25 Ancient Remedies That Used To Be Common Knowledge

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Common knowledge has certainly changed a lot over the past century. Today it is “common knowledge” that if you can’t sleep, you should just take a sleeping pill. But it used to be common knowledge that if you can’t sleep, you should drink some chamomile tea or take some valerian root. Some people argue that …

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Wild Violets: 10 ways to put them to use

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Though pretty, many people look at wild violets as a scourge that kills the lawn. They are further frustrated by the fact that they are really hard to control and have been referred to as the wild violet weed. But I have good news. Instead of looking at them as a difficult weed, wild violets […]

11 Herbal Alternatives to Antibiotics

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Oftentimes, the world’s best medications are not the ones developed in labs, but rather the ones made by Mother Nature. For thousands of years, mankind has relied on various herbs to treat a wide range of conditions. While the advent of antibiotics drastically reduced the popularity of these herbal alternatives, they still remain effective to […]

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Essential Oils As Medical Tools

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ESSENTIAL OILS

Essential Oils As Survival Tools

Essential Oils As Survival Tools

Recently, I wrote an article about the use of herbal teas for their medicinal benefits. For the medic who is concerned about long-term survival scenarios, a hard reality is that stored pharmaceuticals will run out over time. This leaves them with only natural options, such as the plants that grow in their own backyard. These were used with skill by our ancestors, who had little else to treat sickness and injury.

While teas are the simplest way to utilize your medicinal herbs, many swear by essential oils as a storage option with other medical supplies. These items have much more longevity than fresh plants and can include those that don’t naturally grow in the area.

Essential Oils Contain Various Compounds

Essential Oils Contain Various Compounds

An essential oil is distilled from whole plant material, not a single ingredient; therefore, each one has multiple compounds that might be medically useful. To take an example, English lavender has about 20 different chemicals, including esters, ketones, and terpenes. These combinations make each oil unique. Oils may be produced from leaves, bark, flowers, resin, fruit or roots. For example, Lemon oil comes from the peel, Lavender oil from flowers, and Cinnamon oil from bark.

Although you might not realize it, you’ve been using essential oils all your life in soaps, furniture polishes, perfumes, and ointments. Previous generations of conventional physicians commonly included them in their medical bags. Indeed, many standard medical texts of the past were really instruction manuals on how to use these products.

Distilling Essential Oils Requires Equipment

One Way To Make Essential Oils: Distillation

Essential oils aren’t easy to produce without distillery equipment. Although it only takes a few leaves of peppermint to make a tea, you would need 5 pounds of leaves to make 1 ounce of essential oil. One source states that it takes an entire acre of peppermint to produce just 12 pounds of oil. The same source says that 12,000 rose blossoms are required to produce a tablespoon of rose oil. These concentrated versions are the ones you see marketed in small, dark bottles. Unless you intend to buy distilling materials, you should accumulate essential oils in quantity but use them sparingly.

The strength or quality of the oil is dependent on multiple factors, including soil conditions, season harvested, subspecies of plant, rainfall, and, in some cases, even the time of day. This is akin to the conditions that determine the quality of a particular vintage of wine. It also explains the significant variance you’ll see in the effects of the same oil from year to year.

You might be surprised to learn that the Food and Drug Administration only requires 10% essential oil in the bottle for it to be marketed as “Pure Essential Oil”. Beware of claims of FDA certification; the FDA has no certification or approval process for these products.

Making Essential Oils

The manufacture of essential oils, known as “extraction”, can be achieved by various methods:

Distillation Method: Using a “still” like old-time moonshiners, water is boiled through an amount of plant material to produce a steam that travels through cooled coils. This steam condenses into a “mixture” of oil and water from which the oil can be extracted

Pressing Method: The oils of citrus fruit can be isolated by a technique which involves putting the peels through a “press”. This works well only with the oiliest of plant materials, such as orange skins.

Maceration Method: a fixed oil (sometimes called “carrier” oil) or lard may be combined with the plant part and exposed to the sun over time, causing the fixed oil to become infused with the plant “essence”. Oftentimes, a heat source is used to move the process along. The plant material may be added several times during the process to manufacture stronger versions. This is the method by which you obtain products such as “garlic-infused olive oil”. A similar process using flowers is referred to as “Enfleurage”.

Solvent Method: Alcohol and other solvents may be used on some plant parts, usually flowers, to release the essential oil in a multi-step process.

As each essential oil has different chemical compounds in it, it stands to reason that the medicinal benefits are also different. An entire alternative medical discipline has developed to find the appropriate oil for the condition that needs treatment. The method of treatment may differ, as well. Common methods are:

1) Inhalation Therapy: This method is also known as “aroma- therapy”. The simplest  way to perform direct inhalation therapy involves putting 2 or 3 drops of essential oil on your hands, rubbing them together, and inhaling.

Steam inhalation therapy utilizes the addition of a few drops of the essential oil in a bowl of steaming water (distilled or sterilized), which is then inhaled. This method is most effective when placing a towel over your head to catch the vapors.

Many people will place essential oils in potpourri or use a “diffuser” to spread the aroma throughout the room. This technique probably dilutes any medicinal effects, however.

2) Topical Application: The skin is an amazing absorbent surface, and using essential oils by direct application is a popular method of administration. The oil may be used as part of a massage, or directly placed on the skin to achieve a therapeutic effect on a rash or aching muscle.

It’s wise to always test for allergic reactions before using an essential oil in this manner: Even though the chemical compounds in the oil are natural, you could still exhibit an allergy to it or be irritated by it (case in point: poison ivy).

A simple test involves placing a couple of drops on the inside of your forearm with a cotton applicator. Within 12-24 hours, you’ll notice redness and itching if you’re allergic. Mixing some of the essential oil with a “carrier” oil such as olive oil before use is a safer option for topical use. Another concern, mostly with citrus oils applied to the skin, is “phototoxicity” (an exaggerated burn response to sun exposure).

Although we have seen many sources recommend applying essential oil over the location of an internal organ, some reservations exist about whether such an application will really have an effect on that organ. It is much more likely to work on skin issues or, perhaps, underlying muscle tissue.

3) Ingestion: Direct ingestion is unwise for many essential oils, and this method should be used with caution. Professional guidance is imperative when considering this method, except for a very few instances. A reasonable alternative to consider is a tea made with the dried herb. This is a safer mode of internal use, but the effect may not be as strong.

Hard Data?

Hard Data on Oils is Not Always Easy To Find

Hard Data on Oils is Not Always Easy To Find

Essential oils have been used as medical treatment for a very long time, but it’s difficult to provide definitive evidence of their effectiveness for several reasons. Essential oils are difficult to standardize, due to variance in the quality of the product based on soil conditions, time of year, and other factors that we mentioned above.

In addition, there are many subspecies of plants that may differ in their effects. An essential oil of Eucalyptus, for example, may be obtained from Eucalyptus Globulus or Eucalyptus Radiata; these plants may have their own unique properties. These factors combine to make scientific study problematic.

In most university experiments, a major effort is made to be certain that the substance tested caused the results obtained. As essential oils have a number of different compounds and are often marketed as blends, which ingredient was the cause of the effect? If the oil is applied with massage, was the effect related to the oil itself or from the physical therapy?

The majority of studies on essential oils have been conducted by the cosmetics and food industries. Others have been conducted by individuals or small companies with a vested interest in the product.

Definitive studies of possible medicinal benefits are usually performed in universities sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry. Unfortunately, they generally have little interest in herbal products because they are hard to patent. Therefore, serious funding is hard to find because of the limited profit potential.

Commonly Used Essential Oils

There are many types of essential oils

There are many types of essential oils

Despite the lack of hard data, essential oils have various reported beneficial effects, mainly based on their historical use on thousands of patients by generations of healers. Although there are many essential oils, a number of them are considered mainstays of any herbal medicine cabinet. Here are some of the most popular:

purple colored lavender flowers smell really good and they have medicinal properties

Lavender is a very popular oil

Lavender Oil: An analgesic (pain reliever), antiseptic, and immune stimulant. It is thought to be good for skin care and to pro- mote healing, especially in burns, bruises, scrapes, acne, rashes and bug bites. Lavender has a calming effect and is used for insomnia, stress and depression. It has been reported effective as a decongestant through steam inhalation. Lavender oil may have benefit as an antifungal agent, and has been used for athlete’s foot or other related conditions.

Eucalyptus Oil: An antiseptic, antiviral, and decongestant (also an excellent insect repellent), Eucalyptus oil has a “cooling” effect on skin. It aids with respiratory issues and is thought to boost the immune system. Consider its use for flus, colds, sore throats, coughs, sinusitis, bronchitis, and hay fever. Eucalyptus may be used in massages, steam inhalation, and as a bath additive. Although eucalyptus oil has been used in cough medicine, it is likely greatly diluted and should not be ingested in pure form.

Melaleuca (Tea Tree) Oil: Diluted in a carrier oil such as coconut, Tea Tree oil may be good for athlete’s foot, acne, skin wounds, and even insect bites. In the garden, Tea Tree oil is a reasonable organic method of pest control. In inhalation therapy, it is reported to help relieve respiratory congestion. Studies have been performed which find it effective against both Staphylococcus and fungal infections. Some even recommend a few drops in a pint of water for use as a vaginal douche to treat yeast. Tea Tree oil may be toxic if ingested or used in high concentrations, around sensitive areas like the eyes.

Peppermint Oil: This oil is said to have various therapeutic effects: antiseptic, antibacterial, decongestant, and anti-emetic (stops vomiting). Peppermint oil is claimed to help for digestive disorders when applied directly to the abdomen. Some herbalists prescribe Peppermint for headache; massage a drop or two to the temples as needed. For achy muscles or painful joints, massage the diluted oil externally onto the affected area. As mentioned previously, definitive proof of topical application effects on deep organs is difficult to find.

Lemon Oil: Used for many years as a surface disinfectant, it is often found in furniture cleaners. Many seem to think that this disinfecting action makes it good for sterilizing water, but there is no evidence that it is as effective as any of the standard methods, such as boiling. Lemon oil is thought to have a calming effect; some businesses claim to have better results from their employees when they use it as aromatherapy. Don’t apply this oil on the skin if you will be exposed to the sun that day, due to increased likelihood of burns.

Clove Bud Oil Is A Dental Anesthetic

Clove Bud Oil Is A Dental Anesthetic

Clove Oil: Although thought to have multiple uses as an anti-fungal, antiseptic, antiviral, analgesic, and sedative, Clove oil particularly shines as an anesthetic and antimicrobial. It is marketed as “Eugenol” to dentists throughout the world as a natural painkiller for toothaches. A toothpaste can be made by combining clove oil and baking soda. When mixed with zinc oxide powder, it makes a temporary cement for lost fillings and loose crowns. Use Clove oil with caution, however, as it may have an irritant effect on the gums if too much is applied.

Arnica Oil: Arnica oil is used as a topical agent for muscle injuries and aches. Thought to be analgesic and anti-inflammatory, it is found in a number of sports ointments. As a personal aside, we have tested this oil on ourselves and found it to be effective, though not very long lasting. Frequent application would be needed for long term relief. Although some essential oils are used as aromatherapy, Arnica oil is toxic if inhaled.

Chamomile Oil: There are at least two versions of Chamomile oil, Roman and German. Roman Chamomile is a watery oil, while German Chamomile seems more viscous. Both are used to treat skin conditions such as eczema as well as irritations due to allergies. Chamomile oil is thought to decrease gastrointestinal inflammation and irritation, and is thought have a calming effect as aromatherapy, especially in children.

Geranium Oil: Although variable in its effects based on the species of plant used, Geranium oil is reported to inhibit the production of sebum in the skin, and may be helpful in controlling acne. Some believe that it also may have hemostatic (blood-clotting) properties, and is often recommended for bleeding from small cuts and bruising. When a small amount of oil is diluted in shampoo, it may be considered a treatment for head lice.

Helichrysum Oil: Thought to be a strong analgesic and anti-inflammatory, Helichrysum is used to treat arthritis, tendonitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, and fibromyalgia as part of massage therapy. It has also been offered as a treatment for chronic skin irritation

Rosemary is a versatile oil

Rosemary is a versatile oil

Rosemary Oil: Represented as having multiple uses as an antibacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-parasitic, Rosemary oil is proven to control spider mites in gardens. Use a few drops with water for a disinfectant mouthwash. Inhalation, either cold or steamed, may relieve congested or constricted respiration. Mixed with a carrier oil, it is used to treat tension headaches and muscle aches

Clary Sage Oil: One of the various chemical constituents of Clary Sage has a composition similar to estrogen. It has been used to treat menstrual irregularities, premenstrual syndrome, and other hormonal issues. Sage is also believed to have a mild anticoagulant effect, and may have some use as a blood thinner. Clary Sage also is thought to have some sedative effect, and has been used as a sleep aid.

Neem Oil: With over 150 chemical ingredients, the Neem tree is called “the village pharmacy” in its native India. Many Ayurvedic alternative remedies have some form of Neem oil in them. Proven as a natural organic pesticide, we personally use Neem Oil in our garden. Reported medicinal benefits are too numerous to list here and seem to cover just about every organ system. It should be noted, however, that it may be toxic when the oil is taken internally.

Wintergreen Oil: A source of natural salicylates, Wintergreen oil is a proven anticoagulant and analgesic. About 1 fluid ounce of Wintergreen Oil is the equivalent of 171 aspirin tablets if ingested, so use extreme caution. It may also have beneficial effects on intestinal spasms and might reduce elevated blood pressures.

Frankincense Oil: One of the earliest documented essential oils, evidence of its use goes back 5000 years to ancient Egypt. Catholics will recognize it as the incense used during religious ceremonies. Studies from Johns Hopkins and Hebrew Universities state that Frankincense relieves anxiety and depression in mice (we’re unsure how, exactly, this was determined, but it probably involved a cat). Direct application of the oil may have antibacterial and antifungal properties, and is thought to be helpful for wound healing. As a cold or steam inhalant, it is some- times used for lung and nasal congestion.

Blue Tansy Oil: Helpful in the garden as a companion plant for organic pest control, Blue Tansy is sometimes planted along with potatoes and other vegetables. The oil has been used for years to treat intestinal worms and other parasites. One of its constituents, Camphor, is used in medicinal chest rubs and ointments. In the past, it has been used in certain dental procedures as an antibacterial.

Oregano Oil: An antiseptic, oregano oil has been used in the past as an antibacterial agent. It should be noted that Oregano oil is derived from a different species of the plant than the Oregano used in cooking. One of the minority of essential oils that are safe to ingest, it is thought to be helpful in calming stomach upset, and may help relieve sore throats. Its antibacterial action leads some to use the oil in topical applications on skin infections when diluted with a carrier oil. Oregano Oil may reduce the body’s ability to absorb iron, so consider an iron supplement if you use this regularly.

Thyme Oil: Reported to have significant antimicrobial action, diluted Thyme oil is used to cure skin infections, and may be helpful for ringworm and athlete’s foot. Thyme is sometimes used to reduce intestinal cramps in massage therapy. As inhalation therapy, it may loosen congestion from upper respiratory infections.

“Thieves’ Oil”: Many essential oils are marketed as blends, such as “Thieves’ Oil”. This is a combination of clove, lemon, cinnamon bark, eucalyptus, and rosemary essential oils. Touted to treat a broad variety of ailments, studies at Weber State University indicate a good success rate in killing airborne viruses and bacteria. Of course, the more elements in the mixture, the higher chance for adverse reactions, such as phototoxicity.

I’m sure I missed some of your favorites. There are as many oils as there are species of plants.

Many oils aren't proven safe in pregnancy

Many oils aren’t proven safe in pregnancy

Some important caveats to the above list should be stated here. Many of the essential oils listed are unsafe to use in pregnancy, and some may even cause miscarriage. Also, allergic reactions to essential oils, especially on the skin, are not uncommon; use the allergy test we described earlier before starting regular topical applications.

Even though essential oils are natural substances, they may interact with medicines that you may regularly take or have adverse effects on chronic illness such as liver disease, epilepsy, or high blood pressure. Thorough research is required to determine whether a particular essential oil is safe to use.

Having said that, essential oils are a viable option for many conditions. Anyone interested in maintaining their family’s well-being, especially off the grid, should regard them as another weapon in the medical arsenal. Learn about them with an open mind, but maintain a healthy skepticism especially about “cure-all” claims.

Joe Alton MD

Dr. Alton

Dr. Alton

Learn more about natural remedies and 150 other topics on survival medicine with the 2017 Book Excellence Award winner in medicine, “The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide For When Medical Help is Not on the Way”.

Similar to Morphine: Natural Painkiller in Your Backyard

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Recently I read an article about the medicinal benefits of lactuca virosa, otherwise known as wild lettuce. I found it very interesting because I’ve seen it growing in my neighborhood. Lots of it, in fact. I remember learning that it has effects similar to opium, but since there are other ways to ease pain, I […]

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8 Medicinal Herbs Our Ancestors Grew In Their ‘Home Apothecary’

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8 Medicinal Herbs Our Ancestors Grew In Their ‘Home Apothecary’

Herbs are an important part of most home gardens, especially on a homestead. When life was a little harder than it is today and doctors were few and far between, homesteaders would turn to their herb garden in times of sickness.

Below are eight of the most useful herbs our ancestors Grew. Grow them to create your own in-home apothecary.

Basil. Certainly one of the most common herbs grown in the home garden, basil is also praised for its antibacterial properties. The fluid in basil leaves can help eliminate the risk of infection when applied as a poultice to minor wounds. Boiling the leaves in water along with sea salt and cloves can create a tea to fight off influenza. Boiling basil leaves with honey and ginger can create a tea that fights colds, coughs, bronchitis and the inflammation associated with asthma.

Parsley. Although most people use parsley as a garnish, it is an incredibly powerful medicinal herb, as well. Parsley contains a number of volatile compounds that inhibit the growth of tumors. It also is rich in vitamin C, and it has been shown to be useful in reducing the effects of rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Additionally, it is rich in anti-oxidants and has been used to treat urinary tract infections, kidney stones, constipation, indigestion, anemia and high blood pressure.

8 Medicinal Herbs Our Ancestors Grew In Their ‘Home Apothecary’

Oregano. Image source: Pixabay.com

Oregano. This popular herb contains powerful antiviral and antibacterial qualities. Currently, oregano oil is being studied in both its liquid and vapor form for its ability to kill listeria and hospital strains of MRSA. Oregano also is being studied for its ability to slow tumor growth in breast cancer patients and as a potential control method for type-2 diabetes.

Looking For Non-GMO Herb Seeds? Get Them From A Company You Can Trust!

Valerian. Although less common than some of the other herbs, valerian root is incredibly effective at treating sleep disorders. The name itself is derived from the Latin valere — to be in health. Valerian is especially useful in calming an overly stimulated nervous system (i.e. it’s good for fighting stress).

8 Medicinal Herbs Our Ancestors Grew In Their ‘Home Apothecary’

Oregano. Image source: Pixabay.com

Lavender. Lavender oil is very effective in the treatment of minor fungal infections. Lavender oil is astringent in nature and is well-known for its anti-bacterial qualities. The scent of lavender lessens anxiety and promotes a sense of calm and well-being. Strangely enough, lavender oil has also been shown to promote hair growth when used regularly for prolonged periods of time, although caution is advised for long-term topical use, since some undesirable side effects have been noted (including a slowing down of the central nervous system).

Mint. Mint is an incredibly versatile herb. In addition to its many culinary uses, mint tea is also used to treat indigestion or inflammation of the gut caused by illness. It offers relief from nausea due to motion sickness. Mint oil can be used to alleviate headaches, and it lessens the severity of migraines. The aromatic properties of the oil can be used to clear up congestion caused by colds and the flu. The antiseptic properties of mint oil are useful for the treatment of insect bites, small cuts, minor burns and as an acne treatment.

Chamomile. German and Roman chamomile have been used for centuries for their anti-inflammatory properties. Chamomile tea can be used to sooth gastrointestinal problems, such as heart burn, diverticular disorders and spasms of the stomach and intestine. It is useful as a mild sedative, and it helps alleviate insomnia. Chamomile salves are used in the treatment of hemorrhoids and minor wounds. Chamomile has also been shown to be effective in combating morning sickness, teething symptoms in young children and colic.

Dill. The seeds and leaves are the most useful portions of the dill plant. For centuries, people have turned to dill for the treatment of diarrhea, excess gas and dysentery. Dill also has been studied for its ability to promote good bone density, reducing the symptoms associated with arthritis and fighting off bacterial infections throughout the body. Dill promotes good oral health and is effective at removing free radicals from the body.

*This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or cure any particular health condition. Please consult with a qualified health professional first.

What herbs would you add to our list? Share your own list in the section below:

10 Healthy Herbs You Can Grow in Water

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No garden? No Problem! You can grow your own indoor herb garden without a pinch of soil. Even if you live in an apartment with nothing more than a tiny back porch or balcony, there is still room to grow some fragrant herbs. All you need is water, sunlight, and a place for your plants […]

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17 Natural Antibiotics Our Grandparents Used

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I’ve written about the importance of stocking up on antibiotics, but since antibiotics require a prescription, it can be difficult to stockpile enough to last a long time, and they won’t last more than a couple years anyway. Plus, if the people in your group get a lot of infections, you might go through your […]

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43 Lost Remedies From Our Forefathers

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There are several advantages to learning home remedies for common ailments: you’ll save money by not purchasing expensive medication, you’ll avoid the unpleasant side effects that come with those medications, and you’ll be able to treat ailments in a post-disaster world where medications are unavailable. Anne from Ask A Prepper wrote an article that is […]

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Preserve your medicinal herbs the right way!

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Preserve your medicinal herbs the right way! Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Learn how to properly preserve your medicinal herbs on this week’s episode of Herbal Prepper Live. Just like food storage, your herbs can be preserved and stored for later use. But, if you don’t choose the right preservation method for the right herb … Continue reading Preserve your medicinal herbs the right way!

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Grid Down: Heart & Blood Pressure Care

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It is important to realize and understand that if we ever have a grid down situation or some sort of natural disaster that prevented us from getting our medication, a lot of people will die. Diabetics, epileptics, anyone with heart disease. You name it. So what can you learn and put into play that will help you with the disability that you have?

Well we can help with that! Below we have another cheerful video by ThePatriotNurse.  She talks about what sorts of herbal medicine will help with your heart health and in possible emergencies. She gives a brief crash course on how the heart works and all the vessels. Her description simplifies the basic way the heart works.

Neglect of the body over time can manifest into high blood pressure and different kinds of arrhythmia. So what happens if we no longer have pills and medicine to help us out? She talks about different herbs you can incorporate into your daily routine easily and store some for grid down. Cayenne, Garlic, Hawthorn Berries, and Ginger plus tons more than can help you all through life.

Patriot Nurse shares with us her four “must have” books. (Listed at the bottom of the page.) Reference books can always be helpful and beneficial in assisting you in an emergency.

We hope you enjoy watching ThePatriotNurse. Please feel free to comment and share your knowledge with fellow preppers

Grid Down: Heart & Blood Pressure Care

Herbal Home Health Care by John R. Christopher Prescription For Natural Healing by Phyllis A. Balch CNC School of Natural HealingEditors Favorite:The Survival Medicine Handbook by Dr. Joeseph Alton and Nurse Amy AltonA.K.A Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy

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Nature’s Nutrition

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 4 Wild Edibles, Their Nutrition and How to Find Them

Submitted by Marlena Stoddard

If you’re lost in the woods without any food, how can you keep yourself from starving while waiting for help? Sometimes unlikely sources of food can be the most nutritious. These four wild edibles will give you all the nutrients you need to stay alive when scrounging.

Cattail Roots

Cattails are the survivalist’s best friend. Cattail roots have plenty of fiber, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, manganese, and vitamins A, B, C, and K.

Cattails can be found in any wet, marshy area, including drainage ditches alongside the road. You can also dig up the roots in the winter. Clean the roots before boiling them. You can also harvest starch from them or grind them to make flour. Eating them raw won’t hurt, either, but it can give you a stomachache.

Stinging Nettles

A cup of stinging nettles has almost 40 calories and nearly half of your daily recommended dose of calcium. It also has so much iron that it’s sometimes used to treat iron deficiencies.

Nettles grow anywhere that grass or weeds can. Look for their slightly hairy, serrated leaves—just make sure you wear gloves before you touch them.

Don’t eat raw nettle leaves—it’ll hurt! Blanch or steam the leaves to remove their sting. You can also use their leaves to make a very nutritious tea.

Grasshoppers and Crickets

Grasshoppers and crickets have a surprising amount of protein and are tasty when fried in butter or oil. Though, according to a Bethesda, Maryland, pest control company, you’ll probably want to remove their wings and spiky legs before you fry them up. In just 100 grams, these bugs can contain up to 20 grams of protein. That’s almost as much as ground beef. They also contain lots of calcium, iron, and fat.

Crickets and grasshoppers can be found in tall grass. Just listen for their telltale chirping. Grasshoppers are more nutritious but can be trickier to catch because they can fly. You may need a quick, silent approach or a net to catch them.

Bee and Fly Larvae

Larvae taste good baked or fried and have life-sustaining protein, amino acids, and fat.

You’ll find bee larvae if you break open a beehive or honeycomb. Honeybee larvae will also be surrounded by honey and royal jelly, which can provide even more nutrients. Getting stung can sometimes be life-threatening, though, so think twice before raiding a hive. On the other hand, fly larvae can be found anywhere there is decomposing material or manure. Once they’re cleaned off, they’re ok to eat.

Surviving Off Your Back Yard

Nature has everything you need to forage for food as long as you know where to look. Keep an eye out for wild edibles and do some research to find which plants and insects are native in your area.

The post Nature’s Nutrition appeared first on American Preppers Network.

9 Medicinal Herbs For Fighting Pain

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9 Medicinal Herbs For Fighting Pain I don’t know about you, but I’m no scientist. I can’t name any of the ingredients found in commonly used OTC drugs, and I certainly can’t make them. As a matter of fact, if and when possible, I prefer to take a more “natural” approach to treating my pain. …

Continue reading »

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Medicinal herbs, the ones to grow!

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Medicinal herbs, the ones to grow!
Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live

I’ve been reading a number of blog postsMedicinal herbs Prepper's Natural Medicine lately, each listing what herbs are most important for preppers to grow in a medicinal herb garden. This is my chance to weigh in, because I think most of them have got it all wrong. Sure garlic and chamomile and thyme are wonderful, but there’s more- so much more than can and should be done.

11-8-15 Solomon's_SealAnd here is just one of many reasons why: the primaries in South Carolina and Nevada may have given us a glimpse of who will be the next President of the United States. While things could still change, the front runners are Hillary and Trump. I just finished listening to Trump promise to repeal the ironically named “Affordable Care Act”, aka ObamaCare, if he’s elected President. The Hildebeast pushed single-payer when she was the First Lady, and wants to build onto ObamaCare if elected President.

Either way, access to the medical system and how medical bills get paid, are likely to change in the next couple of years.

Whether this change will be good or not, remains to be seen. Will we still have access to only one option- sick care from our medical system? Sick care has a place. People get sick. But, the goal should be to improve and get off the maintenance medicines, something rarely seen, and not to just maintain a state of unwellness. Plus, it will still probably be expensive.

I cannot stress enough the necessity to grow your own herbs, learn to identify the medicinal plants in your area, and make your own herbal remedies. If you truly want affordable health care, this is where you start. Herbal medicine is your medicine. You have a right to grow your own herbs and make your own herbal preparations.

In this episode, I cover some of the herbs that I think are “must grow” herbs. Some of these will be antibiotic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, decongestant, analgesic, and some will repel disease or venom-carrying pests.
Herbal Prepper Website: http://www.herbalprepper.com/
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Listen to this broadcast or download “Medicinal herbs, the ones to grow” in player below!

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Archived shows of Herbal Prepper Live at bottom of THIS PAGE!

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