Winter Camping Essentials

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By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

If you love nothing more than getting away from the city and adventuring out into the wild, you will likely love the idea of getting away for a camping trip at the weekend. As it’s still winter right now, it can be pretty unforgiving in the wild at night, and you will need to prepare a lot more for your trip out into the wild.

Camping in the winter might be cold, but it is also very tranquil and fun. Not many people choose the winter time to come out camping, so you will likely have the whole space to yourself, and beyond all that, you will be able to enjoy watching the stars and cuddling up beside the fire when the sun goes down.

If you want to shed a few post Christmas pounds and have a break with your family, get yourself a tent and head out into the wild this weekend. Before you go though here is a list of the winter camping essentials which you’ll need to take with you on the trip.

Navigation

For navigation, you will want a GPS or your phone, and also a compass and map just in case you run out of power and signal in the forest.

Sun protection

Although you might think that the sun can’t damage you in the winter, it is actually slightly lower at this time of year so you could end up burnt if you are out for too long. Bring along some sunscreen, sunglasses and lip balm to protect your lips from cracking in the cold.

Insulation
It goes without saying that you are in need of some layers in the winter. Mountain Goat Outdoor Apparel provides a range of thermal underwear, tops, fleeces, jackets, pants, gloves and hats to keep you warm and protected against the harsh conditions outside.

Light

Because the days are much shorter in the winter, you will need a few forms of light to keep you going. You will need a flashlight, headlamp and batteries ready in case they run out during the trip.

First-aid

Of course, every trip into the wild needs a first aid kit. You can get a kit from any drugstore for a great price.

Fire

If you are going to be spending some cold nights out in the wild and cooking food, you are going to need a fire to keep you and your food warm. Bring either a fire lighting kit, some matches or a lighter with you and you will be able to collect wood and make a fire on site.

Tools

In case of emergencies, bring along a Swiss Army knife, cooking equipment and duct tape.

Food

Potatoes, meat,  vegetables and of course marshmallows are a must here.

Water

Always pack more water than you will need, because you never know if something will go wrong. It may be useful to bring a water filter to if you need to drink from the river or lake.

Shelter

It goes without saying that you can’t go camping without a tent, sleeping bag and blankets!

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How To Survive Camping With Your Young Children

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Plenty to see and do but will the kids agree? Picture source

By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

Children are great fun to be around. At least, that is until they get tired, hungry, bored, or frustrated. Then the fun ends, and you’re in survival mode trying to get through the minutes it takes to address their needs and soothe them back to fun mode. It’s not easy to spend a long vacation with kids. It’s even harder to make it through a camping trip. Here are just a few tips to help you survive your first camping vacation with your little ones:

Survive Boredom

The things that you love are definitely not the things your kids love. It doesn’t matter how badly you want to share your passion for fishing, the thrill of reaching the peak of that mountain, or the pleasure of foraging for food. You’re not going to convince them to share those feelings until they are ready. But while you’re pursuing your interests your kids are going to succumb to boredom. That’s when it can get really tough for all of you.

Electronic devices are the mainstay for kids these days but usually rendered useless when you’re out camping. Engage your children in plenty of activities and games that are relatively simple and short. The younger they are, the shorter the attention span. To keep it fun, you have to engage in that activity at their level. You’re going to need a lot of energy for that! Try building a den, hunting for fairies, and playing pinecone bowling.

Surviving Fussy Eaters

Camping is a struggle for fussy eaters. It doesn’t feel right for grownups to take bags of chips. They want to cook sausages and bacon and beans. If your kids are fussy, chances are they’re still quite young. Why not let them have a go at helping you prepare the meal? Safety is essential, so have a second adult nearby to help you.

You might not be keen to show them how to make a fire just yet, so use something like the everstryke pro. It will be quicker to get things going and will reduce the risk of injury or dangerous fire making. Next, you can ask your child to pour the beans or soup into the pot. You might prefer to place the pot on the campfire or stove. If you hold the handle, your little one might be happy to stir with a wooden spoon (wearing oven gloves or other safety equipment.) It’s amazing how much more fun it is to eat something when you’re prepared it yourself!

Surviving Bad Weather Misery

Kids hate being cooped up. If the weather is so bad you have to stay in the tent, make sure you have plenty of things to hand to keep them occupied. A coloring book, reading books, board games, and puzzles can all be handy here. Make up a game, or write a story together. Traditional games like charades can be fun here too.

Of course, if you have plenty of wet weather gear, then this might be the perfect opportunity for splashing about in muddy puddles. Sure, you’re all going to get a bit messy and a bit damp. Just head over to the shower blocks when you’re done. Kids don’t care about getting dirty. The fact you do care makes it so much more fun to do it!

Surviving The Long Hike With Little Legs

Taking a long walk is an essential part of any camping trip. The trouble is, those with the littlest legs don’t move so fast. And they’re the ones that tire quickly and want to be carried the rest of the way. It’s important you pitch your camping trip at the right level for the participants. If you have tiny tots, you’re going to have to carry them or walk shorter distances. It can’t be helped.

There are some very good carriers if your child is still toddling. They are quite comfortable for parent and passenger alike and allow you to walk as far as you want without your child getting tired. And if they want to sleep it will make no difference to you. Be wary of tough terrain though. Your balance and your weight will be altered!

Surviving Night Time Bathroom Breaks

It’s not often you get to pitch your tent close to the facilities you need most when you have kids with you. Night time is the worst time to need to go. However, it’s pretty much guaranteed your little one will want to go during the night. Torches and easy footwear are essential. The next problem is convincing a small child to walk out of the tent in the middle of the night to go and find the bathroom. Even with you, it can be a scary thing to do for a tiny tot.

Don’t fuel their fears if they’re nervous out in the open. Picture source

If your child is frightened, they might simply refuse. A wet sleeping bag is a disaster! Always carry a spare one, and make sure you know where laundry services are in the morning. Potties can be helpful or the portaloos you can get with camper vans. Still, it’s not pleasant for the rest of you in the tent, and hygiene could be a real problem. Try to make the excursion from the tent a fun adventure and nothing to worry about.

Surviving Insect Invasions

Kids really don’t like flies, roaches, spiders or other insects. Of course, if you’re going to sleep in their territory, there is little you can do about it. That said, it’s important to prevent bites and stings. A child-friendly insect repellent might help here. Make sure you’ve packed a full first aid kit that includes sting relief, bandages, plasters, and antibacterial creams. You might need extra tissues for the tearies too.

Camping should be fun for all the family, but you might have to give up some of the activities you would normally do on your own. Introduce new things one at a time. Little ones can become quite frightened by strange environments and noises. Bring a comforter, and get ready for the biggest adventure in parenthood so far!

 

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Self-Sufficiency Is A Powerful Tool That Can Be Learned

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The Survival Place – Staff Writer

Being at one with nature has to come second. Being at one with yourself is much more important. Being confident in your skills of proficiency in a scenario where you’re left to your own devices, is the key to many survival mindsets. Being self-sufficient is perhaps the best ability you can have when you’re going out hiking, trekking up a mountain, or suddenly being lost out in the woods during a camping trip. However, it doesn’t come naturally to most people; therefore, it does put them off from going out and taking charge of their own adventure. But it can be learned, and much of that has to do with knowing what kinds of skills can be supplemented by modern technology. The combination of knowing the basics and being proficient in them can be complemented to a greater extent with the aid of gadgets that enhance those skills.

Map reading and orientation

Knowing where you are on a map is paramount to being aware of where you came from, where you are and which direction you should be travelling in. Without the know-how to reading a map, you can only turn back around and restart your adventure. You can learn how to read a map online with many different options at your disposal. You can play online games, watch detailed and lengthy walkthroughs from the basics of advanced techniques on video sharing websites, as well as the good old fashioned way of learning from a skilled bushcraft teacher. Together with this, you can get a GPS electronic map, which can pinpoint your location with precision. This kind of portable, handheld technology is great as a backup for your map reading skills and imperative in a life and death situation.

Forging ahead in the dark

Sometimes when you’re out on adventures, the night can suddenly take you by surprise. Without the proper technology and gadgets to help you see in the dark, you will have to bed for the night, exactly where you are at that moment. There are some great reviews on http://offthegridguru.com/ for tactical flashlights that are small and extremely useful in a tight situation. They can also be attached to things like clothing, hats and fitting onto your backpack. There are other reviews on the website that include tactical tomahawks which are useful cutting and shaping tools. Military watches are also put under the spotlight, but more of all, the tactical torches of the modern market are put through their paces.

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Cutting before building

Every single adventurer should be carrying with them a good sharp bushcraft knife. This can cut branches and shape them; it can also help to make you tools which you can use to make other survival necessities. Being self-sufficient starts with being able to carve out tools from pieces of timber, making small changes to equipment, and or cutting through something that is hindering your ability to progress. The knife is the first and foremost tool of anyone looking to take care of themselves on their trip.

Being self-sufficient is one of the keys to being confident during a survival scenario. However being great at the basics can be further improved by the use of modern gadgets and technologies, helping you to survive and thrive in the wildness of nature.

The Survival place Blog: Self-Sufficiency Is A Powerful Tool That Can Be Learned

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I’m Lost! What Do I do?

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TakeOutdoors Infographic on Things to Do When Lost

From our friends over at TakeOutdoors.com , check out the complete article here it’s worth the read: How To Navigate In The Woods – The Traditional Way

About:

TakeOutdoors.com is a website created to make better outdoor experiences for everyone. It is for avid outdoor travelers who want to make the best out of their trip.

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How To Introduce Kids To Survival In The Great Outdoors

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By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

Even though you, and most probably your partner, might be adept at getting out into nature and living off the environment on a regular basis; the younger members of your family may not understand what all the fuss is about. Kids learn quickly and pick up knowledge and skills at an enviable rate, so they are the perfect students to teach the ways of the outdoors, and how to deal with any danger that may head their way in the future. The following are some ideas to inspire you to get the family in the 4×4 and head out into the wilderness for some fun.

 

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The Gear

You’ve probably got all of the essential gear for a successful camping or survival trip; however, if you’re the only one using it, you won’t be teaching your kids a thing. Your children can start learning when you start prepping for the journey ahead. Ask them to help put things into rucksacks and load up the wagon; make sure they know the name of everything they pick up, and what it’s used for. The knowledge you give them before you leave will ensure they’re off to a great start when they help to set up camp. Try to think about any items that could prove hazardous to little ones; it’s important that kids know what to steer clear of, and learn to respect the things that they will utilize in the future, so bear that in mind when you spot their curiosity.

Teal and Yellow Dome Tent on Peach Leveled With Clouds Near Mountain Under Daytime

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The Accommodation

You might want to take the minimal, and sleep under the stars. However, you’ll want your kids to have a positive first experience of the wilderness, so it’s worth making them as comfortable as possible. They’ll toughen up the more they experience various terrains, so show them a variety of environments and locations. If you’re thinking of investing in a family-sized tent, you can find out here what the best on the market are, and which ones to consider for your adventures together. Keep the kids engaged at every stage of the vacation; they might want to run off and play tag as you sort out the sleeping arrangements, but it’s important that they come and help you set-up. You can still make every step a fun challenge; you kids will learn more if the are having fun and partaking in some sibling rivalry.

The Tricks And Tactics

Once you’re all embracing the outdoors in your desired location and your camp is all set; the enjoyment can really begin. Kids will grow a deep passion for everything the outdoors has to offer them, as long as they have positive memories and associations with it. Teach them as much as you can; all the tricks and lessons that you may have learned the hard way will come in handy as you inform them of how to do things. Keep their safety and happiness as a priority at all times, and the whole family won’t want to go back to normal life again; you’ll make great memories, and your kids will become adept little survivalists in no time!

This article was originally published at The Survival Place BlogHow To Introduce Kids To Survival In The Great Outdoors

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Spend Your Summer Wisely: Preparing For Survival

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By The Survival Place Blog

There’s a million and one things you could do this summer. Lying by the beach, hosting a BBQ in your backyard…but what will you actually gain from this, beyond a few hours of pleasure? If you want to make the best possible use of the good weather, then you need to head outside and cement your survival skills. Summer, with its fine weather, is an ideal time for those people who haven’t quite got the skills they need.

Into the Woods

Of course, to practice survival skills you’ll need to take yourself away from anything man made, but also somewhere that contains plenty of life. Regardless of where you live, you most likely have a deep, dark forest somewhere within driving distance from you. Make that your base for a week or two and you’ll return to civilization with a whole host of new skills.

Finding Food

Most people underrate their ability to find food when it really matters. It’s a basic skill that everybody can learn if they put the effort in; just most people don’t put the effort in. Your best options for food will be: animals, fish, and foraging plants. It can be tricky to catch animals if you’ve never done it before, but fishing is a skill that everyone should have. Take a read of fly fishing explained and get into the water: one day, it could be the difference between life and death. Also, having a book that outlines which plants can and cannot be eaten will be an invaluable resource, so make it one of the few things you take with you on your trip.

Stepping it Up

If you’ve been on a survival trip before, then summer is a good opportunity for you to step it up and real test your skills. For example, try going into the woods without a tent and see if you’re capable of making your own shelter. In an emergency, it’s unlikely you’ll have a waterproof, easy to put up tent just lying around. Similarly, you should have water with you, but see first if you could make it without access to clean water. Where would you go for water in an emergency? Would you know where to look? Before doing either of these things, let someone know where you’re going and when you’ll be back.

Celestial Navigation

The clear summer nights are ideal time to learn how to navigate yourself using only stars. Once you know a few basic rules, you’ll know that it’s actually very easy. And if you have no access to any type of technology at some point in the future, you’ll still know how to get around.

Learning Lessons

At the end of your trip, have a think about what worked and what didn’t. How ready would you be, really, if something terrible happened and you needed to survive in the wild? There’ll almost be areas that you need to improve on, and they can become the focus for your next trip into the woods.

Originally published at The Survival Place Blog: Spend Your Summer Wisely: Preparing For Survival

Filed under: Outdoor Recreation, Prepping

Tech And Tips You Need Camping In The Wilderness

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By The Survival Place Blog

Are you planning on taking a trip into the wilderness for your next vacation? Then, you need to be prepared for everything that the elements can throw at you. You might think that it’s easy to survive the outdoors. Particularly, if you’re heading to a place that you know quite well. But you might be surprised because the weather can turn at any moment leaving you in trouble. For instance, you might be camping miles from the nearest point of civilization. Imagine, if fog falls thick and low over the ground. You would struggle to find your way back and would need to rely on the kit that you had with you. If you didn’t have enough supplies, you might find the next few days incredibly difficult. So, what do you need to survive camping in the wilderness?

 

A Portable Heater

 

You may want to consider purchasing a portable heater for camping in the wilderness with a good supply of fuel. It does depend on whether you’re traveling on foot or in the car. You might also want to consider whether you’ll be moving around a lot. That said if you’re camping a portable heater can be incredibly useful. Particularly, if you are camping in the winter. If you don’t take a portable heater, you need to make sure you have a survival sleeping bag. The best sleeping bag has a hood to keep you warm, even when the temperature has dropped below freezing outside. It’s possible with the best sleeping bags to stay warm and dry even without a tent!

 

A Compass

 

There are two things you’ll need to make sure that you don’t get completely lost wandering in the wilderness. The first is a map and the second is a compass. Ideally, you should have adequate orienteering skills to make sure that you can find your way back to camp. However, even if you don’t, with a compass, you should always be able to find your way back where you started. By knowing what direction your campsite is, you’ll always be able to find your way back to the starting point. You will even find some winter jackets come with compasses included on them. This shows how important that piece of kit is. You might also want to think about some night vision goggles. Night monoculars will allow you to see for miles even when it’s pitch black. You’ll always find your camp site with these and you can check out a review on a site such as www.opticscastle.com/night-vision-monocular-reviews/

 

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Axe

 

Make sure you have a device or tool that you can use to chop down wood. In extreme situations, you might need to collect wood for shelter or even to supply fuel for a fire. Be aware that to make a good shelter or fire the wood has to be dry. If it’s not, it won’t light, and you’ll struggle to keep your body temperature at a normal level. You might be camping in an area where it is illegal to cut down trees. However, if it is a matter of survival, be prepared to ignore rules like this. Your safety should always be the top priority.

 

Tracker
Finally, this is another useful tool that you can find on most winter, explorer jackets. Check out some of the latest winter jackets on http://snowboarding.transworld.net/news/oneill-launches-gps-jacket/.  A small tracker is embedded in the material. When pressed it will send a signal to the closest rescue team. They will then be able to track your exact location and avoid you being lost in the wilderness for days.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Tech And Tips You Need Camping In The Wilderness

Filed under: Outdoor Recreation, Wilderness Survival Gear

Family Fun That Doubles As The Preparedness Training You Need

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By The Survival Place Blog

The stereotype of preppers is one that very much doesn’t fit the reality a lot of us live in. Many will imagine that we’re loners without families. In reality, a lot of us have kids and spouses who we’re keen to protect as much as ourselves if not more. So, as a prepper with a family, you need to start preparing them, too. It just so happens to be that there are plenty of activities you can get into year round to help with that.

Real camping

An obvious activity to get into is camping. There are plenty of great spots for it. But we’re not talking about the places with running water and electricity within five feet. To really benefit from camping, you need to go as wild as you can. You need to teach your family to create rope from nature, how useful a knife is for first aid and cooking and how to really thrive in the wild.

Traversing those waters

Being near water when out in the wild is important. Being able to move over it is even better. If cars and public transport fail, then water is one of the best ways to travel. Look up the best sit on top kayak and get practicing. It helps a lot that kayaking is one of the most fun ways to spend your time in the water.

Nature hikes

When you’re not camping, considering taking the family to see some of the most beautiful environments that nature has to offer. But don’t just take the sights in. Learn them. Consider using apps to start identifying different plants. There are those with harmful properties as well as helpful ones. Not to mention all kinds of foodstuffs that could be foraged when needed. Make your hikes a much more educational experience. That knowledge of nature is something we’ve been lacking for far too long.

A good fishing trip

As important as nature is, it’s also important we learn how to sustain ourselves from it. Fishing has that obvious benefit. But it’s also a great way to teach your kids some important values. Values like patience and dedication. It also serves as a time to spend one-to-one with your kids. The intimate peace of a fishing trip can be a tremendous force in building lasting bonds.

Winter building

Not every activity is best done in Spring and Summer. Camping is one thing, but it’s not enough in the Winter. Yet Winter can be one of the most magical times to get out in nature. So take your kids somewhere you can all practice building a Winter shelter together. Build yourself a cozy space where you can sit inside with your family and watch the landscape fill up with snow. The kids are guaranteed to love it and you’re guaranteed a skill that could one day be the deciding factor for your survival.

What we consider recreation was once essential for survival. If the world we know changes (as it has before and will again), they might be essential still. Make sure your family is as prepared as you.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Family Fun That Doubles As The Preparedness Training You Need

Filed under: How To Prepare, Outdoor Recreation, Prepping

Surviving Vacation With The Kids: Family-Friendly RV Camps

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By The Survival Place Blog

Once you become a parent, you enter a whole new zone. And as much as it’s fun thrilling and happy, sometimes it’s all about survival too!  Kids are notoriously difficult to please. And they might be as good as gold one minute, but they go into serious meltdown mode the next. And don’t we just love them for it! But sometimes it can be exasperating and stressful too. And never is that exasperation more present than when trying to work out where to go on a vacation as a family.

Ever Considered An RV Adventure?

Luxury hotels are wonderful, but sometimes they are best enjoyed as a couple. Especially if you have young kids in tow. Quite frankly they’re not going to care about marble bathrooms and Egyptian cotton sheets. They much prefer outdoor adventure, playgrounds, splashing in the pool and campfires at night. This is why it’s worth considering buying a luxury travel suite so that you can enjoy the flexibility and freedom on offer. Take to the open road whenever you want and have all their creature comforts available inside. Fluffy bunnies, DVD’s, their favorite games and all their books can come with them. And don’t forget emergency supplies of food. And there’s something ever beautiful knowing you’re on the road ready to take on a big adventure. And to survive? It may be bad but take Haribo and potato chips. Use films to keep them occupied. Bargain away with ice lollies and spending money. Remember that the iPad is your new best friend. And pack a couple of bicycles so they can have lots of outdoor fun!

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Family Friendly RV Campsites

So what are some of the best RV resorts when traveling with a family?

Enota RV Campground, Georgia

This place is perfect for kids and adults alike. It’s located in the Chattahoochee National Forest and close to plenty of waterfalls and streams perfect for outdoor swimming. There are fire pits and campfires, and you can really get to enjoy the outdoor scenery with the kids, and maybe even teach them some survival skills of their own!  You can go fishing and hiking, and enjoy the organic farm, where kids can learn all about life in the great outdoors. And bonus, there are three ground trampolines which will wear them out, just in time for you to enjoy a glass of wine by the fire in the evening.

Copper Johns Resort, Arkansas

Want to get your kids back to nature and give them a great big slice of beauty and fresh air? Then head to Copper Johns resort, Arkansas. Here you can spend your days fishing on White River, all having some good quality family fun together. There’s plenty to do here including boating, scuba diving, wakeboarding, and swimming. The focus is all on an outdoor adventure in beautiful surrounds.

Fort Wilderness Resort, Disney

Sometimes, we’ve just got to go with what the kid’s dream of this year why not let their imagination run wild at Disney! The Fort Wilderness Resort recreates the timeless beauty of the American Frontier. There are great entertainment and fantastic swimming pools. And as a survival bonus, it’s close enough to Disney to enjoy all the theme parks on offer. On top of that, there is also archery, horse riding, and waterslides too!

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Surviving Vacation With The Kids: Family-Friendly RV Camps

Filed under: Outdoor Recreation

Cutting Down Problems: Use These Basic Ideas for Survival

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By The Survival Place Blog

There are often problems when you have to survive in the wilderness. So the best thing to do is to plan and prepare for this and make sure you have the skills you need. These are a few of the ideas you can use for basic survival, should the time ever come to use them.

Learn First Aid

What’s the one skill that is going to possibly save lives in a survival situation? Probably first aid training. Being out in the wilderness and having to survive is going to lead to unexpected events. And it could well end up with people getting injured. That’s why it’s important to make sure you are trained in matters of first aid. This is so vital because it can make all the difference. You’ll know exactly what supplies to pack, and what to do to tend to injuries or wounds.

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Stock Up on Useful Tools and Weapons

There are a lot of things you’re going to need to help you when it comes to basic survival. That’s why it’s a good idea to try to stockpile tools and weapons as much as you can, starting right now! You’re going to need axes, which you can find out plenty about by checking out Axe and Answered. You’ll need water bottles, a compass, sleeping bag, tool box. And you could personably use some weapons too. There are a lot of tools, and weapons you could do with that will come in useful in survival scenarios. Do a bit of research if you’re unsure to make certain you have what you need.

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Spend a Weekend in the Wilderness

The best way to get yourself survival ready is to put what you know into practice. And the way to achieve that is to spend a weekend in the wilderness with your survival gear. This will give you an idea of what it’s like to be out there on your own. Plus you will be able to hone and develop your survival skills and instincts. This is very much one of those things that you need to learn by doing. So, it’s crucial to gain this experience and understand the sorts of things that will come in useful when you have to survive in the wild.

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Take up Fishing

If you haven’t fished before now is the time to take it up as a hobby. You have to make certain you learn skills that will come in handy in the wild. And you’re hardly going to be able to whip up a pasta bake, are you?! Learning to fish is fun and helps you develop a skill. Plus it is one of the most useful of all survival skills. It means you never have to worry about going hungry. As long as you are by water, you’ll always have access to a food supply. Fishing is awesome, therapeutic, and big part of survival 101.

You never know when disaster is going to strike and you might be thrust into survival mode. That’s why it’s useful to know some survival training and have plenty of resources to hand. Take a look at these basic ideas and try to use them to make sure you win at survival.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Cutting Down Problems: Use These Basic Ideas for Survival

Filed under: Emergency Survival Tips, Outdoor Recreation, Wilderness Survival Gear

What You’ll Need To Survive If You’re Caught Out In The Wild

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By The Survival Place Blog

You never know where you’re going to be when disaster strikes. Whether you’re stranded or the inevitable happens and you’re in the middle of nowhere. Survival isn’t just about making sure that you have your bug-out bag. It isn’t just about having your shelter ready. It’s also about being able to make it on your own. Being able to survive in the wild. If you’re not sure how to do that, keep reading.

Equipment

You’re not always going to have your bug-out bag handy with you when you’re out in the wild. Whether you’re hunting, scouting or simply on the road in less populated areas. That’s why it’s a good idea to have a mini-bag of useful tools with you. Tools that can help you purify water. That can keep you connected to radio stations. The best tactical flashlight you can use to navigate the wilderness. The best clothes to keep you sheltered from the elements. Even when you’re far from home, it’s a good idea to have these kinds of things with you.

Food

You’re going to want to have some kind of food with you to keep you immediately supplied. But besides that, it’s a good idea to also have some notion of how to keep your own food. Especially if you have to stay out there for days on end. Besides recognizing what and how to forage successfully, finding yourself a good supply of protein is valuable. This is where hunting skills come into play. Perhaps more reliably is finding protein sources from water, however. Sources like being able to successfully fish for bass and bluegill.

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Physical strength

If you want to be able to make it away from civilization (or if civilization crumbles), then you need to be prepared. Not just in terms of equipment and knowledge. You’re going to need a certain degree of fitness, as well. Traversing rough terrain, particularly if you have the kind of equipment you need, isn’t easy. Similarly, in the event of the breakdown of civilization and any ensuing violence, then you need to be in a position to defend yourself as well. After all, your gun won’t always be immediately handy. If you’re talking about survival, your physical condition plays a key role.

Skills

Of course, it’s more than just the skill to procure food and take of yourself physically you need. Being truly independent means developing a whole set of skills that most people today have forgotten about. Skills we once relied on that have gotten a soft as a result of civilized living. Skills like orienteering and being able to navigate all by yourself. Skills like locating the site and resources for a shelter as well as being able to build it yourself. Take constant trips into the wilderness to cultivate these skills. Do it before you’re caught entirely unprepared.

Surviving in the wild is about combining skills, knowledge and conditioning. You’re going to need to learn how to take care of yourself, even when your supplies aren’t immediately handy.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: What You’ll Need To Survive If You’re Caught Out In The Wild

Filed under: Emergency Survival Tips, Outdoor Recreation, Wilderness Survival Gear

3 Things You Need To Survive In The Wilderness

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The Survival Place Blog

Nobody wants to think that it might happen to them. But the truth is, no-one knows what the future holds. Ten or twenty years down the line, any of us could find ourselves out in the jungle in the middle of nowhere. When it comes time to fend for yourself, do you have what it takes? Maybe you have started to realise, recently, that you could benefit from learning some basic survival skills. Or you might just want to have a bit of fun with it while spending some time outdoors. Whatever your reason for coming to this is, be sure that we’ve got you covered. Here, we’re going to look at some of the essential things you need if you are to survive in the wilderness for any decent length of time. Let’s dive right in.

The Right Training

As with everything in life, preparation is the key. If you are not prepared for what life throws at you, then there is every chance you just won’t make it. That’s why it is a solid idea to get some decent training in as early as possible. Not only that, but make sure you get as much of it as possible as well. The more training you have had, the higher your chance of survival. But what kind of training should you go for? Well, there are lots of different options for you on that front. If you go for an all-out assault course, you can’t go wrong. You’ll be sure to learn many valuable survival skills that way. The main thing is to learn as many different skills from as many different traditions as possible.

The Right Weapon

This can be a difficult one to decide upon – there’s just so much choice out there. The fact is, if it came to a survival situation, you wouldn’t beat about the bush. You’d want something which had real power behind it. Otherwise, what’s the point? That’s why one of your best options for any survival situation is an air rifle. Air rifles offer you the perfect combination of power and subtlety. There’s a reason they have always been so popular. The only question now is: which is the best air rifle? That is something which is definitely up for debate, but you can’t go wrong with a .177 Caliber.

The Right Experience

Knowing what to do in a survival situation is not just about the training you’ve received or the weapon you’re holding. It’s also a lot to do with your life experience. This is a world apart from the idea of specific survival training. Training is useful, obviously, for if the situation occurs. But when it comes down to it, the people who do well and survive are those who have a host of other life skills at their disposal too. That’s why it is a really good idea to get as much life experience as you can. One of the best ways to do this is to travel extensively. As they say, travel broadens the mind – it’s true. And the broader your mind, the greater your understanding of what the right thing is to do in any given situation. That’s why the best preparation for a survival situation is to get out and make the most of life now.

 

Filed under: Outdoor Recreation, Wilderness Survival Gear

How To Survive: Underwater

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By The Survival Place Blog

Today, we’re looking at the most hostile and unexplored region on the planet: the ocean. It doesn’t get much more terrifying or dangerous than under the sea. We still know so little about this vast expanse. In fact, we know more about the solar system and space than we do our own oceans. The sea has claimed its fair share of victims who failed to act accordingly underwater. Just like any hostile environment, the ocean demands respect. Whether you’re sailing on top, or diving below.

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In this post, we’ll teach you how to dive correctly, and avoid the most common mistakes. Diving has a mythical aura about it, but it’s certainly not to be taken lightly. It is fascinating and exciting, but it’s also dangerous. Disorientation is commonplace, and it’s not unusual for divers to lose all sense of where they are. Without further ado, here’s how to survive underwater.

Rule #1: Dive with an expert

The underwater diving community has always maintained the ‘buddy rule’. In other words, always dive with a partner. It’s good for maintaining safe practice, and you can keep an eye on each other. Some diving experts have recently relaxed this rule, and expressed the safety benefits of solo diving. However, this is only for divers with years of experience under their weighted belts. If you’re a newbie, always dive with an experienced expert. Follow their lead.

Rule #2: Get the right gear

You would scale a mountain with dodgy, frayed ropes or a discount snow jacket. So don’t dive without top-of-the-range gear and technology. You’re looking for a high-tech dry suit to start with. Buy the very best you can afford if you expect to use it regularly. Invest in the latest oxygen systems and dive monitoring equipment. You do not want your oxygen and nitrogen monitors to fail. Lastly, if you plan on checking out shipwrecks and established dive sites, load up on underwater lift bags. That way, you can bring things back up to the surface.

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Rule #3: Ascend slowly

Any diver’s instinct tells them to head straight for the surface after a long dive. However, this couldn’t be more dangerous. Ascending quickly wreaks havoc with your pressure system, and can cause a lot of damage. Ascend slowly and carefully. The general rule is one foot every two seconds.

Rule #4: Safety stops

A safety stop is a three-four minute rest before your final ascent. You do this at about 15 feet under the surface. The reason for this stop is to ease the decompression process. It gives your body time to release excess nitrogen before going through the biggest pressure change. (Right under the surface).

Rule #5: Equalise

You all know that the pressure changes as you go deeper. This can have a devastating effect on your ears and bodily systems. That’s why you must ‘equalise’ as you go down. The most common method is squeezing your nose, and blowing to ‘pop’ the pressure in your ears.

With these tips, you’re ready to face the ocean. Good luck!

Delivered by The Survival Place Blog

Filed under: Emergency Survival Tips, Outdoor Recreation

Essential Checklist for Emergency Preparedness & Outdoor Adventure Planning – Including Vehicle Preparedness – Latest Update

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By Denis Korn                                                                                                                    emergency_preparedness1

NOTE:  The demand for the information given in this list has been significant – so I am posting it again with additional comments and items.  I have decided to keep adding comments under selected items on a continuing basis – so you may want to periodically check back at this post for new comments.  There are listed both convenient and essential items required for proper preparedness & adventure.  Only you know your unique situations and anticipated scenarios – prepare accordingly.

Many of the items listed in this checklist are available at our product website PrepareDirect.  We will be adding new items and categories continually so please visit us.

 

This exceptionally comprehensive essential checklist for emergency preparedness should be a crucial assist in your emergency, survival and outdoor adventure planning – study it carefully! It is one of the most (if not the most) comprehensive lists available – thankfully copied by many.

For most people planning for emergencies is similar to planning for a camping trip or any other outdoor adventure where the normal conveniences of home are not available. The biggest difference is determining whether to plan for being away from home or in your own residence – or perhaps both. The equipment to include in your emergency kit or camping supplies list will be very comparable. Differences and variations will generally depend upon the severity and length of time you anticipate for your emergency scenario. Long term emergencies and outdoor explorations will require, in addition to this list, more extensive planning and provisioning.

Important questions to answer as you do your planning: 

  • Are the equipment and supplies necessary to fulfill your needs going to be based on how cheap they are, or on the quality, value, and reliability of the product?
  • What are the repercussions or benefits from the choices that are made?
  • Who is affected?
  • What chances are you willing to take with inferior and inadequate provisions?
  • What will the climate be during the emergency or adventure – weather and political?
  • What is the probable availability of essential goods and services at the location where you are or where you are going for your adventure or during your anticipated emergency?

Although this list is an authoritative and comprehensive compilation of crucial supplies for emergency preparedness and outdoor adventure, these suggestions focus on basic necessities, and are not intended to be an exhaustive and detailed list of all choices, as each person or group has their own special requirements and needs. While there are numerous options to choose from in each category, use this guideline of essentials to ensure you have evaluated all the possibilities given the scenarios and circumstances for which you are preparing and provisioning, whether for preparedness planning or outdoor adventuring.

Your comfort, enjoyment and life may depend upon it!

Be clear about the time factors, persons involved, and situations that you anticipate will occur in an emergency or an outdoor experience. Knowing this information is crucial to stocking the appropriate items in the appropriate quantities. Many of these items will be essential for bartering if supplies are exhausted and the emergency you are preparing for is long term.

Proper provisioning is about safety, health, protection, comfort, and peace of mind – for not only you, but also your family and friends.

Items with an asterisk * are recommended for a “grab-and-go bag” or “bug out bag.” This is an easily accessible bag you keep near by to grab when you only have a moments notice to evacuate. Items with a double asterisk ** indicates items for your bag whose quantity will depend on the length of your anticipated emergency scenario. You may require more than one quick-grab-bag depending on your specific needs.

As a complement to this checklist I highly recommend answering the questions in: The 12 Crucial Questions of Preparedness Planning article.

THE LIST

 

  1. Carrier for Provisions

If you anticipate having to relocate, have your transportable supplies in one or two easily accessible carriers, especially if you must leave in a hurry.

  • *Backpack
  • *Large duffel/canvass bag with duel shoulder straps in case it has to be carried for some distance
  • Lightweight suitcase/sturdy container/Food and Supply Brick™
  • Wheeled device
  1. Water

An obvious necessity for everyone. Know what water sources are available to you during an emergency, or in the outdoors. Plan accordingly and don’t hold back preparing for this essential category. Don’t go cheap!

  • *Gravity/hand pump water purifier/filter/extra cartridges/straw filters
  • *Bottle purifier/filter
  • *Purification tablets – Chlorine Dioxide/iodine
  • *Separate containers for dirty and treated water
  • Multiple containers depending upon situation
  • WaterBricks™ water container
  • Camelback™ & bladder type containers
  • **Specially packaged water (5+ years storage life), Aqua Blox®
  • **Bottled water (2 years storage life) – can be filtered or treated if older
  • Solar or stove top distillers
  • Survival Still® non-electric portable distiller
  • Desalinators for salt water
  • Reverse osmosis purifiers
  • UV purifiers
  • Additives – colloidal silver/bio-active silver hydrosol/stabilized oxygen/BioFilm drops
  • Chlorine (5.25 % sodium hypochlorite, non-scented only with no additives – 6 drops per gallon)
  • Manual pump if near a well
  • Water gathering supplies – plastic tarps/containers/instructions
  • Water stored in your own containers – large and small
  1. Food

Numerous options are available. This category must be accessed carefully depending upon the length of time of the emergency or outing, and severity of circumstances you anticipate might occur. Remember, certain foods will require more water and fuel to prepare – is this appropriate to your anticipated situation? Would you store foods for an emergency that you would not normally want to eat? Foods should be shelf stable and easy to prepare. Consider nutrient dense foods not empty calorie foods. When considering whole grains, seeds, legumes and beans don’t forget sprouting.

NOTE: Many newer food companies are promoting their pouched foods to have a 25 year plus shelf life – beware! Many of these food companies market their foods as “survival” foods – they are just that – eaten to survive only – their quality, packaging and shelf stability is questionable. Would you store foods for an emergency that you would not normally want to eat?

  • **Bars/energy bars/trail mix/food tablets
  • **Other eat-as-is simple and nutritional compact/nutritionally dense foods
  • **Freeze-dried/dehydrated from established companies in pouches, cans or bulk – numerous varieties available
  • Canned – wet pack
  • **Retort wet-pack pouches/trays/self-heating meals
  • **MRE’s (Meals-Ready-To-Eat) – military specs (These military designed rations were developed for troops to be eaten for no longer than one month at a time – they are not appropriate for exclusive long term consumption)
  • Boxed – eat as is/mixes/individual items
  • Baking soda (numerous uses)
  • Non-perishable basics
  • Powdered items – milk/cheese/whey/vegetables/fruits
  • Wild foods/foraging – get a good illustrated guide
  • Bulk commodities – Rice (brown rice has a short – 6 months – shelf life), grains, seeds, honey, beans (smaller grains and beans are good for sprouting and cook quicker with less water)
  • Bulk freeze-dried, dehydrated, air dried, instant, just-add-water, powders – fruits, vegetables, beans, pasta, oats
  • **Ready-to-eat comfort and nutritional foods
  • Garden seeds if appropriate – longer term scenarios – heirloom/organic (You will find many who promote storing garden seeds. You must research the shelf life, storage conditions and germination viability of the different varieties you are storing – they vary considerably.       Garden seeds alone are inadequate without tools, gardening knowledge, the ability to remain in place and of course water. In the long term emergency situation where survival depends on growing your own food, significant planning is vital.)
  • Supplements – vitamins/minerals/powdered green drinks/energy formulations
  • **Concentrated energy powders/bars/tablets
  • Condiments/seasoning blends/salt/coffee/tea/bullion/sweeteners (as natural as possible such as stevia and coconut sugar)
  • Gravy – dry mix or canned (can be added to bland foods for flavor)
  • Cooking oil (olive oil in a steel container has a decent shelf life – avoid hydrogenated oils containing trans-fat)
  • **Special needs foods – Those with food intolerance’s/nursing mothers/children/medical conditions
  • Baby foods
  • Red wine
  • Freeze-dried meats
  • Tuna fish in oil/sardines – high protein and long shelf life
  • **Cooking/heating required for the foods you have in your grab-and-go bag?
  1. Food Preparation

If you must relocate and plan on cooking or heating water, consider lighter weight and efficient equipment.

  • **Stove – camping/alternative/very portable/Kelly Kettle®
  • **Pots and pans – stainless steel/cast iron/non-stick – avoid aluminum
  • **Utensils
  • Pressure cooker
  • **Cookware kit
  • Grills
  • **Fuel – propane canisters/butane canisters/white gas/alcohol/wood/solid fuel cubes/charcoal/kerosene/lighter fluid
  • *Water/food bottle
  • *Hand operated can opener/opener on knife or multi-tool/P38 (for all of us military folks)
  • 5 or 6 gallon plastic buckets
  • FoodBricks™ – from WaterBrick™ company
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Chlorine bleach – non scented
  • *Plastic bags/containers
  • Cheese cloth
  • Thermos for “prepare in container” whole and cracked cereals (Add about a 1:1 ratio of boiling water and cereal –       mix in dried fruit, nuts and sweetener if desired – close container tight – let sit a few hours or overnight.)
  • Knife sharpener
  • “Package-you-own” equipment and supplies
  • Solar oven with cookware/GoSun Solar Stove/All American Sun Oven (both units will also purify water)
  • Manual grain mills/grinders/juicers/mixers/beaters
  • Sprouting equipment – portable and/or stationary/sprouting jars
  • Canning equipment if appropriate
  • Twist-ties
  • Corkscrew/bottle opener
  • Paper plates/bowls/cups/towels
  • Coffee filters – has multiple filtering uses
  • Small storage containers
  • Aluminum foil
  1. Fire Starter – Matches

Be prepared for any situation and the possible need to start a fire, especially if weather conditions are severe.

  • *Flint/magnesium starters
  • **Waterproof tinder/very fine steel wool/products designed to start fires in adverse conditions
  • **Windproof high quality lighters/disposable Bic type lighters
  • **Matches in a waterproof container/storm proof matches
  • Magnifying glass
  1. Medical

When your health and survival during a medical emergency is at stake, you don’t want to rely on cheap or inadequate medical supplies. This is an important category to thoughtfully evaluate. Don’t forget medications or products needed for those with special medical conditions.

  • *Quality kit with adequate components for a multitude of emergencies
  • *Accessories – dental emergencies/suture kit/snake bite kit – instructions/tweezers/safety razor blades/cotton balls/scissors/safety pins/tick removal
  • Syrup of Ipecac (to induce vomiting if poisoned)
  • *Essential prescription medications/allergy medications/birth control
  • *First Aid manual
  • *Insect repellant (non DEET recommended)
  • *Sunscreen/lip balm
  • *Eyeglasses/sunglasses/contacts/repair kit
  • *Copies of prescriptions
  • *Foot care/moleskin/blister pads
  • Aspirin/Tylenol/ibuprofen/other over the counter drugs for minor issues/antibiotics
  • Homeopathic remedies
  • Colloidal Silver – internal/external – gel
  • Herbal kits/aloe vera
  • Dust masks/gas masks
  • Potassium Iodate (Iodate is recommended over Iodide)
  • Isopropyl alcohol/rubbing alcohol
  • Anti-itch salve
  • Medications for head lice
  • Ear plugs (it could get noisy at night)
  • Quik Clot® (stops bleeding)
  • Baking soda/hydrogen peroxide
  • Tourniquet
  • Thermometer
  • Latex gloves/Nitrile – latex free gloves
  1. Personal Hygiene – Sanitary Supplies  

Depending on individual circumstances and your location, it is vital to prevent any problems that might arise from unsanitary conditions. Take precautions to ensure a disease free environment. The length of an emergency and living/camping conditions require different approaches to personal hygiene.

  • **Personal hygiene items – soap/toothbrush/toothpaste/shampoo/deodorant/hair brush/comb/dental floss (multiple uses)
  • **Feminine hygiene
  • **Treated towelettes/waterless wipes
  • **Sanitary toilet provisions – portable toilet/powered chlorinates or lime/disposable urinals – solid waste bags
  • *Plastic bags
  • Latex gloves/nitrile – latex free gloves
  • **Toilet Paper
  • Towels
  • Solar shower
  • *All purpose soap/cleaning agents
  • *Anti-bacterial sanitizer
  • Kleenex
  • *Nail clippers
  • Lime/disinfectant/bleach
  • Cloth diapers (multiple uses)
  • Small shovel
  1. Clothing

For warmth, comfort, and protection from insects and the elements.

  • *Proper and adequate clothing for the appropriate season and location
  • *Appropriate shoes/socks/boots/snow shoes/extra laces
  • *Rain gear/poncho/rubberized boots
  • *Cold weather gear – coats/layered clothing/thermal underwear
  • *Hat/gloves/bandana
  • Extra stuff sacks
  • Insect head net
  • Belts – regular/military type with small pouches
  1. Shelter – Warmth

For protection from insects and the elements, warmth, sleeping, comfort, privacy.

  • *Tarps
  • Plastic sheeting/large plastic trash bags
  • *Tent – *tube/*lightweight/regular
  • Shelter building material
  • Nylon patch repair kit/seam sealer
  • *Sleeping bag – *emergency/*lightweight/*bivy bag (small individual size tent/bag)/compact lightweight/regular down bag
  • Sleeping pad/cot/air mattress
  • Hammock
  • *Emergency blankets
  • Regular blankets
  • Sheets
  • Hand/body warmers
  • Insect netting
  • Extra stakes/rope/bungee cords
  • Umbrella

  10. Communication

It is essential to be kept informed during an emergency with friends, family, and appropriate governmental agencies and emergency organizations. When in an outdoor environment, unsettled weather considerations necessitate weather alert radios. Avoid a sense of isolation during serious emergencies.

  • *Radios – hand cranked/solar/batteries
  • Two-way radios
  • Short wave/CB (citizens band)/GMRS (general mobile radio service)/FRS (family radio service)/VHF (very high frequency) radios
  • Ham radio for radio amateurs – need license to transmit and/or radio with Ham frequencies for listening
  • Radios with NOAA (government agency) weather channels (7) and weather alerts if necessary in your area
  • *Cell phones/smart phones/charger
  • Satellite phones
  • *Whistle
  • *Signaling devices/flares/mirror
  • *Notebook/pen – regular & space pen that will write in any weather and position/markers/waterproof paper
  • PLB (personal locator beacon)
  • Small TV – battery/solar operated
  • Telephone not requiring external power
  • Morse code chart

11. Lighting

This is an essential category to address when anticipating any situation where you may be in darkness. Not only for a sense of security and comfort, but to be able to see clearly and act accordingly if emergencies happen in the dark.

  • *Flashlight – hand cranked/solar/batteries/LED and regular bulbs
  • *Lantern (*small or large size) – hand cranked/solar/batteries/propane/mantel/ candle/LED and regular bulbs
  • Oil lamps – kerosene/clear lamp oil/wicks
  • Strobe light
  • *Head Lamp
  • **Extra batteries/power source
  • **Candles
  • Extra mantels/extra propane canisters
  • Light sticks
  • Solar charger for charging rechargeable batteries

12. Tools – Instruments – Accessories

Numerous unforeseen situations or just routine conditions occur during an emergency or during an outdoor adventure. Be prepared and secure with the proper quality tool.

  • *Knife/knives/knife maintenance/sharpener
  • *Multi-tool/Swiss Army knife
  • *Navigation/compass/GPS device
  • Repair tools – hammer/screwdrivers/pliers/wire cutters/nails/screws/nuts & bolts/crowbar/spikes/pulley
  • Repair Kits
  • *Axe (*small or large)/saw (*hand controlled chain or special outdoor)/hacksaw/wood splitting/wedges
  • *Rope/wire/bungee cords/straps/paracord/heavy cordage/cable ties
  • *JB Weld/super adhesive/superglue/epoxy
  • Goo remover
  • Lubricating oil/WD-40®
  • Chain
  • Padlocks
  • *Work gloves
  • Shovel/multi-purpose folding shovel
  • Garden tools if appropriate
  • Fishing/hunting/trapping gear/Ronco Pocket Fisherman®/snare wire
  • *Duct tape/Hurricane tape/nylon repair tape/patches
  • *Plastic bags/trash bags/plastic sheeting
  • *Aluminum foil
  • *Sewing and repair supplies
  • Velcro
  • Safety goggles
  • Weather condition instruments/thermometer
  • *Watch – regular/multi-featured
  • Binoculars
  • Stuff bags for organizing
  • Scissors
  • Rubber bands
  • Small broom/rake
  • Buckets
  • Files
  • Clothes pins
  • Dust/gas masks
  • *Siphoning tube/hose
  • Hand pump
  • *Auto/bicycle/boat emergency items (keep in vehicle)
  • Can of red spray paint to indicate emergency information
  • Shut-off tool for gas/water supply
  • Tool for braking auto glass and cutting seat belts/webbing
  • Fuel – gasoline/diesel/kerosene/propane
  • Fuel stabilizer
  • Fire extinguisher

         13. Emergency Instructions – Guidance – Support – Back up – Personal Documents

Important and accurate information can not only be helpful it can be life saving. Researching reliable and trustworthy information sources is a vital component to preparedness and outdoor survival planning. Establishing family communication and reunion plans is also essential for security and peace of mind. Certain documents should always be available.

  • Books/*Bible/novels
  • Morale builders – personal items that help children and adults cope in stressful situations
  • *Medical information
  • *Emergency/survival information
  • *Manuals appropriate for equipment you have
  • *Maps
  • *Pen/magic marker/paper/chalk
  • *Compass
  • Edible wild foods publications/field guides
  • *Essential personal documents – photo ID/will/insurance/stocks/bonds/birth certificates/DD214/bank account & credit card numbers/family records/personal property inventory for insurance/deeds/pink slips/passports/ Social Security cards/check books/credit and debit cards/irreplaceable photographs and certificates – IN WATERPROOF CONTAINER
  • *Phone numbers and addresses of friends, relatives, and emergency organizations/agencies
  • *Spare keys
  • *Instructions on meeting and/or communicating with family and/or friends during or after an emergency
  • Duel language dictionary if appropriate
  • Solar calculator
  • Back-up computer discs/flash drives
  • Laptop/iPad/tablets/PDA’s/mp3-4 players
  • *Entertainment – music/instruments/cards/games

14. Power – Energy

A reliable power supply can be crucial in an emergency or for various outdoor recreational activities. Many valuable communication, radio, entertainment and lighting devices require power. Currently there are a number of dependable portable solar (large and small), storage, and hand operated units available to power your electronic devices.

  • *For power – a small portable solar charger for electronics and rechargeable batteries
  • For lighting
  • For radios
  • For electronic devices
  • For communication
  • *Hand cranked radios and lanterns with USB charger & power cords
  • Solar/storage/hand cranked power devices – fuel free portable power/small power packs
  • Solar panels
  • Generator – gas/propane/back up fuel
  • Appropriate linking cables
  • *Batteries of all sizes – alkaline/rechargeable
  • *Battery charger – wall/car/solar
  • Deep cycle battery
  • Inverter

15. Cash

It is impossible to know for certain what circumstances might exist during a serious emergency and for what duration normal financial activities will be disrupted. Access to electronic funds or use of credit cards may not be possible. Cash or barter may be the only means of paying for goods or services.

  • *Cash in smaller denomination bills
  • Gold/silver coins
  • Smaller items for barter
  • *Credit/debit cards

16. Personal Security

Each individual must decide the extent to which they will provide protection for themselves and their families from physical harm by others or wild animals. Don’t forget fire safety.

  • Weapons/ammunition/gun cleaning supplies/bow hunting supplies – If you have firearms make sure all those who might use them are properly trained
  • Tazer
  • Mace
  • Pepper Spray
  • Bear repellant
  • Sling shot
  • Clubs/bats
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Large dog

17. Special Needs

This category must not be overlooked if you, other family members, or friends have specials needs and require individual attention.

  • **Personal items specifically required by special needs individuals
  • **Medical items and prescriptions – consider having an adequate supply on hand in the event of a unforeseen and prolonged emergency
  • **Special foods or other items for children/elderly/disabled/nursing mothers
  • *Children’s items for comfort and a sense of security – blankets/dolls/toys/diapers/pacifiers
  • **Pet needs

18. Transportation Support

An often overlooked category, specific transportation support must be assessed especially for longer duration emergencies or for outdoor activities where the transportation devices are critical. Evaluate these options, determine which ones you will utilize, determine what you will need to ensure safety, comfort, repair potential, and adequacy to handle the transportation of your provisions.

  • Motor Vehicle – car/truck/van/RV/motorcycle/extra gas/repair and emergency equipment/trailer
  • Boat – motorized/sail/canoe/kayak/paddle/inflatable/folding
  • Scooter – gas/electric/solar
  • Bicycle – regular/folding – repair parts/tire pump – special towing cart/small gas engine
  • Horse
  • By foot
  • Wagon/garden cart/wheel barrow – for manual needs

Emergency Preparedness Items for Automobiles – Trucks – Vans – RV’s

These items are especially important for long trips, family outings, new younger drivers, inclement weather, remote areas and at night.

  • Spare tire
  • Jack with tire iron and supporting tools
  • Device to break window and cut seat belts from the inside in an emergency
  • Tire inflation device – portable power and/or aerosol can inflator/other tire repair materials
  • JB Weld®/super adhesive
  • Jumper cables
  • Portable power unit for jump starting and backup power
  • Tow cables/rope
  • Chains/cables/bungee cords for tightening
  • Crowbar
  • Reflectors/flares
  • Hidden spare key
  • Extra oil
  • Extra gas/funnel if appropriate
  • Siphon hose
  • Extra fan belts/bulbs/hoses/additives/sealers/hard to get parts/repair kit
  • Window scraper
  • Important phone numbers/documents/insurance information
  • GPS device if appropriate
  • Empty gas can
  • Material to gain traction if stuck in snow or ice – cat liter/sand/wood shavings/old rug

Additional critical items from the above Essential Checklist to carry in your vehicle:

  • Tarps
  • Blankets/emergency sleeping bag
  • First Aid kit
  • Baby supplies
  • Food and water/water purification/containers if appropriate
  • Maps
  • Pen/magic marker/paper
  • Personal documents and photo ID/registration/insurance
  • Gloves
  • Duct tape
  • Rope/wire
  • Repair tools
  • Plastic bags large and small
  • Cell phone/smart phone/charger
  • Emergency radio/hand crank radio
  • Emergency lighting
  • Rope/wire/bungees
  • Small solar/12 volt power packs for small electronics
  • Cash/credit card
  • Extra clothing in harsh and/or wet weather/hat
  • Hand/body warmers
  • Rain gear/rubber boots/poncho
  • Knife/multi-tool
  • Whistle
  • Toilet paper
  • Towels
  • Shovel
  • Small fire extinguisher
  • Matches/fire starter
  • Extra batteries
  • Personal protection devices or items as appropriate/pepper spray                                                                                                                                      
  • Refer to the Essential Checklist for other items relevant to your vehicles specific needs.

Reproduction of this important Checklist for other media is granted if Denis Korn and Learn To Prepare is appropriately credited

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