Nature’s Top 10 Healing Vegetables and Fruits You Can Easily Grow

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If you are looking to supercharge your immune system against today’s ever-evasive diseases, melt away that excess weight, or stimulate the brain while actively building barriers against stroke and heart attack risk, then look no further than…your own backyard or patio or garden plot (as you can grow thse healing vegetables literally anywhere). Ancient remedies, … Read more…

The post Nature’s Top 10 Healing Vegetables and Fruits You Can Easily Grow was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

The Old Technique Of Planting By The Signs

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It’s about damn time that we begin to realize all that we’ve put out of whack in this great system we are part of. Using old hacks like planting by the signs in this modern world seems a little odd, but is it really? Our ancestors did it with great success and they left us … Read more…

The post The Old Technique Of Planting By The Signs was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Boots-Choice: A Bigger Deal Than You Thought

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When it comes to hitting trails, climbing crags, walking at the local YMCA, or just simply being on your feet for any amount of time, your footwear of choice is immensely important. One of the chief mistakes a new hiker makes when hitting the trails is said hikers choice in footwear. Let’s look at how … Read more…

The post Boots-Choice: A Bigger Deal Than You Thought was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

1 Way Poor People Can Buy Land With No Money

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There are thousands of people who dream of moving off the grid and starting a homestead, but they assume it will always be nothing more than a dream because they simply don’t have enough money to buy land. The truth is, buying land might not be as expensive as you think. People with very tight …

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Crisis Communication Advice – Ditch the cell phone (or not?)

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Not very long ago (hardly a handful or two of years back) our communicational availability was a quarter (or less) of what it now is. If you could not reach John Joe on his kitchen phone and he didn’t come to the door when you knocked, well, you just figured he wasn’t home. Boy how … Read more…

The post Crisis Communication Advice – Ditch the cell phone (or not?) was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

5 Kids, 40 Acres, And A $25,000 House

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5 Kids, 40 Acres, And A $25,000 House

If you are attracted to the idea of living off the grid, but you think there is no way you could do it with a large family, you need to meet Jeff and Rose and their five daughters.

With a strong desire to live an inexpensive and debt-free lifestyle, Jeff and Rose purchased 40 acres in Northern British Columbia, Canada in 2011.

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There they built a 900-square foot house for less than $25,000. It features cedar posts that are sunk directly into the ground, log rafters, a living roof and wrapped plywood and foam insulation. They have no concrete foundation, no well and no septic system. Yet, after watching the video below, you will see they seem to have everything they need – plus the time to experience their surroundings and their independent way of life.

(Editor’s note: Listen to Off The Grid Radio’s interview with Jeff here.)

This homeschooling family enjoys beekeeping, gardening, hunting, fishing, horseback riding, hiking, baking and many other activities. Their location and lifestyle make “homeschooling both a requirement and our preference,” says Jeff. He explains that his daughters complete their academic studies in two to three hours each day and then are able to “learn in everything they do…We want them to have broad and varied life experiences.”

The girls also help with chores, including carrying water, emptying compost buckets and collecting firewood. During the winter, the family spends much of their time maintaining their road, since accumulations of five to six feet of snow are common.

“Electricity is no problem at all,” says Jeff. Their first solar panel generates 12-volt power for their lights and cell phones. The second 2.5-kilowatt system has a lithium ion battery bank that powers their full-sized refrigerator, a separate chest freezer, washing machine, as well as several small kitchen appliances. However, Jeff points out that their power-hungry toaster is off limits in the winter.

They have a backup generator, but Jeff says they only need it during extended cloudy or snowy periods.

The family collects rainwater from their shop and shed roofs and stores it in a 900-gallon tank located below the shop floor. They carry buckets of water into the house for cooking, dishes and showers. They use a Berkey passive water filter to clean the rainwater for drinking.

Jeff and Rose heat the family’s shower water on the centrally-located woodstove, which also provides most of their heat. The hot water is then pumped to the nearby shower on an as-needed basis. Grey water from the shower and the kitchen sink is pumped into a shallow field in the backyard. The family has two basic composting bucket toilets.

When you watch the video, you will see the beautiful location where this family lives and feel inspired to live their lifestyle yourself. “We can’t go back,” says Jeff. “Gridlessness is too good.”

Would you want to live off-grid in Canada? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

 

Collecting Rainwater – Storage Options For Your Prepping Plans

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One significant thing that we all need to realize is that there is an important and extremely useful resource that we are not utilizing to the full extent of its benefits. For the most part, we allow it to go to waste. That important resource is rainwater and many of us take it for granted. …

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Vehicle Preparedness Essentials You Need To Cover

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Vehicle preparedness is something we all have to consider. It doesn’t matter if you’re a prepper or an average Joe, accidents happen all the time. As you can imagine, vehicle preparedness is more than having a bug out bag or get home bag in the back of your truck. Today we will discuss the essentials … Read more…

The post Vehicle Preparedness Essentials You Need To Cover was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Prepper’s Gear – LifeStraw Go Water Filter Bottle Review

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Nowadays, you can find a variety of innovatively designed water bottles which include filters and some other features which makes them ideal for preppers but not only them. If you are looking for water bottles that have a filter incorporated, LifeStraw Go may be the right option for you. I have two LifeStraw Go bottles, … Read more…

The post Prepper’s Gear – LifeStraw Go Water Filter Bottle Review was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Retired, Happy, & 100 Percent Off Grid In Alaska — ‘We’re Staying’

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Retired, Happy, & 100 Percent Off Grid In Alaska -- ‘We’re Staying’

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Doug Rudolph, 63, and his wife, Cathy, 57, left family, friends and a comfortable lifestyle in West Chester Pennsylvania to live off-grid in Anchor Point, Alaska. In a recent video tour of their home and property, the couple seems to be thriving.

“Probably what inspired me the most was the movie ‘Alone in the Wilderness,’” says Doug, referring to the 2004 documentary about Dick Proenneke, who in the 1960s built his own cabin in what is now Alaska’s Lake Clark National Park.

After visiting a cousin in Alaska and making the breathtaking drive from Anchorage to Anchor Point several times, Doug says he “fell in love with the place. It truly is an amazing, beautiful place.”

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He and Cathy decided to purchase property in Anchor Point and to live off-grid there because, as Doug puts it, “you don’t get the true wilderness feel if you have all the necessities.”

Story continues below video

The retired couple built their 1,300-square-foot two-level home from a kit from an Alaska builder, but they have modified it, according to their own needs and preferences. For example, Doug incorporated logs that were on the property into structural beams, and he moved a staircase’s location and angle to offer more floor space on the main level. He had to construct three sets of scaffolding to complete the 19-foot tongue-in-groove wood ceiling.

“After seven and a half years, we are still building,” says Doug, referring to some of the siding and framing that still remains unfinished. The home, which features a welcoming and open floor plan and features south-facing five-foot windows, is powered by three 250-watt solar panels. In the video, Cathy demonstrates how she moves the direction of the solar panels — usually twice a day — to capture as much of the northern sun’s rays as she can.

They use an outdoor wood boiler and a woodstove that burn about eight cords of firewood a year. In the summer, when they are not using the wood boiler, they have a three-tank propane system to heat water and the stove. In addition, they have a back-up gasoline-powered generator that can be started remotely if needed. It is housed in an insulated shed near the home.

Although Cathy admits she has tried to talk Doug into using an indoor compost toilet, the couple has an outhouse. Doug admits it can get difficult to have to “shovel your way” to the outhouse in the winter.

The couple raises chickens for meat and for eggs, and their coop is situated close to their large fenced garden to make for easy composting and feeding. Cathy says moose are the main unwanted visitors to keep out of their vegetable garden. “They can jump, but they haven’t gotten in yet,” she says.

Between what extra produce Cathy obtains through her job at a local greenhouse and what they grow in their own garden, Doug and Cathy are largely self-sufficient when it comes to food.

When asked for advice for people considering a similar lifestyle, Doug says, “It really helps if you want to live off grid in Alaska if you’re a handyman.” He adds that he has five different battery-operated hand drills. He also lists a shovel, a rake, a sander, a circular saw and a chainsaw as some of his most important tools.

“It’s hard for me to explain,” says Doug when asked how he feels about his off-grid lifestyle. “As much as we miss family, since I first set foot here, (I have felt) this is where I am supposed to be…We’re here. We’re staying.”

Would you want to live in Alaska? Share your thoughts in the section below:

6 Survival Life Hacks YOU SHOULD KNOW

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Ahh the survival hack. Some hacks can be garbage but some can change everything. Its probably worth creating a website dedicated to all of the great, old and new survival hacks of our time. There are just so many of them out there now its hard to catch them all in one place. I am …

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Newly Expanded Australian Survival Forum.

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The Survival Connection.

This is a survival board on our groups forum. Many of our members joined our 18th century Living History forum because they had a strong interest in survival & prepping, so we also added The Survival Connection board.
This board is like a separate forum, it is not just for primitive gear & primitive skills, it covers anything & everything in regards to survival.

The Survival Connection Forum: http://neclhg.freeforums.net/board/18/survival-connection

The Chemical-Free Secret To Fighting Homestead Pests

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The Chemical-Free Secret To Fighting Homestead Pests

Image source: Pixabay.com

Unfortunately, pests are a fact of life. Actually, they’re a necessary part of the ecologic chain, but it’s hard to remember that when they’re invading your home and garden. Ever since buying our home in the country, we’ve been battling various types of pests. Adding a vegetable garden in our backyard just gave us one more battleground for that fight.

Granted, insects and rodents must eat, but why do they have to think it’s my job to feed them? Like many people, I’ve got enough trouble feeding my family, and once pests have been into my food, it’s pretty much spoiled for use by my family. But even without that, hearing my wife scream every time she sees a cockroach or ants invade the house is tiring. Fortunately, she doesn’t scream about mice.

Of course, if a major disaster occurs, problems with these pests will only increase. As scavengers, insect and rodent populations tend to grow in the wake of disasters, living off the abundance of food available to them.

Unlike some people, I am not really in favor of using chemicals to control pests. First of all, I have pets that I want to protect. Insect repellents are nerve agents and rat poison is, well, poison. So they can both harm my pets. They also pose a risk for the grandchildren that will soon be visiting my home. Besides, in that post-disaster world that I just mentioned, those means of controlling pests may not be available to me.

Storing Foods

The first real step in gaining victory over these pests came when we started making changes in our food-storage techniques. From the very beginning, we had problems with ant infestations, maybe because our home had sat vacant for over two years before we bought it. When they got into the pantry and spoiled a bunch of food, we realized that we had to store it better.

Now, just about everything in the pantry that’s not canned is stored in rectangular food storage containers. We have a variety of different sizes and shapes, allowing us to fit the container to the item. Most of the foods that ants can get into are repackaged as soon as they come home from the store.

Another of our favorite storage containers is five-gallon buckets. As preppers, we are accustomed to buying in bulk, so we extend that to our normal purchases, as well. I also like galvanized trash cans. Although hard to find, they are ideal for dog food and feed for the chickens.

This also does a fairly good job of protecting them from rodents. Although I have a few buckets where rats have gnawed at the lids, they have yet to get inside one of them. Lids are replaceable anyway, so no problem.

Rodents

We have mice, rats and possums living in the field behind our home and in our backyard. So, it’s inevitable that they’ll get into our home. Proper storage has stopped them from getting into our food, but that hasn’t kept them out of our home. A mouse can squeeze through a space as small as six millimeters, so it’s virtually impossible to seal a house from them.

The oldest, and probably best solution for rodents is having a cat or two. Don’t overfeed them, as that can dull their hunting instinct. I really can’t see any reason why anyone who doesn’t have allergies to cats, wouldn’t have one. Just consider it part of your prepping tools.

Unfortunately, I am allergic to cats, so we can’t have one. But we do have dogs. One of them, a black lab, is a great hunter. If there are any mice or rats around, she finds them. If she can’t get to them (most of the time), she’ll let me know they are there. Then I can dispatch them with a pellet gun I keep for that purpose. So far, we’ve only had one rat manage to get away from us.

Unless you’re far, far out in the country, I’d recommend against using even a .22 pistol for shooting rodents, even with “rat rounds.” Discharging a firearm is illegal in most municipalities. While a .22 is fairly quiet, if the neighbors hear it and call the police, they have to respond. If there is any evidence that you discharged a firearm, like a hole in the wall, you’ll be in trouble. The mice and rats aren’t worth a night in jail.

We don’t kill the possums, although I have a hard time convincing my dog of that. Even though the possums like to eat my grapefruit, they also eat ticks. We have a problem with ticks in our area, so I’m glad to have them around.

We use urine to help keep rodents out of the garden. While not a perfect solution, animals mark their territories with urine. Other animals, smelling this, understand the signal and will be wary. While some may still find their way in, many will avoid it. If you can train your dogs to pee around your garden, it marks it as their territory. Since that is a bit difficult to do, you might consider collecting human urine and pouring it around the perimeter of the garden. It will even act as a fertilizer, putting useful minerals in the soil.

Another good rodent repellent is a mixture of:

  • 1 cup diatomaceous earth
  • 2-3 drops peppermint or lemon citrus essential oil
  • 1/8 cup water

Mix the liquids together first and then mix in the earth until it is totally moist. Set in a container near entrances where rodents enter or in their holes. The smell will drive them away.

Insects

When we talk insects, we’re talking about a huge variety of life. In the home, cockroaches and ants are the big problems. But in the garden, there are many more to worry about.

A lot can be done to keep ants and cockroaches out of the home by using diatomaceous earth. A thin line around your home and garden will keep most insects out. While totally safe for humans and animals, this amazing substance is deadly for insects, cutting them like a series of knives.

There are a number of different natural solutions which work well for controlling insects. A spray made with garlic oil, peppermint extract or hot peppers, combined with dishwashing soap works to keep many insects at bay. These both act as repellents for bugs and destroy their skin, killing them if they come into contact with too much of it.

But my favorite means of pest control in the garden is to use good bugs to control the bad ones. I’ve had incredible results in using these, without creating any risk for my family. The food I grow in my garden is natural and chemical free. While I am sure that there are many more types of insects than what I am currently using, here is at least a partial list of the most common good bugs and what they kill:

  • Praying mantis (one of the best) against anything smaller than it.
  • Ladybugs against aphids & soft-bodied pests.
  • Trichogramma against moth & caterpillar eggs.
  • Fly exterminators (I don’t know what their actual name is, but you can buy them by this name) against flies
  • Nematodes against grubs and many other soil pests

One nice thing about using these good insects against the pests in your garden is that once you have a good population of them living there, you shouldn’t have to replace it for several years, unless they run out of insects to eat or something happens to kill them off. They’ll stay on duty, generation after generation, protecting your garden and harvest.

What advice would you add? Share it in the section below:

Waterproofing Gear for a Cold Spring (Or Any Season)

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With springtime waiting just around the corner, preparation for wet weather is in check. It is also highly important to have the skillset of weatherproofing if SHTF anytime soon (and yet again, who are we kidding…). Learning a thing or two about waterproofing gear will surely come in handy. There is not much worse than … Read more…

The post Waterproofing Gear for a Cold Spring (Or Any Season) was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Tara Westover – Off-grid abuse

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The shocking story of Tara Westover which she tells in her recently published memoir ‘Educated’ casts an undeserved shadow on off-grid-families and their ways of life. Off-grid abuse is not the norm.

It seems like Tara came a long way from growing up on a mountain in Idaho with her radical Mormon family of survivalists to studying at Cambridge University and writing a book that is surely going to make waves. Just the story of her being sent to work in a rubbish dump make scary reading.  But there were compensations as well.

“There’s a sense of sovereignty that comes from life on a mountain. It calms with its very magnitude, which renders the merely human of no consequence.”, Westover says as she describes her old home in the book.

Tara Westover - Portrait

From Idaho mountains to Cambridge Uni, UK.

Young Tara suffered from severe emotional and physical abuse by family members and had no access to medical care or higher education for most of her life. ‘All abuse is foremost an assault on the mind.’, Westover states.

While this story is heartbreaking it is a shame that it may give the alternative lifestyle of being off-the-grid a negative reputation.  Living in a remote, self-sustained community can be a wonderful experience, even for families.

I personally think that children should be given equal opportunities when it comes to education or going to college and be given the choice whether they want to spend their lives living off-grid or not. The issue in Tara’s case, so it seems, is that her parents were very anxious and paranoid about the ‘outside world’ (Westover had no birth certificate for 9 years, she was told to sleep with a knife and her and her siblings weren’t given medical care when injured).

There is no excuse for parents to abuse their children in any way, and although I don’t believe living off-the-grid has led to that kind of behavior, it certainly makes it easier to conceal.

I think it is crucial to always be open when raising children and to show and teach them as much as possible, to allow them to find out what is right and good for them, and give them the option to set goals and follow their desired path in life, even if it something the parents disagree with.

Tara’s parents allegedly did not give here those options and tried to keep her away from society as much as possible while limiting her physically and mentally for many years growing up.

The author has taken impressive steps to get to where she is today and I am very excited to read ‘Educated’ and find out more about her view on off-grid-living and also perhaps some of the positive aspects of it.

Tara Westover now is on her way to becoming a confident successful author and despite her strict Mormon upbringing she seems to have recovered from her childhood of off-grid abuse and enjoying her new lifestyle to the fullest.

When asked about her family and whether she misses home or not she replied “You can cut someone out of your life and miss them every day but still be glad you don’t have to see them again.”

We have a feeling ‘Educated’ is going to be a great read. (buy from Amazon UK)

Book review coming soon!

The post Tara Westover – Off-grid abuse appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Their Radical Plan To Off-Grid, Debt-Free Living Worked. Here’s What They Did.

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Their Radical Plan To Off-Grid, Debt-Free Living Worked. Here’s What They Did.Jocelyn and Jarvis knew they would have to make some radical changes in their lifestyle if they were going to get out of debt, but they did not know that those changes would put them on a different path altogether.

In order to pay off their $96,000 debt from student loans, credit cards and the purchase of small rural property, the couple moved into a small apartment, changed jobs and switched to a strict cash-only budget. By adhering to a frugal lifestyle, they were able to pay off their debt in 20 months. Their plan was then to save to make the down-payment for their own home.

However, the lessons they had learned had changed their perspective. “We’d gone from this heavy burden of debt to feeling very free,” recalls Jocelyn, adding that they asked themselves, “Do we really want to now take on a huge mortgage?”

Their answer was no, and when a friend of Jocelyn’s was selling the framework of a tiny house on a trailer bed, the couple began a new journey. With only a two-week window to make the decision to buy the house, Jocelyn admits she talked her husband into the design and building project. “We planned to work on it for maybe four to five months,” Jocelyn says. “We started in May and we thought we would be finished by November.”

However, since neither of them had building experience, and their daughter was born in the meantime, the project ended up taking 14 months. “We spent our evenings on YouTube watching videos on how to wire an outlet or how to flash a roof,” Jarvis says.

“It was a huge sacrifice,” says Joselyn, who cared for their baby while Jarvis worked on the house. Their story is detailed in a new YouTube video (above). “I sort of hated the tiny house for a while. … But as soon as we moved in, it was totally worth it.”

Today, after two years in their new home, the family has added a fourth member, a baby son, and they are hooked on the tiny house lifestyle.

Built on a 32-foot by eight-foot trailer bed, the home has a 225-square-foot main level and a 100-square foot sleeping loft. Jarvis admits that having a separate small bedroom for the kids on the main level is an important part of the design for his family. “I’ve seen a lot of designs that only have a nook (for kids), but I think that would be very challenging,” he admits.

The home has a composting toilet, uses well water, is heated with propane and has an on-demand hot water propane tank. It operates on a standard 15-amp plug-in to the property owner’s home. They have added solar panels as part of their plan to be able to go off the grid in coming months.

“Living in a tiny house really promotes living a lot of the time outside,” says Jocelyn. “We are so much more connected with the seasons now.” Calling themselves novice gardeners, the couple is starting to grow some of their own food in terraced gardens outside their home, and they are raising chickens for eggs.

Jarvis and Jocelyn currently rent their home site but are saving to purchase their own property and to then live off-grid in the near future. “Because we don’t have debt and we don’t have a lot of possessions, we have a lot of freedom,” says Jocelyn. “We feel very much in control of our lives.”

Would you want to live in a tiny home? What advice do you have for getting out of debt? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

Pressure Canning Meat For Food Storage

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Canning meat for food storage is one of the most important skills for preppers. Canned meat is surprisingly easy, tasty and safe. These aren’t your grandmother’s pressure canners.

The post Pressure Canning Meat For Food Storage appeared first on Just Plain Living.

Prepper’s Gear – Gerber Bear Grylls Survival Hatchet Review

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As promised a while ago, I will continue to review some of the prepping gear I own. Today, the Gerber Bear Grylls survival hatchet is in the spotlight. It is one of the best compact survival hatchets available on the market and it is considered a lifesaving aid in building a shelter and a campfire. … Read more…

The post Prepper’s Gear – Gerber Bear Grylls Survival Hatchet Review was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Prepping Up and Rick Austin and Biolite!

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Prepping Up and Rick Austin and Biolite!
Host: David Jones “Prepping Up with the Jones “Audio player provided!

On this show Dave has former Television Producer turned Prepper, Rick Austin on the show. Rick is also the brains behind Prepper Camp one of, if not the largest, outdoor Prepper and Self Reliance Expos in the country. Rick will talk about Prepper Camp and how he went form TV Producer to becoming an off the grid Prepper living the dream.

Continue reading Prepping Up and Rick Austin and Biolite! at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

8 Tips On How To Get A Good Night’s Sleep In The Outdoors

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Getting back to nature is one of the last remaining pleasures we as Americans can all agree on. The great outdoors, however, is not a place to be taken lightly. Every year campers tragically die in situations that could’ve been easily avoided. Thankfully this is rare. What’s more common is that every year countless campers … Read more…

The post 8 Tips On How To Get A Good Night’s Sleep In The Outdoors was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Off-Grid Dental Care and Emergencies!

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Off-Grid Dental Care and Emergencies!

Off-Grid Dental Care and Emergencies
Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Audio player below!

This  Herbal Prepper Live show explores the preventative and emergency dental care for off-grid scenarios. Preppers tend to think a lot about what life would be if there were no doctor, hospital, or pharmacy around. This week, we’re looking at strategies if there is no dentist or commercially-prepared dental hygiene products available.

Herbal Dental Care

Listen to this broadcast or download “Off-Grid Dental Care and Emergencies” in player below!

Continue reading Off-Grid Dental Care and Emergencies! at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

How To Build An Herb Spiral

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How To Build An Herb Spiral Spring is just around the corner and winter is starting to wind down, for some of us anyway. Build one of these beauties and have plenty herbs for the rest of the year. I found an article that shows you how to construct these simple herb gardens in a …

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How To Treat Gunshot Wounds When There’s No Doctor

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How To Treat Gunshot Wounds When There’s No Doctor

Image source: Pixabay.com

Accidents happen; that’s a basic fact of life that we have to deal with. We have a huge medical infrastructure to deal with those accidents. Even so, the action that is taken immediately, at the time and scene of the accident, can be the most important part of treating the patient and ensuring their survival.

This is even more critical in situations where medical services may not be available. I don’t care if you’re talking about a post-disaster scenario, a hunting trip or hiking in the mountains, people can get hurt. In any of these situations, and many more, you’re unlikely to find a hospital emergency room, ambulance or even an EMT standing there, ready and waiting for you.

Active shooter situations, as well, warrant the need for quick first-aid. One of the things that has helped to reduce the number of deaths in some active shooter situations, even with the shooters creating more casualties, is a major difference in police response. Law enforcement agencies are training the officers on the street in trauma care, especially for gunshot wounds, and providing them with an IFAK (Individual First-Aid Kit). This allows officers arriving on the scene to pick one casualty, provide them with emergency treatment, and transport them to an emergency room in their cruiser.

You or I can do the same, with just a little bit of knowledge and a basic IFAK. Please note that this is different than the type of first-aid kits we can find at the corner pharmacy, as it is intended specifically for treating major trauma cases, especially gunshot wounds.

Patient Assessment

Treatment of any wound starts out by assessing the condition of the patient. This shouldn’t take more than a second or two, with your eyes roving over their body, while you ask them basic questions (like their name) to ensure that they are lucid. The current acronym for this is SMARCHR, which stands for:

  • S – Security and safety – Ensure that the victim is where they won’t be in danger of being shot again
  • M – Massive hemorrhage – Look for massive bleeding, as this is the greatest danger. An adult who has lost two liters of blood probably will not recover. So you have to stop it before then.
  • A – Airway – Are they able to breathe? If they can talk, they can breathe.
  • R – Respiration – How are they breathing? Get a good idea of how fast and deep they are breathing, so that you have a baseline to see any change.
  • C – Circulation – How high is their pulse (not an exact number, just an idea)? How is their skin tone and temperature? Are they clammy, damp, dry, ashen, blue? If you can feel their pulse at the wrist, they have a systolic blood pressure of 80-90. This is good enough. If you can’t feel it there, but can feel it at the carotid artery (the neck) it is 60-70. At this point, they are at risk of losing too much blood.
  • H – Hypothermia – Are they at risk of losing too much body heat, due to ambient temperature and wet clothing?
  • R – Recovery Position – After treating the patient, roll them on their side, so that if they vomit, they won’t gag on it.

Treating the Wound

Basically, wounds fall into two different categories and have to be treated differently, depending on which category they are in. These categories are: in the limbs or in the body and head.

Learn The Secrets and Tricks Of The Word’s Top Survivalists!

In either case, any gunshot wound consists of two parts: the permanent cavity made by the passage of the bullet (the hole) and the temporary cavity. This temporary cavity is flesh around the temporary cavity, which was damaged by the passing of the bullet. It can include broken bones — even those that weren’t touched by the bullet. Generally speaking, most of this flesh is damaged enough that the cells will die off and need to be replaced.

Keep in mind that in many cases the bullet will pass through the body, leaving both an entrance and exit wound. In such cases, the exit wound will be larger than the entrance one, as the bullet deforms while it is passing through the body, even if it is not a hollow point.

Treating Wounds in the Extremities

Wounds in the arms and legs can cause extensive bleeding, especially if an artery was ruptured by the bullet. If you see pulsing blood coming out of the bullet hole, an artery has been ruptured. In that case, you most likely need to apply a tourniquet, especially if a lot of blood is spurting out of the wound.

Using Tourniquets

Before going on, let me say one important thing about tourniquets. I have heard different opinions about tourniquets over the years. Some people talk about them from the viewpoint of doing the least amount of damage to the wounded extremity, so that it might be saved. But if you are forced to apply a tourniquet, the patient’s life is in danger. Losing a limb is bad, but it is not as bad as losing a life. Your goal is to save their life, even if that means at the cost of them losing a limb.

The idea behind a tourniquet is to crush the artery against the bone, sealing it off. This means that the tourniquet is going to have to be very tight. That will hurt and the patient will complain. Don’t loosen it for them and don’t leave them alone where they could loosen it themselves. That could cause them to bleed out.

Not all tourniquets are created equal and many poor-quality tourniquets or makeshift tourniquets are unable to effectively accomplish their job. The best ones on the market are the SOF Tactical Tourniquet and the Combat Application Tourniquet; both developed by former military medics for use by the military. They are more expensive than others, but also more effective.

Some say to place the tourniquet two to four inches above the wound. This is fine if the laceration in the artery is straight through. But you have no way of knowing if it is or not. If you place the tourniquet too close to the wound, all you will do is force an internal bleed. So put the tourniquet as high on the limb as you can.

Treating the Wound

Whether you need to apply a tourniquet or not, you still need to treat the wound. There are several steps involved in this:

  • Clean the wound, flushing it out with clean water, alcohol or hydrogen peroxide.
  • Apply an antibiotic cream to help prevent infection.
  • Apply a clotting agent (optional). Any clotting agent has to be held in place to function. They work by creating heat, which cauterizes the wound. This means that it will hurt a lot, so the patient may need to be held down.
  • If there is a gash, where the skin is separated, the skin around the wound needs to be pulled closed and secured in place, with the edges touching, by using either SteriStrips or butterfly closures.
  • Cover the wound with a bandage to soak up blood and protect it. This can be done with gauze, sanitary napkins or clean cloth, depending on what you have available. The best is an Israeli Bandage, which combines a gauze dressing with a pressure bandage.
  • Apply pressure to the wound, either through the use of a pressure bandage or your hand. Pressure will help to reduce the bleeding.
  • Transport the patient to medical care.

Treating an Abdominal Wound

Abdominal wounds are much more serious than those in the extremities, even though they may not look as bad. The problem is that there are very few places that a bullet can pass through the body, without hitting organs and causing serious problems. Small caliber rounds or 5.56mm rifle round (which tumble when they hit) are worse for this, as they can ricochet in the body, causing more damage.

There is a high chance of internal bleeding in any abdominal wound. Not only that, but if the bullet passes through the lower abdomen, it is likely to puncture the intestines several times. This will release bacteria into the body cavity, which can cause serious infections.

It is nearly impossible to treat abdominal wounds in the field, because they generally require surgery to find the extent of the damage and repair it. Therefore, your top priority in these cases is to get the patient to a hospital emergency room, as quickly as possible.

Your first-aid treatment is going to be limited to controlling the external bleeding and protecting the wound from anything that might cause infection. Don’t try to repair anything, even if the intestines are sticking out of a hole in the body. Rather, cover them to protect them and move the patient, getting them to competent medical care.

Treating a Chest Wound

Chest wounds can penetrate the lungs, which can be serious. But even more serious than this, is that the puncture of the chest cavity and lungs can create a condition where air is being drawn into the chest through the wound, but isn’t able to escape. This can collapse the lungs, preventing the patient from breathing. Allowed to progress far enough, and the patient will die from asphyxiation.

There are several ways of treating this, depending on what you have available to you and how serious the patient’s condition is. If the patient is having trouble breathing and the veins in their neck are distended, they are having trouble taking in enough air, because the chest cavity is partially filled with air and there is a flap of flesh covering the inside of the hole, preventing that air from escaping.

In that case, the air pressure has to be relieved. You can do this easily by sticking your finger in the hole and moving the flesh aside. You will hear air escaping from the chest, as the lungs inflate.

If there is a sucking chest wound, where air is passing in and out of the wound, you will need to apply a chest seal. The two best chest seals are the Hyfin and the Asherman. If you don’t have one of these available, you can improvise one from a piece of plastic sheeting (think plastic bag) and tape. Cut a piece three or four inches square and tape it to the chest, over the wound, on three sides, leaving the fourth side open for air to escape through.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this article is provided for information only and not intended to replace the knowledge of a medical professional. The information in this article is all readily available from military emergency medical training manuals. If you have any doubts about anything herein, please check with competent medical authority before trying these methods.

Generator Safety Rules To Implement Before A Natural Disaster Occurs

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Nowadays, a generator is more than a convenience, and these items are no longer used sporadically like in the past. In fact, they fly off the shelves of general stores every time the media channels broadcast the “BAD forecast for this week’s weather” message. While some people know how to use a generator, the vast … Read more…

The post Generator Safety Rules To Implement Before A Natural Disaster Occurs was written by David Andrew Brown and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

How to Handle Every Day Tasks When There Is No Electricity

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For us, rural and urban dwellers, the thought of living in a world without electrical power is a pretty scary one. Few people know what to do when there is no electricity and for them, it’s like a trip back in time, when things were much simpler. However, for the rest of us, electricity is … Read more…

The post How to Handle Every Day Tasks When There Is No Electricity was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

DIY Solar Garage

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DIY Solar Garage We are only a decade or so away from solar really being effective. The gamble with solar power is when to get in. If you buy a solar array today what will it be compared to something in two years or 10 years. Do you wait it out or do you start …

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Nickel Iron Battery For Off Grid Energy Storage

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The Nickel Iron battery from ‘Iron Edison’ is an updated version of Thomas Edison’s battery design that he considered to be nearly perfect. For off grid energy storage and renewable energy systems, this battery will likely be the last one you’ll ever buy. Why? Because it’s nearly indestructible! Edison’s battery recipe used iron oxide and nickel hydrate, without the corrosive acid-based electrolyte used in today’s lead acid batteries. The result was the long life Nickel-Iron-Alkaline cell. The Nickel Iron battery features the longest life span of any battery ever invented. You might want to read that again…   Advantages of

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All-Natural, Off-Grid Tricks For Eliminating Mice And Rats

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All-Natural, Off-Grid Tricks For Eliminating Mice And Rats

One of the more frustrating nuisances to deal with on the homestead are rodents. The three main you will normally see are mice, rats and packrats.

Here are some tips in dealing with, discouraging and ridding yourself of each of them.

Mice

Mice come in diverse sizes, types and colors throughout the U.S., but most are from the Deer Mice genus. Deer Mice range in territory across the U.S. and are very adaptive to their surroundings. Usually a gray to reddish brown, they are called Deer Mice because of their white feet and underbelly, as well as their quick speed and agility (like a deer). They prefer more agricultural areas to build a home, so your new homestead with lush crops makes a perfect place to build an adjoining home with an unlimited supply of food.

They aren’t likely to dig underground to make a nest or den, but they rather prefer to find a suitable already complete and secure spot to nest in, such as holes in a hollow tree or fence post, scrap lumber piles, trash piles and firewood bins. They will also build a nest under logs or in tunnels left by other animals. Deer mice, and mice in general, take materials like stuffing from upholstery, string and cloth to build suitable nests. They will build a cache of food including seeds, nuts and plant leaves to nibble on; they have a sweet tooth when it comes to corn.

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The best way to discourage mice from taking up residence is to keep things tidy to eliminate nesting spots and eliminate feed whenever possible. A cat or a dog that enjoys hunting mice are usually effective in keeping numbers down, and storing animal feed in chew-proof containers works to deny them an easy feeding source.

Getting rid of mice can be troublesome, as they are prolific breeders and can increase their numbers quickly. We have had the best success with both glue traps on the floor baited with dog food and snap traps baited with peanut butter. Mice aren’t much for climbing but are surprising agile jumpers, and prefer to run along the base of the walls. Place the traps at a corner facing outward where they can run directly to them and be vigilant on checking them every day. You can catch more than one in a day by continually checking them and resetting as needed.

Rats

On the homestead, you most likely won’t see the same rats as you would in your favorite Hollywood horror film. They are horrible to deal with, but they may not run in packs like the groups in your favorite sewer scene. Common Norway or Roof Rats are the variety usually found on the homestead. They like to enter structures through openings in the foundation, through the attic, and will cross tree branches that come too close to structures that need to be cut back further. Another infestation sign could be the entrance to an underground burrow. A simple hole near your foundation could be the entrance to a large den containing more rats than you know about. They leave signs of chewing on materials such as soft metals, plastic and wood. Their main food source is vegetation and grain that they can find on the homestead, and their tastes can change based on what becomes available. You may see their droppings or smell their urine left along their normal nightly trails.

Unlike mice, rats are more likely to attack small livestock such as chicks, quail and even rabbits. Along with the usual sign of droppings, you may see rabbits with missing/chewed off toes, chicks that go missing or even wings that have been ripped off.

Getting rid of a rat or many rats should be done with trapping, as cats don’t always discourage these large rodents. Common rats aren’t climbers, so all traps should be placed in a hidden floor location in a corner with the trap opening facing out and ready to catch the first rat that comes by. Add a little fragrant bait like peanut butter or meat to enhance their curiosity to see what the trap holds for them.

Packrats

Packrats are like a super rodent. Also known as a woodrat, they have strength that smaller rodents don’t and they have unique characteristics that identify what type they are based on how they operate. Packrats typically are very elusive. They mostly operate under the cover of night searching for food and nesting materials unless disturbed during the daylight hours. Their main attraction outside of finding feed is to build a nest or home. Where other rodents try to use natural materials and burrow into something cozy, packrats like to grab the oddest building materials they can find.

They are particularly fond of shiny objects and will drop what they are carrying and constantly trade for something more interesting and shinier. They will take string, grass, and sticks just like other rodents, but they have a penchant for taking things you left out like a gift. We’ve had packrats steal scrub brushes, pencils, yarn, scissors, pliers, rocks from the driveway, and wiring from the engine harness of our farm truck. They aren’t afraid to take what you left out. Just like a normal rat, you may see their droppings or smell their urine along their normal running trails.

The best way to discourage Packrats is to eliminate areas in which they might try and build their nests. This means keeping lumber piles or stacks of pallets away from the home or outbuildings. Check unused buildings regularly for packrat activity, and keep a bag of mothballs in the engine bay of unused vehicles as they are repelled by the smell.

Packrats are climbers, so dealing with them is best done by trapping it in a large trap baited with food or a shiny object. Place the trap along a known running path for them. Packrats aren’t suspicious of changes to their surroundings, so a new trap doesn’t need to be hidden like it does for a common rat. Be warned that because they are strong, the trap should be tied to something they can’t carry away. We have seen a packrat stand on its hind legs and run away with a trap attached to a foot. Also, be prepared to deal with an angry packrat the next time you catch one. They will lead with a foot to take the bait rather than their head, so you’ll most likely catch them by a foot than their head. Disposal of them will be up to you.

Of course, dealing with any of these rodents after they have established a nest or burrow is reactive, so the best prevention is to not give them the opportunity to start a home near your home or outbuildings. Check your foundation for cracks or openings they can get into, and find a new place to live. Always look for new chew marks, holes that could signal a new burrow, and always put away shiny tools that can attract a packrat. Prevention is your best defense against these invasive rodents.

What advice would you add? Share it in the section below:

Recovering From Hypothermia Using Various Beverages – The Dos And Don’ts

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During this time of year, a lot of people are affected by hypothermia. Many of them have no idea what hypothermia really is or what its symptoms are. When people feel cold they power through as they think it’s normal and soon enough things get worse, especially if they drink the wrong beverages. Hypothermia occurs … Read more…

The post Recovering From Hypothermia Using Various Beverages – The Dos And Don’ts was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

5 Tips for Successful Natural Navigation

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Traveling through the wilderness requires for you to learn how to use all your senses. The more you learn to merge your senses, the more you will be able to enjoy the environment, but also make it safer when navigating through. The following natural navigation methods should be known by anyone who plans on spending … Read more…

The post 5 Tips for Successful Natural Navigation was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

The Most Useful Methods To Prepare Medicinal Herbs

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Herbal medicine has been around for centuries and it helped mankind survive through harsh time. Although the modern folks are encouraged to buy top-brand medicine, this ancient healing knowledge is still widely practiced in many communities around the world. In fact, medicinal herbs will still be here, long after the collapse of modern society. We … Read more…

The post The Most Useful Methods To Prepare Medicinal Herbs was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Top 5 Wilderness Shelters Using Natural Materials

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The ability to build wilderness shelters is an important factor to your ability to live through a cold weather survival scenario. We should all respect Mother Natures since her angriest periods can defeat even the most experienced survivalists. If you learn how to build these five wilderness survival shelters using natural resources, you will have … Read more…

The post Top 5 Wilderness Shelters Using Natural Materials was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

5 Unconventional Uses For A Hammock

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Having a hammock in your bug out bag will help you get the needed rest to recover from a stressful situation. However, it is more than a sleeping accessory and as you will discover in this article, hammocks are versatile and can be used in various situations. If you go camping often, you probably learned … Read more…

The post 5 Unconventional Uses For A Hammock was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Top 5 Shooting Mistakes Most Hunters Make

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You might be good at shooting targets, but that’s not the same as shooting game. When the time comes and the game is in your sight, you will tend to fall apart, both physically and mentally. Most shooting instructors will tell you that the following five shooting mistakes are the most common for hunters. According … Read more…

The post Top 5 Shooting Mistakes Most Hunters Make was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

The Sun Heats His Off-Grid ‘Passive Home’ – Even When It’s 0 Degrees Outside

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The Sun Heats His Off-Grid ‘Passive Home’ – Even When It’s 0 Degrees Outside

Although Andrew Michler has been working on his passive house for the past 20 years, he admits it is still very much a work in progress.

Located one hour north of Denver and offering sweeping mountain views, the off-grid project started 20 years ago when Michler bought what he calls “a solar shack” for $60,000. “It immediately fell apart, and I have been fixing it ever since,” he admits.

Michler is modest; he has rebuilt that shack and a former shed on the property into an impressive Passive House, which is an international term for a building that focuses on reducing energy consumption by as much as 90 percent. The passive heating design allows the house to stay warm – about 62 degrees – when it’s -10 degrees Fahrenheit.

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The idea for the Passive House does not come from builders, Michler explains, but from physicists. “This entire building is designed in a spread sheet,” he says, adding, “This house is essentially a thermal battery bank.”

Bright, inviting and warm enough inside to allow you to stand comfortably in front of a large pane window wearing a t-shirt during a harsh Colorado winter, Michler’s home features a simple wedge shape. Along with a southern exposure and a location nestled on a hillside, the home also is wedged between three trees, which offer it an energy-efficient canopy.

Inside, Michler says he “decided to erase any labels from rooms and make it as much a continuous space” as he could. “The idea of walls is counterproductive,” he explains. “They just make a small space smaller.”

Two children visiting the home during a recent video interview are drawn to a large second level net bed that works as a place to sleep or to play. From the net bed, the kids also climb into a high window ledge that beckons them with a commanding view of the surrounding landscape. “It almost has become a little clubhouse space up there,” Michler says as he watches them.

The home’s doors and windows are designed to be air-tight, and Michler says that when they are shut, the home will hold its temperature for days. “It’s like a big thermos,” he comments.

In the small, tidy kitchen, he has used equipment designed for boats, including the cooktop, the cutting board and the countertops. Flooring throughout the home is 80 percent plywood, a decision he says he was nervous about at first. He says the floor has held up well, however, and he points out how the different grains of the floor boards add character to the bedroom.

When Michler built his outside rainwater catch and filtration system, it was contrary to Colorado building laws. Although those rules have now been modified, Michler laments that restrictions ever existed against harnessing a valuable natural resource in the high desert.

Michler says living off-the-grid as he and his wife do is not for everybody, and he admits that some of his neighbors have given up and moved back to urban areas.

“You have to know yourself to be out here for any length of time,” he says. “But it is not just your relationship with yourself, but also with your landscape.”

“The forest is very dynamic. … There is a rawness in the landscape, and the inside (of the home) contains a certain level of rawness too.”

Would you like to live in this type of house? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

Things You Should Consider When Buying Woodland

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A lot of preppers and bushcraft enthusiasts have a hard time finding a place suitable to camp and practice their survival skills. A small patch of woodland to call your own is an ideal solution for most of us. However, before buying woodland, there are a few things you should really consider. When you go … Read more…

The post Things You Should Consider When Buying Woodland was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

10 Tips For Becoming A Great Deer Hunter

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Hunting resembles an incredible journey with lots of adventurous periods of time, especially when you hunt deer. You should always prepare everything before entering a shooting range, just like students review their lessons carefully before they take an examination. In other words, you should do your homework precisely before the beginning of the deer hunting … Read more…

The post 10 Tips For Becoming A Great Deer Hunter was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

A Few Considerations Before Bugging Out Into The Woods

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I spend a lot of time on forums and social media discussing about bugging out with other preppers. It’s a topic that should be covered by everyone since one day you might be forced to leave everything behind in order to survive. Bugging out into the woods is a common plan for a lot of … Read more…

The post A Few Considerations Before Bugging Out Into The Woods was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

10 Ways To Keep Your Car From Becoming Trapped In Snow

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A relaxing drive up to a mountain cabin can turn into a disaster during this time of the year. All it takes is a wrong move, and in a blink of an eye, your vehicle is covered in snow. You are now stranded, cold and isolated in your own car. Being trapped in the snow … Read more…

The post 10 Ways To Keep Your Car From Becoming Trapped In Snow was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Thanksgiving off grid workshop making candles!

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Thanksgiving off grid workshop making candles!

Thanksgiving off grid workshop making candles!

Living off grid for most means solar power for light to see when darkness falls and solar means sun. But when living in norther or southern latitudes the sun does not visit long and is often obscured by snow, rain, or a few clouds. We can not rely totally on solar and so we become creative to stay out of the dark. On this Thanksgiving day we went to the office/workshop to make candles.

Continue reading Thanksgiving off grid workshop making candles! at Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

5 Prompt Recovery Tips After An Injury

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Suffering an injury is never fun. Not only can it be extremely painful depending upon the injury you are suffering from, but it can also leave you sore and unable to perform daily tasks for quite some time. This can really help to make the injury far worse in your own mind. The Problem with … Read more…

The post 5 Prompt Recovery Tips After An Injury was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

What You Should Know About Foot Care In The Field

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I love to explore the great outdoors and I try to spend more time in nature. I’ve seen many hikers with feet that have been abused. I can tell you from experience that few people pay attention to their feet when they are uncomfortable. Foot care should become a priority if you plan on bugging … Read more…

The post What You Should Know About Foot Care In The Field was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Guide To Picking The Best Sleeping Pads For Survival

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Picking the right sleeping pads is something all preppers should consider with great care. Sleep has a direct relationship with just about every other aspect of your life. While a solid night’s sleep can affect our day-to-day life in some important ways, in a survival situation, it means the difference between life and death. There’s … Read more…

The post Guide To Picking The Best Sleeping Pads For Survival was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Critical Questions You Better Answer Before Going Off-Grid

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Questions You Better Answer Before Going Off-Grid

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Going off-grid means different things to different folks. For some, it’s living a “normal” life without an electric bill. For others, it’s a dance of compromise with what you are willing to live without and what you won’t live without; making those things you deem necessary for your life run off power you generate yourself. And for still others, off-grid living is a couple of solar panels deep in the woods somewhere with just the bare minimums.

Whatever your version of off-grid living is, there are several key questions to ask before you take the plunge.

What is it that you want to accomplish, and what does your off-grid life look like?

This is truly the first step, before you look at pretty solar packages and rugged wind generators. Long before you start looking at wattages and discussing power storage, you need to determine just what you want from an off-grid life.

I’ll give you three very different examples:

The first, is my parents. When we were selling our house in Mississippi to move to Southern Oregon and go off-grid, they decided it was something they wanted to do, as well. My dad knew he wanted to be able to live a pretty normal life. He enjoys watching TV, my mom likes to sew and watch movies. They run a construction company from their house, and always have computers, scanners and printers working. They grow a garden and put up some of their own food, so they knew they’d need a freezer (or three). My mom very much likes modern conveniences and already had her eyes on a new Samsung side-by-side refrigerator, long before the final design for their new house was done. Dad knew they would have to save power where they could, so they went with wood heat; propane water heating, cooking and clothes dryer; LED and energy efficient lighting and appliances; and, of course, a diesel backup generator for those snowy winter days when the sky barely peaks out. They settled on a 4,500-watt system with a 40kw backup battery bank.

Next is us. Unlike my folks, we run a full homesteading operation here. We don’t mind minimums. We have no TV service of any kind and use our TV on those rare occasions that we feel like watching movies or old TV shows on DVD that we can pick up for cheap at the local Walmart. We have a very basic washing machine and no dryer of any kind. Our biggest splurge for household appliances is our super-efficient French door refrigerator, and two super-efficient freezers that we keep full enough and in an insulated building so that they don’t run much. Our main heat source is wood, and we use propane for backup heating, cooking and water heating.

We have two main barns with lights that get turned on for winter feeding. There are lights in the rabbit barns, as well. We also hatch poultry from April until October, so we run a full-sized cabinet incubator and up to two brooder pads. In the summer, we also run fans in the poultry and rabbit houses. In addition, we have a well with a 2hp pump that runs 2 hours a day from May until late September to water our garden. We also use the well to fill our cistern and a much smaller pump to take water into the house. When we sized our system, we wanted the very minimal usage of the diesel backup generator. We ended up with a 6,000-watt system and the same 40kw backup battery bank.

If you are thinking these first two are very large systems, you are right. So here is an example of going the absolute other direction. I met this young lady who lives about 15 miles from us. She lives in a camper that she built a roof over. She has a well that she runs with a 6,500-watt generator, and she pumps her water into a tank that she has hooked up to the camper. She can charge her camper battery bank with a 150-watt solar charger kit. Heating, water heating and cooking are all done with propane. Her battery system is modified from the original, and she uses four 6volt deep cycle RV batteries. When the snow gets deep and she can’t keep the panels clear, she simply charges up her batteries with the generator and if she’s careful, can go for several days.

No matter what you want your life to look like, it’s easiest to make it happen if you can fully define your version.

What is your current power usage? What do you have now that you can live without?

Whether you have an existing home you are taking off the grid or building a new home, it’s important to have a base starting point such as a current power bill. This gives you an idea of what you use right now with the appliances and gadgets you have currently. If you plan to live just as you do now, is it possible to generate the amount of power that you presently use, or are you going to have to modify your lifestyle a bit?

When we planned our solar, we set out our highest bills (one summer, one winter) to give us our starting point. We lived in a house with electric cooking, electric water heating and central heat/air, all of which we knew would not be feasible to support with a solar system. Then we went room by room and determined what we would need at the new house, what we needed that would have to convert to propane, and what we flat out could live without. There was also a short list of items we use every now and then, such as food dehydrators, clothes irons and waffle makers. We then looked at the power requirements of each item.

Next, we went through the drawings we’d done of our new property to determine if there were power needs there that we didn’t currently have. A well pump. Barn lighting. A bigger incubator and an extra brooder pad. All these things were figured out well before we looked at systems.

(To determine what the power usage is on appliances and gadgets, there are a number of places to look – owner’s manuals, product plates placed by the manufacturer, or any one of a number of websites.)

Does everyone in the household agree with the vision?

No matter what type of system you have, you need to make sure that everyone in the household is on the same page and understands that off-grid living is a change, regardless of system size. If you are going solar, then you already know that when there is no sun, less power is being generated. This means that you aren’t running the washing machine before bed, the kids aren’t up all-night binging on video games, and that non-essential devices are off.

Earlier this year our 18-year-old nephew moved in with us. He’d been here to visit a few times before and had stayed for a long weekend a couple months before making the move. We explained at length how the system worked, and why we have a lights-out-at-10 p.m. policy around here. He doesn’t own much, just a few clothes, a cell phone, a beat-up car, and a computer that he’ll need when he gets started at the local Community College this fall. He didn’t mind the power restrictions, and we figured we could make the computer work, so he moved in.

Within two weeks, we found out that he is also an avid gamer. As in, sit-in-front-of-the-computer-for-hours-on-end type gamer. And the simple desktop computer for school?  It’s a high-end gaming computer that draws 500 watts when it’s on! (For reference, my desktop computer uses around 125 watts.) Needless to say, it’s not a problem during summer days when we have power to spare, but we’ve already had the talk that he’s going to need a laptop for school usage, as we simply won’t be able to support the power on that big beast during the winter months and evenings that he needs to be studying. There was a surprising amount of whining and complaining, but he’s come around.

We would strongly suggest you make sure, on the front end, that everyone in the household understands exactly what off-grid living will mean to their daily life.

Can you install everything yourself, or are you going to have to hire out?

Depending on the size of your off-grid system, this can be a very big deal. If you plan a small system of a few panels or a small wind turbine, a small inverter and a couple of batteries, you may be more than capable of doing it yourself. Larger systems require a good understanding of what you are dealing with, as inverters and charge controllers can be very complex.

Beyond the electrical work required to install an off-grid system, you may require mechanical assembly and/or construction work. Even the smallest of solar arrays require some sort of racking assembly. Wind turbines require tall poles with ground tethers. You’ll need a dry place with good ventilation to house not only your inverters but also your battery bank.

We were fortunate that my father has spent his entire life in the construction industry and that my husband is a mechanical engineer by trade as well as being a car enthusiast in his spare time. Installation of our system required concrete work, rack construction, underground conduit installation, battery box construction and wiring. Lots and lots of wiring.

Even though we had the experience to put our system in, mistakes were still made. A wire was hooked up incorrectly that resulted in both of our charge controllers getting blown. It was our mistake and a fairly costly one — new controllers cost us an extra $1,000.

Can you maintain your system yourself?

For the most part, maintaining an off-grid system is pretty simple. However, when compared to an on-grid lifestyle there is much more to it. Not only do battery charge levels need to be monitored daily to ensure that there are no problems, but batteries themselves will need to be regularly maintained and even periodically replaced. Solar panels may need to be adjusted several times per year for maximum solar gain, cleared of snow in winter, or washed down during heavy pollen or if your area gets dusty during the latter part of summer. Wind power is also not without its maintenance, including checking connections and bolts, adjusting tension on guy wire, and checking blades for worn edges. If you are using a backup generator, there will be maintenance to do there as well – radiator coolant checks, oil changes, filters, plugs, etc.

It’s important to think through these items and be realistic with yourself.  If you don’t know how to do these things, can you learn, or is there someone nearby that can help you?

Final Thoughts

Going to an off-grid lifestyle is wonderful as long as you really think it through before you set out. After living off-grid for the last four years, I can say that there is a real sense of pride and self-reliance when you can meet all of your own power needs.

I’ve talked a lot about bigger systems, but depending on your lifestyle choices it is possible to live with just a few panels or a small turbine if you do your planning correctly. I’m going to leave you with my personal story of moving to an off-grid lifestyle.

For the first year of living at our homestead, I lived alone with no more power than a 150-watt kit and two 6v deep cycle batteries, and a couple of gas powered generators. I was able to get two cords of firewood delivered, and I split over half by myself, my husband doing the rest when he came to visit. I used the firewood to heat the house with our tiny woodstove, and occasionally heated my meals on it. I had propane lights, a propane range, and an old tiny propane refrigerator. When I needed to charge my phone, iPad, or my portable DVD player I ran a little 4,500-watt generator. For water, I had a 250-gallon carry tank on a trailer which I would fill from the well head and truck the 500 feet to the house to be emptied into a much larger cistern. I used a 7,500-watt generator to run the well pump. The deep cycle batteries I mentioned earlier ran an RV pump that ran water from the cistern to the house. On the days I needed to do laundry, I would wheel the 7,500-watt generator down from the well head to the house.

The hardest part was not the work of it all — it was the complete change from the convenient life we’d lived in Mississippi. I had to constantly monitor the battery levels of everything around me, and filling the cistern was at minimum a two-hour event. At night, the quiet was almost deafening. You really never notice the hum of all the electrical gadgets in your life until they are gone.

A year after moving, our house in Mississippi sold and my husband moved in. It was so late into the fall that we had to wait until the following spring to break ground on the shop that would house all our solar equipment and the area where the solar panel racking would be built. After 21 months we finally were able to put in a regular refrigerator, run normal household lights, and live – mostly — like regular people.

While we now live what most people would consider a “normal” life, we live more of a hybrid lifestyle. We have modern appliances, yet still are very conscious of the weather and power usage at all hours of the day. It’s just something you have to embrace, use power when you can make it, and stop using it when you can’t.  It becomes a skill to know when you can and can’t use anything connected to power, but it’s something you will learn living off-grid.

What advice would you add? Share your tips in the section below:

10 Wild, Off-Grid Foods You Can Forage For Each Fall

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10 Wild, Off-Grid Foods You Can Forage For Each Fall

Image source: Pixabay.com

From backyard gardens to large-scale farms, fall is often viewed as harvest time. But “nature’s garden” is in full yield in the autumn, too, as the trees begin to lose their leaves and heavy frosts set in.

Following are a few of the highest-yielding, nutritious wild foods that are ready for harvest in the fall. You will need a good plant ID book to make sure you get the right plant. As with foraging at any time, do NOT eat anything you are not 100 percent certain is the correct plant.

Root Crops

Many plants begin to bring their energy into their roots in the fall to wait out the winter underground, in preparation for a growth explosion in the spring. Most root crops can either be dug up with a shovel, or pulled up after loosening the soil around them with the garden fork.

1. Burdock (Arctium species): a variety of burdock has been eaten in Japan for centuries, and with a delicious sweet flavor and a delightful crunchy texture, it’s well worth trying. Burdock should be harvested the fall of their first year (before they produce along central stock with flowers) and can be dried or eaten right away.

2. Chicory (Cichorium intybus): known as an excellent coffee substitute, chicory is best harvested once the top of the plant mostly dies, sending its energy to the roots. It can be roasted and ground into a powder for a delightful tea high in nutrients.

3. Dandelion (Taraxacum species): another potential coffee substitute, dandelion roots are known as a powerful medicine and can be roasted much the same way as chicory. Be careful not to confuse them with chicory, since the leaves look similar.

Nuts

Many nuts are available in the fall, and they are available from year to year under two categories: mast year nut producers, and annual producers. Mast year nuts produce nuts irregularly from year to year, with some years being “mast years” of high production, and other years yielding few or no nuts at all. Many nuts can be harvested simply by waiting until they fall to the ground, particularly after strong winds around the time they are ripe. One can put a tarp under the tree to catch the nuts during windy periods, knock the branches with a long stick, climb a ladder and shake the branches (or shake the whole tree if small enough), or get a good, solid throwing stick and chuck it at the nuts to dislodge them. Nuts keep longer once dried for two weeks either in a cotton sack (e.g. old pillow case), or on screens, and then roasted. You may also choose to purchase specialized “pickers” for your nuts to pick them up off the ground, which can be purchased online.

4. Acorns (Quercus species): With mast years every 2-3 years, acorns fall when they are ripe in early- to mid-fall, especially during wind events.

5. Walnuts (Juglans species): Irregular mast producers, walnuts may still produce at least some nuts during low-production years. They are both delectable and nutritious, though some species such as black walnut (Juglans nigra) are more difficult to shell, with relatively little nut meat, while others, such as English walnut (Juglans regia) have much bigger nuts with thinner shells. Depending on the species, they ripen throughout the fall. The hulls can be removed by stomping on them and rolling them with your feet, or they can be cut off with a knife by cutting a line around their diameter and removing by hand with a good, thick set of gloves (the hulls will stain your hands). You can then put them in a bucket with a lid, some gravel, and a bit of water, and shake the bucket vigorously to remove hull remnants, followed by a good rinse before drying (old pillow cases hung indoors away from sun work well). Dispose of the hulls by spreading them across the landscape away from gardens, as black walnuts especially can damage soil life and inhibit plant growth.

6. Hickories (Carya ovata, Carya laciniosa, Carya palida, Carya tomentosa, and Carya ovalis): Closely related to pecans, but often sweeter tasting, most hickories produce annually, ripening in the early fall, or late summer. Once dry, husks are easy to remove.

7. Pecans (Carya illinoinensis): Another irregular mast producer, they are usually ready in November, when they fall consistently from the trees. Some trees may have very small nuts that are difficult to remove from shells, though as with other hickories, husks are fairly easy to remove.

8. Hazelnuts (Corylus species): Ripening from late August through September, as with all nuts, you’ll have to beat the squirrels to hazels. Nuts can be found during mast years under the leaves and are easy to remove from the shell.

Other Fall Forage Crops

9. Apples (Malus domestica): There are many wild or untended apple trees growing throughout North America and elsewhere. Once you start looking in the fall, they shouldn’t be hard to spot in a good year. Similar to nuts, many apple trees don’t produce a heavy crop every year. Lower quality apples can be used to make apple chips (simply by cutting and dehydrating), or apple cider.

10. Hackberry / Sugarberry (Celtis species): There are several species of hackberry, many of them containing a delectable and sweet date flavored dark, light brown or orangish berry ready in mid to late fall. One way to harvest them is to wait until the leaves fall from the tree, put a tarp under the tree and shake the tree or branches vigorously. Due to their low moisture and high sugar content, the berries keep quite well without any processing and can be stored in paper bags or simply in a bowl or container that allows excess moisture to escape.

Although there are many other wild foods available for harvest in the fall, this list of higher-yielding foods is a good place to start. Other wild foods to look out for in the fall include rosehips, elderberries, watercress, amaranth seed, ground nut and many others. Fortunately, most plant ID books give a good indication as to the season that a given crop is available, so hopefully this will only be the start of your journey to find the best foods nature has to offer in your area.

If you have your own favorite fall forage crops you like to harvest in the fall, please share in the comments below!

What I Learned Living Through Harvey

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What I Learned Living Through Harvey Easily the most effective study on preparedness in American the recent hurricanes have changed everything. There were an in depth look at how the U.S Government and the people of the nation would react to serious disasters. If we learned anything it’s that now is the time to start …

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Going Off Grid: Is It Right For You?

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By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

Going off grid is something that few people have chosen to do, but those who have would never go back to the way things were before. Going off grid isn’t for everybody, but for the right people, it’ll completely change their lives.

Taking this step isn’t something that should be taken lightly, so you’ll need to consider a few things first. After reading this, you should have a good idea of whether going off grid is truly right for you:

Is Going Off Grid Right For You?

You need to figure out if going off grid is right for you. Ask yourself, do you want to stop paying electricity bills? Are you ok with spending money to create your off grid paradise? Do you want to teach yourself all about alternative energy?

If the answer to those questions is yes, then this could potentially be a good choice for you.

There are plenty of reasons people choose to live in this way. For example, finding a place in the world that you think is absolutely amazing but you’ll have to come off the grid to live there is a perfectly good reason. Producing your own energy and doing other things related to coming off the grid are also good reasons, as they are so empowering. You will be producing your own clean energy, and there’s nothing in the world quite like it. Especially when you’re not receiving utility bills anymore!

Reasons To Go Off Grid

  • Being concerned for the environment. You can use less energy and make your own from renewable resources.
  • You want to eliminate vulnerability from utility outages.
  • Your political/social values.
  • It makes economic sense for you in terms of cost.

The Time Needed To Maintain Your System

Figure out how much time you have to maintain your off-grid system. It’s going to take plenty of work in the beginning, and you’ll more than likely make some mistakes while you figure out what’s right for you. Your lifestyle will need to change considerably, and it can take some getting used to. You’re going to need to pay attention to your energy stores too, so you know you’re not depleting what you have faster than you generate. It takes a lot of thought and planning, but if it’s something you really want, you can do it.

Finding The Money/Resources To Go Off The Grid

Going off the grid doesn’t need to be expensive. You can do so many things to your home to get started and many are inexpensive. Solar panels, for example, or rechargeable batteries can be used to generate your own power. Many of the items you purchase will be a one time payment. There are all kinds of resources online to help you too. You can find out how to make well water drinkable, how to generate your own power from scratch, and more. This will be a huge change of lifestyle, so you need to make the commitment if you decide this is what you want.

You can learn more about becoming energy self-sufficient through various resources. It’ll take time, so if this is what you want to do, make sure you start now.

Is going off grid for you? Leave a comment!

The Survival Place Blog: Going Off Grid: Is It Right For You?

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Luxury Volkner Motorhome

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The Volkner mobil performance s is the future of road living. The 40ft luxury motorhome comes with all of the mod-cons you could possibly wish for. However

Picture of the Volkner Mobil Performance S

Volkner Mobil Performance S

you may need deep pockets to purchase one. There is no doubt that this mobile home has the super wealthy in mind. With a price tag of $1.7million (£1.2million) it is out of reach for most people, but it never hurt to dream.

The Performance S also offers a fully-equipped kitchen, sleeping quarters, wooden and leather fittings, state-of-the-art entertainment, and a wall that slides out to provide extra space.
Stephanie Volkner, director of German firm Volkner Mobil, says one of the greatest features that shows off the home’s lavishness is a cooking island, something that cannot be found inside most of the motorhome’s competitors. Going on to say “It is a house on wheels”.

  • The made-to-order machines take around 12 months to build.

Customers can choose from a range of fixtures and fittings to customise their motor homes to their preferences. With high-quality leather seats to real wood units and stone tiles in the kitchen and bathroom on offer. It even includes a supercar garage fitted with a electrohydraulic lift. So, if you happen to own a Ferrari, Porsche, BMW or Mercedes, You can bring it with you on your travels.

Volkner also says ‘Our clients normally have big companies. They want to travel freely.

‘They want to decide when they start their journey, where they can go, not before. ‘They look at the weather and start. They want to live in their own, very personal area. Exclusive is for everybody very different. Some need a golden faucet to be exclusive.

‘For me, it’s exclusive that the interior has harmony and all the materials are of the highest quality and their processing is at the highest level.’

Would you buy one if you had the cash ?

Find more luxury mobile homes here: http://www.billionaire.com/luxury-mobile-homes/1659/the-best-luxury-mobile-homes-

Looking for a cheaper alternative? Read: https://www.off-grid.net/mobile-homesteading/

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How to Start a Campfire Cooking Like a Pro

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How to Start a Campfire Cooking Like a Pro Introduction The annual camping trip is around the corner, guys. What could be more wonderful than sleeping under the stars and escaping from the daily grind! However, the most preferred part of camping is sitting around a flaming fire and enjoying yummy meals from a campfire. …

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How to Avoid Careless Behavior while Hunting

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How to Avoid Careless Behavior while Hunting This article comes from a website that is based around deer hunting but I think it holds great appeal to preppers and survivalists. For those of you who are not hunting but assume you will be when the world goes off the rails, it’s not something you jump …

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Personal Wilderness Survival Kit [For Pros]

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Personal Wilderness Survival Kit [For Pros] Raise your hand if you are a wilderness survival pro. I will be honest the title of this article caught my attention because I thought it was very pompous. Who truly considers themselves a wilderness survival pro. The other important thing to remember is that every year survival pros …

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Going Off Grid This Winter? Don’t Miss These 8 Pro Tips How To Survive Your First Cold Weather Camping Trip

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Are you planning a trip into the tundra this winter? Do you love the allure cold-weather camping — a crackling fire, snuggling in a sleeping bag, roasting marshmallows? Do you worry about weather you’ll be equipped well for surviving a winter camping trip? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then you certainly … Continue reading “Going Off Grid This Winter? Don’t Miss These 8 Pro Tips How To Survive Your First Cold Weather Camping Trip”

How To Store Potatoes Long Term

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A lot of folks, including us, are growing potatoes and it’s one of the crops that won’t give you a headache if you follow a few particularities. There are many projects which allow you to grow potatoes on smaller gardening areas and even in containers. If you have a good yield year after year, here … Read more…

The post How To Store Potatoes Long Term was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

The Quick & Definitive Guide On How To Wear A Boot Knife

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The Quick & Definitive Guide On How To Wear A Boot Knife Never did I think I would come across a definitive guide on how to wear a boot knife. In the world of EDC its easy to get eaten up with gear. Pretty quickly you realize you are running out of pockets and belt …

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Tips I’ve Learned After Years Of Trapping Animals

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I come from a family of hunters and trappers, and I’ve learned that the easiest way to provide a meal for yourself is via traps and snares. Setting traps and snares grants you the luxury to take care of other survival tasks while you wait for the animal to make a mistake. Here are my … Read more…

The post Tips I’ve Learned After Years Of Trapping Animals was written by Dan Mowinski and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Why the Giant Mouse GM3 Might Be the Perfect EDC Knife

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Why the Giant Mouse GM3 Might Be the Perfect EDC Knife The great debate of EDC is one of my personal favorites. What do you carry, what don’t you carry and when it gets to the item level there are just no answers. The best you can do is stay abreast of the newest designs …

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Which Rope is the One for You? Fibers Comparison

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Which Rope is the One for You? Fibers Comparison I guess you already know that rope may be made of any long, stringy, fibrous material, but generally is made of certain natural or synthetic fibers. Furthermore, the properties and performance of any rope are reliant on the materials from which they are made. So I …

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A Fully Off-Grid Home For $4,500

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A Fully Off-Grid Home For $4,500

By Tricia Drevets – Off The Grid News

If you have been wondering about living a self-sufficient lifestyle in a tiny house, you may want to check out a new video tour of such a home in Eastern North Carolina.

Jeremy Clemons designed and built his cozy $4,500, 160-square-foot home himself, and it is an evolving work in progress. He is working on the door for his stall shower, and he says he is on his fifth revision of the home’s interior set-up, including the placement of his queen bed in the tiny house. Right now, the bed is set up several feet in the air, allowing plenty of room for storage underneath.

Jeremy grows much of his own food in a garden outside his home. He gets power from solar panels and from three marine batteries. A large woodstove dominates the home, and he admits it puts out more heat than he needs. Jeremy says that the foam board insulation in his walls helps the home retain heat and that his inside temperature is often 20 degrees above the outside temperature in the winter without use of the woodstove.

This article first appeared at Off The Grid News: A Fully Off-Grid Home For $4,500

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How To Integrate A Horse In Your Survival Plans

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No matter how well you prepare for a disaster, you can only speculate as to what will happen. Entire regions could be decimated by natural or manmade disasters and provisions of food, water and fuel will be in short supply, long after the crisis has ended. Using a horse after SHTF will help you survive … Read more…

The post How To Integrate A Horse In Your Survival Plans was written by Dan Mowinski and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Four Simple Methods To Preserve Eggs For The Long Term

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My family loves fresh eggs during the winter, and I’ve learned how to preserve our farm-fresh eggs to last for many months. During our first winter at our off-grid homestead, eggs were scarce, and we had to buy from the store. If you raise chickens, you know how different the taste of store-bought eggs is, … Read more…

The post Four Simple Methods To Preserve Eggs For The Long Term was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Considerations for Night Operations- Part 1, by Max Alexander

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Considerations for Night Operations- Part 1, by Max Alexander If we find ourselves in a bugout situation where the wheels have really come off of society you will need to make lots of special considerations. There will not only be the crazy people who were waiting for a reason to come out and destroy but …

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The Importance Of Sleep When Bugging Out Into The Woods

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If you have gone camping before, you should know by now how hard it is to get a safe, sound sleep. In fact, it’s difficult to get a good night’s sleep during proper camping conditions. Imagine how hard it will be to get some shut-eye during a bug out scenario. I’ve been going camping for … Read more…

The post The Importance Of Sleep When Bugging Out Into The Woods was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Floods, and EMP attack? South Korean ‘Preppers’ are Bracing for The Real Thing

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Floods, and EMP attack? South Korean ‘Preppers’ are Bracing for The Real Thing Apparently, Americans aren’t the only ones seeing the light when it comes to both the threat of North Korea and the instability in the world. These are all serious issues that we must take heed to. That said, I didn’t think I …

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The Middle Class Is Being Destroyed: Now Only 25 Percent Of All Americans Have $10,000 Or More In Savings

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The Middle Class Is Being Destroyed: Now Only 25 Percent Of All Americans Have $10,000 Or More In Savings We are spending like crazy to the void we have created with our crazy lifestyle. The American lifestyle is very unique. We are living very, very busy lives and most are unsure and unfulfilled. They are …

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How Much Is Too Much Bug-out Gear?

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How Much Is Too Much Bug-out Gear? We all know the guy on the forum or even in real life who is just over the top with gear. Its an addiction like anything else. Good gear is as dangerous as gambling. If you have the money and the price is right its nearly impossible not …

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How to Keep Fruits and Vegetables Fresh Without Canning

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Fruits and vegetables should be a regular part of our diet. Yes, they are absolutely essential for the amazing nutritional goodness they offer. The power-packed dose of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals provided by fresh fruit and veggies can keep your immune system healthy, and your body energized all day long. Whenever hunger pangs strike, it … Read more…

The post How to Keep Fruits and Vegetables Fresh Without Canning was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

15 Camping Gifts for the High-Tech Camper in Your Life

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15 Camping Gifts for the High-Tech Camper in Your Life The world of tech is ever expanding and its creeping into our world. I have to say that it is very exciting. Because of the explosion in the adventure industry we are watching prepper equipment get a serious boost from other markets. This article is …

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Season Hunting Pack Contents

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Season Hunting Pack Contents We all know about the value of hunting with a bow. Proficiency with a silent weapon is just such a benefit in a survival scenario. This is less of an article and more of a video. Sometimes, a good video can be the best way to explain something. When it comes …

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Underwater Hunting and Primitive Gourmet

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Underwater Hunting and Primitive Gourmet We often hear about the importance of hunting, foraging and being able to process meats in the wild. These are all important parts of the survival skill set. There is a lot of food in the wild, if you know where to look and how to get it. This doesn’t …

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How to Run the Economy on the Weather. An interesting read.

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Stoneferry (detail), a painting by John Ward of Hull.

Off-Grid Life In Alaska, With No Roads

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For homesteaders Bryan and Laura Emerson, a trip to town doesn’t involve a quick drive in the family car. In fact, in their neck of the woods, nothing is quick. And they’re perfectly fine with that.

Bryan and Laura live on a lake in the bush of Alaska, where they are a 20-minute float plane trip to the nearest road. They’re also this week’s guests on Off The Grid Radio, and they tell us what it’s like to live 100 percent off-grid in the heart of America’s “Last Frontier” – in a location that gets 20 hours of sunlight.

They also share with us:

  • How they generate electricity and obtain water.
  • What they grow, store and eat in such a unique climate.
  • How they make money by telecommuting.
  • Why they don’t have indoor plumbing.
  • How Laura survived a frightening encounter with a bear … on their property.
  • Why they ditched the city life for the bush.

Finally, Bryan and Laura provide tips for people who are considering moving off-grid, even to Alaska. We were inspired by their story, and you will be, too!

 

 

Preparing For The Apocalypse By Living Off-Grid

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Living “off the grid” to most people sounds like something only someone with a secret to hide might do — but the truth is, when it comes to the end of the world, it’s going to be the safest place. Not only are you likely already well out of any nuclear and zombie-attack range brought about by big cities, but if you’ve been doing it for a few years and are settled into a regular day-by-day operation, you’re going to survive a lot longer than anyone in the city who thinks it’ll be easy.

Maybe they know about water filtration and how to start a fire, but what about after the portable camping generator dies? What about after the gasoline runs out? Or the RV, tent, or supposed-to-only-be-temporary tarp shelter is torn to shreds by a wild animal? There are only so many defensive bullets and safe spaces available to those who flee into the woods, thinking they can survive with no problems.

Today, I’m here to shed some light on a few of the things overlooked in the common escape plan. After all, the world hasn’t ended just yet, so we’re all still on the same team.

  1. Electricity

    If earlier it sounded like I was ragging on generators, don’t get me wrong: they’ll still incredibly handy for quick electrical pick-me-ups, especially as technology continues to advance and they don’t need as much outside power to keep chugging along.

    But the fact is, most portables generators sold on the market today still require some sort of charging through an outlet or a fuel source. While that might be feasible for a time, chances are even if you’re able to support one, it’s not going to be enough for everything you’re hoping to accomplish, energy-wise. So, unless you plan on packing 20 generators up into the hills, you’re going to have to think of something else.

    The solution is already pretty mainstream: Solar energy, in the form of panels. No longer are they reserved only for the rich man, and are becoming increasingly more popular amongst regular joe-schmoes living in suburban neighborhoods (assuming their HOAs allow them). By 2015, more than a million homes in the USA used solar power.

    What’s better, by utilizing solar energy, you’re not tied down by monthly bills to companies that know and store your personal information — hence that ever-so-desireable off the grid aspect. With the power company no longer able to find you, that one employee who’s sentient even as a zombie won’t be able to use Google Maps to find where you live.

  2. Irrigation

    Along the lines of cutting ties with any big-city company that knows where you live, the water company is next on the list. But without running water, how can you expect to do things like bathe, clean, or raise a sustainable garden in the backyard?

    Off The Grid News gives a thorough guide to creating your own self-sufficient irrigation system, in reference to something that sounds more like a category in competitive sports than anything off the grid: Survival Gardening.

    According to this guide, you’ll likely be getting your water from one of many sources: a spigot (if you still remain on municipal water), a well or reservoir, a natural source like a river or stream, or rainwater. They each have their own pros and cons, but all need a few things: filters ranging from screens to cartridges, water pumps if you’ll pulling from a natural source, and the correct tubing/drip system and layout of your garden.

    Luckily the end of the world will be happening in the future, and there’s nothing wrong with hoarding a bunch of high-tech modern tools to help with this part of the plan — especially since you already have everything hooked up to solar energy and seeking out things to power. There’s nothing in the “Off The Grid Rulebook” that says you have to live like an ancient human, with only rocks and planks of wood at your disposal.

  3. Supplies

    This step is pretty self-explanatory: stock up on non-perishables. This Doomsday Moose article on Prepping Your Homestead for a Natural Disaster specifically lists food, water, and batteries, but I’m going to take it one step further: toiletries, sewing/mending supplies, weapons, books, tools, clothing, shoes, and even some sentimental items.

    In one of my previous articles, I list a few more things like tires, waste treatment systems, and metal detectors, too. Not everything has to be rugged, dirty, and “manly” — creature comforts like a shaved face, deodorant, wet wipes, etc., are going to be just as important once a week turns into a month.

    To touch on weapons, especially — everyone brags about their firearms, everyone dreams about shooting a zombie in the face with a shotgun, but those are: 1. Only favorable to those who actually know how to use and maintain them, and 2. Will eventually run out of ammo.

    Instead, focus on things like baseball bats, knives, swords/blades, and compound bows, whose arrows can be retrieved and reused. Basically, reusable ammo and objects for bludgeoning are best. Also, mace for bears and stuff.

  4. Shelter

    Hopefully by the time the world crumbles, you’ll already be nice and comfy in your mountain cabin, warm by a crackling fire and eating corn on the cob straight from your garden. In that case, good on you, props.

    But, if you aren’t, here are some suggestions: While a fancy, vacation cabin site might be appealing, in the event the world ends, it’s likely going to be less secure, sturdy, and formidable, especially if someone or something comes knocking wanting to remove you from it. Whether that be bears, zombies, or suburban Joe who left his morality back home, giant front-facing windows and low-hanging eaves aren’t going to do much to keep them out.

    I’m not suggesting setting up metal traps, spikes, or trip-wires — unless that’s what you want, in which case, it’s your land and you’re welcome to do that. Moreso, I’m suggesting a few key features to keep your eyes out for:

    1. Secure, heavy doors and entrances, to keep out any unwelcome guests
    2. An underground cellar, in case of unsavory (hurricane level) weather
    3. Thick walls, in case of a nuclear blast — but can also be used to thwart zombies biting through the walls
    4. Just for the fun of it, weapons hidden throughout — over the doors, under the floor rugs, in the mouth of the taxidermy moose hanging over the fireplace

Conclusion

When the end of the world really comes, you’re likely going to be in one of three positions:

  1. Surprised and unprepared.
  2. Surprised, but prepared.
  3. Already living it up with everything in place and no one to fight for supplies at the nearest grocery store.

Which would you prefer?

Not to mention, all of the perks that come with living off the grid anyway, even if the end never comes in your lifetime — disconnecting from municipal government entities like water and power providers, being completely self-sufficient without having to give your money and time away to giant corporate entities, and the overall thrill of living in and of nature, as a non-detrimental entity.

That means no environmental footprint, no destruction of trees or natural springs, living off the land and even contributing fairly to the ecosystem there. Even if the world was destined to keep spinning unchanged for the rest of eternity, doesn’t that still sound like an ideal way to live?

About the Author:
Brooke Faulkner
‘s mission in life is to be prepared for anything life throws at her. As a mother of two, more often than not that includes legos and snotty viruses. When she’s not writing, she can usually be found zipping around the wilderness on her ATV.

How to make Bannock or Indian Bread, the food of mountain men

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Back in the 18th century, every day was a survival situation for most people in North America. Obtaining and eating foods with a high-calorie intake was a great challenge. The taste wasn’t a priority back then and people were looking for calories and durability. Such food is the bannock or Indian bread, and it is … Read more…

The post How to make Bannock or Indian Bread, the food of mountain men was written by Dan Mowinski and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Living Off Grid. Rainwater Collection & Storage.

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We have 4 rainwater tanks for the main house (Linstock), the main house garden & the main house outside laundry. The same 5000 gallon tank that feeds the outside laundry also feeds Elm Cottage via a 12 volt pump under the cottage. Both houses are solar powered.
 The lower cement 5000 gallon water tank is fed from the roof of the main house via down pipes from both the front & the rear of the house. The water from this lower tank is then pumped up to the higher tank which gravity feeds the main house.

 This pump is also a fire pump, it draws water from the stop cock on the side of the lower tank & pumps it up to the higher tank via a pipe that runs underground.

 This image shows the two “first flush” pipes on the lower tank. Any dirt on the roof or in the gutters is washed into these two pipes. When full, a ball float in the pipe rises to the top closing off these tow pipes & allows the rest of the water to flow into the tank. Over time, the water in these pipes is supposed to slowly run out via the hoses at the bottom, but invariably the small hole blocks with dirt, so every now & then I remove the bottom of the pipes, drain & wash out the filters.
 

The garden tank was placed on higher ground to the level of the garden so it would gravity feed better, but this meant that it was too far away from the house to use an overhead down pipe to fill it from the roof at the end of the house. So I run the down pipe underground then back up into the top of the tank.

This is the new 5000 gallon poly tank that feeds the outside laundry, & Elm Cottage. This tank is fed from the roof of Elm Cottage, but the ground close to the cottage was too soft to provide a firm base for the tank, so we placed it on higher ground. Again this meant that the tank was too far away to use overhead down pipes, so again the pipe to the tank from the cottage roof was placed underground then back up & into the top of the tank. The other pipe you can see is an overflow pipe which I have run into a water butt.
Cattail Pond is actually a dam we had put in to collect & store more water from the header stream in Butterfly Valley. It also enables us to keep fish for food. Cattail Pond feeds the gardens at both houses via another fire pump at the side of the dam.
Keith.

Tips For Choosing A Survival Tent For Your Bug Out Plan

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Every family needs a tent or two for their bug out plans. Choosing the perfect tent to be used as temporary shelter during a crisis or a camping trip requires a little bit of experience. Here are my tips for choosing a survival tent for your prepping plans. Tents come in various sizes and shapes, … Read more…

The post Tips For Choosing A Survival Tent For Your Bug Out Plan was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

6 Reliable Pocket Revolvers For Off-grid Defense

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I often travel the backwoods trails to re-connect with nature and find new camping grounds. Since there’s always a chance to find myself face to face with a dangerous animal, I bring some protection along. If you’re looking for a small and reliable handgun for off-grid defense, here are my suggestions for pocket revolvers. Every … Read more…

The post 6 Reliable Pocket Revolvers For Off-grid Defense was written by David Andrew Brown and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

A Quiet Life: How to Lower Your Profile or Go Fully Off the Grid

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A Quiet Life: How to Lower Your Profile or Go Fully Off the Grid The tighter the grip of tech clenches on our lives the more we feel urge to run and hide. There are families who practice powering down all devices for the weekend and “going dark” for some time. I think there are …

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The post A Quiet Life: How to Lower Your Profile or Go Fully Off the Grid appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

7 Important Tips to Prepare For Your First Hunting Trip

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According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, approximately 38 million Americans hunt or fish every year, and if you are reading this, then you are probably not one those people. Hunting is a sport that people have done throughout time, and that tradition continues today with families of all shapes, sizes, backgrounds, and ages. … Read more…

The post 7 Important Tips to Prepare For Your First Hunting Trip was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

An Off-Grid Life With Only 1 Bill A Month

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Every off-gridder wants to live a debt-free, bill-free life. Mark Reinhardt isn’t there yet – but he is very close.

About five years ago Mark ditched his fulltime job, sold his house, and purchased a sailboat with the goal of escaping the “rat race” and sailing the Caribbean. Incredibly, he went from working 60 hours a week and getting nowhere to working three months a year and going everywhere.

And he has only one bill a month: his cell phone bill.

Mark is this week’s guest on Off The Grid Radio as he explains how off-gridders can live on about $5,000 a year.

Mark – who wrote a book, “Off The Grid: How I Quit the Rat Race and Live for Free Aboard a Sailboat” — also tells us about:

  • His boat, and how it helps him live a unique off-grid life.
  • His journeys, and what he does to stay calm during dangerous storms on the water.
  • His food, and what he regularly eats when he’s miles from shore.

Mark also explains how he avoids marina fees.

Don’t miss this inspiring story about an off-gridder who is living out his dream!

 

 

How To Clean Your Home With Borax

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Since the late 19th century, Borax was used in many chores around the household. A lot of people are using it even today and its variety of uses recommend it for preppers and people alike. In this article, I will share some of my cleaning routine which involves using borax. To start from the beginning, … Read more…

The post How To Clean Your Home With Borax was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

How to Produce a Sustainable Food Supply Anywhere

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How to Produce a Sustainable Food Supply Anywhere This is an article that will make your eye brows raise. There is no getting around it. When you see what the basis of this article is all about you may not like it. I think its a conversation and an idea that deserves exploring. This could …

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The post How to Produce a Sustainable Food Supply Anywhere appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Items You Should Stockpile For Proper Off The Grid Sanitation

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A natural disaster can bring a brutal aftermath and people often get caught unprepared. Damaged water mains and downed power lines are often common results of Mother Nature’s fury. The lack of proper sanitation requires your immediate attention and resolution. Stockpiling the following supplies will make your life easier when having to deal with the … Read more…

The post Items You Should Stockpile For Proper Off The Grid Sanitation was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Making Old Pioneer Sourdough For Traditional Baking

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I’m fascinated by the old ways of living and my mother and grandmother were the ones that showed me how to do things the old-fashioned way. I love to bake and I often surprise my family and friends with old recipes. Making pioneer sourdough is one of the teachings I try to pass on and … Read more…

The post Making Old Pioneer Sourdough For Traditional Baking was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.