Could Baking Soda Be Used to Treat Autoimmune Disease? Study Suggests it is Possible

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It’s a household item that is commonly used in baking and for cleaning and deodorizing.

Odds are, you have a box sitting in your pantry or refrigerator right now.

This inexpensive, versatile, and safe product can be used for so many things, including brushing your teeth, treating insect bites and stings, soothing sunburn, as an underarm deodorant, cleaning wounds and preventing infections, and heartburn relief.

Now, yet another possible purpose for baking soda has been discovered, and it is quite incredible.

Scientists have found evidence that a daily dose of baking soda may help reduce the destructive inflammation of autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) can encourage the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be therapeutic in the face of inflammatory disease, Medical College of Georgia scientists report in The Journal of Immunology.

The research found that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda and water, it becomes a trigger for the stomach to make more acid to digest the next meal and for mesothelial cells sitting on the spleen to tell the organ that there’s no need to launch a protective immune response.

Mesothelial cells are found in your blood and kidneys, and baking soda is already used in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. It was this that led the researchers to explore the mechanisms by which baking soda benefits renal function, slowing the progression of kidney disease. During this investigation, the scientists noticed that baking soda shifted the balance of immune cells in the kidneys, boosting anti-inflammatory immune cells while simultaneously decreasing inflammatory cells.

The scientists believe that drinking the baking soda-water solution tells the spleen  – which is part of the immune system and acts like a big blood filter and is where some white blood cells, like macrophages, are stored – to go easy on the immune response.

In a press release, Dr. Paul O’Connor, a renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study’s corresponding author, said: “Certainly drinking bicarbonate affects the spleen and we think it’s through the mesothelial cells.”

“The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere,” O’Connor says. “We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood.”

Here’s more detail, from the press release:

In the spleen, as well as the blood and kidneys, they found after drinking water with baking soda for two weeks, the population of immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. Macrophages, perhaps best known for their ability to consume garbage in the body like debris from injured or dead cells, are early arrivers to a call for an immune response.

O’Connor said the shifting landscape is likely due to increased conversion of some of the proinflammatory cells to anti-inflammatory ones coupled with actual production of more anti-inflammatory macrophages.

The researchers also saw a shift in other immune cell types, like more regulatory T cells, which generally drive down the immune response and help keep the immune system from attacking our own tissues. That anti-inflammatory shift was sustained for at least four hours in humans and three days in rats.

Before you run to your pantry to grab the baking soda, a word of caution: O’Connor warns that the baking soda solution has only been tested on rodents and people without inflammation, reports Mother Nature Network:

“It could have potential, but there’s no data behind it,” he says. “Whether or not it can have a significant effect we don’t know. There’s still more testing to come.” There’s no advantage to trying it in the meantime, he says. Baking soda has high levels of sodium, which is linked to heart, kidney and other issues.

“You certainly shouldn’t go start drinking baking soda and water without consulting a physician. I certainly wouldn’t advise people trying this at home,” he says.

However, O’Connor believes the research is promising because, if it works, it could offer a safe alternative to medication:

“You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus,” he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. “It’s potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease.”

Using baking soda on the body and for cleaning items around the home are generally considered safe. However, it is possible to consume too much, so be careful not to exceed the recommended dose. Too much baking soda can upset the body’s acid-base balance leading to nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. In rare cases, baking soda overdose can lead to seizures, coma, and death. It is very high in sodium and can raise blood pressure and cause swelling.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

25 Ancient Remedies That Used To Be Common Knowledge

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Common knowledge has certainly changed a lot over the past century. Today it is “common knowledge” that if you can’t sleep, you should just take a sleeping pill. But it used to be common knowledge that if you can’t sleep, you should drink some chamomile tea or take some valerian root. Some people argue that …

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E. Coli Contamination

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E. Coli Contamination

E. COLI CONTAMINATION

Romaine Lettuce

Romaine Lettuce

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that food poisoning from romaine lettuce harboring the bacteria E. Coli spread recently to 29 states and sent at least 150 people to the hospital. The areas involved include all parts of the country from Florida to North Dakota to California, and new cases are making it the worst E. Coli outbreak nationally since 5 people died and 200 were hospitalized in 2006.

Although E. Coli is a common inhabitant of the intestinal tract, some strains, especially O157:H7,  produce a toxin known as “Shiga” that causes bloody diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, dehydration, and other symptoms. Victims range from 1 to 88 years old, and a number are experiencing kidney failure, which has killed one person so far. Several E. Coli varieties are common causes of urinary tract infections.

E. Coli

E. Coli

Sources of Shiga-toxin producing E. Coli may include:

·       Contaminated water (even swimming in it may cause infection)

·       Undercooked ground beef

·       Unpasteurized milk or juice

·       Cheese made from raw milk

·       Raw fruits, vegetables, and sprouts

·       Contact with animals and their enclosures

·       Feces of those infected

After the organism enters the system, it usually takes several days for symptoms to appear. Unlike many infections, E. Coli tends not to cause high fevers, but the abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vomiting can be severe. Dehydration can cause decreased urine production, dark urine, weakness, and fatigue.

Rehydration is the main treatment

Rehydration is the main treatment

Re-hydration support during the illness will help support the victim for the 6-8 days it takes most to get over the infection. Antibiotics are rarely indicated, as it usually goes away by itself; it is even thought that taking anti-diarrheal medicines may slow the recovery process by preventing the elimination of the organism through bowel movements. Dairy products or items with high fat content or fiber can make your symptoms worse.

If it occurs, kidney damage will begin to become apparent after the first week.

Simply avoiding bagged lettuce at the grocery store is not enough, as many of those made ill ate the lettuce in salads served in restaurants. It is not yet known where in the chain from farm to consumer that the contamination with the bacteria took place. A farm in Yuma, Arizona may be involved.

Prevention involves avoiding poorly prepared food and water.  Use different cutting boards for raw fruits and vegetables than you would for raw meat.  

The most important factor in preventing E. Coli outbreaks is strict diligence applied to washing hands before cooking, after caring for animals and their environments, and diapering infants or otherwise disposing of human waste. 

Eating salads is a healthy option for most, but always be sure to make yours with freshly-washed hands and vegetables.

Joe Alton MD

Dr. Alton

Dr. Alton

Find out more about E. Coli contamination and 150 other medical issues when the ambulance may not be just around the corner! Check out a copy of the award-winning Third Edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the way, available at Amazon or at doomandbloom.net. Also, be sure to find a medical kit that will help keep your people healthy in good times or bad: Check out store.doomandbloom.net

The Third Edition

The Third Edition

The Home Apothecary: Herbal Medicine, With Recipes

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How are my amazing Apartment Homesteaders doing so far?! Y’all are seriously ROCK STARS.

Please accept another one of my virtual high fives! 🙂

You’ve made the switch to…

Well. Done.

You’re well on your way to a sustainable lifestyle in your apartment homestead. Now it’s time to take control of your personal health and wellness through the use of natural, pharm-free medicines you can grow yourself or source sustainably.

Why Herbal Medicine?

Alternative, herbal medicine—becoming your own “apartment apothecary”—is absolutely vital to your life as an apartment homesteader.

You’ve probably seen the commercials at some point—the “buy this medication” commercials that say they’ll cure psoriasis or help reduce the risk of heart failure or help male members of the species get “ready for action” in 3.2 seconds flat.

But then they list 20 different side effects from that same medicine and you can’t help but stare at the TV with the same look you had last time you watched an ill-funded community theatre play….

Pharmaceuticals are formulated to tackle one problem and one problem only, and that is what the FDA allows them to print on the label: “This medication may help with pain management.” And that is followed with the warnings: “Excessive use of this medication may cause liver failure.”

Wait. WHAT?! Nope. Nope. Nope. Nope.

We already talked about how eating local, pesticide-free food can help you save money at the doctor and pharmacy.

But the switch to herbal medicine is about so much more than saving money.

It’s about cultivating your own wellness through the use of plants (the kind grown in Nature), not toxic chemicals (…grown in a…um…petri dish?). Why not take your apartment homesteading a step further and teach yourself to be your own pharmacy with natural, sustainable alternatives?

What to Expect With Herbal Medicine

I’ve talked to so many people who tried the “herbal medicine” thing and went quickly back to pharmaceuticals because the herbal remedies “didn’t work.”

And I understand why that happened. We’ve been conditioned to assume medicine works instantly—that they get rid of our headaches, cure our sinus infections, or get rid of our yeast infections as soon as the pill, cream, or spray reaches our skin or blood.

When an antibiotic doesn’t work the first time, we’ve been taught to get a second one to knock out the infection. If one round doesn’t work, we throw more at it. Which makes sense … oh wait—no, it doesn’t!

Herbal medicine is not a “quick fix” like the aspirin or Pepto-Bismol most of us are used to.

Herbal remedies create a lifetime of health and wellness by healing your body and helping each system in your body work the way it was intended to.

Alternative medicine is individualized, holistic care for a lifetime of personal health and wellness.

The goal is to find herbal remedies that work for you. The beauty of alternative medicine is the process of finding what works best for you specifically.

Start with the herbs and plants listed in the next section to start cultivating your own best alternative medicine cabinet and be on the road to your own personal, holistic health and wellness routine.

Natural Medicines to Grow Yourself and How to Use Them

If you’re visiting The Grow Network for the first time, I urge you to click around on the blog in the “Medicine” section while you’re here. The network of gardeners, homesteaders, and writers here has done some absolutely amazing work in alternative medicine already. My list below comes from the wealth of knowledge this network has already provided.

Want to learn even more about herbal remedies and all other aspects of apartment and modern homesteading? Sign up for the Lab!

Marjory published her list of the top 15 antibiotic alternatives in this blog post. I want to reiterate her list and talk about how you can grow some of those 15 super plants and use them in your own alternative medicine practice.

Garlic

Marjory will instruct you on everything you need to know about the wonder that is garlic, and you can even get your free copy of “The Miracle of Garlic: Your First Home Medicine” here.

As Apartment Homesteaders, we can grow garlic in containers in our patio gardens. Make sure you give them plenty of room to stretch out in the soil in a container that is around 18 inches deep and 12 inches wide.1)For instructions on how to grow garlic in containers: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/how-to-plant-garlic-in-contain-158494

Check out this video from TGN’s 2016 Home Grown Food Summit on how to grow great garlic!

Echinacea

One of the most visited sections of the pharmacy is the Cold and Flu section. Sinus “yuck” sufferers, get out of the pharmacy and into the garden!

If you’re like the women in my family, you know how nasty the winter sinus infection can be. The only time I’ve had to take antibiotics is for sinus infections, but Echinacea is an herbal alternative that can help knock out the sinus yuck without the harmful side effects of pharmaceutical antibiotics.

You can grow Echinacea in a pot on your garden patio.2)For instructions on how to grow Echinacea in a pot: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/growing-purple-coneflowers-containers-60904.html

But where most people dry Echinacea, recent studies have shown that fresh Echinacea has far more power to treat colds than the dried plant.3)See http://www.health.com/health/condition-article/0,,20251749,00.html

Echinacea Tea Recipe

You can make a simple fresh Echinacea tea to drink during the cold and flu season by simply adding 1/2 cup of fresh Echinacea to 8 ounces of water. Bring the water to a simmer over medium heat for a few minutes, then add the Echinacea. Simmer covered for 15 minutes. Strain and add 1-2 tablespoons of raw, local honey. (The honey is especially helpful for a sore throat and a cough).4)Find Echinacea tea and other recipes for using Echinacea medicinally here: https://thepaleomama.com/2015/07/21/homemade-echinacea-tea/

Cayenne Pepper

Cayenne pepper has shown itself worthy to replace over-the-counter pain relievers like acetaminophen and ibuprofen—especially for muscle and joint pain.

This is another area of the pharmacy that is overused; acetaminophen and ibuprofen have droves of loyal consumers who take the medicines daily in an attempt to heal chronic pain. But they have side effects like liver damage and ulcers, so we need a natural alternative like cayenne pepper to replace the medicines we take for pain relief.

You can grow cayenne peppers in your patio garden or in a small pot indoors.5)For instructions on how to grow cayenne peppers: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-cayenne-peppers-container-47525.html Then, simply dry your peppers in the oven on parchment-lined cookie sheets.

Cut the peppers into chunks so they dry faster and place them in the oven at about 200°F for 1–3 hours until dry. You can then grind them into a powder to use in this simple pain salve recipe:6)Recipe from https://learningherbs.com/remedies-recipes/herbal-pain-relief/

Pain Salve Recipe

1/2 c. olive oil
2 T. cayenne powder
1/2 oz. beeswax

Infuse the olive oil with the cayenne powder using a double boiler technique. Strain through a cheesecloth. Then melt the beeswax and stir in the cayenne-infused olive oil. Pour the liquid mixture into jars or tins. Let it cool.

You can rub this salve directly onto the painful area. Not only does it allow you to avoid the dangerous side effects of over-the-counter pain medicines, but it may also work quicker than the oral pain relievers because it reaches the area of pain immediately without having to go through your blood stream to get there.

Turmeric

Turmeric, a bright orange root, is a great one to add to your garden for dietary and medicinal uses on your apartment homestead.

Turmeric has been shown to help mobilize fat in the body and may help reduce bad cholesterol.

High cholesterol is something many American adults struggle with, and too many of us depend on cholesterol medication to keep us out of the hospital for cholesterol-related issues. You can grow turmeric on your patio or indoors and harvest for treating a whole host of other health issues, as well—from inflammatory bowel disease to gall stones.7)For instruction on how to grow turmeric in a pot: http://balconygardenweb.com/growing-turmeric-in-pots-how-to-grow-turmeric-care-uses-benefits/

Live in the Midwest like I do? Here’s how to grow turmeric and ginger in the Midwest.

One of my favorite ways to use turmeric is in a tea.8)For turmeric tea recipe: https://www.drweil.com/health-wellness/balanced-living/turmeric-tea-benefits/

Turmeric Tea Recipe

Boil four cups of water, add one teaspoon of ground turmeric, and reduce the heat to simmer for 10 minutes.9)Learn how to make turmeric powder: https://www.turmericforhealth.com/general-info/how-to-make-turmeric-powder-at-home-from-raw-turmeric Then, strain the tea and add honey or lemon to taste. You can also add a pinch of black pepper for increased absorption. 

Ginger

Ginger is another plant you can grow fairly easily indoors on your apartment homestead.10)For instruction on how to grow ginger indoors: https://newengland.com/today/living/gardening/how-to-grow-ginger-indoors/

Ginger has been shown to have antiviral effects as well as antibacterial properties. Replace Pepto-Bismol, Imodium, Nauzene, and other medicines for stomach upset with ginger.

Ginger is one of my favorites to use when I suffer from stomach bugs. This is another one I like to take in tea form.

Ginger Tea Recipe

Simply steep between 1 and 1-1/2 teaspoons of freshly grated ginger in boiling water for about 10 minutes; then, strain and sip.11)For the ginger tea recipe: http://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/easy-ginger-tea-23528 

Essential Oils: Round Out Your Medicine Cabinet

We’ve talked about the power of essential oils before, but we can’t have a chapter on alternative medicine without talking about essential oils!

Essential oils are super-concentrated plant extracts. They can be used to replace any and all over-the-counter medicines. And while many herbal remedies can take a little while to work, some essential oils can work almost instantly to reduce the symptoms of our maladies.

While you won’t be able to grow all the plants you need to create every herbal or alternative medicine in your apartment homestead, purchasing therapeutic-grade essential oils can help round out your apartment medicine cabinet. 

Two of My Favorite Natural Remedies

In my own alternative medicine journey, I’ve had the most difficulty replacing over-the-counter medicine in treatment of the common cold. Here are two of the best recipes I’ve found for natural alternatives to cough drops and cough syrup.

Honey and Essential Oils Lozenges Recipe

2 c. raw, local honey
20 drops Thieves essential oil blend*
20 drops lemon essential oil
5 drops oregano essential oil

Heat honey in a pot until candy thermometer reads 300°F (the “hard crack” stage). Stir constantly. Remove from heat and continue stirring until it cools slightly and starts to thicken. Make sure it is not still boiling continuously before adding your essential oils. Stir the oils in.

Then, in candy molds or on parchment paper, spoon out cough-drop-sized amounts of the honey/oils mixture. Allow to cool completely to room temperature. Store at room temperature.

* Thieves essential oil contains cinnamon, clove, lemon, eucalyptus radiata, and rosemary essential oils. I buy mine from Young Living, although you could theoretically make it yourself.

Simple Cough Syrup Recipe

2 c. water
8 sprigs fresh thyme
1/4 c. fresh ginger root, finely chopped
1 c. raw, local honey
1 fresh lemon, juiced
1/8 t. cayenne pepper

Simmer thyme and ginger in water in a small pot over medium heat until the water is reduced by half. Allow to cool completely; then strain the herbs. Return the tea to the pot and whisk in honey, lemon, and cayenne pepper (which you hopefully grew yourself!).

Store in an airtight container.12)I got this recipe from the Traditional Cooking School, but I adapted it so I could make it without an instant pot: https://traditionalcookingschool.com/food-preparation/instant-pot-cough-syrup/ Take one tablespoon to soothe sore throat and calm your cough.

Check out other TGN posts on alternative medicine to arm yourself with all the tools you need to be your own apartment apothecary!

 

You can read the rest of the articles in the Apartment Homesteader series here.

Then, find more tips, tricks, and inspiration in The Apartment Homesteader Facebook group! Join your fellow apartment homesteaders here

 

TGN Bi-Weekly Newsletter

(This article was originally published on December 9, 2017.)

 

References   [ + ]

1. For instructions on how to grow garlic in containers: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/how-to-plant-garlic-in-contain-158494
2. For instructions on how to grow Echinacea in a pot: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/growing-purple-coneflowers-containers-60904.html
3. See http://www.health.com/health/condition-article/0,,20251749,00.html
4. Find Echinacea tea and other recipes for using Echinacea medicinally here: https://thepaleomama.com/2015/07/21/homemade-echinacea-tea/
5. For instructions on how to grow cayenne peppers: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-cayenne-peppers-container-47525.html
6. Recipe from https://learningherbs.com/remedies-recipes/herbal-pain-relief/
7. For instruction on how to grow turmeric in a pot: http://balconygardenweb.com/growing-turmeric-in-pots-how-to-grow-turmeric-care-uses-benefits/
8. For turmeric tea recipe: https://www.drweil.com/health-wellness/balanced-living/turmeric-tea-benefits/
9. Learn how to make turmeric powder: https://www.turmericforhealth.com/general-info/how-to-make-turmeric-powder-at-home-from-raw-turmeric
10. For instruction on how to grow ginger indoors: https://newengland.com/today/living/gardening/how-to-grow-ginger-indoors/
11. For the ginger tea recipe: http://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/easy-ginger-tea-23528
12. I got this recipe from the Traditional Cooking School, but I adapted it so I could make it without an instant pot: https://traditionalcookingschool.com/food-preparation/instant-pot-cough-syrup/

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Survival Medicine Hour: Allergies, More

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Survival Medicine Hour #385

all about allergies

all about allergies

In certain seasons, like Spring, pollens and other substances are at high levels. For most, it’s a great time of year to be outside, but for allergy sufferers, well, not so much. Joe Alton, MD,aka Dr. Bones, and Amy Alton, ARNP, aka Nurse Amy, go into detail to tell you the history of allergies (the word didn’t even exist in the year 1900!), what exactly happens in your body during an allergy attack, and how to identify it from, say, a simple adverse reaction to a medicine.

Also, a little about severe allergic reactions and your treatment options in good times or bad, plus why most people that tell their doctor they’re allergic to something may actually not have an allergy at all!

All this and more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour with Joe and Amy Alton!

To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2018/04/06/survival-medicine-hour-allergies-more

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

Amy and Joe Alton

The Altons

The Altons

Follow the Altons on twitter @preppershow, Facebook at Doom and Bloom(tm), and YouTube at DrBones NurseAmy Channel! Drget to get a copy of their 2017 Book Excellence 1st Place Award winner in medicine, The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way, and medical kits and supplies at store.doomandbloom.net.https://store.doomandbloom.net/

The Survival Medicine Handbook, Third Edition

The Survival Medicine Handbook, Third Edition

Meet Elena Upton, Local Changemaker

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Elena Upton, Local Changemaker

Elena Upton
Local Changemaker

Website: ElenaUpton.com

Follow on Social Media: Mastering Alternative Medicine (Facebook)

Fast Fact: Elena’s first book, Mastering Alternative Medicine: Your Family’s Guide to Wellness, is set to release this spring. Find all the details and more great tips on her website!

___________________________________________

Tell us a bit about your background—your heritage, where you grew up, and what first drew your attention to the world of natural remedies?

I am a native of New England, and my family ancestry is Italian. You know what that means . . . good food!

My paternal grandparents had a garden, and my grandfather made his own wine. He also owned small neighborhood grocery stores (five at one point). I remember them as being no more than probably 500–600 square feet and jam-packed with fruits and vegetables and imported Italian grocery products.

I would go into the store up the hill from my house after school and, of course, make my way to the little ice cream cooler. He kept a box of change by the register for those who needed a little extra, and I’d pick out a nickel to buy a frozen treat.

I also remember he had a large notebook with names and numbers scribbled in it. He said it was for “credit.” The locals would come in and pick up food staples they needed and run a tab, promising to come back later to pay.

This didn’t connect me with natural medicine specifically, but it gave me a foundation for good, healthy food and a sense of taking care of the community.

Was there a particular “Aha!” moment in your family’s medical history that you’d consider a true turning point away from traditional treatment methods?

The “Aha!” moment that changed my life forever was a ski trip to Colorado with my husband and sons in 1988.

We were visiting my husband’s former college roommate, George, when his wife, Colleen, pulled out a little white box filled with vials. She referenced a booklet, opened one of the vials, and popped a few little pills into her mouth.

She had been getting noticeably sick with a cold. Within an hour or so, though, there was no sign of the cold continuing to materialize.

I asked her what had been in the box, and she said homeopathy.

I had never even heard the word before!

She went on to explain that it was natural medicine from Germany. It is made from tiny expressions of plant, animal, and mineral substances that act as “information” for the body to follow to heal itself.

I thought that was the most amazing thing I had ever heard! When we went back to Massachusetts, I immediately went to the library to research homeopathy. (There was no World Wide Web then.)

The reason I was so interested was because I was developing some health issues, my husband had health issues, and both my sons had their own health problems cropping up. It seemed whatever conventional medical intervention we were given only suppressed the problem or made it worse. I wanted to know what this magical medicine was and why I’d never heard of it.

Soon after, my husband was transferred to California, and my good friend’s family was also transferred there. At our first West Coast reunion, my friend mentioned learning about homeopathy in Ohio and had a prospectus in her hand for The British Institute of Homeopathy. They had opened a satellite school in Los Angeles. Needless to say, we both enrolled. This was the beginning of a decade of formal training in homeopathy.

My health immediately improved with the use of homeopathy. My husband’s lifelong allergies were gone, and my son’s chronic, seasonal bronchitis cleared. I never looked back.

You’re a strong believer in “food as your first medicine.” How has your diet and that of your family evolved since the days before your homeopathic training?

Wholesome, fresh food was always my first medicine with the rich experience from my family.

The piece of the puzzle that came next, once I was deeply ingrained in the holistic medical community, was developing an understanding of how our food sources had deteriorated with the use of preservatives, the introduction of fungicides into “modern” farming, and the advent of GMO seeds.

What studies/training did you undergo to lead to your role today as a homeopath, author, lecturer and product development specialist?

When you study homeopathy, or any other form of holistic medicine (naturopathic, acupuncture and Chinese medicine, chiropractic, etc.), you gain insight into working with the whole person mentally, emotionally, and physically.

This includes their energetic body.

It is a huge departure from the Western model of medicine, with its use of pharmaceutical drugs and invasive procedures. Instead, there is a respect for the innate intelligence of the body to heal itself, if given the correct information. This information comes in the form of clean, nutritious food and natural-based medicines.

My earliest experiences included a Canadian naturopathic doctor who came to work with me in the clinic I opened after finishing school. He had trained in Germany and opened my eyes to many modalities beyond homeopathy.

We found herbs, supplements, and homeopathic remedies to be a winning combination.

In addition, my older son became a licensed acupuncturist and Chinese herbalist (yes, I’m very proud!), and we have clients we work with together. He can read their pulse, use needles to direct or unblock energy, fix structural issues, etc., and homeopathy adds another dimension.

Sometimes, when someone is stuck in a certain health pattern and not making the expected progress, I treat with a homeopathic remedy that reaches the emotional blockages, and Bam!, their physical issues clear up.

Grief is, by far, the largest block to healing.

You make an especially ardent case against commonly used antibiotics. Please explain the research behind this movement and the top alternative treatments you credit with keeping you and your family off of antibiotics for 30 years now.

Before antibiotics (and before vaccines were introduced in response to epidemics), there was homeopathy.

It is over 230 years old and is the second largest system of medicine in the world—everywhere but America.

In my upcoming book, Mastering Alternative Medicine: Your Family’s Guide to Wellness, I briefly explain the history of homeopathy and how this inexpensive, safe medicine has been systematically driven out. The space here simply doesn’t allow me to explain the volume of research that exists for homeopathic remedies and the true facts about people saved from smallpox and other diseases when conventional medicine failed.

Armed with a reference guide and a homeopathic kit, you can stop many illnesses in their tracks before they even develop.

Examples include using Euphrasia as soon as symptoms of conjunctivitis (pink eye) arise; Hydrastis for sinusitis, and adding Sanguinaria if it’s chronic; mercurius solubilis or mercurius vivus for tonsillitis; hepar sulph calcarea for dental abscesses; Allium cepa for hay fever; Aconitum and Bryonia (or Gelsemium, depending on symptoms) for the common cold or flu; Belladonna or ferrum phos (depending on symptoms) for fever; and Nux vomica for acid reflux.

I could go on with pages and pages of natural solutions, and this is exactly the subject of my book. Listed above is just a small sampling of the FDA-approved remedies you can buy for $6 to $8 in any health food store or pharmacy or online. (I have an extensive reference section in the book on how to source the remedies you need.)

Not everyone has an opportunity to grow their own food or healing herbs. Even if you do, there are important natural remedies we all should know about sitting on a shelf in your health food store. Just as it takes effort to grow your own food, it takes effort to find health solutions not readily spoken about in mainstream society.

Please tell us how your new book came about and the personal research that fueled it.

For nearly 30 years, I have studied homeopathy and other holistic modalities.

It never gets old to see how quickly people improve (with no side effects) when they use remedies from nature.

I have gathered data, researched, and studied with medical professionals who have found another way . . . a safe way to stay healthy. It was a natural transition to pull it all together and share information you’ll never hear on the nightly news or from your insurance-mandated doctor.

It is your right to keep your family and yourself as healthy as possible. Bringing holistic medicine into your life may be what you are looking for, as it was for me.

Can you offer any last piece of healthy living advice that would be of interest to our Grow Network community?

I would like to stress that, because of the source of homeopathic remedies, they are safe for pregnant women, infants, and the elderly, as well as animals and plants. In essence, when you feed the body what it needs—clean, organic food and clean, natural medicine—it responds in kind.

 

The post Meet Elena Upton, Local Changemaker appeared first on The Grow Network.

10 Fundamentals for Your Homeopathic Medicine Kit

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There may be a day when you cannot run to a grocery store or pharmacy for medical supplies. A visit to a doctor may be impossible however there are a number of time-tested remedies that may prove useful. Having certain items on hand can help prepare you for situations where medical attention is necessary. Here’s […]

10 Fundamentals for Your Natural Medicine Kit

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There may be a day when you cannot run to a grocery store or pharmacy for medical supplies. A visit to a doctor may be impossible however there are a number of time-tested remedies that may prove useful. Having certain items on hand can help prepare you for situations where medical attention is necessary. Here’s […]

Video: Adding Natural Remedies to First Aid Kits

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natural remedies

natural remedies

If you’re putting together a solid first aid kit, you have to decide if that kit is going to have to perform in long-term survival settings. You can put together a decent kit or even consider one of our specially-designed kits, but what if a disaster turns out to be a long-term event that knocks you off the grid for months, maybe longer?

It’s pretty clear you’ll eventually run out of standard medicines and other supplies quickly, especially if you’re taking care of an extended family. That’s why it’s not only important to have more materials than you think you’d need for the group, but also have some natural remedies like essential oils, herbal teas, and maybe even a medicinal garden.

Here’s a video that discusses the topic in detail. It’s something you might want to consider if you believe some long-term disaster could one day affect your area.

To watch, click below:

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

Joe Alton MD

Dr, Alton

Dr, Alton

Read more about natural remedies, plus 150 other medical topics, in the award-winning Third Edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way. Plus fill those holes in your medical storage with kits and individual items from Nurse Amy’s store at store.doomandbloom.net.

Survival Medicine Hour: The Flu Hits The Hosts, Antibiotic Use, More

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Antibiotics not helpful against the flu

Antibiotics not helpful against the flu

Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, come down with the flu after their successful appearance at the SHOT show in Nevada, just one of 47 states reporting widespread outbreaks of influenza. Find out how hard it is to escape becoming a victim, even if you walk around with hand sanitizer in your pocket all day! Nurse Amy gives her advice for speeding recovery and Dr. Bones talks about the anti-viral drug Tamiflu and how it works to shorten the duration and severity of the illness.

It's good to have antibiotics, even fish versions, in your medical storage, but how to use them wisely in survival?

It’s good to have antibiotics, even fish versions, in your medical storage, but how to use them wisely in survival?

Also, Dr. Alton was the first physician to write about the use of fish and bird antibiotics as a survival tool, but this stuff isn’t candy, and has to be used wisely if at all. Having a supply, however, may avoid the preventable deaths from infected cuts and other minor ailments that could become big trouble in hard times. Some general advice regarding appropriate usage is given, and a useful antibiotic called  metronidazole (Flagyl, Fish-Zole) is spotlighted.

All this and more in the latest Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP!

To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2018/02/02/survival-medicine-hour-the-flu-hits-the-hosts-wise-antibiotic-use-more

Follow us on Twitter @preppershow, FB at Doom and Bloom(tm), and YouTube at DrBones NurseAmy Channel!

Joe and Amy Alton

Amy and Joe Alton

Amy and Joe Alton

Learn more about respiratory infections, anti-viral drugs, and antibiotics in the award-winning Third Edition of The Survival Medicine Handbook, The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way.

 

Attacking the flu and an epidemic!

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Attacking the flu and an epidemic!
Host: James Walton “I Am Liberty” Audio player below!

Have you been paying attention to the epidemic of influenza that has been rushing through the nation? This flu is very powerful and has done some incredible things. Its done some amazing things. The flu has forced school districts to close, states to declare a state of emergency and hospitals across the nation to bend under the strain of new patients.

Continue reading Attacking the flu and an epidemic! at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

Survival Medicine Hour: Cellulitis, Spirituality of and Realities for the Medic, More

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SURVIVAL MEDICINE HOUR #369

spirituality and survival

spirituality and survival

In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour, Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP discuss the role of spirituality in survival, and the role hope plays in keeping people resilient in the face of adversity. Also, some hard realities the medic must confront in long-term survival scenarios and the role natural plant products will play in keeping people healthy when the medications run out.

Cellulitis: An epidemic off the grid?

Cellulitis: An epidemic off the grid?

Plus, a discussion of one of the most common issues that will attend injuries in survival settings: cellulitis, or soft tissue infections. People performing activities of daily survival get injured and those injuries can get infected. How do you recognize these infections, and what can you use to treat them?

All this and more in the Doom and Bloom(tm) Survival Medicine Hour with Joe and Amy Alton!

To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/12/22/survival-medicine-hour-spirituality-and-survival-cellulitis-medic-realities

 

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad (and a Merry Christmas)!

Have a Corgi Christmas!

Have a Corgi Christmas!

Follow us on Twitter @preppershow; on Facebook @Doom and Bloom(tm);on Youtube’s DrBones NurseAmy channel!

Don’t forget the award-winning Third Edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way, as well as the kits and supplies at Nurse Amy’s store at store.doomandbloom.net.

 

Essential Oil Sore Muscle Rub Homemade Recipe

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Essential Oil Sore Muscle Rub Homemade Recipe Essential oils are powerful. They can be powerful in bad ways but for the most part they do a great job at creating answers outside of a medicine cabinet. Its an amazing thing. For many people they just don’t appreciated the power of an essential oil. If you …

Continue reading »

The post Essential Oil Sore Muscle Rub Homemade Recipe appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Essential Oils As Medical Tools

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ESSENTIAL OILS

Essential Oils As Survival Tools

Essential Oils As Survival Tools

Recently, I wrote an article about the use of herbal teas for their medicinal benefits. For the medic who is concerned about long-term survival scenarios, a hard reality is that stored pharmaceuticals will run out over time. This leaves them with only natural options, such as the plants that grow in their own backyard. These were used with skill by our ancestors, who had little else to treat sickness and injury.

While teas are the simplest way to utilize your medicinal herbs, many swear by essential oils as a storage option with other medical supplies. These items have much more longevity than fresh plants and can include those that don’t naturally grow in the area.

Essential Oils Contain Various Compounds

Essential Oils Contain Various Compounds

An essential oil is distilled from whole plant material, not a single ingredient; therefore, each one has multiple compounds that might be medically useful. To take an example, English lavender has about 20 different chemicals, including esters, ketones, and terpenes. These combinations make each oil unique. Oils may be produced from leaves, bark, flowers, resin, fruit or roots. For example, Lemon oil comes from the peel, Lavender oil from flowers, and Cinnamon oil from bark.

Although you might not realize it, you’ve been using essential oils all your life in soaps, furniture polishes, perfumes, and ointments. Previous generations of conventional physicians commonly included them in their medical bags. Indeed, many standard medical texts of the past were really instruction manuals on how to use these products.

Distilling Essential Oils Requires Equipment

One Way To Make Essential Oils: Distillation

Essential oils aren’t easy to produce without distillery equipment. Although it only takes a few leaves of peppermint to make a tea, you would need 5 pounds of leaves to make 1 ounce of essential oil. One source states that it takes an entire acre of peppermint to produce just 12 pounds of oil. The same source says that 12,000 rose blossoms are required to produce a tablespoon of rose oil. These concentrated versions are the ones you see marketed in small, dark bottles. Unless you intend to buy distilling materials, you should accumulate essential oils in quantity but use them sparingly.

The strength or quality of the oil is dependent on multiple factors, including soil conditions, season harvested, subspecies of plant, rainfall, and, in some cases, even the time of day. This is akin to the conditions that determine the quality of a particular vintage of wine. It also explains the significant variance you’ll see in the effects of the same oil from year to year.

You might be surprised to learn that the Food and Drug Administration only requires 10% essential oil in the bottle for it to be marketed as “Pure Essential Oil”. Beware of claims of FDA certification; the FDA has no certification or approval process for these products.

Making Essential Oils

The manufacture of essential oils, known as “extraction”, can be achieved by various methods:

Distillation Method: Using a “still” like old-time moonshiners, water is boiled through an amount of plant material to produce a steam that travels through cooled coils. This steam condenses into a “mixture” of oil and water from which the oil can be extracted

Pressing Method: The oils of citrus fruit can be isolated by a technique which involves putting the peels through a “press”. This works well only with the oiliest of plant materials, such as orange skins.

Maceration Method: a fixed oil (sometimes called “carrier” oil) or lard may be combined with the plant part and exposed to the sun over time, causing the fixed oil to become infused with the plant “essence”. Oftentimes, a heat source is used to move the process along. The plant material may be added several times during the process to manufacture stronger versions. This is the method by which you obtain products such as “garlic-infused olive oil”. A similar process using flowers is referred to as “Enfleurage”.

Solvent Method: Alcohol and other solvents may be used on some plant parts, usually flowers, to release the essential oil in a multi-step process.

As each essential oil has different chemical compounds in it, it stands to reason that the medicinal benefits are also different. An entire alternative medical discipline has developed to find the appropriate oil for the condition that needs treatment. The method of treatment may differ, as well. Common methods are:

1) Inhalation Therapy: This method is also known as “aroma- therapy”. The simplest  way to perform direct inhalation therapy involves putting 2 or 3 drops of essential oil on your hands, rubbing them together, and inhaling.

Steam inhalation therapy utilizes the addition of a few drops of the essential oil in a bowl of steaming water (distilled or sterilized), which is then inhaled. This method is most effective when placing a towel over your head to catch the vapors.

Many people will place essential oils in potpourri or use a “diffuser” to spread the aroma throughout the room. This technique probably dilutes any medicinal effects, however.

2) Topical Application: The skin is an amazing absorbent surface, and using essential oils by direct application is a popular method of administration. The oil may be used as part of a massage, or directly placed on the skin to achieve a therapeutic effect on a rash or aching muscle.

It’s wise to always test for allergic reactions before using an essential oil in this manner: Even though the chemical compounds in the oil are natural, you could still exhibit an allergy to it or be irritated by it (case in point: poison ivy).

A simple test involves placing a couple of drops on the inside of your forearm with a cotton applicator. Within 12-24 hours, you’ll notice redness and itching if you’re allergic. Mixing some of the essential oil with a “carrier” oil such as olive oil before use is a safer option for topical use. Another concern, mostly with citrus oils applied to the skin, is “phototoxicity” (an exaggerated burn response to sun exposure).

Although we have seen many sources recommend applying essential oil over the location of an internal organ, some reservations exist about whether such an application will really have an effect on that organ. It is much more likely to work on skin issues or, perhaps, underlying muscle tissue.

3) Ingestion: Direct ingestion is unwise for many essential oils, and this method should be used with caution. Professional guidance is imperative when considering this method, except for a very few instances. A reasonable alternative to consider is a tea made with the dried herb. This is a safer mode of internal use, but the effect may not be as strong.

Hard Data?

Hard Data on Oils is Not Always Easy To Find

Hard Data on Oils is Not Always Easy To Find

Essential oils have been used as medical treatment for a very long time, but it’s difficult to provide definitive evidence of their effectiveness for several reasons. Essential oils are difficult to standardize, due to variance in the quality of the product based on soil conditions, time of year, and other factors that we mentioned above.

In addition, there are many subspecies of plants that may differ in their effects. An essential oil of Eucalyptus, for example, may be obtained from Eucalyptus Globulus or Eucalyptus Radiata; these plants may have their own unique properties. These factors combine to make scientific study problematic.

In most university experiments, a major effort is made to be certain that the substance tested caused the results obtained. As essential oils have a number of different compounds and are often marketed as blends, which ingredient was the cause of the effect? If the oil is applied with massage, was the effect related to the oil itself or from the physical therapy?

The majority of studies on essential oils have been conducted by the cosmetics and food industries. Others have been conducted by individuals or small companies with a vested interest in the product.

Definitive studies of possible medicinal benefits are usually performed in universities sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry. Unfortunately, they generally have little interest in herbal products because they are hard to patent. Therefore, serious funding is hard to find because of the limited profit potential.

Commonly Used Essential Oils

There are many types of essential oils

There are many types of essential oils

Despite the lack of hard data, essential oils have various reported beneficial effects, mainly based on their historical use on thousands of patients by generations of healers. Although there are many essential oils, a number of them are considered mainstays of any herbal medicine cabinet. Here are some of the most popular:

purple colored lavender flowers smell really good and they have medicinal properties

Lavender is a very popular oil

Lavender Oil: An analgesic (pain reliever), antiseptic, and immune stimulant. It is thought to be good for skin care and to pro- mote healing, especially in burns, bruises, scrapes, acne, rashes and bug bites. Lavender has a calming effect and is used for insomnia, stress and depression. It has been reported effective as a decongestant through steam inhalation. Lavender oil may have benefit as an antifungal agent, and has been used for athlete’s foot or other related conditions.

Eucalyptus Oil: An antiseptic, antiviral, and decongestant (also an excellent insect repellent), Eucalyptus oil has a “cooling” effect on skin. It aids with respiratory issues and is thought to boost the immune system. Consider its use for flus, colds, sore throats, coughs, sinusitis, bronchitis, and hay fever. Eucalyptus may be used in massages, steam inhalation, and as a bath additive. Although eucalyptus oil has been used in cough medicine, it is likely greatly diluted and should not be ingested in pure form.

Melaleuca (Tea Tree) Oil: Diluted in a carrier oil such as coconut, Tea Tree oil may be good for athlete’s foot, acne, skin wounds, and even insect bites. In the garden, Tea Tree oil is a reasonable organic method of pest control. In inhalation therapy, it is reported to help relieve respiratory congestion. Studies have been performed which find it effective against both Staphylococcus and fungal infections. Some even recommend a few drops in a pint of water for use as a vaginal douche to treat yeast. Tea Tree oil may be toxic if ingested or used in high concentrations, around sensitive areas like the eyes.

Peppermint Oil: This oil is said to have various therapeutic effects: antiseptic, antibacterial, decongestant, and anti-emetic (stops vomiting). Peppermint oil is claimed to help for digestive disorders when applied directly to the abdomen. Some herbalists prescribe Peppermint for headache; massage a drop or two to the temples as needed. For achy muscles or painful joints, massage the diluted oil externally onto the affected area. As mentioned previously, definitive proof of topical application effects on deep organs is difficult to find.

Lemon Oil: Used for many years as a surface disinfectant, it is often found in furniture cleaners. Many seem to think that this disinfecting action makes it good for sterilizing water, but there is no evidence that it is as effective as any of the standard methods, such as boiling. Lemon oil is thought to have a calming effect; some businesses claim to have better results from their employees when they use it as aromatherapy. Don’t apply this oil on the skin if you will be exposed to the sun that day, due to increased likelihood of burns.

Clove Bud Oil Is A Dental Anesthetic

Clove Bud Oil Is A Dental Anesthetic

Clove Oil: Although thought to have multiple uses as an anti-fungal, antiseptic, antiviral, analgesic, and sedative, Clove oil particularly shines as an anesthetic and antimicrobial. It is marketed as “Eugenol” to dentists throughout the world as a natural painkiller for toothaches. A toothpaste can be made by combining clove oil and baking soda. When mixed with zinc oxide powder, it makes a temporary cement for lost fillings and loose crowns. Use Clove oil with caution, however, as it may have an irritant effect on the gums if too much is applied.

Arnica Oil: Arnica oil is used as a topical agent for muscle injuries and aches. Thought to be analgesic and anti-inflammatory, it is found in a number of sports ointments. As a personal aside, we have tested this oil on ourselves and found it to be effective, though not very long lasting. Frequent application would be needed for long term relief. Although some essential oils are used as aromatherapy, Arnica oil is toxic if inhaled.

Chamomile Oil: There are at least two versions of Chamomile oil, Roman and German. Roman Chamomile is a watery oil, while German Chamomile seems more viscous. Both are used to treat skin conditions such as eczema as well as irritations due to allergies. Chamomile oil is thought to decrease gastrointestinal inflammation and irritation, and is thought have a calming effect as aromatherapy, especially in children.

Geranium Oil: Although variable in its effects based on the species of plant used, Geranium oil is reported to inhibit the production of sebum in the skin, and may be helpful in controlling acne. Some believe that it also may have hemostatic (blood-clotting) properties, and is often recommended for bleeding from small cuts and bruising. When a small amount of oil is diluted in shampoo, it may be considered a treatment for head lice.

Helichrysum Oil: Thought to be a strong analgesic and anti-inflammatory, Helichrysum is used to treat arthritis, tendonitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, and fibromyalgia as part of massage therapy. It has also been offered as a treatment for chronic skin irritation

Rosemary is a versatile oil

Rosemary is a versatile oil

Rosemary Oil: Represented as having multiple uses as an antibacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-parasitic, Rosemary oil is proven to control spider mites in gardens. Use a few drops with water for a disinfectant mouthwash. Inhalation, either cold or steamed, may relieve congested or constricted respiration. Mixed with a carrier oil, it is used to treat tension headaches and muscle aches

Clary Sage Oil: One of the various chemical constituents of Clary Sage has a composition similar to estrogen. It has been used to treat menstrual irregularities, premenstrual syndrome, and other hormonal issues. Sage is also believed to have a mild anticoagulant effect, and may have some use as a blood thinner. Clary Sage also is thought to have some sedative effect, and has been used as a sleep aid.

Neem Oil: With over 150 chemical ingredients, the Neem tree is called “the village pharmacy” in its native India. Many Ayurvedic alternative remedies have some form of Neem oil in them. Proven as a natural organic pesticide, we personally use Neem Oil in our garden. Reported medicinal benefits are too numerous to list here and seem to cover just about every organ system. It should be noted, however, that it may be toxic when the oil is taken internally.

Wintergreen Oil: A source of natural salicylates, Wintergreen oil is a proven anticoagulant and analgesic. About 1 fluid ounce of Wintergreen Oil is the equivalent of 171 aspirin tablets if ingested, so use extreme caution. It may also have beneficial effects on intestinal spasms and might reduce elevated blood pressures.

Frankincense Oil: One of the earliest documented essential oils, evidence of its use goes back 5000 years to ancient Egypt. Catholics will recognize it as the incense used during religious ceremonies. Studies from Johns Hopkins and Hebrew Universities state that Frankincense relieves anxiety and depression in mice (we’re unsure how, exactly, this was determined, but it probably involved a cat). Direct application of the oil may have antibacterial and antifungal properties, and is thought to be helpful for wound healing. As a cold or steam inhalant, it is some- times used for lung and nasal congestion.

Blue Tansy Oil: Helpful in the garden as a companion plant for organic pest control, Blue Tansy is sometimes planted along with potatoes and other vegetables. The oil has been used for years to treat intestinal worms and other parasites. One of its constituents, Camphor, is used in medicinal chest rubs and ointments. In the past, it has been used in certain dental procedures as an antibacterial.

Oregano Oil: An antiseptic, oregano oil has been used in the past as an antibacterial agent. It should be noted that Oregano oil is derived from a different species of the plant than the Oregano used in cooking. One of the minority of essential oils that are safe to ingest, it is thought to be helpful in calming stomach upset, and may help relieve sore throats. Its antibacterial action leads some to use the oil in topical applications on skin infections when diluted with a carrier oil. Oregano Oil may reduce the body’s ability to absorb iron, so consider an iron supplement if you use this regularly.

Thyme Oil: Reported to have significant antimicrobial action, diluted Thyme oil is used to cure skin infections, and may be helpful for ringworm and athlete’s foot. Thyme is sometimes used to reduce intestinal cramps in massage therapy. As inhalation therapy, it may loosen congestion from upper respiratory infections.

“Thieves’ Oil”: Many essential oils are marketed as blends, such as “Thieves’ Oil”. This is a combination of clove, lemon, cinnamon bark, eucalyptus, and rosemary essential oils. Touted to treat a broad variety of ailments, studies at Weber State University indicate a good success rate in killing airborne viruses and bacteria. Of course, the more elements in the mixture, the higher chance for adverse reactions, such as phototoxicity.

I’m sure I missed some of your favorites. There are as many oils as there are species of plants.

Many oils aren't proven safe in pregnancy

Many oils aren’t proven safe in pregnancy

Some important caveats to the above list should be stated here. Many of the essential oils listed are unsafe to use in pregnancy, and some may even cause miscarriage. Also, allergic reactions to essential oils, especially on the skin, are not uncommon; use the allergy test we described earlier before starting regular topical applications.

Even though essential oils are natural substances, they may interact with medicines that you may regularly take or have adverse effects on chronic illness such as liver disease, epilepsy, or high blood pressure. Thorough research is required to determine whether a particular essential oil is safe to use.

Having said that, essential oils are a viable option for many conditions. Anyone interested in maintaining their family’s well-being, especially off the grid, should regard them as another weapon in the medical arsenal. Learn about them with an open mind, but maintain a healthy skepticism especially about “cure-all” claims.

Joe Alton MD

Dr. Alton

Dr. Alton

Learn more about natural remedies and 150 other topics on survival medicine with the 2017 Book Excellence Award winner in medicine, “The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide For When Medical Help is Not on the Way”.

The Apartment Apothecary: Herbal Medicine, With Recipes

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How are my amazing Apartment Homesteaders doing so far?! Y’all are seriously ROCK STARS.

Please accept another one of my virtual high fives! 🙂

You’ve made the switch to…

Well. Done.

You’re well on your way to a sustainable lifestyle in your apartment homestead. Now it’s time to take control of your personal health and wellness through the use of natural, pharm-free medicines you can grow yourself or source sustainably.

Why Herbal Medicine?

Alternative, herbal medicine—becoming your own “apartment apothecary”—is absolutely vital to your life as an apartment homesteader.

You’ve probably seen the commercials at some point—the “buy this medication” commercials that say they’ll cure psoriasis or help reduce the risk of heart failure or help male members of the species get “ready for action” in 3.2 seconds flat.

But then they list 20 different side effects from that same medicine and you can’t help but stare at the TV with the same look you had last time you watched an ill-funded community theatre play….

Pharmaceuticals are formulated to tackle one problem and one problem only, and that is what the FDA allows them to print on the label: “This medication may help with pain management.” And that is followed with the warnings: “Excessive use of this medication may cause liver failure.”

Wait. WHAT?! Nope. Nope. Nope. Nope.

We already talked about how eating local, pesticide-free food can help you save money at the doctor and pharmacy.

But the switch to herbal medicine is about so much more than saving money.

It’s about cultivating your own wellness through the use of plants (the kind grown in Nature), not toxic chemicals (…grown in a…um…petri dish?). Why not take your apartment homesteading a step further and teach yourself to be your own pharmacy with natural, sustainable alternatives?

What to Expect With Herbal Medicine

I’ve talked to so many people who tried the “herbal medicine” thing and went quickly back to pharmaceuticals because the herbal remedies “didn’t work.”

And I understand why that happened. We’ve been conditioned to assume medicine works instantly—that they get rid of our headaches, cure our sinus infections, or get rid of our yeast infections as soon as the pill, cream, or spray reaches our skin or blood.

When an antibiotic doesn’t work the first time, we’ve been taught to get a second one to knock out the infection. If one round doesn’t work, we throw more at it. Which makes sense … oh wait—no, it doesn’t!

Herbal medicine is not a “quick fix” like the aspirin or Pepto-Bismol most of us are used to.

Herbal remedies create a lifetime of health and wellness by healing your body and helping each system in your body work the way it was intended to.

Alternative medicine is individualized, holistic care for a lifetime of personal health and wellness.

The goal is to find herbal remedies that work for you. The beauty of alternative medicine is the process of finding what works best for you specifically.

Start with the herbs and plants listed in the next section to start cultivating your own best alternative medicine cabinet and be on the road to your own personal, holistic health and wellness routine.

Natural Medicines to Grow Yourself and How to Use Them

If you’re visiting The Grow Network for the first time, I urge you to click around on the blog in the “Medicine” section while you’re here. The network of gardeners, homesteaders, and writers here has done some absolutely amazing work in alternative medicine already. My list below comes from the wealth of knowledge this network has already provided.

Want to learn even more about herbal remedies and all other aspects of apartment and modern homesteading? Sign up for the Lab!

Marjory published her list of the top 15 antibiotic alternatives in this blog post. I want to reiterate her list and talk about how you can grow some of those 15 super plants and use them in your own alternative medicine practice.

Garlic

Marjory will instruct you on everything you need to know about the wonder that is garlic, and you can even get your free copy of “The Miracle of Garlic: Your First Home Medicine” here.

As Apartment Homesteaders, we can grow garlic in containers in our patio gardens. Make sure you give them plenty of room to stretch out in the soil in a container that is around 18 inches deep and 12 inches wide.1For instructions on how to grow garlic in containers: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/how-to-plant-garlic-in-contain-158494

Check out this video from TGN’s 2016 Home Grown Food Summit on how to grow great garlic!

Echinacea

One of the most visited sections of the pharmacy is the Cold and Flu section. Sinus “yuck” sufferers, get out of the pharmacy and into the garden!

If you’re like the women in my family, you know how nasty the winter sinus infection can be. The only time I’ve had to take antibiotics is for sinus infections, but Echinacea is an herbal alternative that can help knock out the sinus yuck without the harmful side effects of pharmaceutical antibiotics.

You can grow Echinacea in a pot on your garden patio.2For instructions on how to grow Echinacea in a pot: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/growing-purple-coneflowers-containers-60904.html

But where most people dry Echinacea, recent studies have shown that fresh Echinacea has far more power to treat colds than the dried plant.3See http://www.health.com/health/condition-article/0,,20251749,00.html

Echinacea Tea Recipe

You can make a simple fresh Echinacea tea to drink during the cold and flu season by simply adding 1/2 cup of fresh Echinacea to 8 ounces of water. Bring the water to a simmer over medium heat for a few minutes, then add the Echinacea. Simmer covered for 15 minutes. Strain and add 1-2 tablespoons of raw, local honey. (The honey is especially helpful for a sore throat and a cough).4Find Echinacea tea and other recipes for using Echinacea medicinally here: https://thepaleomama.com/2015/07/21/homemade-echinacea-tea/

Cayenne Pepper

Cayenne pepper has shown itself worthy to replace over-the-counter pain relievers like acetaminophen and ibuprofen—especially for muscle and joint pain.

This is another area of the pharmacy that is overused; acetaminophen and ibuprofen have droves of loyal consumers who take the medicines daily in an attempt to heal chronic pain. But they have side effects like liver damage and ulcers, so we need a natural alternative like cayenne pepper to replace the medicines we take for pain relief.

You can grow cayenne peppers in your patio garden or in a small pot indoors.5For instructions on how to grow cayenne peppers: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-cayenne-peppers-container-47525.html Then, simply dry your peppers in the oven on parchment-lined cookie sheets.

Cut the peppers into chunks so they dry faster and place them in the oven at about 200°F for 1–3 hours until dry. You can then grind them into a powder to use in this simple pain salve recipe:6Recipe from https://learningherbs.com/remedies-recipes/herbal-pain-relief/

Pain Salve Recipe

1/2 c. olive oil
2 T. cayenne powder
1/2 oz. beeswax

Infuse the olive oil with the cayenne powder using a double boiler technique. Strain through a cheesecloth. Then melt the beeswax and stir in the cayenne-infused olive oil. Pour the liquid mixture into jars or tins. Let it cool.

You can rub this salve directly onto the painful area. Not only does it allow you to avoid the dangerous side effects of over-the-counter pain medicines, but it may also work quicker than the oral pain relievers because it reaches the area of pain immediately without having to go through your blood stream to get there.

Turmeric

Turmeric, a bright orange root, is a great one to add to your garden for dietary and medicinal uses on your apartment homestead.

Turmeric has been shown to help mobilize fat in the body and may help reduce bad cholesterol.

High cholesterol is something many American adults struggle with, and too many of us depend on cholesterol medication to keep us out of the hospital for cholesterol-related issues. You can grow turmeric on your patio or indoors and harvest for treating a whole host of other health issues, as well—from inflammatory bowel disease to gall stones.7For instruction on how to grow turmeric in a pot: http://balconygardenweb.com/growing-turmeric-in-pots-how-to-grow-turmeric-care-uses-benefits/

Live in the Midwest like I do? Here’s how to grow turmeric and ginger in the Midwest.

One of my favorite ways to use turmeric is in a tea.8For turmeric tea recipe: https://www.drweil.com/health-wellness/balanced-living/turmeric-tea-benefits/

Turmeric Tea Recipe

Boil four cups of water, add one teaspoon of ground turmeric, and reduce the heat to simmer for 10 minutes.9Learn how to make turmeric powder: https://www.turmericforhealth.com/general-info/how-to-make-turmeric-powder-at-home-from-raw-turmeric Then, strain the tea and add honey or lemon to taste. You can also add a pinch of black pepper for increased absorption. 

Ginger

Ginger is another plant you can grow fairly easily indoors on your apartment homestead.10For instruction on how to grow ginger indoors: https://newengland.com/today/living/gardening/how-to-grow-ginger-indoors/

Ginger has been shown to have antiviral effects as well as antibacterial properties. Replace Pepto-Bismol, Imodium, Nauzene, and other medicines for stomach upset with ginger.

Ginger is one of my favorites to use when I suffer from stomach bugs. This is another one I like to take in tea form.

Ginger Tea Recipe

Simply steep between 1 and 1-1/2 teaspoons of freshly grated ginger in boiling water for about 10 minutes; then, strain and sip.11For the ginger tea recipe: http://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/easy-ginger-tea-23528 

Essential Oils: Round Out Your Medicine Cabinet

We’ve talked about the power of essential oils before, but we can’t have a chapter on alternative medicine without talking about essential oils!

Essential oils are super-concentrated plant extracts. They can be used to replace any and all over-the-counter medicines. And while many herbal remedies can take a little while to work, some essential oils can work almost instantly to reduce the symptoms of our maladies.

While you won’t be able to grow all the plants you need to create every herbal or alternative medicine in your apartment homestead, purchasing therapeutic-grade essential oils can help round out your apartment medicine cabinet. 

Two of My Favorite Natural Remedies

In my own alternative medicine journey, I’ve had the most difficulty replacing over-the-counter medicine in treatment of the common cold. Here are two of the best recipes I’ve found for natural alternatives to cough drops and cough syrup.

Honey and Essential Oils Lozenges Recipe

2 c. raw, local honey
20 drops Thieves essential oil blend*
20 drops lemon essential oil
5 drops oregano essential oil

Heat honey in a pot until candy thermometer reads 300°F (the “hard crack” stage). Stir constantly. Remove from heat and continue stirring until it cools slightly and starts to thicken. Make sure it is not still boiling continuously before adding your essential oils. Stir the oils in.

Then, in candy molds or on parchment paper, spoon out cough-drop-sized amounts of the honey/oils mixture. Allow to cool completely to room temperature. Store at room temperature.

* Thieves essential oil contains cinnamon, clove, lemon, eucalyptus radiata, and rosemary essential oils. I buy mine from Young Living, although you could theoretically make it yourself.

Simple Cough Syrup Recipe

2 c. water
8 sprigs fresh thyme
1/4 c. fresh ginger root, finely chopped
1 c. raw, local honey
1 fresh lemon, juiced
1/8 t. cayenne pepper

Simmer thyme and ginger in water in a small pot over medium heat until the water is reduced by half. Allow to cool completely; then strain the herbs. Return the tea to the pot and whisk in honey, lemon, and cayenne pepper (which you hopefully grew yourself!).

Store in an airtight container.12I got this recipe from the Traditional Cooking School, but I adapted it so I could make it without an instant pot: https://traditionalcookingschool.com/food-preparation/instant-pot-cough-syrup/ Take one tablespoon to soothe sore throat and calm your cough.

 

Click around to other posts on alternative medicine here on The Grow Network to arm yourself with all the tools you need to be your own apartment apothecary!

And stay tuned for the next blog in the Apartment Homesteader series, where I’ll talk about how to surround yourself with a community of inspiring, green-living individuals like yourself who can help you take your sustainable living to the next level.

 

TGN Bi-Weekly Newsletter

References   [ + ]

1. For instructions on how to grow garlic in containers: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/how-to-plant-garlic-in-contain-158494
2. For instructions on how to grow Echinacea in a pot: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/growing-purple-coneflowers-containers-60904.html
3. See http://www.health.com/health/condition-article/0,,20251749,00.html
4. Find Echinacea tea and other recipes for using Echinacea medicinally here: https://thepaleomama.com/2015/07/21/homemade-echinacea-tea/
5. For instructions on how to grow cayenne peppers: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-cayenne-peppers-container-47525.html
6. Recipe from https://learningherbs.com/remedies-recipes/herbal-pain-relief/
7. For instruction on how to grow turmeric in a pot: http://balconygardenweb.com/growing-turmeric-in-pots-how-to-grow-turmeric-care-uses-benefits/
8. For turmeric tea recipe: https://www.drweil.com/health-wellness/balanced-living/turmeric-tea-benefits/
9. Learn how to make turmeric powder: https://www.turmericforhealth.com/general-info/how-to-make-turmeric-powder-at-home-from-raw-turmeric
10. For instruction on how to grow ginger indoors: https://newengland.com/today/living/gardening/how-to-grow-ginger-indoors/
11. For the ginger tea recipe: http://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/easy-ginger-tea-23528
12. I got this recipe from the Traditional Cooking School, but I adapted it so I could make it without an instant pot: https://traditionalcookingschool.com/food-preparation/instant-pot-cough-syrup/

The post The Apartment Apothecary: Herbal Medicine, With Recipes appeared first on The Grow Network.

Herbal Teas as Medicinal Tools

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HERBAL TEAS

herbal teas

herbal teas (image by pixabay)

In a long-term disaster setting where you are knocked off the grid, medical supplies expended and medicines dispensed over time may not be easily replaced. When confronted with dwindling access to the tools needed by the survival medic to keep people healthy, it becomes clear that knowledge of natural remedies is important.

Every medic must determine whether they believe a long-term survival scenario is a possibility. If this is their concern, they must not only have a sizable amount of supplies and medicine, but also a realization that they eventually must turn to the plants in their own backyard that may have medicinal benefit.

For long term storage, the preparedness community has turned primarily to essential oils as a natural alternative. These are, indeed, some of the best natural products the medic can stockpile due to their longevity. Producing new supplies of them, however, is problematic. Without distilling equipment and a large amount of plant material, you will not be able to replenish oils in any significant quantity.

purple colored lavender flowers smell really good and they have medicinal properties

It takes a lot of lavender to make an oil

A more realistic option for sustainable herbal medicines is using fresh or dried plant materials in teas. These require little more than a garden and some knowledge regarding each herb.

It should be noted that the term “tea” is incorrect: The word actually refers to various drinks made from the leaves of one species, Camellia sinensis. Green, black, white, and oolong teas are made from the same plant; only the processing differs. The proper term for a drink made by steeping herbs in hot water would be an “herbal infusion” or “tisane”. For simplicity’s sake, though, we’ll call them teas.

Standard teas from Camellia Sinensis, like green, black, white, and oolong, are high in antioxidants with many health benefits ascribed to them for various medical issues. These include heart disease, type 2 diabetes, liver dysfunction, and more.

Making a tea is one of the simplest ways to prepare medicinal herbs. If you can boil water, you can brew tea. You just:

  • Bring some water to a roiling boil in a pot or other container. Crush the herb leaves, roots, and/or flowers.
  • Pour the boiled water over 1 teaspoon of herbs and let steep for about five or ten minutes
  • Keep a cover on while steeping.
  • Unless using a tea bag or “bob”, place a strainer over a cup, and pour.
  • Use honey or lemon to add flavor if desired.

A tea doesn’t have to be ingested to be of benefit: Some may be used as an eye wash, an irrigation solution for wounds, or in cold or warm compresses.

There are many herbs that can be made into a tea. Although some of the information below lacks hard scientific data, these are just some of the teas made by your ancestors for medicinal purposes.

Alfalfa: The seeds and leaves contain vitamins A, C, E, and K, as well as calcium, phosphorous, iron, and potassium. It has been used as a diuretic to help urine flow and for upset stomachs. There are claims that it helps arthritis pain and may lower cholesterol. Use 1 to 2 teaspoons of dried leaves, steeped in 1 cup of boiling water, for 10-20 minutes.

Burdock: The dried root has been used in teas to help clear acne and to treat psoriasis. Use 2 tablespoons of fresh grated root or 1 tablespoon of well-dried root in 3 cups of boiling water.

Catnip: Leaves and flowers are used to treat intestinal cramping, indigestion, diarrhea, and other stomach ailments. Also thought to treat respiratory infections like the common cold. A substance in catnip called nepetalactone is thought to produce a mild sedative effect. Use 1 teaspoon of dried leaves or 1 tablespoon of fresh leaves per cup.

Chamomile: This popular tea contains the amino acid Tryptophan, which gives it a sedative and relaxing effect. As such, it may help treat anxiety and insomnia. Antioxidants in chamomile may help slow down progression of visual, kidney, and nerve damage in diabetics. Use 2-3 teaspoons of dried flowers per cup.

Chicory: When supplies of coffee ran out, soldiers in the Civil War used the root of this common plant as a substitute. It doesn’t have caffeine, though, and has more of a sedative than stimulant effect in large amounts. Chicory root has an effect against intestinal worms, and has been shown in animal studies to improve calcium absorption and bone mineral density. Scrape the “bark” off the root before drying; use 1 teaspoon to 1 cup of water. Tea made from leaves has a laxative effect.

dandelion tea

dandelion tea

Dandelion: You might be surprised to know that the common dandelion contains vitamins and minerals. Indeed, it’s thought to have more beta-carotene than a similar serving of carrots. Young flowers and leaves make a good tea for constipation (steep for 20 minutes). Roasting the roots produces a coffee-like drink; use 2 teaspoons of dried chopped root in 1 cup of water.

Echinacea: Well-known to decrease the duration of colds and flus, Echinacea boosts the immune system and may have some antiviral activity. Steep 1-2 teaspoons of leaf, flower, or ½ teaspoon of root to 1 cup of boiling water.

Elder: Elderberry flowers make a tea that is used for many upper respiratory infections such as sinusitis, colds, flus, and laryngitis. Applied in a compress, the tea may be helpful for wound healing and some skin conditions.

The blue or purple berries are high in antioxidants and may be made into a juice or syrup: Put two pounds of elderberries and four cups of water and bring to a boil, then simmer for a half hour. Use a fine mesh strainer to press out the juice. Sugar may be added under medium heat to make a syrup.

Eucalyptus: Tea made from eucalyptus leaves offers relief from asthma as well as respiratory infections, mostly by opening airways and loosening thick mucus. It may have antibacterial and antiviral effects. Steep ½ teaspoon of dried or fresh leaves in 1-2 cups of water.

ginger rhizome

ginger rhizome

Ginger: The underground stems, or rhizomes, of Ginger are used to treat nausea of all types from morning sickness to motion sickness. Slice one inch of the rhizome into small pieces and simmer in two cups of water on low heat for 15 minutes. Then strain. ¼ – ½ teaspoon of ginger powder is another option.

Ginseng: Both Asian and American Ginseng root can be made into herbal teas that are thought to lower blood sugar levels, a useful benefit for those with diabetes. Simmer three to six teaspoons of the root for 45 minutes in three or four cups of water, then strain.

Lavender: Used in aromatherapy, lavender may improve nausea and other digestive symptoms when drunk as a tea. It’s thought to decrease migraine headaches and possibly limit convulsions and muscle spasms. Use 1 tablespoon of dried herb in 1 cup of water.

Lemon Balm: An herb with antiviral effects, it’s a member of the mint family. A tea made from lemon balm leaves and flowers was used in the past to treat mouth, throat, and dental infections like gingivitis and herpes sores. It’s also thought to decrease anxiety, aid sleep, and may help improve intestinal spasms and nausea. Add 1 teaspoon of dried herb or 5-6 fresh leaves to one cup of boiling water.

Licorice: Better known as an ingredient in candy, its coating properties may help with sore throats, coughs, and heartburn. Licorice can, however, raise blood pressure and should be avoided during pregnancy. Add 1-2 teaspoons of chopped root to 2 cups of boiling water. Drink ½ cup at a time.

Passionflower: Tea made from passionflower has a beneficial effect on anxiety and may serve as a sleep aid if taken regularly. Boil 1-2 teaspoons of herb (avoid the root) in 2 cups of water for 5-10 minutes.

Peppermint: A long-standing herbal remedy, tea made from peppermint calms the stomach and helps Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), but can worsen heartburn. The tea helps thin respiratory mucus and relieves nasal congestion. Put 1 teaspoon of dried herb or 6-8 fresh leaves over 1 cup of boiling water.

rose hips

rose hips

Rose: Rose “hips” make a tea with vitamin C, as well as calcium, selenium, zinc, manganese, and others. It boosts the immune system and is thought to be beneficial for the adrenal gland, responsible for the stress hormone cortisol. Boil 1 teaspoon of dried rose hips in water and steep for 20 minutes.

Sage: Sage leaf tea is a time-honored remedy for sore throat as well as the common cold as a tea or gargle. It may also aid digestion, decrease cramping, and may even improve memory. Steep 1 teaspoon of dried leaves in one cup of water.

Stinging Nettle: Stinging nettle root is thought to have benefits as a diuretic to improve urine flow, even in those with enlarged prostates. The leaves may decrease the pain of arthritis in joints. Use 1 teaspoon dried leaves in 1 cup boiling water or boil 5 grams of dried root in 2 cups of water for 5-10 minutes.

St. John’s Wort: One of the few herbs that has known activity against minor depression, it has been called “herbal Prozac”. Beware of interactions with prescription drugs, however. Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 1 teaspoon of herb.

Thyme: Teas made from thyme will loosen thick phlegm and may help coughs. It’s known to inhibit bacteria, viruses, and fungi, including many that cause respiratory infections. Steep 1 to 2 teaspoons of fresh or dried leaves in 1 cup of water.

Turmeric: This herb contains curcumin, an anti-inflammatory compound that may treat Crohn’s disease and other digestive tract issues. As well, it may have beneficial effects on joint pain due to rheumatoid arthritis and other disorders.

Valerian

Valerian

Valerian: The dried roots of this plant have been utilized for centuries to deal with anxiety and insomnia. It may even decrease the frequency of seizures in patients with epilepsy. Its mild sedative effect eases pain and promotes sleep. Avoid taking with alcohol or sedative drugs.

Willow: The green underbark of willow trees contain salicin, the original ingredient used to produce aspirin. It is especially useful for muscle aches and joint pain. Simmer 1 teaspoon of bark in 1 cup of water for 10 minutes.

There is much research to be done to confirm all of the effects of these plants, and there may be other benefits not mentioned. Many other plants have medicinal effects other than the ones in the list above. These, however, are easily made into teas that can be produced even while on the move.

I’m sure you have your own herbal teas that have helped with various medical issues. The bottom line: Learn how to grow your own medicinal herbs. You may find they are all you have to keep people healthy in the long run. Using all the tools in the medical woodshed will make you a more effective medic.

Joe Alton MD

Dr. Alton

Dr. Alton

Learn more about natural remedies in the 2017 Book Excellence Award winner in Medicine “The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way”.

Here Are Some Ways To Soothe A Cold

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Here are some ways to soothe a cold. It seems like everywhere I go, someone is coughing, sneezing, and sniffling. It’s that time of year. Is it a cold or allergies? My voice sounds raspy, but I’m not sick. It’s that time of the year, sinus and congestion issues. You know when we have holidays and we have family or friends coming from different cities or states they sometimes bring a sniffle or two with them. Or we have the sniffles, right? It’s life and we love getting together.

Over Thanksgiving, our son-in-law came down with a cold when they arrived here for the holiday, but no one else in the house got it. Then a week later we were getting ready to head up north to visit some family and Mark got a cold with a cough just as we were leaving.

I will share what I do for colds, but it may or may not work for you and your family. I am not a doctor, nurse or anyone in the medical field. We know what is right for our families. Mark and I rarely go to the doctor, but there are times we must all visit a physician. I get it. I will also share ideas to keep from getting a cold, or at least try not to get one. If you are flying in an airplane I suggest you wear some N-95 Masks. I’m sure my husband, Mark wouldn’t wear one, but I will.

How To Soothe A Cold

cold

  1. Wash your hands.
  2. Stay hydrated with good clean water.
  3. Eat a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables.
  4. Stay away from fast food and empty calories.
  5. Always use those wet wipes available at your local grocery store to wipe down the handle of the carts.
  6. When you get home from the store, place those grocery bags on the floor. Those carts are a bacteria haven. If you must put them on the counter clean the area where you place them after you empty the bags. Who knows what’s on those grocery carts. I’m starting to sound a little OCD, I own it.
  7. Please use Clorox or Lysol wipes on your light switches, phones, remotes, etc. at home. They harbor so much bacteria. I know some people are against using bleach, I’m not.
  8. I visit the hospital probably a little more than the normal person does so I can check in on people from our neighborhood, not because I’m a patient. Thank goodness for those hanging hand sanitizer machines. I use them going in and going out. I even have a bottle in my car. You may think I’m a clean freak, I’m thinking I am too. LOL! Oh well, that’s how I roll.
  9. Wash your hands, yes, I’ve already said that. It’s critical to have clean hands.
  10. My favorite drink to clear congestion in my throat is warm water with Organic Green Tea, honey, and lemon juice. I buy Santa Cruz Organic Pure Lemon Juice. It’s too expensive on Amazon, you can buy it at your local grocery stores. Of course, freshly squeezed lemons would be awesome, too.
  11. I use My Doctor Suggests Throat Lozenges, they are not too strong in flavor and contain silver, which I love.
  12. I also use My Doctor Suggests Colloidal Silver 30 ppm. I would suggest you sign up for their emails on their website, and they have specials all the time you can take advantage of. If you are wondering if I take some every day, no I do not. But, if I have been somewhere where people are coughing, sneezing, etc. I will take some when I get home. I also always have their throat lozenges in my car.
  13. I use doTerra “Breathe” essential oil all the time.
  14. I love doTerra “Wintergreen” essential oil as well.
  15. Have you tried their “Eucalyptus” essential oil? I love it.
  16. I have a diffuser going almost every day at my house.
  17. I have a warm vaporizer I use to keep the room humidified. It’s cheap but it works. Vicks Warm Vaporizer
  18. Have you ever used a Neti Pot? They clean out your sinus cavities. Please be sure and use clean water.
  19. Make a pot of good old-fashioned chicken noodle soup. Chicken Noodle Soup by Linda
  20. Rest, sip on a warm drink, curled up in a blanket, sounds awesome, doesn’t it?
  21. Keep your over the counter cold remedies or cough syrups rotated.  If we have a power outage, you may be out of luck getting some of the ones you need.
  22. Some people like nasal sprays, I know I do. I buy Nasacort at Costco.
  23. Please rotate your fever reducer products if you use them. You may need some when the pharmacies are closed.
  24. Thermometers may be needed.
  25. Wash your hands with soap and water frequently, especially if you are coughing and sneezing.
  26. Keep a good supply of cloth hankies or tissues for wiping our noses. They would be great to help cut down on the virus or bacteria floating in the air.
  27. If you can stay home, please stay home, let’s cut down on sickness in the day care centers, churches, schools and the workplace.
  28. Please rest and stay hydrated

Stock Up On Cold Remedies

Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. If we lose power from a disaster or unforeseen emergency you will be glad you stocked up on your favorite old remedies. Make a list and stock your cold kit. May God bless this world.

Influenza by Linda

“Prepare Your Family For Survival” by Linda Loosli

 

The post Here Are Some Ways To Soothe A Cold appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Survival Medicine Hour: Natural Burn Remedies, Ingrown Nails, Lone Wolves

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Survival Medicine Hour Podcast #365

lone wolf

Lone Wolf?

Does the “lone wolf” have an advantage or disadvantage in situations where you’re knocked off the grid and long term survival is not a sure thing? Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP discuss the importance of community in tough times, even if it’s just an extended family.

3rd degree burn

3rd degree burn

Plus, after discussing first and second degree burns last week, Dr. Alton, aka Dr. Bones, tackles third degree burns, a difficult challenge for the survival medic, as well as natural burn remedies that might help speed recovery for some of the injured.

off grid ingrown toenail strategy

off grid ingrown toenail strategy

Lastly, minor conditions like ingrown toenails may not seem like much to those who watch The Walking Dead, but they’re a major impediment to work efficiency. Not being able to take a step without pain isn’t likely to increase your chances for survival. Dr. Alton talks about what can be done to prevent and treat this condition off the grid.

To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/11/25/survival-medicine-hour-natural-burn-remedies-ingrown-nails-lone-wolves

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad!

Joe and Amy Alton

The Altons

The Altons

Hey, follow us on twitter @preppershow, YouTube at DrBones NurseAmy channel, and Facebook at Doom and Bloom. And check out the Third Edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook on Amazon!

Third Edition

Third Edition

 

 

 

 

 

G.E.R.D. (Severe Acid Reflux) Off The Grid

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Acid Reflux Off The Grid

G.E.R.D.

Acid Reflux

In this high-stress world, you probably know someone who suffers from G.E.R.D. (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease). “Gastro-“ refers to your stomach; “-esophageal” refers to the tube that runs from it to your throat. Acid “reflux” is essentially acid that escapes the stomach and can go all the way up to your throat. G.E.R.D. is a severe form of acid reflux that can ruin a person’s quality of life.

Normally, an area called the “lower esophageal sphincter” (LES) is what separates the contents of the very acidic stomach from entering the esophagus. In G.E.R.D., the LES allows food to enter the stomach but fails to close tightly enough to keep juices from going back up, causing what we call “heartburn” and other symptoms.

Up to 20 per cent of the U.S. population suffers from some form of G.E.R.D., which means that it’s likely that the medic will eventually encounter this issue in a remote setting or survival scenario. Off the grid, we won’t have the stress that goes with the modern rat race, but there will be more basic issues just as concerning like “where’s my next meal coming from?”.

hiatal hernia

Hiatal Hernia

G.E.R.D. may occur in those with a “hiatal hernia”. This condition occurs when the top of the stomach moves up through a weak area in the diaphragm (the muscle that separates chest from abdomen and helps you breathe). As such, acid can more easily leave the stomach.

Although the stomach has a lining that can handle acidic environments, the esophagus becomes inflamed when exposed to too much. The lining becomes weakened and can erode, a condition known as an “ulcer”. Ulcers can occur in the esophagus, stomach, and upper part of the small intestine.

To make the diagnosis of ulcer or acid reflux disease as opposed to, say, chest pain from heart issues, the timing of the discomfort is important. Ulcer and acid reflux discomfort occurs soon after eating but is sometimes seen several hours after a meal. It can be differentiated from other causes of chest pain in another way: it gets better by drinking milk or taking antacids. As you can imagine, this wouldn’t do much for heart problems. Also, it often worsens when lying down or eating acidic foods. In the worse cases, such as with ulcers, blackish stools may be seen or vomiting may occur that looks like coffee grounds. This is a sign of bleeding high up in the GI tract.

ulcers

ulcers

Certain lifestyle changes are often helpful for people with G.E.R.D. Eating smaller meals (say, 5 a day) and avoiding acidic foods before bedtime may help prevent reflux. Give your stomach at least 3 hours to empty before you lie down or add a pillow or two behind your shoulders, head, and neck.

You would think chewing gum would increase stomach acid; chewing gum, however, produces saliva: Saliva acts to buffer acid.  Also, you swallow the saliva, which might force some of that acid further down the esophagus.

Spicy foods may worsen G.E.R.D.

Spicy foods may worsen G.E.R.D. (image by pixabay)

Your patient may benefit from avoiding certain foods. These commonly include:

  • Acidic fruit (for example, oranges or other citrus)
  • Fatty food
  • Coffee
  • Certain teas
  • Tomatoes
  • Onions
  • Peppermint
  • Chocolate
  • Alcohol
  • Spicy foods

Medicines like aspirin, ibuprofen, and others may also cause stomach issues. As well, smoking is thought to worsen G.E.R.D.

One thing about milk: although it may be helpful as a treatment, avoid regular milk intake and stick with low-fat, as high levels of fat ingestion may actually increase stomach acid. Obese individuals seem to suffer more from this problem:  Excess abdominal fat can press against the stomach, forcing acids up into the esophagus. Weight loss may help, something that’s likely in survival scenarios.

Medications that commonly relieve acid reflux include calcium, magnesium, aluminum, and bismuth antacids such as Tums, Maalox, Mylanta or Pepto-Bismol, as well as other medications such as Ranitidine (Zantac), Cimetidine (Tagamet), and Omeprazole (Prilosec). These medications are available in non-prescription strength and are easy to accumulate in quantity.

In modern times, G.E.R.D. can be definitively identified by procedures such as upper G.I. endoscopy, X-ray tests like an upper GI series, and other high technology. Of course, off the grid, these aren’t an option.

There are many alternative remedies reported to be helpful to deal with G.E.R.D. Home remedies for acid reflux include:

Organic apple cider vinegar: Mix one tablespoon in four ounces of water, drink before each meal.

Aloe Vera juice: Mix one ounce in two ounces of water before a meal.

Baking soda: Mix one tablespoon in a glass of water and drink right away when you begin to feel heartburn

Glutamine: An amino acid that has an anti-inflammatory effect and reduces acid reflux. It can be found in milk and eggs.

Melatonin might be useful  for some (more study is needed on this one).

I’m sure you have some home remedies of your own.

Off the grid, many stoic individuals in the preparedness community may be unlikely to tell the medic about something they consider trivial, like heartburn. Someone in pain, however, loses sleep and work efficiency. Always question these people to find out what their symptoms are. You might be able to help.

Joe Alton MD

Dr. Alton

Dr. Alton

Find out more about G.E.R.D. and 150 medical issues in tough times by checking out the 2017 Book Excellence Award winner in medicine “The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way”.

FDA Tries Again To Ban Natural Pain Herb

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FDA Tries Again To Ban Kratom

Kratom plant

Kratom plant

Last year, I wrote about the Food and Drug Administration’s campaign to ban the Asian herb Kratom, a non-opiate option for those with chronic pain, anxiety, and drug dependency issues.

As someone interested in medical strategies for disaster or remote settings, I was considering the herb as an option in circumstances when modern medicine isn’t available. The FDA, however, set a date for late 2016 to rule Kratom a Schedule I drug (the same category as heroin) and eliminate its access to the average citizen.

Then an extraordinary thing happened: A public outcry from tens of thousands of citizens that also included dozens of members of Congress. In response to the pressure, the proposed ban was cancelled. Now, a persistent FDA is once again pushing to prevent the sale and use of Kratom in the U.S.

Kratom (scientific name Mitragyna speciosa) has long been used in Southeast Asia for various medicinal purposes, including pain, anxiety, and depression. The chemical compounds in Kratom, (scientific name Mitragyna speciosa) are mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. These substances act on opioid receptors in the brain, just like heroin and morphine do, to eliminate pain. Despite this, Kratom is not an opioid; It’s actually a member of the coffee family. Therefore, using it doesn’t cause respiratory depression, which is how most opioid overdoses die.

A non-opioid alternative to Heroin? Sounds like a reasonable option to pursue, but FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb says: “At a time when we have hit a critical point in the opioid epidemic, the increasing use of kratom as an alternative or adjunct to opioid use is extremely concerning.”

I can understand not wanting it to be an adjunct (medical-speak for adding Kratom to your drug intake), but not even as an alternative to Heroin? I think almost anything would be a welcome substitute for Heroin or prescription opioid abuse.

In the U.S., Kratom has received many testimonials as to its success in helping those addicted to opioids “kick the habit”.  On the other side of the coin, however, FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb claims there is no hard data for Kratom’s effectiveness and that there is a “deadly risk” to using the herb. Indeed, some states, and even some countries, have outlawed its sale or export.

The FDA uses several hundred reported cases of Kratom “poisoning” and 36 deaths “involving” Kratom over the past few years as reason enough to deny access to it. But Kratom is rarely the only drug found in the systems of these cases; some mix it with OxyContin and other drugs. In the meantime, the number of deaths from Heroin overdose in 2015 alone was more than 13,000, with 15,000 prescription opioid deaths in the same year.

Given those numbers, you would think that the government would want to do further research on Kratom before dismissing it as Heroin-class dangerous. Some of the research, reported in Scientific American as well as by Columbia and other universities, favors further evaluation before placing Kratom on the list with the bad-guy drugs.

Columbia University pharmacologist Andrew Kruegel says keeping Kratom legal may help develop better pain meds: “Those compounds alone may already be superior to codeine and oxycodone. At a minimum, if you can get rid of respiratory [problems] then you can save thousands of lives…if the research were able to legally continue.”

However, the FDA was stung by the pressure to reverse its decision last year, so it persists in its mission. Is it so certain, however, that it won’t drive Kratom users to more clearly dangerous drugs by banning it? Perhaps the devil you know (Heroin, prescription opioids) is better than the devil you don’t (Kratom), but in this case, I doubt it. Don’t act hastily to prohibit Kratom.

Here’s a sobering video by Navy veteran Andrew Turner, who uses Kratom to deal with a nerve condition called Meige’s syndrome, as well as his Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and pain issues. You see him both before and after taking the herb:

Joe Alton MD

Dr. Alton

Dr. Alton

Fill those holes in your medical supplies with kits and individual items from Nurse Amy’s store at store.doomandbloom.net!

A loaded first aid kit with medical supplies for trauma,burns, sprains and strains and other medical issues

Stomp Supreme First Aid Kit

15 Amazing Health Benefits Of Turmeric

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I’m always looking for natural healing remedies, let me tell you what I learned about turmeric. This is an organic spice I purchased at a local store. It tastes very similar to curry, but maybe not as strong. It is used to flavor and to color curry products. It is a perennial in the ginger family that grows in Southeast Asia and requires a lot of annual rainfall for it to thrive. It’s a substance with powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidants properties. Turmeric is a spice that comes from the turmeric plant.

The root of turmeric is used to make medicine and contains a yellow-colored chemical called curcumin. Curcumin is used to color foods and some cosmetics. Please keep in mind, I’m not a doctor, nurse or anyone in the medical field. I’m sharing what I have researched about turmeric with you. You need to decide if this is right for you or your family. If you are pregnant or nursing your baby, again, please consult with your doctor. Cooking or drinks made with it are generally considered safe. When in doubt just ask your medical physician.

I use a Keurig to heat my reverse osmosis water in the morning, thanks to my daughter for gifting me one. In the old days, I had a bright cherry red tea kettle. This is the green tea I love to drink: Organic Green Tea. After I heat up the water in the Keurig, I add a green tea bag, a sprinkle of turmeric, and some honey. Some days I add a little cinnamon. They are all natural remedies in their own way. Life is good when we use natural products.

turmeric

I have extremely bad arthritis, so I’m always on the lookout for natural anti-inflammatory products. I have friends with diabetes, autoimmune diseases, and other ailments. I research 24/7 for natural remedies because I want to know more than what the doctors tell me about prescriptions. I believe some prescriptions, notice I said some prescriptions, are toxic.

I get the giggles sometimes when I see pharmaceutical companies pushing their drugs on TV commercials and life looks so blissful, happy, and then they drop the bomb with the possible side effects. I’m not laughing if these happen to people but, I say to Mark jokingly, “yep, that’s a prescription I want to try, nope, nada.” I hope you get the picture of what I’m saying, I want to try natural remedies before I plunge into chemicals that the FDA has approved for today, and may pull from the market in a couple of years from now.

I sprinkle a turmeric, cinnamon, and pepper in my morning hot drinks. Sometimes, I add turmeric to my smoothies. When you have pain you will try anything that is natural. Please check with your health provider before you try turmeric, let’s make sure it won’t conflict with some of your prescriptions or health issues.

15 Turmeric Health Benefits:

These may or not work for you, but I will say this, they help me. So let’s get started with my research. If you know of other benefits, please tell me. We learn from each other.

  1. Arthritis
  2. Headaches
  3. Crohn’s Disease
  4. Heartburn
  5. Stomach Ulcers
  6. Diarrhea
  7. Loss of appetite
  8. Menstrual problems
  9. Colds/Bronchitis
  10. Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  11. Lung Infections
  12. Fibromyalgia
  13. Fever
  14. Worms
  15. Water retention

I remember when I was growing up my grandmother was always taking “Tums” for stomach pain. I wonder now if she could have used turmeric, a natural remedy. It would have been a whole lot cheaper to sprinkle a little turmeric in her morning coffee.

Some people actually rub a little turmeric on their skin for pain, sprains or swellings. I use Deep Blue from DoTerra so I will keep using that product. I also read it possibly helps with high cholesterol by lowering LDL or the “bad” cholesterol. Another note, turmeric may possibly lower your triglycerides.

Suggestions To Add Turmeric:

I always start with a little because it is a bit strong when you first try it.

Homemade soap

Face Mask

Soups

Smoothies

Hot tea or coffee drinks

Use as a spice for scrambled eggs, veggies or meats

Great for colds in warm green tea with some honey

When I first heard about turmeric I looked at the containers and I wanted to smell it, you know so I didn’t waste my money if I didn’t like what I smelled. No, I didn’t smell it, but I wanted to see if I could add it my drinks, etc. I gambled and purchased two bottles. I’m so glad I did.

If you have used this for cholesterol, please let me know if it lowered your numbers. I want to use it for three full months before I get my cholesterol checked again. I have seen the product sold as tablets, but I opted for the powdered spice.

Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. Please look into natural remedies because we need to have options besides big pharma. I looked at the Doterra website for a turmeric essential oil, but I didn’t see one. I did see some on Amazon, but I can’t recommend them unless I have tried them. May God bless this world.

Tea Kettle

Organic USDA Product

Why I Love Honey by Linda

The post 15 Amazing Health Benefits Of Turmeric appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Survival Medicine Hour: Earthquake, Birthing Supplies, Hemorrhage, More

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Survival Medicine Hour #355

earthquake damage

earthquake damage

What would you have done if you were in Mexico City during the recent earthquakes? Is there anything that might have increased your chances of survival? In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour, hosts Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP talk about earhtquakes in general and give you safety tips that could save a life.

birthing supplies

birthing supplies

Plus, what supplies would you need for delivering a baby and caring for a pregnancy in tough times? Nurse Amy put on her Expert Council hat from Jack Spirko’s Survival Podcast to answer a listener’s question. In addition, one of our readers sends us an entertaining story about her son’s hornet sting and some natural remedies she uses for her allergy-prone family.

Direct Pressure on Bleeding Wound

Bleeding wound

Lastly, is it time to add a 4th R to Reading, ‘Riting, ‘Rithmetic in school curriculums? Should Reduce hemorrhage classes be talk in view of the risk of injury during natural disasters, shooter events, even car crashes? Sounds crazy, but would it save a life?

All this and more in the latest episode of The Survival Medicine Hour with Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy! To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/09/22/survival-medicine-hour-earthquakes-first-aid-hornets-birthing-supplies

 

BTW, you can follow us at twitter @preppershow, YouTube at DrBones NurseAmy channel, and Facebook at our Doom and Bloom page or our survival medicine group “survival medicine dr bones nurse amy”

Thanks!

Don’t forget to check our medical kits and supplies at store.doomandbloom.net, plus our latest edition of The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way, available at Amazon and on this website.

The Survival medicine handbook Third Edition 2016

The Survival Medicine Handbook Third Edition

10 Must Have Natural Remedies for Preppers

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editor’s Note: This post has been contributed by Saqib. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter the Prepper Writing Contest today.


Imagine women giving birth centuries ago or imagine you suffer from some critical injury or serious ailment. Centuries ago, there was not the concept of technology and there certainly weren’t the advances in medical science we have today. Your best option would be to call the tribal medicine doctor or shaman. Someone who knew how to use a leaf as a bandage and how to break and pull a teeth out with a stone. Could you survive? Could you stay healthy? Could you even live long enough to see the next sunrise? Thinking of those types of situations now, it hardly seems possible, but we humans are tenacious and if it was impossible,  then how did mankind make it this far? If modern medicines and advances in science are the only reason we are combating serious diseases now, then how did we make it this far?

The answer to this question is simple – Mother Nature has her own secrets.  There are many who fear that humans won’t be able to survive without the conveniences of modern medicine. Granted, we won’t be able to say life on the scale that we can now, but there are natural options.  Humans made it pretty far along the span of history without any complicated and advanced sciences. For sure there is something much greater reserved in nature. Today we will discuss 10 must have natural remedies that will could offer comfort and healing when the possibility of modern medicine is gone.

Apple Cider Vinegar

Everything from stomach related disorders, to vitality upgrade, to counteract diseases . Taken before suppers, it even assists with weight reduction! Likewise, the vinegar is one of those ‘100 uses’ wonder items. It has topical applications from eye drops to against tingle treatment and numerous other first guide employments.

Honey

Yes the gift of God, the food of heaven, honey is one of those natural remedies that you need to have around in your house. The food of God, honey is both good for medicinal purpose and equally serves as a dessert. Honey also has 1st aid and topical skin care application benefits that are far superior to toxic cosmetic treatments.

Garlic

In the event that anything upgrades nourishment season or enhances well-being better, it’s yet to be found. There’s an excessive number of advantages to list here that range from extraordinary against viral and hostile to bacterial properties to keeping up sound blood cholesterol levels to treating sort 2 diabetes.

Coconut Oil

Coconut milk and coconut oil on wooden table

Coconut oil has hundreds of uses not to mention as a cooking oil and is one of the best skin “creams” you can put all over and hands. Furthermore, it even fills in as a weapon lube oil when absolutely necessary. It can be put away effectively as it doesn’t ruin at room temperature and cements beneath 76 degrees.

Hydrogen Peroxide

A slightly different solution, hydrogen peroxide is good for skin care and nurturing. We’re talking about 35% FOOD grade, which is NOT the same as what you normally purchase. The 35% grade can actually burn your skin if you put too much in one spot. But you can dilute a drop or so depending upon the requirement in a glass of water and you have a prophylaxis or potential cure.

Flax

China seeds are viewed as the ideal natural nourishment since they contain an excessive number of advantages to list here. More to it, who might trust that what gives off an impression of being simply one more “weed” with entirely blue blooms would be a characteristic of well-being.

Steam Water – Distilled Water

Refined water is a more dissoluble than different waters, particularly “hard” water. It cleans independent from anyone else, particularly the skin, without cleaning added substances. It has an alternate particle structure than non-refined water that pulls in overwhelming metals and different poisons in your framework and removes them from your body when it experiences your urinary procedure!

Red Chili

Red chilli pepper

Looking for immediate skin care of for some nerve pain relief, the red chili is your spicy go to product. Beware heavy eating can bring about some serious trouble. Proceed with caution.

Bergamot

Bergamot is also a good source of vitamins and is said to have super anti-oxidant and other unique properties that enhance well-being and promote anti-aging. Exemplified by all the dancing and bike riding you see 100-year-old Italians doing.

Aloe Vera

This is viewed as an attempted and demonstrated must have mending plant that as a rule is related with skin medicines, particularly consumes, yet it is much more flexible than simply that. Make ointments and medicine from a mix of coconut oil, aloe, and nectar for astounding skin revival properties.

Author Bio: Saqib Khan, is an inquisitive blogger and loves to spread his knowledge. With a penchant for politics and current affairs, Saqib’s new field of interest social development. He is currently associated with an online video curation site in Pakistan named Ravapk offering news and entertainment, intelligently and with utmost credibility.

The post 10 Must Have Natural Remedies for Preppers appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

A Collection Of Cool Things To Do With Stinging Nettles

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A Collection Of Cool Things To Do With Stinging Nettles Stinging nettles have been around from the beginning of time, they hurt us a kid but these green wild plants can actually be very useful in the kitchen. Here is something that I have just found out today! Stinging nettles actually have a similar flavor to that …

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The post A Collection Of Cool Things To Do With Stinging Nettles appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

20 Unusual Uses For Everyday Herbs

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20 Unusual Uses For Everyday Herbs Herbs are so much more than a garnish. This article will show you 20 unusual uses for everyday herbs… Take these 10 herbs and you’ve got yourself 20 different ways to tackle everyday issues, from keeping mice away to treating the common cold. Herbs are so easy to grow, …

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Natural DIY Remedies for Stings, Bites, Scratches, and Sunburns

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The crisp fall weather has not yet appeared where I live.  It still feels like summer and we are still seeing stinging bugs such as wasps.  I wrote about Apt Prepper son got stung before and it is not pleasant.  Back then I did not know about natural remedies or essential oils.  They really work! DIY Remedies for Stings, Bites, Scratches, and Sunburns Here’s a neat infographic from Fix.com (shared with permission) that gives some great tips.   Source: Fix.com […]

The post Natural DIY Remedies for Stings, Bites, Scratches, and Sunburns appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

How To Get Rid of Bed Bugs Naturally

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How To Get Rid of Bed Bugs Naturally Once bed bugs invade your home, they are an incredible nuisance and infamously difficult to get rid of. They are more common than you think and can be easily transferred from one location to another and from one unlucky host to the next! If you happen to be …

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The post How To Get Rid of Bed Bugs Naturally appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Home Remedy for Swimmers Ear and Preventing Ear Infections

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Home Remedy for Swimmers Ear and Preventing Ear Infections I am a firm believer in natural remedies. I use them where ever I can. My son who is in his teens now, suffers from ear infections a lot if he goes swimming. The doctors say everything is fine he just traps water in his ears more …

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Why You Should Put Onion Slices In Your Socks While You Sleep

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Why You Should Put Onion Slices In Your Socks While You Sleep Ok, I have seen this floating around the internet for years now. I saw it a few days ago in my newsfeed and actually decided to click through and take a look at why everyone seems to be doing this. I am so glad …

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The post Why You Should Put Onion Slices In Your Socks While You Sleep appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Survival Medicine Hour: Bleeding Control Kit, Herbal Teas, Zika update, more

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Direct Pressure on Bleeding Wound

Bleeding wound

Would you have the materials and knowledge to stop heavy bleeding if you were confronted with it? In these violent times, you should be prepared to deal with injuries that could be life threatening and have the equipment that might save a life. Hear Amy Alton, ARNP, explain her thinking in designing a compact med kit that deal with hemorrhage that she believes should be in every workplace, classroom, and homestead. Also, Joe Alton, MD, talks about natural remedies when he goes over some herbal teas. Plus: Why does Zika Virus in Brazil cause birth defects, while no major history of the problem seems to occur with Zika virus in its original territory (Africa and Asia)? Is a mutation the cause? All this and more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour with Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy.

shutterstock_93431647

To listen in, click below:

 

 

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/01/31/survival-medicine-hour-bleeding-control-kit-herbal-teas-zika-update-more

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Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

 

 

Joe and Amy Alton

 

Check out Nurse Amy’s latest kit “The First Aid Bleeding Control Kit” at her store at store.doomandbloom.net

 

 

videocast

Survival Medicine Hour: Blizzard, Top Natural Remedies, More

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carsinsnow

26 inches of snow and high winds cost 19 people their lives this weekend on the East Coast. Would you know how to keep warm in a blizzard? Dr. Joe Alton discusses the news and basic strategies that could save your life. Also, What will you do when the pharmaceuticals run out in a survival setting? Do you know the basics of natural remedies like essential oils and herbal medicine? Joe Alton, MD, and Amy Alton, ARNP, discuss what you need to know about the medicinal benefits of various natural substances.

To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/01/25/survival-medicine-hour-blizzard-natural-remedies-more

 

Joe Alton, MD

AmyandJoePodcast400x200

Learn about how to use all the tools in the medical woodshed with the 3-category Amazon bestseller “The Survival Medicine Hour“, with over 270 5-star reviews!

Survival Medicine Hour: Nosebleeds, Flu Vaccines, Natural Diabetes Remedies, More

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fluad

Last year’s vaccine was 20% effective, is next year’s any different?

 

What do you know about FLUAD, the latest flu vaccine? How is it different from older versions? Also, are there any natural remedies that might have a beneficial effect on diabetes (more than you think)? Joe Alton, MD discusses these topics plus using Afrin for nosebleeds, and how to approach head trauma. All this and more on Amy and Joe Alton’s Doom and Bloom(tm) Survival Medicine Hour.

 

To listen in, click below:

 

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2015/11/28/survival-medicine-hour-flu-vaccine-nosebleeds-natural-diabetes-remedies-more

shutterstock_84827734

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

 

Joe and Amy Alton

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Hey, looking for a Christmas present for that older child or prepper in your family? Check out our board game Doom and Bloom’s SURVIVAL!, a great way to get the whole family together  and have a fun family game night!

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Stop Bleeding Fast With This Weed

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This article first appeared at The Prepper Project I was out in the yard one beautiful May afternoon when I made an exciting discovery. It was a tall, scraggly plant towering a good foot and a half above the other weeds scattering our overgrown yard. I crouched down to get a closer look and immediately … Continue reading Stop Bleeding Fast With This Weed