The Wonderful Plant Garlic

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If I could have put one plant to grow, I believe it would be garlic.

Garlic is one of the earliest documented plans to be used by humans in the treatment of disease and to maintain health. From Neolithic times in central Asia spreading to the Middle East and North Africa in 3000 BC, garlic has been used by man. Ancient medical text from Egypt, Greece, Rome, China, and India, each prescribing medical applications of garlic. There are even biblical references to garlic, as well as garlic in the Jewish teachings and the Quran.

The wild plant of course was used first and then slowly domesticated over time, garlic has been worth its weight in gold.
Around 3000 BC, trading parties from India reached Middle East, where they introduced garlic to the Babylonians and Assyrian Empire. From these places neighboring civilizations found the plant to be useful as food seasoning, medical ingredients, and religious ingredients.

Garlic is highly nutritious but has very few calories. A 1 ounce serving of garlic contains, manganese, vitamin B6, vitamin B1, vitamin C, calcium, copper, potassium, phosphorus, iron, also contains trace amounts of various other nutrients. This includes 42 cal, with 1.8 g of protein and 9 g of carbs.

The medical uses for garlic are too many to name, the fact that garlic has been used for almost every ailment of the human body, is amazing. From cancer to insect bites, from athletes foot to heart problems, garlic has been used to treat almost any ailment you can think of.

There are a few drawbacks when soft prescribing or using garlic medicinally. Garlic especially fresh, may increase the risk of bleeding. Garlic can irritate the stomach and digestive track sometimes causing digestion problems. Garlic can lower blood pressure, people of prescription medication should be careful. And some people may be sensitive to garlic on their skin.

Garlic produces a chemical called allicin. This is what seems to make garlic work for certain conditions. Allicin also makes garlic smell. Some products are made “odorless” by aging the garlic, but this process can also make the garlic less effective.

As for using garlic and cooking, I think that stands for itself. Whether using the bulbs or the leaves, garlic is a wonderful addition to your culinary uses.

Garlic can be grown year-round in a pot right on your windowsill in your kitchen. I believe the fresh garlic is always better than aged garlic. I myself prefer wild garlic to the grocery store variety.

Yes, if I could grow but one plant, it would be garlic. The flavor, the culinary uses, and the medical benefits, outweigh that of any other plant that I know of.

By Rich Beresford
Rich@AroundTheCabin.com

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Sesame Seeds

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Sesame seeds are a high energy food that help to provide optimum health and wellness. They are an excellent source of high-quality protein which is most beneficial for growth, especially in children. Sesame seeds are also high in minerals such as calcium, iron, zinc, magnesium, selenium, and copper. In fact, did you know that just a 1/4 cup of sesame seeds provides MORE calcium than 1 cup of milk?

And calcium is not only vital to bone strength, it is also known to help ease the affects of migraines, aid in weight loss, and provide relief from PMS. The copper in sesame seeds offers anti-inflammatory benefits which can help to relieve swelling in auto-immune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia.

Sesame seeds are rich in Vitamin E, Folic acid and B-complex vitamins such as niacin which enhances GABA activity in the brain, reduces anxiety, and provides for a better night’s sleep. They also contain a special element called “sesame-lignin”, a potent antioxidant, which is an active free-radical scavenger that can also aid in lowering cholesterol and preventing high blood pressure.

Sesame seeds have the unique ability to nourish the nervous system, strengthen hormone production, support the cardiovascular system, benefit the digestive system, and reduce fatigue. The high Vitamin E content in sesame seeds has been highly prized as an ancient beauty treatment for healthy skin, hair, and nails.

Sesame seeds can be sprinkled on salads, vegetables or rice, mixed with dates or honey, or used as a delicious spread known as tahini. Tahini (sesame butter) is creamy, rich, and satisfying and can be used as a savory base to salad dressings, dips, sauces or hummus, or used as a sweet treat when mixed with honey and nuts.

http://www.medicalmedium.com/blog/sesame-seeds

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Lemons

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Lemons are a powerful healing fruit that contain phenomenal antibiotic, antiseptic, and anti-cancer properties. Lemons are rich in vitamins C and B-complex and minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, silicon, copper, and potassium. They are considered to be a wonderful tonic and can help to cleanse and detoxify the entire body.

Although lemons have an acidic taste they actually have a very strong alkaline reaction on the body and can help to alkalize blood, cells, lymph, organs, and tissues. Lemons are known to help destroy putrefactive bacteria in the mouth and intestines which can help alleviate flatulence, indigestion, and constipation. Lemons contain a compound called limonene which is used to dissolve gallstones and kidney stones and can help to fight oral, lung, skin, breast, stomach, and colon cancer.

Lemons are also rich in bioflavonoids which can significantly boost the immune system and reduce inflammation in the body. Lemon juice is known to be particularly beneficial for colds, coughs, sore throats, hiccups, ear infections, fevers, arthritis, heart disease, COPD, atherosclerosis, diabetes, high cholesterol, autoimmune disorders, stroke, and cancer. Topically, lemon juice is a great remedy for wrinkles, warts, toothaches, corns, sunburns, poison ivy, acne, psoriasis, and as a hair rinse and facial astringent.

A tall glass of lemon water upon waking is an excellent way to hydrate and cleanse the body first thing in the morning. Fresh lemon in tea and green juice and added to salads, wraps, hummus, guacamole, and nori rolls is another great way to add this healing and nutritious fruit into your diet. Fresh lemons can be found at your local grocery and health food store.

Learn more about which foods can heal and restore your body in my new book Life-Changing Foods, click here for more info http://bit.ly/LCFBook

Thank you: Anthony William

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Burdock Root

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Burdock root is a medicinal herb and food that has powerful anti-tumor, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial properties. Burdock root is one of the top recommended herbal remedies for cancer due to the belief that it can stop cancer cells from metastasizing and it is one of the star ingredients of the famous natural cancer remedy known as Essiac tea.

It is also highly beneficial for colds, flu, sore throats, bronchial congestion, ulcers, gallstones, anemia, kidney stones, chicken pox, gout, measles, strep throat, urinary tract infections, bladder infections, hepatitis, and enlarged prostates. Burdock root is an essential blood purifier and detoxifying herb as it can neutralize and safely eliminate poisons and toxins from the body.

Burdock is one of the most important herbs for treating chronic skin problems such as acne, psoriasis, eczema, and shingles. It can also help to stimulate metabolism, re-grow hair, strengthen nails, and aid in edema and weight loss. Burdock root is an effective painkiller that can help alleviate symptoms of inflammation that affect auto-immune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, bursitis, lupus, and diabetes.

Fresh burdock can be juiced with celery, kale, and apple or used in recipes similarly to carrots. It is often steamed or added to soups and stews. It has a subtly sweet and earthy flavor that works well with potatoes, mushrooms, and onions. Dried burdock root is often used as a medicinal tea.

Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 1-2 teaspoons of dried burdock root and let steep for at least 10 minutes or more, sweeten with honey if desired. Burdock root can be readily found in a cream, salve, tincture, extract, and capsule form. It’s potent healing abilities has made it a vital herb for your natural medicine cabinet.

From our friend at: http://www.medicalmedium.com/blog/burdock-root

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Persimmons

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Persimmons

Persimmons are a sweet and delicious fruit that are an excellent source of vitamin A, C, and B-complex and minerals such as potassium, manganese and copper. They contain an anti-cancer and anti-tumor compound called Betulinic acid which makes them highly beneficial for lung, colon, prostate, breast, and skin cancer. Persimmons contain active enzymes that help […]

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Kale

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Kale

Kale is a nutritionally packed leafy vegetable that contains incredible healing and rejuvenating properties. Kale is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, chlorophyll, amino acids, vitamins A, C, E, K, B-complex and minerals such as iron, magnesium, copper, and potassium. Kale is an anti-cancer powerhouse and contains phytochemicals such as glucosinolates that help protect the body […]

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Healing Broth

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Healing Broth

Healing Broth is a powerful mineral-rich liquid that carries the essence of vitally nutritious vegetables, herbs, & spices in a way that is easy for the body to digest, assimilate, and utilize. You will find this recipe as comforting as it is nourishing. The ingredients of this simple recipe help to provide tremendous healing benefits […]

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Pumpkin

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Pumpkin

Pumpkin is a very low calorie vegetable (actually technically a fruit) that is packed with antioxidants such as vitamins A, C, E, beta-carotene, and zea-xanthin which can help prevent age-related macular disease. Pumpkin is also a rich source of B-vitamins such as folates, niacin, thiamin, and pantothenic acid and minerals like calcium, copper, potassium, and […]

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Banana Apple Oatmeal

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Banana Apple Oatmeal

Oatmeal is one of the most common and popular breakfast choices for Americans. It’s comforting, filling and delicious. This recipe for oatmeal skips the grains altogether which is an added plus for those looking to avoid them. Instead delicious sweet fruit is used to mimic the consistency and comfort of oatmeal, with the added bonus […]

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Grapefruits

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Grapefruits

Grapefruits are an exceptional fruit that have very strong anti-viral and anti-bacterial properties. They are a great source of vitamin C and bioflavonoids which help to boost the immune system and prevent aging, illness, and disease. Grapefruits are known to help with fevers, fatigue, indigestion, insomnia, diabetes, weight loss, influenza, malaria, urinary tract disorders, constipation, […]

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Tarragon

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Tarragon

Tarragon is a culinary and medicinal herb that is rich in vitamins A, C, and B-complex and minerals such as zinc, copper, iron, and magnesium. It is known to help stimulate the appetite, relieve flatulence and colic, balance the body’s acidity, alleviate the pains of arthritis, rheumatism and gout, regulate menstruation, stop hiccups, prevent dyspepsia, […]

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Sunflower Seeds

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Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds have the power to nourish the entire body. They are a rich source of easily digestible and assimilable protein which is essential for the repair of tissues, nerves, and cells. Sunflower seeds are an excellent source of Vitamin D, B-complex, Vitamin K, and Vitamin E. Vitamin E, also known as tocopherol, is an […]

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