, amino acids, vitamins, and minerals

While Stainer-Scholte medium has the following ingredients:

tris hydrochloride, tris base, glutamate (monosodium salt) [MSG], proline, salt, monopotassium phosphate, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, ferrous sulfate, asorbic acid, niacin, glutathione [5]

The vaccine is formulated without preservatives, but contains a trace amount of thimerosal [(mercury derivative), (≤0.3 μg mercury/dose)] from the manufacturing process. Each 0.5 mL dose also contains, by assay, not more than 0.170 mg of aluminum and not more than 100 μg (0.02%) of residual formaldehyde. The vaccine contains gelatin and polysorbate 80 (Tween-80), which are used in the production of the pertussis concentrate[6]. [CJF emphasis added]

“Probable cause” ingredients for adverse reactions—especially neurological, in my opinion, include: casein[7], to which some children are allergic; MSG—an excitotoxin[8]; thimerosal-ethylmercury[9]; aluminum[10]; formaldehyde[11]; gelatin[12]; and polysorbate 80[13].

You can’t handle the truth about vaccines (Ad)

Now that we have at least one vaccine manufacturer leveling with the medical profession, why aren’t pediatricians, nurses, and all medical personnel, plus the media, not telling parents and guardians that the DTaP vaccine has caused autism and also telling parents ALL the adverse effects that appear in vaccine package inserts?

To take the vaccine debacle further, most of the mandated vaccines for infants and children, contain many of the above ingredients, which must be stopped from being injected into infants, toddlers, teens and even adults!

It’s time for Congress to rescind the “Get out of Jail Free” card for vaccine makers and stop the aggressive onslaught of the Autism Spectrum Disorder [1 in 45 kids (2015)[14]] that is depriving children of a fulfilling life and ruining families emotionally, financially, and physically to the point of parents divorcing because of the stresses of ASD in a family.

To really understand the vaccine “conundrum,” plus crimes of fraudulent science, data, and skullduggery, readers should know that the new motion picture documentary VAXXED is being released April 1st, 2016. For information on how you can get your local movie theater to show it, here’s the link for the movie on how to get it distributed to theaters.

It’s about time vaccines are publicly acknowledged by the feds and the media for all the health damages they have caused. Just check out the CDC’s VAERS reports and the vaccine damage payouts by the HHS/HRSA; see pages 5 and 9. A grand total of $3,325,248,027.02 – that’s Billions! – have been paid for vaccine adverse reactions and deaths from 1989 to 2016 so far.

Truly, vaccines are a crime against humanity, in my opinion.

Footnotes:

  1. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/ApprovedProducts/UCM101580.pdPg. 11,
  2. Ibid. Pg. 12
  3. Ibid. Pg. 1
  4. http://mommysknowledge.com/2014/07/31/vaccines-and-their-ingredients-what-are-we-putting-into-our-children/
  5. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/ApprovedProducts/UCM101580.pdPg. 1
  6. Ibid.
  7. http://stovelesscuisine.com/toxic-casein-protein/
  8. http://www.jpands.org/hacienda/article27.html  Food Additive Excitotoxins and Degenerative Brain Disorders, Russel L Blaylock, MD
  9. http://www.amazon.com/Thimerosal-Supporting-Immediate-Mercury-Neurotoxin/dp/1632206013
  10. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19568732
  11. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10729924
  12. Flu Vaccine Reactions From The Same Gelatin in Gummy Bears
  13.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21348312  Polysorbate-80 modified neurotoxin nanoparticle with its transport and cytotoxicity against blood-brain barrier
  14. https://www.autismspeaks.org/science/science-news/new-government-survey-pegs-autism-prevalence-1-45

This article (Vaccine Maker Admits on FDA Website That DTaP Vaccine Causes Autism) can be republished  under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Catherine J. Frompovich and Natural Blaze.com and Activist Post, keeping all links intact.

Catherine J Frompovich (website) is a retired natural nutritionist who earned advanced degrees in Nutrition and Holistic Health Sciences, Certification in Orthomolecular Theory and Practice plus Paralegal Studies. Her work has been published in national and airline magazines since the early 1980s. Catherine authored numerous books on health issues along with co-authoring papers and monographs with physicians, nurses, and holistic healthcare professionals. She has been a consumer healthcare researcher 35 years and counting.

Catherine’s NEW book Eat To Beat Disease, Foods Medicinal Qualities©2016 Catherine J Frompovich coming in Summer 2016

Catherine’s latest book, published October 4, 2013, is Vaccination Voodoo, What YOU Don’t Know About Vaccines, available on Amazon.com.

Her 2012 book A Cancer Answer, Holistic BREAST Cancer Management, A Guide to Effective & Non-Toxic Treatments, is available on Amazon.com and as a Kindle eBook.

Two of Catherine’s more recent books on Amazon.com are Our Chemical Lives And The Hijacking Of Our DNA, A Probe Into What’s Probably Making Us Sick(2009) and Lord, How Can I Make It Through Grieving My Loss, An Inspirational Guide Through the Grieving Process (2008)

The Natural Blaze team is dedicated to the path of natural health and wellness. But we’re not just believers, we’ve experienced the healing properties of natural remedies first hand. That is why we are so deeply passionate to report natural health news, share wellness tips, and provide proven natural products to you.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Mom, Could You Please Pass the Potassium Iodide?

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ReadyNutrition guys and gals, by now, hopefully you’re well on your way to finishing up making a batch of JJ’s Ginger Ale; and what could go better with it than a nice serving of Potassium Iodide!  Only kidding.  Potassium Iodide is what you need to stock up on to protect your thyroid from radiation.  I’m sure my Ginger Ale will help it go down a little more smoothly.  We’re going to cover Potassium Iodide in this piece…what it is, and why you should have some in your supplies to prep for when the SHTF.

Why Should Every Family Have Potassium Iodide in Their Supplies

First, let’s cover the why.  Fukushima is still glowing hot, and according to news sources, the control rods have now completely melted into a radioactive “blob” weighing many tons…and gone right through their protective casing into the earth.  The radiation levels are on the rise.  We already know (no thanks to the MSM and their obfuscations mislabeled “reporting”) that radioactive particles are reaching the West Coast and the Pacific is beginning to show signs of contamination.

In addition to the Japanese problem, there are many reactors in the U.S. that are either leaking or beginning to have structural problems.  I just recently did a piece on EMPs and that article came with a map showing the location of the nuclear power plants in the U.S.  Skipping on, we find that Kim Jong-Un of North Korea is threatening the U.S. with a nuclear strike on an almost daily basis, and he has the capability to do it.  Russia and China have not become any friendlier, and Iran is waiting in the wings to develop its own nuclear capabilities with the assistance of all three of the other nations just mentioned.

How Does Potassium Iodide Protect Me?

So, let’s talk about Potassium Iodide.  It is a compound with the chemical formula of KI.  It can be found on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, and it is commercially produced in quantity in the U.S.  It is specifically used in medicine to block excess intake of radiation by the thyroid, hence its value in a nuclear disaster/situation.  In emergency purposes, potassium iodide tablets are given out by emergency responders to prevent radioiodine uptake.  This is a deadly form of radiation poisoning caused primarily with the uptake by the human body of iodine-131, produced with a fission reaction found in a nuclear explosion or a leakage.

Symptoms of Radiation Sickness Include:

  • Bleeding from the nose, mouth, gums, and rectum
  • Bloody stool
  • Bruising
  • Confusion
  • Dehydration
  • Diarrhea
  • Fainting
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Hair loss
  • Inflammation of exposed areas (redness, tenderness, swelling, bleeding)
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Open sores on the skin
  • Skin burns (redness, blistering)
  • Sloughing of skin
  • Ulcers in the esophagus, stomach or intestines
  • Vomiting blood
  • Weakness

Read more about radiation exposure and how to circumvent it here.

You may find it interesting to know that potassium iodide is produced naturally within Kelp, and the iodide content can range from 89 µg/g to 8165 µg/g.  Potassium iodide, incidentally, is what is added to table salt to prevent iodine deficiencies.

The thyroid gland has a natural affinity for iodine.  Iodine deficiency can lead to goiters, which presents with an enlarged, thickened throat/neck area.  Potassium iodide was approved in 1982 by the FDA for use in protecting the thyroid gland from fallout or fission in a nuclear emergency/accident, or in the event of a war.  By saturating the thyroid gland with the potassium iodide, the harmful nuclear fission-produced iodide particles are unable to be absorbed/taken up by the thyroid.  This has to be taken prior to exposure.  The dosage lasts for 24 hours.  Here is the WHO recommendations for dosages of KI:

 

WHO Recommended Dosage for Radiological Emergencies involving radioactive iodine:
Age KI in mg per day
Over 12 years old 130
3 – 12 years old 65
1 – 36 months old 32
Under 1 month old 16

 The pills were given out in 1986 with Chernobyl’s nuclear reactor accident, and the U.S. Navy has been giving KI to its personnel who have operated within the area of Fukushima’s contamination.  As with all things medical, consult with your physician prior to acting upon any of this information, as there are some complications that may arise from overdosing, and also with those who have heart conditions, due to the potassium intake. In this case, there are natural foods you should have on hand that are high in iodine.

 You can obtain it (for now) in some of your health food stores, for about $10 a bottle, ranging from 50 to 100 pills.  I picked up some made by NOW foods, 30 mg per tablet, 60 per bottle…originally $9.99, for $1.00 per bottle at a yard sale.  You just have to shop around; you can find a deal on it.  Bottom line: it’s a good line of defense in your arsenal.  I’ll bet every government employee and their families have a supply for themselves, paid for by our dime, no less.  Stock up on it and set it aside, and let’s hope we’ll never have to use it.  In the meantime, drink a glass of Ginger Ale and keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Additional Information:

How to Survive When a Nuke Is Dropped

Are You Ready: Nuclear Disaster Preparedness

An Urban Guide to Surviving a Nuclear Attack

How can I avoid radiation exposure?

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

7 Natural Supplements You Should Have in Case of Nuclear Fallout

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 ReadyNutrition Readers, this article is going to highlight several effective naturopathic remedies to assist in the removal of radiation from the human body.  The information can be used if you are undergoing any treatments that have radiation therapy attached to them, such as chemotherapy, and can also be taken into consideration for preparation and survival.  We have Fukushima that is an ongoing release of radiation into the Pacific Ocean, and we also have a world situation where the nations are poised on the brink of thermonuclear war. Knowing what to do when this type of disaster occurs can save your life and those around you. The most important point to go from here is to educate yourself on what happens when a nuke is dropped.

Types of Radiation Exposure

Radiation affects the tissues and leads to cancer risks with long-term exposure.  For a really good expose on it, read Cresson Kearney’s “Nuclear War Survival Skills” series of information articles that give many different ways to protect against it.  The information is free and downloadable from the internet. In this type of emergency, it is paramount that you understand the differences in radiation exposure.

Contamination – This is usually unintended contact from radioactive material such as dust or liquid. This type of exposure may be internal or external, but nevertheless, causes poisoning to the body.
Irradiation –  This is the process by which an object is exposed to radiation, but not radioactive material. This usually occurs with x-ray machines, cancer treatments and blood transfusions. That said, the exposure can originate from various sources, including natural sources. Irradiation can involve the whole body, which, if the dose is high enough, can result in systemic symptoms and radiation syndromes or a small part of the body (i.e., from radiation therapy), which can result in local effects.

What symptoms to look for with radiation poisoning:

radiation poisoning

 7 Natural Supplements that Remove Radiation From the Body

Now we’re going to outline some aids you can use. Having these essential supplements on hand will assist in helping the body prevent the absorption of radiation. As well, it is recommended that each family member have a bottle each of these natural supplements stored.

  1. Calcium and Magnesium: these minerals combat the uptake of Strontium 90 by over 90% when taken. Studies were conducted by Dr. Linus Pauling showing how the calcium blocks the uptake of this dangerous radioisotope.
  2. Zeolite Clay: also combats Strontium 90 as well as Cesium 137, another dangerous radioactive isotope. It was used effectively for victims of Chernobyl.  Zeolites attach themselves to radiation and remove it at the cellular level.  The U.S. military uses Zeolite clay to line the floors of its weapons arsenals to help protect against radiation.  The clay can be taken (ingested) internally to remove radiation.
  3. Activated Charcoal: reduces radiation by neutralizing it. The ratio of reduction is 10 grams of activated charcoal will reduce 7 grams of toxic substance.  You already are aware of how important activated charcoal is regarding water purification; now you can add this medicinal use to your preparation supplies.
  4. Bee Pollen: can drastically reduce the harmful side effects of radiation exposure. This is beneficial to those undergoing chemotherapy.  The side effects such as that of radium, x-rays and cobalt-60 radiotherapy can be buffered against with the bee pollen.  Bee pollen intake is a natural method of boosting vital functions, such as red and white blood cell and antibody production.  These functions are hampered by radiation, be it an uncontrolled release or a controlled therapy.
  5. Oils: Extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, and hemp oil can remove radiation. Studies have shown that the lipids in these oils (and other oils as well) bind to toxins, as well as strengthening cellular membranes.  Various studies agree that if you have been exposed, drinking 4 ounces of oil can neutralize the toxins and help pull the radiation out of your system, as well as strengthening your cellular tissues.
  6. Chlorella: is a single-celled green algae that is extremely useful in detoxification of tissues; it can be used concurrently with the other aids mentioned for the removal of radiation from your system.
  7. Iodine tablets: use those approved specifically for a nuclear disaster/exposure to radiation. The way they work is that they are taken up by the Thyroid gland, and in essence “crowd” the gland…blocking further uptake from the deadly forms of radioactive iodine (the harmful isotopes) found in a nuclear blast/nuclear accident.

As with all things, consult with your physician prior to utilizing any of these supplements, especially the calcium and magnesium.  Many heart patients use things such as calcium channel blockers and the like.  Too much calcium or any mineral can potentially upset the delicate balance in their system.  Check with the physician to find out about any potential problems or contraindications prior to utilizing the information in this article.  The information is presented for informational purposes only, and does not intend to diagnose, treat, or prescribe any cure or action.

Even if these seven mentioned materials are not used on a daily basis, it cannot hurt you to have them in your disaster supplies.  The time to obtain such materials is, of course, before an event occurs.  Familiarize yourself with the manufacturer’s recommendations and know how to use each material.  Have a great day, and keep up the good work with your preps and supplies.  JJ out!

 

Advanced Tactical Gas Mask – Are You Ready for a Biological, Nuclear or Chemical Attack?

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Every Natural Medicine Chest Should Have These 3 Herbs

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natural medicineReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, the object of this article is to provide you with a quick reference guide for on-the-spot herbs you can use in your first-aid kits.  The information has a twofold purpose: 1) to provide information on three basic herbs that will run the gamut of what you need for first-aid measures in your bug-out bag, and 2) to list herbs that are readily obtainable.  Regarding item #2, one of the problems with herb supplies is that the best/optimal herb for the job is either not readily available or it isn’t practical to use it (because it has budgetary constraints or presents with a high degree of difficulty to prepare).

Most Common Ailments To Have Natural Medicine For

There are some common ailments and their causative organisms that I’m going to list.

  • Enterococcus (Post-surgical infections, blood poisoning)
  • Haemophilus influenzae (Otitis media, meningitis, sinus infections, pneumonia)
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Tuberculosis)
  • Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gonorrhea)
  • Plasmodium falciparum (Malaria)
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pneumonia, Bacteremia)
  • Shigella dysenteriae (serious/extreme diarrhea)
  • Staphylococcus aureus (Pneumonia, post-surgical infections, bacteremia)
  • Streptococcus pneumoniae (meningitis, pneumonia)
  • Escherichia coli /E. coli (foodborne illness, with/without bloody diarrhea)
  • Salmonella spp. (severe food poisoning, extreme diarrhea)

The Three G’s

Guess what all of these guys have in common?  They can all be treated with JJ’s #1 herb

  1. Garlic (Allium sativum): absolutely the best “broad spectrum” herb there is. Massive doses of it only lead to one immediate complication of severe flatulence.  Another contraindication/caution is that garlic is a blood-thinner.  It tends to interfere with those on platelet therapy and should be discontinued prior to a scheduled surgery.  It is easy to obtain.  For ear infections or external wounds you can make an infused oil for it.

How To Make Infused Garlic Oil:

– 5 cloves of garlic

– 4 ounces of olive oil

Chop up the garlic really fine, and place it in the oil…. shake it each day and let it sit in a cool dark place for two weeks…. much the same as a tincture.  Then when needed, apply liberally.

Garlic is such a powerful herb that if you have nothing but garlic, you’re going to be doing pretty well.  It can be found in the wild and easily cultivated.  You’re going to hear flak from people about the allicin content being diminished after gathering/storage/drying, etc.  Just do the best you can.  In a long-term emergency scenario, your stored/tinctured/chopped garlic will have what you need to fight the illnesses.  Along with what has been mentioned, it is antihypertensive, reduces plaque formation with atherosclerosis, lowers risks for cancer, reduces hypertension and lipids, and helps with unstable angina.  Average daily dosage is 1 fresh garlic clove 1-2 times per day.  Average daily dose is 4 grams or 8 mg essential oil.  With commercial preparations such as capsules or tablets, consult with the packaging information as they’re produced at different strengths and concentrations.

  1. Ginger (Zingiber officinale): this is another highly-effective herb that is used with all manner of illnesses. Malaria, Shigella, Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, strep, pneumonia, cancer fighting and Salmonella are just a few that ginger is effective against.  A primary herb against cold and flu, one of the best reasons to have it around is that it’s very safe, especially with peds (kids).  Teas, capsules, tinctures, and fresh (in your food) are some of the methods it can be employed with safety and effectiveness.  Ginger is an antitussive that is almost as strong as codeine, and it clears mucus from the system as an expectorant.  It is also an antihistamine.  It’s great for upper respiratory infections.  (Note: Garlic is good for lower respiratory tract infections….so the two go hand in hand.)

REMEMBER THIS!  Ginger is also great for burn treatment: apply the juice for an instant pain reliever, to reduce blistering and inflammation, and to prevent subsequent infections of the burned area.  You can make a tea and use this tea for burns, as well.

1 ounce/25 grams steeped for 5 minutes in 8 ounces of water.  I mentioned this in the past, and I’ll mention it again: bring your water to a boil, and then take it off-boil for 1 minute prior to steeping your herb in it…the boiling point kills off the helpful components of almost any and all herbs.  Dried root is 1 ½ ounces steeped for 10 minutes.  You can also tincture it, or obtain commercially-prepared tinctures, as well as capsules containing dried root.

  1. Ginseng: In this case, the preferred is Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus), although Asian and American ginseng can be used, the latter actually growing in the wild in North America, making that a plus.  The ginseng does the following: enhances the immune system (T-lymphocytes in particular), increases mental alertness, and (proven by hundreds of studies) increases the ability of people to hold up under stressful, severe conditions [nice to know for when the SHTF].  It enhances physical performance, and has been used by athletes with great success.  It can be taken as a tea (3-6 ounces, or 85 to 170 grams) up to 3 times per day.  It can also be found in tincture or capsule form; again, follow the instructions as per the manufacturer on commercially-prepared supplements.  Cautions for those with high blood pressure, as ginseng tends to “get the blood moving.”

So, there they are: Garlic, ginger, and ginseng.  These herbs are easy to obtain, easy to prepare, and easy to use.  The trick is to do further research and really learn about them.  In this manner, you have the knowledge to employ them more effectively, and you can use them to balance and complement one another.  They are safe, reliable supplements that you can pack dried or (when safeguarded) prepare as either oils, teas, or tinctures.  Test them out for yourselves to tailor-make your own supply to fit your needs.  Have a great day, and enjoy the “Three G’s” in your preps!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Preppers – Foot Care is a Top Priority

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I have a confession to make. I was born with extremely high arches and an obscene love of boots in all their variations. Although my feet don’t quite meet the standards for Pes Cavus (who’s literal translation is “hollow foot”), the footprint I leave behind, were I to stand on a piece of paper with a wet foot, is pretty close. The ball of my foot and my heel can be plainly seen, but there is only a thin line in the print from the outer side of my foot (lateral aspect) connecting the two. The opposite foot structure from mine is a completely flat foot.

foot arch types1Both of these variations in foot structure tend to run in families (sorry, kids, you got that from me) and can wreak havoc over time on “blue collar feet”. Being on my feet all day caring for animals, jumping out of semi’s and tractors, repeatedly pushing down with my foot on a shovel to turn earth or muck out stalls, hiking up and own the hills here in the Sierras, and carrying heavy sacks of feed on my shoulder while wearing improper footwear (for my foot structure) all added up.

I could tell you how to properly trim almost any animal’s hooves, the importance of properly fitting shoes on a horse, how to treat thrush, how to prevent and treat hutch burn in rabbits, and even how to treat bumblefoot in chickens. But until a few years ago, when I was diagnosed with severe, chronic plantar fasciitis, I didn’t know a thing about my own feet, nor did I appreciate the importance of their care. Whether you’re farming or concerned about winter wilderness survival taking care of your feet should be one of your top priorities.

Foot Injuries vs Foot Conditions/Diseases

A foot injury is pretty self-explanatory. Something acute has happened- you’ve stepped on a sharp object, developed a wickedly painful blister, or broken a bone. Foot conditions, on the other hand, are usually things you’re born with that may or may not have any effect for some time. The problem is, it’s a cumulative effect, so addressing the underlying condition and caring for it properly before an issue arises, is much more affective than trying to resolve it after the fact.

As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and this is certainly the case in foot problems. There’s a myriad of conditions and diseases than can affect the foot, but for this discussion, I’m going to focus on the ones most often encountered by “blue collar feet”: plantar fasciitis, sesamoid injuries, and their treatments.

Plantar Fasciitis and Heel Pain

pf 1Anyone can develop plantar fasciitis, the most common cause of heel pain, but you’re at greater risk if the arch of your foot is very high or very flat, are overweight, have very tight calf muscles that make it difficult for you to flex your foot back so that your toes are point up towards your shins, repetitive impact injury (like jumping out of semis and tractors), or a new or sudden increase in activity (like bugging out on foot or the increased farm work that spring season brings). It can start off as pain in the heel, especially upon waking (post-static dyskinesia). Oftentimes, the pain and stiffness in the heel will go away after a few minutes of walking.

As it progresses and is left untreated, the heel also becomes very painful after exertion. If you ignore these early warning signs, as I did, the pain can spread across the bottom of your foot from your heel to the ball of your foot, is constant, and is so painful that bearing any weight on your feet becomes impossible. It can affect one or both feet.

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is literally the inflammation and irritation of the plantar fascia, the strong band of tissue that supports the arch of your foot. To picture where this strong band of tissue is, imagine your bare foot print. The band looks something like a tree with the bottom of the trunk starting at the back of your heel print (called “the insertion point”), the trunk of the tree running up your arch, and the branches spreading out across the ball of your foot to each toe. Unlike other connective tissues in your body, the plantar fascia doesn’t stretch. Instead, it’s designed to absorb the high strains and stresses we place on our feet, but if too much stress is placed on it, it tears the tissue which causes stiffness and inflammation. Dr. Julia Overstreet, a podiatrist, high-risk foot and lower extremity specialist, has a very good video on the subject here.

Mild plantar fasciitis can be treated much like any other sprain or strain: over the counter (OTC) non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), an ice pack, and rest. Many doctors recommend stretching the affected area by doing a calf stretch and plantar fascia stretch.

  • Calf stretch – Lean forward against a wall with one knee straight and the heel on the ground. Place the other leg in front, with the knee bent. To stretch the calf muscles and the heel cord, push your hips toward the wall in a controlled fashion. Hold the position for 10 seconds and relax. Repeat this exercise 20 times for each foot. A strong pull in the calf should be felt during the stretch.
  • Plantar fascia stretch – This stretch is performed in the seated position. Cross your affected foot over the knee of your other leg. Grasp the toes of your painful foot and slowly pull them toward you in a controlled fashion. If it is difficult to reach your foot, wrap a towel around your big toe to help pull your toes toward you. Place your other hand along the plantar fascia. The fascia should feel like a tight band along the bottom of your foot when stretched. Hold the stretch for 10 seconds. Repeat it 20 times for each foot. This exercise is best done in the morning before standing or walking. (Source)

However, I completely agree with Dr. Overstreet that these exercises have little to no affect. The fascia doesn’t stretch, so you’re really just stretching the tissues surrounding them. This might work for very mild cases of plantar fasciitis, but it doesn’t work once you’ve allowed it to go beyond that.
Plantar fasciitis is a mechanical issue and as such should be treated with devices that help support the mechanics of your foot. That means finding an arch support that will fit your arch and keep it from being stressed. Low dye taping is an economical short-term treatment that can get you back on your feet long enough to get out of an emergency situation or to offer relief until you can see a podiatrist. Dr. David Hughes, podiatrist with The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group, has an excellent video on how to properly tape a foot in the low dye method for plantar fasciitis relief here.

A more permanent solution is to get a pair of OTC orthotics. Many think that the massaging gel foot inserts that you find at the pharmacy will help, but they won’t. Instead, go to a sports shoe store or a podiatrists office (you don’t need an appointment- many of them carry high-quality orthotics that they sell over the counter) and get your feet fitted for orthotics. Why get fitted? Because everyone’s feet are different, each arch is different, and the point is to get an orthotic that closely matches the arch of your foot to give it maximum support. You’re looking for something like this.

Examine Your Footwear

Now is a good time to examine your footwear, too. Shoes, like tires on your car, have a mileage life. Shoes will usually last about 300 miles. It doesn’t matter how pretty they still look on the outside- after 300 miles, the inner structure starts breaking down and will no longer support your feet. For maximum support, choose lace-up shoes. Slip-on shoes won’t hug your feet well enough to keep the arch support snug against your arch. There’s a reason the military provides all their soldiers with lace-up boots! This video gives you a good overview on how to evaluate the quality of the construction of a shoe or boot.

I love the convenience of my slip-on muck boots, but they had to go. My beautiful cowboy boots are now reserved for nights out on the town. Flip-flops and stilettos? Fuggedaboutit! You’ll probably need to remove the insole that came with your shoes. Most of them now have their own support and it will interfere with the custom fit of your new orthotic. Trying to put the orthotic in while the old insole is still in place will also make your shoes too small. If you find that your lace-up boots are too tight even after removing the old insole and replacing it with the new orthotic, you can try lacing them differently for a more comfortable fit. A video on alternative lacing methods can be found here.

Sesamoid Injuries

This is another common injury of “blue collar feet” that take a pounding. Most joint bones connect to each other, but some do not, like your knee cap. The sesamoid bone in your foot is like the knee cap of your big toe. It’s in the underside of your foot where the big toe connects to your foot. Bruising of the sesamoid in your foot is more common (I’m looking at you, stiletto pumps!), but sesamoiditis (inflammation of the tendons surrounding the sesamoids) happens over time with repeated stress. Ironically, it was the quality boots and the custom-fit orthotics that made me more susceptible to sesamoiditis (through no fault of either device).

I took advantage of the increased support and felt indestructible. I was jumping off of things and sitting in bent-knees, toes-flexed-backwards position for long lengths of time. By the end of the day, it felt like a fire had been lit at the base of my big toe and stretching it backwards, even a little, was very painful.

If I had fractured the sesamoid, the pain would have been immediate. Fortunately, the treatment for sesamoiditis and fracture is the same- first, stop doing whatever it is that made it hurt. Next, use NSAIDS, rest, and ice the area to bring the inflammation down. Taping the big toe so that it remains slightly bent down or wearing a soft J-shaped pad to cushion it can sometimes offer relief (but really, you should just stay off of it). If the symptoms persist, you may need to wear a short leg fracture brace for four to six weeks to let the fracture heal.

Conclusion

Whether you’re thinking about preps for your bug-out or your feet are putting in a hard day’s work, having the proper support for them and quality footwear is a must. Shoes wear out after about 300 miles and foot problems can stop you in your tracks. Knowing what to look for in the construction of quality footwear and how to take care of the unique structure of your feet will insure you remain mobile in emergency situations or can keep you earning a living. As Leonardo da Vinci said, “The human foot is a masterpiece of engineering and a work of art”.  Stay tuned!

Ruby is a first generation Californian who grew up in the heart of the Central San Joaquin Valley farming community. She’s been involved in agriculture for 40 years and learned to preserve food, traditional home arts, to hunt and fish, raise livestock and garden from her Ozark native mother.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Dropping Out Of Society: How To Prepare For A Solo Life Off-Grid

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Dropping Out Of Society: How To Prepare For A Solo Life

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Many of us dream or desire to live off-grid by ourselves, enjoying a peaceful life of solitude. But it’s easy to underestimate the difficulty of this. Living off the grid is hard enough if you have family and other homesteaders around you. Going it alone is even more challenging. Here are some things to think about before deciding to live alone on your off-grid homestead:

1. Consider your physical strength

An off-grid lifestyle requires a lot of physical labor. Tilling the garden, delivering a calf, or chopping firewood are all common tasks on the homestead. So if you’re going it alone, be prepared to do all the hard work yourself.

2. Review your technical knowledge and skills

Most off-grid homesteads generate power from the land’s resources. Typical power sources are the sun for solar power, the wind for wind power, and flowing water for hydropower. Many times these primary power systems are backed up with a diesel generator.

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The common power generation technologies can malfunction or simply stop working. For example, solar power is a great technology. However, it generally entails electronic controllers like an inverter to convert captured energy into a form usable by modern appliances and equipment. You’ll need to know how to program, maintain and troubleshoot the inverter. Generating power from the wind or water rely on mechanical parts that can wear down, stop working together, or simply break. Finally, while diesel generators are reliable workhorses, many years of experience with them have taught me that the smallest issue can make a diesel generator come to a crashing halt.

So learn how to maintain, troubleshoot and repair the power generation equipment you rely on. Sure, you can get experts to come out and fix things, but this is expensive, especially if you live a long way from metropolitan areas.

3. Prepare for medical emergencies

For the solo off-gridder living in a remote location, it is critical to have first-aid knowledge and access to emergency medical care in case of a serious injury.

Dropping Out Of Society: How To Prepare For A Solo Life

Image source: Flickr

For first-aid knowledge, take both the standard and advanced first-aid courses available through local schools or government agencies. After mastering the skills, make sure the homestead is fully stocked to handle everything from a minor burn to a gunshot wound to a severed limb.

You also need access to emergency medical care. If you live far away from a hospital, look into plans where you can pay a small annual fee to get helicopter transfer to the nearest hospital. Research the plans carefully to understand how they work and their limitations.4. Don’t forget security

4. Don’t forget security

Living by yourself on an isolated property is a dream come true for many — including me. But it’s not a safe world out there. There are those who have no compunction about stealing what is yours, whether or not you’re home at the time.

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So learn self-defense, and get the guns you need to protect your life in the case of robbery or home invasion. You’ll also need to consider the wildlife around you, and select the right firearms to protect yourself against curious bears, mountain lions, or any of the other predators out there that roam sparsely populated areas.

5. Cultivate working relationships

I get it. You want to live on your off-grid homestead alone and take care of yourself by yourself. But things happen when you’ll simply need someone else’s help. For example, there are probably a lot of chores around the homestead — tending the garden, feeding the chickens, milking the goat — that really need to be done every day. If you seriously hurt yourself and end up bedridden or in the hospital for a few days, it’s good to have someone you can trust who can competently care for the homestead during your absence. So get out there and make some friends and build some relationships, even if it’s the last thing you want to do.Conclusion

Conclusion

Living alone is hard work. Learn the right skills and build the right relationships to be successful at it. Taking the right steps now will allow you to continue your solitude, even after a major injury or other incident prevents you from caring temporarily for the homestead.

Related:

A Survivalist’s Dream: Dropping Out Of Society

What advice would you add to this story? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Are You Prepared For Blackouts This Winter? Read More Here.

Three Preps Your SHTF Stockpile Cannot Do Without

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 In a recent article written by Tess Pennington regarding why we should continue to prepare when nothing seems to have happened.  My philosophy and hers are almost identical.  In the vein of her sound advice, who is to know exactly when something will or will not happen?  And then, if you prepare 99 times out of a hundred, do those 99 times count for anything if you did not prepare for the 1 time that something did happen?

Statistics and probability alone bespeak of the current situation here in the U.S. and in the world.

Michael Snyder posted an excellent piece, 27 nations where the stock markets have already crashed in 2015.  Britain, China, Saudi Arabia, and Canada, surprisingly, to name a few among the group.  The Euro is in deep trouble, as is the European Union, united only in the concept of introducing their own self-destruction with inane (unless you’re a globalist-oligarch) policies of “immigration” for the “refugees” of the Middle East.

The Credit Deferred Swaps, estimated at some 80-100 trillion dollars, actually exceeds the GDP of the planet Earth.  I mentioned it that way to draw significance to it.  The entire planet Earth does not earn the amount of CDS’s that are due.  In addition to this, we know the economies of the whole world are coming apart akin to an unraveling sweater.  The numbers in the U.S. are all “faux,” with actual unemployment being somewhere around 20%.

What is on the horizon?

War is coming in the Middle East between Russia and the United States.  War is coming in Europe (the flashpoint being Ukraine) between Russia and the United States.  The world situation is rapidly deteriorating, with flashpoints in the South China Sea, with the two Koreas, and an undefined, worldwide battlefield pitting Muslim extremists against anyone not a Muslim extremist.

The Three B’s

Understanding all of this, what we need now are basics.  When all else fails, return to your basics and your base.  Regroup is the term we used in the Service.  What is your base, prepper/survivalist family?  Your base is the Three B’s:  Bullets, Beans, and Band-Aids, in that order.  Let us go into them once again.

Bullets:

The category “bullets” is all-inclusive of weaponry, meaning the firearms themselves.  It also includes reloading equipment, and anything necessary to enable you to effectively employ the weapon technically and tactically.  There is a saying by Thomas Jefferson that I will mention.  I’m sure he will not mind, as he modified the words of the prophet Isaiah.  TJ said:

               “He who beats his rifles into plowshares will plow for he who does not.”

Sage wisdom, and completely applicable.  You must defend yourself, your family, and your property, or you will lose all three.  Let me give you some rules…rules you should not bend at all…regarding such.  It may help.

  1. Firearms take precedence over food; if you have a firearm, you can hunt for food.
  2. Never barter ammunition, as it will come back at you. The sole exception is blood family members.
  3. Minimum 1,000 pieces of “Pez” per “Pez-dispenser,” if you catch my inference. Anything less (unless it is either specialty or rare), and you are shorting yourself.
  4. You must be able to reload for every “Pez-dispenser” at your disposal; never trade or relinquish reloading equipment. Here is a great ammunition loader to consider. Make sure the loader is compatible with your firearm.
  5. You need it all: muzzle-loaders, boxer, berdan…the whole kit for reloading. Berdan is tough, but it is worth it in the end.
  6. Stagger your Pez-dispensers in terms of size/caliber…you need to be able to fire whatever ammo you can find
  7. Be an expert with whatever you have. All the supplies in the world won’t do you a bit of good if you can’t employ them.
  8. Shut up around others. Keep your amounts of candy and toys to yourself.  Today’s buddy is tomorrow’s burglar.
  9. Whatever you fire, your spouse should also fire…this for handguns/pistols, and rifles. You want to be able to exchange magazines/speed loaders/ammo.
  10. The golden rule: Never give up your weapon…ever, to anyone.

[Editor’s Note: Do not be solely dependent on a firearm for protection. As much as I value my firearm, I know that it can be taken out of my hands and used against me. Learning of other forms of personal protection such as hand-to-hand combat, krav maga, martial arts and other forms to self-defense for last resort measures will only make you more capable of protecting yourself, your loved ones and your preps.]

Beans:

Important, but secondary to a weapons, always is food.  Here is the proof.  You have a rifle and I have a hamburger.  Give it time.  You’ll have a hamburger and a rifle soon.  It is neither good or bad.  It just is.  I know, it doesn’t fall in line with “The Waltons” or “Bonanza,” but it is reality.

You can be the good, giving, guy; however, you better be able to beat the bad guy.

You need to set limits and goals for yourself for food for you and your family.  Now is the time.  Knowing how to layer your food sources in order to avoid malnutrition will keep your family thriving, Canned goods, freeze dried foods, vitamins, supplements, water supplies, water purification devices.  This preparedness calculator can save valuable time in helping you plan how much food your family needs. As well, consider these 25 food items.  All of these things, it would behoove you to reevaluate now while you have some time remaining.  One year’s food supply per person should be the absolute minimum you stock up.

Make allowances for seasonal and temperature changes.  Make allowances for hunting and foraging.  He who does not hunt and forage is forced to eat from his stores. If you feel compelled to have some items to donate to the needy, make sure you do so inconspicuously.

Band-Aids:

These are your medical supplies.  First-aid kits and supplies should be comprehensive and be able to deal with a wide range of injuries.  A thermonuclear device is not just dangerous due to radiation.  There are thermal burns, and the damage caused to structures by blast overpressure.  You better have a good supply of Potassium Iodine pills.  It might also behoove you to know there are naturopathic foods such as Chlorella and Spirulina that can rid your body of radiation.  Get ahold of some silver sulfadiazine cream for burns, as well as Aloe Vera gel for the same.

You can never have enough bandages, gauze, antibiotics, suturing kits, or IV bags.  Now is the window for you to stock up on as much as you can.  As well, consider creating trauma packs to have on standby in case a dire emergency occurs. You must also have any kind of supportive or life-saving medicine or medical equipment for your family members with special needs!  When the mushroom clouds sprout, it is too late to lay in supplies for the diabetic in your family.  You need (once again) to not just gather the supplies, but know how to use them and to administer them.  You also better have some good reference materials with plenty of photos and diagrams, if you’ve never done needle pericardiocentisis or run a chest tube (tube thoracostomy) on your own.

We have covered these areas to exhort you to return to basics, and build outward.  The time is short, and Yours Truly believes that there will be a war, a World War very soon.  Prepare now while you have the time and you’re not beset by a host of problems and “behind the power curve,” so to speak.  Keep those 3-B’s in mind, and “game” the possible scenarios day by day in your mind.  Fight the good fight!  JJ out.

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

4 Ways the Pine Tree Can Save Your Life

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pine treeHey there, ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals!  Today we’re going to give a few pointers to possibly an overlooked resource for your survival right under your fingertips.  You guessed it: the pine tree.  There are many benefits that pine trees offer for the survival enthusiast.  They can be found virtually in any part of the country; therefore, it will benefit you to explore the resources of this bountiful plant.

Food

Pine needle tea alone contains more than 5 times the amount of vitamin C in an orange.  The way to prepare it is as follows.

Pine Needle Tea

  • 1 handful of pine needles, cut up 1/2 inch in length
  • Boiling water

Take your pine needles (a good, full handful) and cut up the needles until you have a bunch of pieces about ½ inch in length.  Then macerate them (chop them up).  Add them to boiling water, and boil for about 3 minutes.  Then take them off the burner, keeping the pot covered and allow them to steep for a good 15 to 20 minutes or until cool. One cup of it is enough to maintain the RDA for Vitamin C in an adult.

This holds true for all of the pines, however, there are 6 species that must be mentioned for toxic effects.  Avoid these for any kind of food use:  Norfolk Island Pine, Ponderosa Pine, Monterey Cypress, Lodge pole Pine, Common Juniper, and Yew.

Pine nuts can be gathered from pine cones between September and November.  They are rich in Vitamin E, pinolenic acid (an omega-6 fatty acid), and oleic acid (a monounsaturated fat that lowers LDL (the bad cholesterol, Low-density Lipoprotein).  Pine nuts are chock full of essential minerals such as manganese, potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium. The nuts also provide the B-complex group of vitamins such as thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine) and folates.

From a nutritional perspective, it can also be said that the pine tree can provide for some of your needs in a survival situation.  There is a layer beneath the bark called the cambium layer.  This is a layer that the tree stores all of its energy, similar to the way other plants store theirs in bulbs, roots, etc.  When you extract this cambium layer, you can obtain the carbohydrates by cutting pieces of it up into strips and chewing them.  Don’t eat them!  The fiber will pass through you akin to a lawn mower in Stephen King’s movie “Maximum Overdrive,” thereby defeating the positive gains you may realize.

Chew on those strips and allow the carbohydrates to be softened and absorbed as you such on the plant fibers.  It tastes terrible: akin to turpentine.  Then again, this is survival, and you don’t have the luxury of choice in certain circumstances. The thing that makes the pine so good a resource is that it is a perennial and an evergreen: it can be used in these outlined capacities all year round.

Here is a link you may find interesting that has several films on various uses of pine sap (resin).

Bedding and Shelter

Pine boughs are excellent material for bedding.  When layered properly, they will lock the cold out and keep your heat from being transferred into the ground (conduction).  You can also thatch the top/roof of a lean-to that will enable you to keep drier.  See video here. This is due to the semi-waxy coating on the outside of the leaves (the needles) that help in terms of water resistance.

Fuel

Fire is life in a survival situation and pine wood is an excellent source for fires. Specifically, older pine needles make excellent fire starting material, as well as the older pine cones. Fatwood is another bi-product from the resourceful pine tree. You can find high quality fatwood in forests or in your own backyard that will help to start your fire more quickly. You can also collect the sticky resin from pine trees to use to start a fire – all you need is a dime-sized amount. Pine stumps are an excellent source to look for fatwood and resin. As well, the resin can be used as a waterproofing agent to patch up tent seams, boots and mittens.

Medicine

Incidentally, I almost forgot…the tea I outlined above?  You can also bottle it up and use it as an astringent for minor cuts, wounds, abrasions, and rashes.  Pines are habitats for many different forms of wildlife, such as birds and squirrels.  In a survival situation, it would behoove you to study what pines the birds and squirrels prefer in your locality.

The pine tree can be a very valuable resource for you: for food, shelter, fire and medicine.  Be sure to mind the local laws and ordinances before you practice some of these techniques.  I highly recommend (if you have a Christmas tree) trying it with some of the needles, and experimenting with a tea for yourself, prior to discarding the tree this season.  Have a great day!

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Creating a Prepper Group: How To Assess Family Members During a Crisis

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prepper group[Editor’s Note: Everyone knows there is strength in numbers, and as many preppers are creating cohesive units with friends or family members, it is paramount that each member be assessed for pertinent skills that can help the group flourish during a crisis. As well, cross training those members will ensure that all members can carry on if one member is unable to perform duties. 

Jeremiah Johnson provides some excellent advice on what areas to look into when assessing family or group members and what the keys to success are.]

Good Day, ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals!  This article is going to give some pointers on continuous assessment of family members during a SHTF scenario.  Some of you may wonder what that is all about.  The concept is simple: as a survivor, you will need to wear “many hats” on the team (your family) that you’re a part of.  The best way to ensure continuity and success is to address problems before they arise or nip them in the bud in their infancy.

What Hats Will You Need to Wear During a Crisis?

Much of this depends on your role and position in the family.  Are you the Dad or the Mom?  What kinds of things does your family depend on you to do as the normal course of your daily routine?  What special skills do you have?  What special needs (medical, psychological, physical limitations, etc.) do your family members have?

Therefore, we have a few steps to begin with.

  1. First you must assess yourself and your capabilities.
  2. Secondly you must consider each and every member of your family, assessing their strengths and limitations realistically.

All of this is taking one thing for granted that needs mention: this article is assuming you are the “bedrock,” a stable family member that the others will rely upon.

But is that the case?

Be True to Yourself

Now is the time to identify your own weaknesses and limitations.  Be honest!  As Shakespeare eloquently phrased it, “To thine own self be true.”  Be honest: identify your physical and emotional limitations.  Guess what?

You may read this article and realize you are “not the one” the family will rely upon…so bring these words to the family member who will be the bedrock!

Be the facilitator of information.  Be someone who is in on making the plan!  This is part of being a team: make a role for yourself and stick to it.  You don’t have to be the leader in order to take a leadership role in certain things, such as planning and organizing.  You may begin the assessment to have another member of the family finish it up.  Does this mean you’re finished?  Absolutely not!  You then become the backup: the one they’ll depend on if the primary leader “goes down,” so to speak.

You need to initiate group discussions on this topic with your family.  Few and far in between are the families where one person does everything for a whole multitude of family members.  Your family has many things to identify: special medical needs and special medications; emotional stability; “history” of performance under pressure.  Knowing these basics, for example, will help you later on when the pressure is higher and the stressful conditions have arisen.

These Are the Keys To Success:

You will succeed by assessing the changes in your family member’s behavior.

In brief, you will be watching out for changes in the normative behavior…indicators that a problem either exists or has the potential to exist.  Nervousness in speech or behavior, or extreme unwillingness to do something that would normally be done are indicators.  Excessive or unreasonable fears are others.  I did a piece earlier on handling stress.  You may find that in certain situations you may need to medicate them according to an existing prescription, or you may wish to give them herbal supplements to help with their needs.

As mentioned in previous articles, St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum) is extremely good for stress and anxiety, as well as depression.  As concentrations vary per manufacturer, consult the package instructions.  The herb is available in capsule form in Wal-Mart.  Herbal teas, such as Chamomile and Peppermint have calmative effects, as they are nervines.

Balance your immediate needs with your operational capabilities.

It may not be convenient to boil water and make a tea at the moment; you may have to rely on the capsule forms of the herbs, deferring the tea-making until a time when you are able.  In the meantime, your assessments do not stop.  Talk to your family member.  Reassure him or her that you are there and that other members of the family are there as well.

Remember, although your family member may make it through a crisis, this is not a guarantee that they won’t have another situation.  Recidivism can best be avoided through reassurance.  You will only be on top of a situation if you stay on top of it at all times.  Life is continuous maintenance, and that is what this is.

 Your task is to train your family member to be able to assess himself or herself.

In this manner, when a crisis threatens to rise, they can be more self-aware and responsible to help you do your job.  After a crisis has been successfully navigated through, you should talk to the affected family members as well as the rest of the group.  By understanding the circumstances, it reinforces all of them: to aid the main member who is afflicted by whatever fear or problem, as well as being able to spot it and avoid it for themselves.  Nobody is immune to a breakdown or a crisis.

Self-assessment and continuous assessment of family members helps to maintain effective control and smoothness in operations.  Assessments take time and practice until they will eventually become a part of your routine.  Every member of the family can perform them, and they can provide you with a powerful tool for avoiding or managing crises that may arise.  Develop your techniques now and it will be a smoother transition for you when a disaster strikes or the SHTF.  Be safe and help one another!

JJ

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Survival Medicine Hour: GMO Salmon, Medical Emergencies

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salmon and bear

What’s for dinner? Well, it could be Frankenfish, as the FDA gives final approval for  genetically modified salmon to hit the supermarket shelves. This story and more about dealing with a person physically collapsing in front of you are part of this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour with Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy. Also, a visit to the Urban Farming Institute…

 

To listen in, click here:

 

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2015/11/22/survival-medicine-hour-gmo-salmon-medical-emergencies

 

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

 

 

Joe and Amy Alton

HiDrBonesNurseAmy-20120327rnd

Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy

Winter Wilderness Survival: Take Care of Your Feet and Your Odds of Survival Increase.

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immersion footReadyNutrition Readers, we continue our winter trauma series on first aid measures with a segment on Immersion foot.  As you guys and gals are going to be hiking, hunting, and hill-climbing all over this fall, it is very important that you protect two friends of yours…your feet…from unnecessary damage they could sustain.  In order to do that you need some knowledge and some preventative measures.  The best adventures are most enjoyable when they are planned out beforehand with the proper equipment and training.

What is Immersion Foot?

This medical issues defined as “damage to the foot owing to continued exposure to water or to moisture, e.g., hiking through streams, mud, or puddles,” (Taber’s, 19th ed. pg. 1019).  Symptoms mentioned are numbness, tingling, and cramps within the legs.  Sounds simple enough.  There are other complications, especially depending on the exposure time and the temperature, two of the main factors that determine exactly how severe a case one will experience.

Immersion foot is also known in the vernacular as trench foot, labeled as such during World War I when “doughboys” (American GI’s) suffered from it while fighting in the trenches (trench warfare was predominant then) of Europe.  The greatest short-term complications are as follows:

  1. Blistering and “pruning” (withering) of the bottoms/soles of the feet
  2. Raw rubbing and cracking of the toes and the membranes/skin between the toes
  3. Sloughing off of the bottom layer of the soles from movement after wetting
  4. Incapacitation: inability to walk
  5. Local hypothermia

Long-term complications are much more serious, and some of them are as follows:

  1. Necrosis – tissue death from sloughing and lack of circulation
  2. Secondary Infection: from long exposure to water/wetness, with athlete’s foot or even gangrene arising (the latter very common during World War I with the doughboys).
  3. Prolonged/permanent incapacity/inability to walk.

Preventative measures are the key, but first a little first aid.  When your feet are not in the condition to walk, don’t push the envelope: take a break and baby your feet.  First, follow JJ’s simple rules:

Always have a dry pair of boots in your backpack and at least 3 pairs of socks.

Some may complain that such a precaution adds too much weight.  Bunk.  It pays for itself the first time your feet become soaked without warning.  It does not have to go to immersion foot…dry your feet and change out your footgear!  It isn’t that much weight…and you can carry a lighter pair of boots, and thick spare socks.  You’ll have to dry the other pair (the wet one) out by a fire, anyway.  A pair of jungle boots and two pairs of wool socks will go a long way.

Bring plenty of foot powder with you and powder up those “dogs” when they’re wet.  There are plenty of good ones out there that will stay dry a long time.  Also, you’re going to need to make a shelter of some kind if you don’t have a tent and you’re just hiking.  The day hike can turn into a survival epic if you break through the ice of a creek.  Bring a poncho (military issue if possible) and five (5) bungee cords to construct a temporary shelter.  Four corners, grommets and bungees, stretched to four trees, and the hood tied off and bungeed to an overhanging branch, and you’ll be all set.

Make sure your waterproof your boots and your socks in Ziploc bags or wet weather bags.  Also make sure you have plenty of fire starting materials and that they also are secured in waterproof containers.  Moleskin is great for blisters.  Buy a nice big square of it and a pair of medical shears/scissors.  The moleskin can be cut into doughnuts for the hot spots and as a semi-bandage for the blistered areas that have ruptured.

A word of advice: do not lance the blister (bubble-type) on your feet!  The fluid inside of the blister is sterile; once you lance it, you have created an open wound.  Then there is an avenue for pathogens, and you have also just removed a natural “cushion” that your body produced on its own.  Yes, the blister is a pain in the neck, but it is designed to act as a cushion between the skin and the underlying subcutaneous tissue that is injured.

How to Prevent Food Immersion

Now for the prevention portion.  JJ prefers Rocky Gore-Tex boots with vibram soles and at least 1000 grams of Thinsulate within.  His socks of choice are cotton against the skin overlapped by pure wool socks.  The cotton absorbs the sweat, and the wool wicks it away from the cotton and the skin.  In addition are Rocky Gore-Tex socks that are designed to work against the skin; however, the author usually wears thin cotton socks beneath them to prevent chafing.  JJ’s backup pair is a pair of winter desert camo (military issue), and six (6) pairs of socks: three cotton and three wool.

Other good types are Belleville, Hi-Tecs (the full leather jobs only), and Herman Survivors as your primary winter boot.  These Gore-Tex boots go a long way in preventing immersion foot and frostbite.  Remember, if you suffer an injury as such, be sure and check your feet out with the doctor, as these are first aid measures only as discussed in this article.  Be safe, and remember to plan everything in advance.  When you plan properly, an accident becomes a minor setback instead of a major challenge that can end in disaster.  Have a great time, and keep those feet dry and warm!

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Frostbite: How To Survive Winter’s Unrelenting Brutality

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 ReadyNutrition guys and gals, this article will focus upon our Winter First Aid measures to treat Frostbite.  We will cover first aid procedures, as well as, the ways to understand and recognize frostbite for what it is.  As this is a medical condition, keep in mind we are giving first aid parameters to deal with in a wilderness/field environment.  After you render first aid, immediately transport the patient to a doctor or a definitive healthcare treatment facility.

Frostbite

Frostbite is tissue damage sustained by prolonged or extreme exposure to cold temperatures.  The tissue in this case refers to the epidermis, or skin layers.  When the skin is exposed to temperatures of 32 degrees Fahrenheit or below, the vessels next to the skin surface begin to shrink and constrict.  This causes shunting, a condition where the blood is whisked away from limbs and other parts of the body away from the thoracic cavity, or chest.

Shunting is a necessary survival response to the cold.  You may have seen episodes of shunting when, for example, someone’s car plunges into an icy river or body of water.  The person may be lying unconscious in the water for almost an hour, yet they live.  This is called the mammalian dive reflex, and is a type of shunting.  The body (to preserve itself and survive) removes the blood from the extremities and sends it to the core (heart, lungs, and thorax).

 

Image source courtesy of The Mayo Clinic

Image source courtesy of The Mayo Clinic

In this manner with frostbite, the body (and sort of “mistakenly” so) wishes to protect from the cold in a survival response: the body is willing to sacrifice the extremity to ensure the survival of the individual as a whole.  The loss/transfer of blood from these extremities (especially the limbs and the feet and hands) causes the freezing and eventual necrosis (tissue death) of these areas.  Frostbite is measured in degrees, and they are as follows:

  1. First Degree Frostbite – only affects the outermost layer of the skin. It is characterized by mild pain with itching and some redness upon return of blood flow to the area.  Another name for it is frostnip.  First-degree frostbite does not usually result in any long-term damage, although the experience can lead to a long-term susceptibility to cold weather injuries and extra sensitivity for the afflicted body part/area.
  1. Second Degree Frostbite – this is a more severe form that is subsequent to first-degree frostbite. In this form, the skin may actually be frozen and assume a rigidity akin to actual ice.  After several days (1-3 in most cases) blistering can happen to the areas of the skin that were frozen.  These may turn black and rigid; however, it usually heals up completely in about a month or so.  Once again, these affected areas may hold a permanent sensitivity to cold and susceptibility to cold weather injuries.
  1. Third Degree Frostbite – This is characterized by the depth of the skin frozen, as well as structures below the skin. Such structures include muscle, veins, arteries, nerve tissue, tendons, and cartilage.  This type of frostbite is most severe and may result in the loss of limbs and structures such as hands/feet and the digits.  The greatest cause/contributing factor (in addition to the cold, naturally) is poor or compromised blood circulation to the affected area(s).  The shunting that we mentioned earlier is a big contributor, as well.

With third degree frostbite, there are blisters that become purple and then turn black.  The blisters are filled with blood, and the affected areas may need to be amputated.  Those who have health factors such as diabetes and are taking certain medications such as beta-blockers place people at high risk for this affliction.

 Treatment of Frostbite

Treatment can be effected by rewarming the afflicted body part or parts by two methods:

1) Passive Rewarming – this is accomplished by either using room temperature of a warm structure, or by body heat (the patient’s own, or another person providing first aid).  Addition of warm clothing and use of blankets are also part of this method.

2) Active Rewarming – this is where heat is directly applied to a person.  Such is accomplished after the steps to passive rewarming have been undertaken.  Immersion of the affected tissues in a water bath between 104-108 degrees Fahrenheit is the preferred method.  Such is undertaken because the more quickly the affected tissue is rewarmed, the less potential there is for a permanent cold weather injury and damages that are affected in the long-term.

As the first-line first aid provider, follow this rule: DO NOT MASSAGE OR RUB THE AFFECTED AREA!  Ice crystals can form in the tissue that has been frozen, and any kind of movement such as rubbing or other physical actions can cause the ice crystals to further damage the tissues.

Keep your patient warm.  Keep them dry and covered, and make sure their clothing is not too tight or restrictive so as to prevent circulation.  As we have covered in other articles, continuously monitor and reassess the patient!

JJ’s rule: When treating any condition, always monitor and reassess for shock.

Remember: a patient can “crash” when they have been affected by severe trauma such as a severe case of frostbite.  They have been weakened by exposure and the trauma.  “Crashing” is when their vital signs (temperature, pulse, blood pressure, etc.) take a “nose dive” and the patient slips into shock.  Shock kills!  It is an insidious enemy that can always creep up on you to ally itself with the injury.  Please remember this always.
There are many ways, as well as tools to prevent frostbite, and prevention is the number one objective you need to strive for.  Here are a few methods for you to file away: 

  1. Know your limits: know the area you are camping or hiking in and the weather patterns. Know yourself and what you can and cannot do physically.
  1. Warm clothing and footgear: Extras of both. JJ recommends at least one extra pair of boots in the backcountry and you can never have enough pairs of socks.  Good thermal underwear, gloves, gore-tex jackets, hats, scarves, and facemasks are must have’s when you are out and about.  Make sure you waterproof ’em before you pack ’em in
  1. Emergency hand and foot warmers: Those commercial “hot hands” packets, and such. For those of you who are wondering, you must read the short story, “To Build a Fire” by Jack London…you’ll never want to be without hand warmers again!  If your hands are cold/frozen, you will need to thaw them out to build a fire.
  1. Take plenty of food and water: It is very important to hydrate yourself, as you will waste a tremendous amount of water through physical exertion and your body’s response to cold. Bring high-calorie, easily digested foods that give you quick energy, such as trail mixes and chocolate bars, along with dried fruits and hard candies.
  1. Have a place to warm up in an emergency: Even if it is just a vehicle, make sure you can go into a structure that will allow you to rewarm frozen tissues and affected body parts.

Here are some steps for treating frostbite:

  1. Protect your skin from further exposure.
  2. Get out of the cold.
  3. Gradually warm frostbitten areas with warm water (never hot).
  4. Do not rub or massage frostbitten areas.
  5. Don’t walk on frostbitten toes or feet, if possible.
  6. If there is a chance the area will freeze again, don’t thaw them.

Remember with all of this that you must seek medical attention immediately.  Take them to a doctor or a hospital as quickly as possible.  Frostbite is treatable and it is best defeated by proper prevention and planning prior to your outdoor excursions.  Enjoy yourself the most by preparing yourself beforehand.  Have a great day!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition