Top 10 Food Storage Myths

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food storage myths

The internet is full of websites that give information on survival topics, including food storage. There are dozens and dozens of books that will teach you “the right way” to store food and YouTube videos galore. Most contain valid, trustworthy information, but mixed in with that are a number of food storage myths that many people accept without question.

Here are 10 that I take issue with, and I explain why.

By the way, following Myth #10 are 2 short videos that review these myths.

Myth #1:  You should stock up on lots of wheat.

When I was researching foods typically eaten during the Great Depression, I noticed that many of them included sandwiches of every variety. So it makes sense to stock up on wheat, which, when ground, becomes flour, the main ingredient to every bread recipe.

There are a couple of problems with the focus on wheat in virtually all food storage plans, however. First, since the time of the Great Depression millions of people now have various health issues when they consume wheat. From causing gluten intolerance to celiac disease our hybridized wheat is a whole ‘nother animal that our great-grandparents never consumed.

The second issue is that wheat isn’t the simplest food to prepare, unless you simply cook the wheat berries in water and eat them as a hot cereal or add them to other dishes. In order to make a loaf of bread, you have to grind the wheat, which requires the purchase of at least one grain mill. Electric mills are much easier to use and, within just seconds, you have freshly ground flour. However, you’ll probably want to add a hand-crank mill to have on hand for power outages. All together, 2 mills will end up costing a pretty penny, depending on the brands you purchase.

Then there’s the process of making the bread itself, which is time consuming.

I’m not saying you shouldn’t store wheat, and, in fact, I have several hundred pounds of it myself. The emphasis on wheat as a major component in food storage is what I have a problem with. In retrospect, I wish I had purchased far more rice and less wheat. Rice is incredibly simple to prepare and is very versatile. It, too, has a very long shelf life.

Myth #2: Beans last forever.

While it’s true that beans have a long shelf life, they have been known to become virtually inedible over time. Old-timers have reported using every cooking method imaginable in order to soften the beans. A pressure cooker is one option but, again, some have told me that doesn’t even work!

Another option is to grind the beans and add the powdered beans to various recipes. They will still contain some nutrients and fiber.

Over the years, I’ve stocked up on cans of beans — beans of all kinds. They retain their nutrients in the canning process and are already cooked, so there’s no need to soak, boil, pressure cook, etc. You can always home can dried beans, and if you have beans that have been around for more than 10 years or so, canning them is a super simple process and insures they won’t become inedible.

Myth #3: If they’re hungry enough, they’ll eat it!

Have you ever fallen in love with a recipe that was easy to make, inexpensive, and your family loved it? You probably thought you’d finally found The Dream Recipe. And then you made it a second time, then a third, then a fourth. About the 8th or 9th time, however, you may have discovered that you had developed a mild form of food fatigue. Suddenly, it didn’t taste all that great and your family wasn’t giving it rave reviews anymore.

When it comes to food storage, don’t assume that someone will eat a certain item they currently hate, just because they’re hungry. If you stock up on dozens of #10 cans of Turkey Tetrazzini, sooner or later the family will revolt, no matter how hungry they are.

Myth #4. All I need is lots and lots of canned food.

There’s nothing wrong with canned food. In fact, that’s how I got started with food storage. However, canned food has its limitations. A can of ravioli is a can of ravioli. You can’t exactly transform it into a completely different dish. As well, canned food may have additives that you don’t care to eat and, in the case of my own kids, tastes change over time. I had to eventually give away the last few cans of ravioli and Spaghetti-O’s because my kids suddenly didn’t like them anymore.

Be sure to rotate whatever canned food you have, since age takes a toll on all foods, but, as I’ve discovered, on certain canned items in particular. My experience with old canned tuna hasn’t been all that positive, and certain high-acid foods, such as canned tomato products, are known to have issues with can corrosion. Double check the seams of canned food and look for any sign of bulging, leaks, or rust.

Lightly rusted cans, meaning you can rub the rust off with a cloth or your fingertip, are safe to continue storing. However, when a can is badly rusted, there’s a very good chance that the rust has corroded the can, allowing bacteria to enter. Those cans should be thrown away.

Worried about the “expiration” date on canned food? Well, those dates are set by the food production company and don’t have any bearing on how the food will taste, its nutrients, or safety after that date. If the food was canned correctly and you’ve been storing it in a dry and cool location, theoretically, the food will be safe to consume for years after that stamped date.

Myth #5: I can store my food anywhere that I have extra space.

Yikes! Not if you want to extend its shelf life beyond just a few months! Know the enemies of food storage and do your best to store food in the best conditions possible.

TIP: Learn more about the enemies of food storage: heat, humidity, light, oxygen, pests, and time.

I emphasize home organization and decluttering on this blog, mainly because it frees up space that is currently occupied by things you don’t need or use. Start decluttering and then storing your food in places that are cool, dark, and dry.

Myth #6: My food will last X-number of years because that’s what the food storage company said.

I have purchased a lot of food from very reputable companies over the years: Augason Farms, Thrive Life, Honeyville, and Emergency Essentials. They all do a great job of processing food for storage and then packaging it in containers that will help prolong its shelf life.

However, once the food gets to your house, only you are in control of how that food is stored. Yes, under proper conditions, food can easily have a shelf life of 20 years or more, but when it’s stored in heat, fluctuating temperatures, and isn’t protected from light, oxygen, and pests, and never rotated, it will deteriorate quickly.

NOTE: When food is old, it doesn’t become poisonous or evaporate in its container. Rather, it loses nutrients, flavor, texture, and color. In a word, it becomes unappetizing.

Myth #7: Just-add-hot-water meals are all I need.

There are many companies who make and sell only add-hot-water meals. In general, I’m not a big fan of these. They contain numerous additives that I don’t care for, in some cases the flavors and textures and truly awful, but the main reason why I don’t personally store a lot of these meals is because they get boring.

Try eating pre-made chicken teriyaki every day for 2 weeks, and you’ll see what I mean. Some people don’t require a lot of variety in their food, but most of us tire quickly when we eat the same things over and over.

These meals have a couple of advantages, though. They are lightweight and come in handy during evacuation time and power outages. If you can boil a couple of cups of water over a rocket stove, propane grill, or some other cooking device, then you’ll have a meal in a few minutes.

TIP: Store a few days worth of just-add-water meals with your emergency kits and be ready to grab them for a quick emergency evacuation. Be sure to also pack a spoon or fork for each person and a metal pot for meals that require cooking over a heat source.

However, for a well-balanced food storage pantry, stock up on individual ingredients and fewer just-add-hot-water meals.

Myth #8: I can stock up on a year’s worth and won’t need to worry about food anymore.

That is probably the fantasy of many a prepper. Buy the food, stash it away, and don’t give it a thought until the S hits the fan. There’s a big problem with that plan, however. When everything does hit the fan and it’s just you and all that food:

  • Will you know how to prepare it?
  • Will you have the proper supplies and tools to prepare the food?
  • Did you store enough extra water to rehydrate all those cans of freeze-dried and dehydrated foods?
  • Do you have recipes you’re familiar with, that your family enjoys, and that use whatever you’ve purchased?
  • What if there’s an ingredient a family member is allergic to?
  • Does everyone even like what you’ve purchased?
  • Have any of the containers been damaged? How do you know if you haven’t inspected them and checked them occasionally for bulges and/or pest damage?

If you’ve purchased a pre-packaged food storage supply, the contents of that package were determined by just a small handful of people who do not know your family, your health issues, or other pertinent details. These packages aren’t a bad thing to have on hand. Just don’t be lulled into a false sense of security.

Myth #9: Freeze dried foods are too expensive.

Yes, there is a bit of sticker shock initially when you begin to shop online at sites like Thrive Life, Augason Farms, and Emergency Essentials. If you’ve been used to paying a few dollars for a block of cheddar cheese and then see a price of $35 for a can of freeze-dried cheddar, it can be alarming.

However, take a look at how many servings are in each container and consider how much it would cost to either grow or purchase that same food item and preserve it in one way or another, on your own.

The 3 companies I mentioned all have monthly specials on their food and other survival supplies — that’s how I ended up with 2 cases of granola from Emergency Essentials!

Myth #10: This expert’s food storage plan will fit my family.

The very best food storage plan is the one that you have customized yourself. By all means, use advice given by a number of experts. Take a look at online food calculators, but when it’s time to make purchases, buy what suits your family best. What one person thinks is ideal for food storage may leave your kids retching.

Lots of resources to help you with your food storage pantry

Want this info on video? Here you go!

Food Storage Myths, Part 1: Myths 1-5

Food Storage Myths, Part 2: Myths 6-10

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 food storage myths

PANTRY: Long Term Food Storage

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PANTRY: Long Term Food Storage Bobby Akart “Prepping For Tomorrow” Audio in player below! On this week’s episode of the Prepping for Tomorrow program, Author Bobby Akart continues his discussion about stocking your Prepper Pantry. Last week, the program focused on growing your own food and heirloom seeds.  This week, we’ll focus on food storage … Continue reading PANTRY: Long Term Food Storage

The post PANTRY: Long Term Food Storage appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

10 Common Kitchen Spices That Have REMARKABLE Healing Powers

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10 Common Kitchen Spices That Have REMARKABLE Healing Powers

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Did you know you have a medicine cabinet of sorts right inside your kitchen? Many of the spices and herbs you have in your pantry can do more than just add flavor and color to your cooking. They also can benefit your health.

For centuries, traditional health practitioners have used spices and herbs to help people heal from all sorts of ailments and to help them maintain their wellbeing. Many herbs and spices contain as much or more vitamins, minerals and antioxidants as fruits and vegetables.

Here is our list of 10 healing spices that you likely already have in your pantry:

1. Basil. Fragrant basil, which is a great addition to many dishes, has anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. The volatile oils in basil can help relieve stomach and digestive upsets.

Research by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology found that basil contains high amounts of beta-caryophyllene (BCP), which may be useful for treating inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis. A study by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society also found that basil is useful in reducing swelling.

‘Miracle Oil Maker’ Lets You Make Fresh Nut Oils Within Minutes!

There are many varieties of basil available, including lemon basil, holy basil and Christmas basil.

2. Cloves. You can use ground or whole cloves to treat inflammation in the body caused by anything from the common cold to a toothache.

Cloves, which have anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties, also may be useful in controlling insulin levels for diabetics.

3. Cayenne pepper. Made from tropical chili peppers, cayenne pepper contains alkaloid capsaicin, which blocks the chemicals that send pain messages to the brain. Capsaicin also works to rev up the body’s metabolism and may boost calorie and fat burning in certain individuals.

Cayenne can relieve indigestion, gas and nausea. Since it thins phlegm and eases the body’s passageways from the lungs, cayenne also is useful in treating coughs and colds.

A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that people with diabetes who ate a meal with liberal amounts of cayenne required less insulin to reduce their body’s blood sugar.

4. Rosemary. As a super anti-oxidant, rosemary contains 19 chemicals with antibacterial properties that help fight infection. Often used by herbalists to treat asthma and allergies, rosemary contains volatile oils that can reduce the nasal constriction caused by histamine.

Researchers from Kansas State University found that rosemary can help your skin and aid your memory retention.

5. Turmeric. A favorite ingredient in curries, turmeric is the spice that gives many Indian dishes their yellow color. The chemical responsible for turmeric’s color, called curcumin, may protect the body from certain forms of cancer, such as prostrate and colon cancer and melanoma.

10 Common Kitchen Spices That Have REMARKABLE Healing Powers

Image source: Pixabay.com

Research has linked turmeric consumption with reduced inflammation in certain chronic conditions, such as psoriasis, and it is useful in treating colds and respiratory problems.

6. Sage. Sage is a natural mood-enhancer and memory booster. Sage also boosts the action of insulin and reduces blood sugar in the body, so it is helpful for diabetics.

Preliminary research suggests that sage may be useful in treating Alzheimer’s disease, since it prevents a key enzyme from destroying acetylcholine, which is a brain chemical involved in memory retention and cognitive learning. In another study, college students who took sage extract performed significantly better on memory tests than students who did not consume sage before the test.

7. Ginger. Ginger has been used by natural medical practitioners in many cultures for centuries to reduce stomach upset and to quell nausea.

Beet Powder: The Ancient Secret To Renewed Energy And Stamina

As an anti-inflammatory, ginger also is useful in reducing the pain of arthritis and of osteoarthritis pain of the knee. Ginger root’s healing compounds, including gingerols, also help ease headache pain.

8. Cinnamon. This tasty spice is an antioxidant powerhouse that can help stabilize blood sugar levels in diabetics and pre-diabetics.

Just a half teaspoon serving of cinnamon a day can reduce triglycerides and total cholesterol levels by 12 to 30 percent, according to research studies. Cinnamon also can help prevent blood clots.

9. Thyme. Thyme contains thymol, a germ-killing oil that can protect against gum disease, infections, ulcers and certain forms of cancer.

In addition, thyme extracts can soothe the coughing and throat irritation caused by the common cold or bronchitis.

10. Oregano. Often used in Italian recipes, oregano contains four compounds that soothe coughs and colds and 19 different chemicals that contain antibacterial properties.

Oregano consumption can improve the digestive tract, and research shows that it may help lower blood pressure, as well.

You may be wondering how long your spices will stay fresh in your pantry. As a general rule, herbs lose their potency and flavor over time. Whole spices will stay fresh for about four years. Ground spices will stay fresh for two to three years, and dried herbs will be potent for up to three years.

What is your favorite healing spice? Share your tips in the section below:

Discover The Secret To Saving Thousands At The Grocery Store. Read More Here.

Use Dry Pack Canning Methods to Preserve Food

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5 Ways to store food using dry pack canning techniques | PreparednessMama

5 Ways to Store Food Long-Term Dry Pack Canning is the process used to  store foods that have less than 10% moisture and are low in oil content. When properly done, these items will last a long time, maybe even 30 years under certain conditions. We’ve talked in the past about the reasons to have extra […]

The post Use Dry Pack Canning Methods to Preserve Food appeared first on PreparednessMama.

How to Calculate How Much Food to Store

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how much food to storeWhen I first began setting up my family’s food storage pantry, I was in a bit of a panic. It was late 2008, the economy was beginning to wave red warning flags, and all I wanted was to keep my family safe and surviving. I never stopped to figure out how much food to store.

So, into the shopping cart went multiple cans of ravioli, boxes of granola bars, juice boxes, and Honey Nut Cheerios. I had no idea of how much we needed to have, nor which foods were best. I just figured that food would keep us alive, and that was what was most important.

Well, that’s not a bad starting point, but over time, my  knowledge of food storage increased and the contents of my pantry improved, and I owe it all to spaghetti sauce.

The spaghetti sauce eye-opener

One day, after I’d been storing food for several months, I was looking over my over-stuffed pantry shelves and counted the jars of spaghetti sauce I had on hand. 53. Fifty-three jars of Prego, Ragu, Paul Newman’s — pretty much any brand for which I had found a coupon.

Then I counted the amount of spaghetti I had: 13 packages. How did I plan on making spaghetti as a meal without much actual spaghetti? That’s when I realized the importance of aligning what was in my pantry with specific meals planned and knowing how much of each ingredient to purchase and store.

As a mom, I do my regular grocery shopping around a menu. I make a list of what I want to cook for dinners, what we’ll eat for breakfasts and lunches, and then create a shopping list. I think in terms of recipes, not so much in terms of ounces or pounds of specific ingredients.

Over time, this is pretty much how I’ve managed my entire food storage. It’s centered around what we actually like to eat and meals that are easy to prepare if we were without power and I had to use a solar oven, like this one. Even in the best of times, cooking is not my favorite past time, so why complicate the process when planning for the worst of times with overly fussy recipes that are time consuming.

When all hell is breaking loose, who cares if they’re eating chili mac or boeuf bourguignon?

It’s important to have a solid idea of how much food your family consumes now as well as how much it will consume following a major disaster of some type. That way, you’ll know your own family’s needs are covered, will have an idea of how much you can spare (or not) in helping others, and will also let you know when you’ve reached your food storage goal.

Get started with the recipes

One of the best ways to make sure you are storing what you eat, is by doing doing just that – STORE WHAT YOU EAT! Find your family’s favorite recipes and then figure out how much food you’ll need to be able to make those meals for 3 months, 6 months, or however long you want to hide out in your home away from zombies.

You might have to make some minor adjustments to your recipes –  like having canned chicken on hand, or buying some freeze-dried fruits and veggies, but if you plan ahead you will have everything you need in case Ebola strikes your town and you need to hide out for awhile.

Some of the recipes that I have in my food storage planner are Macho Mexican Rice (been making this for years, you can tweak it in dozens of different ways), No-Recipe Soups, and various types of skillet casseroles.

In the case of soups and casseroles, their cooking pots or pans become both a mixing bowl, the cooking/baking vessel, and then the serving dish, all in one. Again, think “hard times, no power, must…keep…up…my…strength”. Anything that makes the whole cooking/eating/cleaning cycle easy is the route to take.

As well, look for recipes that are shelf stable and do not require refrigeration. In prepper circles, this is why dehydrated and freeze-dried foods are so popular. Stock up on cans of freeze-dried ground beef, store in on a shelf in a cool location, and you’ll be able to make hamburger pie, chili, or tacos in a matter of 5 minutes. The brand of freeze-dried food that I use most often is Thrive Life, but there are many different brands on the market.

For recipes requiring fresh produce, consider buying freeze-dried and/or dehydrated. Dittos if they call for meat and dairy products. Freeze-dried cheese is surprisingly good, although expensive.

The breakfasts and lunches at my house rarely require an actual recipe. For breakfast, I personally favor oatmeal and homemade pancakes. If I make 3-4 loaves of bread per week for my family of 4, I can serve up sandwiches at lunch. Leftovers are another popular lunch item as well as quick meals of pasta and homemade marinara sauce. Even though these meals are quick and casual, I will still have to account for them in my planning.

How to calculate how much food to store

Now that you have your meals planned, it’s time to calculate how much food you’ll need. A goal of 3 months is a reasonable one for more people and all too many crises, such as Superstorm Sandy, have proven that life doesn’t always return to normal as quickly as we might expect.

Also, in the days and weeks following a major disaster and the grocery stores have re-opened, do you really want to have grocery shopping on your To Do list? That stash of food, cleaning supplies, toiletries, etc. will be a godsend in more ways than one.

So, on to our calculations.

For each recipe, decide how many times you want to make it in a given month. A meal of pasta and marinara would be fine with my own family if I served it once a week. Dittos for the Macho Mexican Rice and chicken salad using freeze dried chicken. I’ll plan on making each of these meals once a week, or 12 times for my 3-month plan.

For your planning purposes, it will be simpler to assume each main meal/recipe will be made once a week. Therefore, when it comes time to begin shopping for ingredients, you’ll take each recipe, multiply each ingredient times 12, and that’s how much of each ingredient you’ll need to stock up on.

Going back to my Mexican rice recipe, let’s use that as an example:

  • 2 cups white rice
  • 3 T. olive oil
  • 3 cups water or chicken broth
  • 2 T. tomato paste
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 t. salt
  • 1 t. each: cumin, chili powder
  • 1 can chopped green chilies
  • 1/2 c. corn (frozen, freeze-dried, or canned)
  • 1/2 c. salsa

My plan is to make this once a week and, since all the ingredients are very food-storage friendly (have long shelf lives and can be stored at room temperature), I’m ready to move on to my calculations by multiplying each ingredient amount by 12.

  • 24 cups white rice
  • 36 T. olive oil
  • 36 cups water or chicken broth
  • 24 T. tomato paste
  • 24 cloves garlic
  • 6 t. salt
  • 12 t. each: cumin, chili powder
  • 12 cans chopped green chilies
  • 6 c. corn
  • 6 c. salsa

Looking over this list, a few things come to mind that will make storing this food easier. First, rice is inexpensive and maybe another rice-centered meal would be a good idea. I can buy a 50 pound bag of rice at Costco and be ready to make many dozens of these recipes. That would cover 2 days per week with 2 rice meals.

Storing oil can be tricky, and I detail the problem and solutions in this article, but in this case, olive oil stores for quite a long while on its own and can also be refrigerated or even frozen to extend its shelf life.

Next, if I prefer chicken broth over water, I can buy a large can of chicken bouillon and be good for at least a year. The bouillon from the grocery store is very expensive in comparison. Buy tomato paste in the largest size can OR make my own with tomato powder and a little bit of water.

Most of my recipes require garlic and I have a good supply of garlic powder on hand already. For this recipe and during a time of duress, I’d go ahead and use that garlic powder in lieu of fresh garlic. If you also use a lot of garlic in your cooking, plant many cloves of it and begin harvesting your own.

The remaining ingredients are all nicely shelf stable and will last for years by storing them in a dark, cool location — away from the enemies of food storage. I buy many spices in bulk already and canned goods and the salsa can be purchased inexpensively with coupons.

Once I know how much of each ingredient I need for this recipe, I need to make the same calculations for every other recipe in my plan. Honestly, this is the hardest part of the whole planning process.

You’ll end up with quite a long list of ingredients, but you’ll find a lot of recipes will call for the same ingredient. Between coupons, grocery store sales, and buying food in bulk when it costs less per unit, this really doesn’t have to be expensive.

By the way, if these large amounts cause you to freak out, just step your goal down a notch from 3 months to 1 month or from 1 month to 2 weeks. The main goal is to have extra food on hand that your family will eat and that can be prepared for a time of emergency. Once you get those 2 weeks or that 1 month under your belt, just repeat the process, except this time around, you’ll be a pro!

The recipe secret

If you think about a time when you’ll have to rely on stored food to see you and your family through a very tough time, the last thing you’ll want to do is make complicated recipes. The Mexican rice recipe borders on being almost too fussy for a survival recipe, but I’ve made it many times and know that I can make it as simple as possible by using only the first 6 or 7 ingredients AND I can turn it into a very satisfying meal by adding just about any kind of meat, including homemade hamburger rocks or freeze-dried beef.

The secret to making the planning, shopping, and storing of your food easy is by selecting very simple recipes that call for basic ingredients that will also be used in other dishes. If your kids can also make the recipes, that’s a huge bonus. This article provides even more details for the planning process.

Depending on your own style and skills, all this information can be kept in a spreadsheet or on sheets of plain old notebook paper. You’ll definitely want to have a system for tracking what you have and what you still need to buy.

how much food to store

How to Repurpose Glass Jars

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How to repurpose glass jars into something spectacular for your pantry storage | PreparednessMama

I have a collection of Tostitos Queso Dip glass jars that I’ve been saving for quite some time. In fact, I love to use them for storage so much that I moved them all the way from Oregon to Texas. Today is the day that I’m going to repurpose those glass jars into something spectacular. […]

The post How to Repurpose Glass Jars appeared first on PreparednessMama.

Fruit Juice in the Pantry — Giveaway!

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Mott's Fruit Juice giveawayOne of my favorite memories from my son’s early childhood was coming home one day and finding him hosting a kiddie cocktail party in our garage. Ever hospitable, he had provided each of his little friends with a bottle of water or juice. The kids, ages 3-5, were standing around, sipping their drinks, and, so help me, it truly looked like quite a sophisticated gathering, minus any tipsy behavior!

#mottsmoments #sweepstakes

#mottsmoments #sweepstakes

While my kids were growing up, we always kept a bottle of juice on hand in the fridge, since, sometimes, kids want something other than water or milk. I knew to stay away from sugary drinks and always opted for juices that contained only natural sugar from the fruit itself, such as Mott’s® and my creative offspring turned them into slushies and frozen juice pops.

This week my family revisited our juice cocktail party days with Mott’s® Apple Cherry juice. It’s a new flavor with no added sugar and a ton of Vitamin C. It’s slightly sweet and tart and, mixed with chilled, diet lemon-lime soda, was refreshing on a warm spring day in Texas.

Try Mott’s — Enter a giveaway!

Here at The Survival Mom, we spend a lot of time talking about saving money and raising smart, healthy, and prepared kids, and this giveaway will help you do both. Mott’s® is sponsoring a social media sweepstakes to promote their products, and winners receive a $100 Walmart gift card!

TIP: A Mott’s individual juice box inside a zipped plastic bag is a handy drink to add to a kid’s emergency kit. The natural sugars will give her a boost and the drink will help keep her hydrated.

To enter this contest, post a photo with Mott’s Apple Cherry Juice and tell why it is perfect for meal time (give the new Apple Cherry juice a try!). Share it on Instagram and/or Twitter, and use the hashtags #MottsMoments and #sweepstakes to make your entry official. Both hashtags are required. This sweepstakes ends on June 2, 2016.

Screenshot_20160504-101436

Last, register your social media share at THIS LINK. Be sure to include your Instagram or Twitter handle (mine is @TheSurvivalMom on Twitter and thesurvivalmom on Instagram), name, and email in order for Mott’s to contact you if you win. And I do hope at least one of my readers is a winner!

The Survival Mom and juice bottles

If I were to tell you only about this fun sweepstakes, I wouldn’t be The Survival Mom! Here are a few survival tips you can use:

  • For food storage purposes, bottled juices are shelf stable, unopened, for at least 3 months. Store in a cool, dark location.
  • Over the years, I have repurposed empty juice bottles in a couple of different ways. I refilled them with water for a stash of emergency water, but usually, I reuse them to store dry foods, such as rice, cornmeal, and oats. The plastic bottles are made of food safe PET material. To extend the shelf life of the food so it doesn’t lose flavor, texture, or nutrients, I keep it stored at the coolest temperatures possible and in a dark location.
  • Empty juice bottles are also handy for keeping a small supply of pet food and kitty litter in the trunk of the car. Unlike a cardboard box or paper bag, the heavy duty plastic won’t rip and the tightly capped bottle insures that spillage is unlikely.
  • In an extreme scenario, juice provides additional nutrients your body needs that plain water doesn’t. For example, the Mott’s® Apple Cherry juice contains 120% of the recommended daily value of Vitamin C.
  • Any mylar drink pouch can be repurposed to store small amounts of food, laundry soap, or other dry goods. Click here for complete instructions.

How about you? Have you tried the new Mott’s® Apple Cherry juice? What do you look for in a fruit juice for your family and is it part of your food storage?

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Mott’s®. The opinions and text are all mine.

50 Tips for Eating From the Pantry When You Have No Money for Groceries

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50 Tips for Eating From the Pantry When You Have No Money for Groceries When do you actually use the stuff in your prepper’s pantry? Have you ever stopped to think about what is the most frequent disaster that causes people to turn to their emergency food supplies? It isn’t what you might think. The …

Continue reading »

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The Organic Prepper!

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The Organic Prepper, Daisy Luther
Host: Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live

Organic Prepper Daisy Book Pic1On this episode, I’m joined by my good friend Daisy Luther. Daisy is a blogger, author of multiple preparedness-oriented books, and expert prepper who shares my passions for natural health and finding the enjoyment in prepping.

Daisy Luther lives in a small village in the Pacific Northwestern area of the United States. She is the author of TheOrganic Canner, The Pantry Primer: How to Build a One Year Food Supply in Three Months, and the soon-to-be-released The Prepper’s Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource.

The Organic Prepper, Daisy LutherOn her website, TheOrganic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health and preparedness, and offers a path of rational anarchy against a system that will leave us broke, unhealthy, and enslaved if we comply. As well, Daisy is the co-founder of the website Nutritional Anarchy, and her articles are widely republished throughout alternative media. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest,  andTwitter.

Organic Prepper Daisy Book Pic3Recently, Daisy and I were chatting about prepping, and how prepping makes us happy. Sure, the subjects we both write about and prepare for are serious as a heart attack, but the act of prepping brings us peace of mind. And let’s face it, a lot of them are just plain fun. Prepping is important, but that doesn’t mean that it has to be miserable. Remember, many people grow a garden and hunt simply because they like to.

Organic Prepper Daisy Book Pic2Constant stress will impact your physiology. The human Nervous System was not designed to remain in a constant state of alert, and eventually, your health will pay the price. Finding satisfaction in our day to day lives is important, and our prepping activities can be a solid source of that.

So join Daisy and I as we dish about how to incorporate natural health into prepping, finding satisfaction in a colorful wall of mason jars of food, the tuberculosis outbreak at a high school in Kansas, natural and herbal remedies, and who knows what else! One thing is for sure, and that is it will be a fun hour.
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25 Pantry Essentials for the Lost Art of Cooking from Scratch

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25 Pantry Essentials for the Lost Art of Cooking from Scratch Lots of folks busily fill their pantries with emergency food.  They stockpile grains, flours, canned fruits and vegetables, and preserved meats. But without 25 essential  ingredients for scratch cooking, it’s going to be pretty hard to make a delicious meal from those stored items. …

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The post 25 Pantry Essentials for the Lost Art of Cooking from Scratch appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Freeze-Dried Chicken: A Tutorial

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Freeze-Dried Chicken: A Tutorial via The Survival Mom

Of all the freeze-dried meats on the market, chicken is the one I use the most. It’s such a part of my everyday cooking that I was a bit surprised to hear someone say just this week that they weren’t entirely sure how to cook with it. Well, let me tell you.

How many recipes are there in the world that call for “one chicken breast, cooked and chopped?” Usually when I see something like that, I immediately think of the overhead required to thaw the chicken, cook it, and chop it up before I can get to the rest of the recipe. When I only have 45 minutes to throw a meal together for a hungry family, that’s the last thing I want to do. Freeze dried chicken takes out those extra laborious steps. Just rehydrate it and you’re golden. Specific instructions may vary, depending on the brand you’re using, but typically rehydration involves letting one part freeze dried chicken chunks stand in 2 parts water for 5-15 minutes. After the requisite time, I use my handy kitchen strainer to pour off any excess water.

Because it’s already pre-chopped and pre-cooked, freeze dried chicken is excellent for quick casseroles, chicken salad, and chicken noodle soup. Here are 3 of my tried-and-tested recipes using this handy food.

Layered Freeze-Dried Chicken Enchiladas

This is one of my family’s most favorite meals. It’s not terribly authentic because it is more of a tortilla lasagna than anything, but it’s still tasty and doesn’t take a lot of time to make.

Ingredients

1 1/2 cup freeze dried chicken, rehydrated

1/4 cup dehydrated onions

1 1/2 cup freeze dried cheddar cheese, divided

2 cans enchilada sauce -or- 2 cup homemade enchilada sauce, divided

1 cup sour cream

green chiles – optional (My kids just pick them out, so I tend to omit them.)

tortillas (whole wheat is best – usually 10 store bought, or anywhere from 6-9 homemade ones using the tortilla recipe found here.)

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. In a mixing bowl, combine chicken, onions, 1 1/2 cup enchilada sauce, chiles, 1 cup cheese.

In a 13 x 9 inch pan, put down a tortilla layer, breaking them in pieces in order to cover the whole bottom.

Spread a thin layer of the chicken and cheese filling, then cover with another layer of tortillas. Alternate layers until you run out of filling, ending with tortillas.

Pour the remaining enchilada sauce over the pan, and sprinkle with remaining cheese. Bake for 25 min or until bubbly.

Freeze-Dried Chicken Salad

Chicken salad is many things to many people, which is the primary basis of its appeal. All chicken salad has chicken and mayonnaise as the primary ingredients. It can be easily customized, according to preference and availability of ingredients, by adding:

  • chopped apples
  • chopped celery
  • parsley
  • basil
  • tarragon
  • dill
  • pecans or walnuts
  • minced hard-boiled egg
  • pineapple
  • grapes
  • mustard
  • chili powder or paprika
  • red onion or scallions
  • shredded carrots
  • olives

Here is where experimentation is truly king. If you don’t already have a favorite way to make chicken salad, I encourage you to add or subtract ingredients until you find one. If mayonnaise isn’t really your thing, you can also use sour cream or even plain yogurt instead.

Freeze-Dried Chicken Noodle Soup

Making soup with freeze-dried chicken is even easier, because you don’t even have to rehydrate the chicken ahead of time! Just make your soup as you normally would. Add 1/2 cup or so of chicken chunks into the pot once other ingredients are cooked through. Since the chicken doesn’t have to actually cook, just rehydrate and heat up, it’s okay to add the chicken toward the end of the cooking time. This is usually about when I add noodles as well.

NOTE: It’s okay to make soup without a recipe! It’s super easy with this tutorial.

Some people might think that freeze-dried chicken is one of those fluffy “luxury foods” for emergency preparedness – too outer-spacey and high tech for every day use by actual people. Not so! I like to keep a can on hand at all times. After you get used to cooking with freeze-dried chicken, you’ll start to think of fresh or frozen chicken breasts as a waste of time and motions (at least when it comes to making a quick dinner).

A quick word on taste: I used to cook with a lot of canned chicken for the same reasons I now use the freeze-dried version. The thing with canned chicken, though, is that it doesn’t have nearly the shelf-life. Also, and I think anyone who has eaten chicken out of a can will agree with me, it does have a residual taste that you don’t usually find when eating fresh chicken. If you’re worried that freeze-dried chicken will have a weird taste that can only be described as “ugh,” don’t. This very week I made a freeze-dried chicken meal for my family, and I was pleasantly surprised by how normal it tasted. You never would have guessed that this meal came from a can!

If you don’t already have freeze-dried chicken as part of your food storage, I encourage you to change your ways. You won’t be sorry!

Freeze-Dried Chicken: A Tutorial via The Survival Mom

Venezuela Is Out of Food: Here’s What an Economic Collapse Really Looks Like

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Venezuela is out of food.

After several years of long lines, rationing, and shortages, the socialist country does not have enough food to feed its population, and the opposition government … Read the rest

The post Venezuela Is Out of Food: Here’s What an Economic Collapse Really Looks Like appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

Top 10 Food Storage Posts of 2015

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You voted and chose the top 10 food storage posts on PreparednessMama in 2015!

PreparednessMama is on vacation this week. We hope you enjoy the top 10 food storage posts from 2015 Food storage is an easy preparedness win. Making sure that you can feed your family during economic challenges is the single biggest thing you can do to become self-reliant. These are the posts viewed most often by […]

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What’s for dinner? It’s in the can

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food storage cansWant to know when I am most often thankful to have food storage? It’s on those nights when I have trouble figuring out what to have for dinner!

Being a Survival Mom doesn’t mean just being prepared for the big emergencies, but for the every day ones – like having four hungry children to feed.

More often than not, I have a main dish planned, but I need a side dish or two to go with it. For my kids anyway, they’ll need more nourishment than just an entree! When I’ve been desperate in the past for side dish ideas, I’ve looked over what we had on hand, hoping for some inspiration!

One recent night, I knew we were going to have shredded barbecue beef sandwiches. We’ve been having them two to three times a month as I’m trying to work our way through a half cow we bought. I needed a new side or two to keep my family’s taste buds happy. Baked beans and corn came to mind, so I searched for some new recipes on Del Monte’s Web site. (I didn’t have a can of baked beans in the house, so I’d have to make them from “scratch.”) Below is what I tried, along with a few variations that can be made with them. (There was one recipe I didn’t try yet, but it gave me an “aha” moment – using canned fruit in smoothies! My children love smoothies, but we don’t always have the right ingredients on hand. That will change soon.)

These recipes use canned ingredients, along with seasonings and an occasional fresh ingredient or two. Opening a few cans makes the cooking process super easy and painless.

Baked Beans

This baked beans recipe called for pinto beans (canned), diced tomatoes (canned), sautéed onions, brown sugar, mustard, cinnamon and allspice. Dried beans could be used, although that takes a bit of planning and prep work to soak and cook them. Dried onions could be used instead of sautéed onions. Instead of baking, I threw the ingredients in a crock pot on low.

The recipe ended up a bit on the sweet side, so I added some paprika, cumin and jalapenos to make it a little zippier. It was a hit with everyone. I’ll probably cut down on some of the brown sugar next time and add some bacon if we have some on hand, but now I can make baked beans from “scratch” pretty easily.

Zesty Mexican Corn

This easy corn side dish calls for corn, butter, chili powder, cumin and lime juice. The corn could be sautéed in oil instead of butter and lime juice could be substituted with lime essential oil (just a drop or two). I had never cooked corn this way and it added a little crunch to the corn. This was another hit with the family and I wish I had doubled the recipe. Frozen or freeze dried corn could easily be used in place of the canned corn. Onions, green peppers, diced tomatoes or salsa could all be added for extra flavor.

Both of these recipes are very easy to make from food storage and pantry items. They could easily be done on the gas or charcoal grill or even over a fire. If we ever end up facing a long-term power outage, I think my family and I will be grateful to know different options for cooking from our food storage.

It’s in the can

Canned goods are a great part of any food storage pantry. Canned fruits and vegetables can make meals easy when the power goes out and are easy to pack up if you need to leave your home. Make sure to have a hand operated can opener with the cans and in any bug-out bag, though. If you end up in a situation where you have canned food and no can opener, you can try this tip from Survival Life: rub the can top side down on a hard surface like concrete until the seal starts to break.

Canned goods do have expiration dates, but many people believe the food can be good long past that date. Expiration dates are set by food production companies and can just reflect the “peak of freshness.” How can you know canned goods are still okay to eat? Signs that the food inside may not be safe to eat are bulging cans, rusted cans and cans that are leaking. Canned meat may break down more over time and tomato based products can break down cans eventually since they are high-acidic foods. In fact, I’ve heard complaints about canned tomato products than any other canned food.

While canned goods may not always be the absolutely healthiest option, in times of emergency (every day or catastrophic), they can come in handy to feed yourself and your family. Take the time to be creative with the food you store – your future taste buds (and those of your family) will thank you!

food storage cans

13 Food Storage New Year’s Resolutions

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food storage resolutionsStoring food, say a month or two’s worth, is no longer the habit of a fringe group of Doomers. Everyday moms like me have an extra stash of food set away for those “just in case” events.

1. Don’t let “perfect” get in the way of “it’s good enough.” You don’t need freeze-dried food to have a decent food storage pantry. Cans of food, lots of cans!, will do just fine. Stay focused on stocking up on shelf-stable food your family will eat and stay within your budget.

VIDEO: “Don’t let the ‘perfect’ become the enemy of the ‘good’.

2.  Do your best to protect stored food from the enemies of food storage. All of these will cause your food to deteriorate more quickly: heat, humidity, pests, oxygen, light and time. Heat is the worst enemy of all, so do everything you can to store the bulk of your food in the coolest part of the house.

READ THIS to learn more about the enemies of stored food. By the way, these enemies affect food in emergency kits, too.

3.  Try a few new varieties of food from companies like Emergency Essentials, but first, buy the smallest containers possible for a taste test. With each purchase, check for flavor, fresh-looking color, and then use that food in multiple ways to see if it’s a good fit for you. My family loves freeze-dried corn and I buy it, knowing that we can use it in chowders, stew, my Mexican rice recipe, and a whole lot more. The more versatile a food is, the more value it has.

NEW TO FOOD STORAGE? Read my tips for placing your first order with a food storage company here.

4.  Don’t stock up on foods that will disappear once the kids find them! At first, I stocked up on things like juice boxes and granola bars, only to find that they had mysteriously disappeared, leaving only the wrappers behind! My kids saw them and figured, “Hey, Mom’s finally buying the good stuff and hiding it from us!”

5.  Buy what you actually like and will use and resist the temptation to stock up on something just because it’s super cheap on double coupon day! At one point I had about 15 bottles of salad dressing that we never used and 2 years later, they were all such a disgusting looking color that I threw them out.

6.  Do keep your food storage area(s) free from pests. Diatomaceous earth, sprinkled around the floorboards of your pantry area is a good, non-toxic method for controlling pests. I also set out small containers of cornmeal mixed with borax as a safe way to kill off bugs. Given enough time, a really determined rodent can chew through the plastic of a 5-gallon bucket, so keep an eye out for rodent droppings.

7.  Stay focused on buying food that can be used in multiple recipes rather than just-add-hot-water meals. Those quick meals are fine for short term emergencies, but you want a pantry that will contain healthy ingredients for delicious meals — more of a long-term solution.

8.  Set a goal of collecting 12 new recipes that you and your family love that require only shelf-stable ingredients. If you already have a good start on a balanced food storage pantry, you’ll find that you already have many of the required ingredients stored. With fresh, new recipes, you’ll spare your family of food fatigue if you are ever completely reliant on that stored food.

READ MORE: My book, Survival Mom: How to Prepare Your Family for Everyday Disasters and Worst Case Scenarios, has 2 full chapters that will help you decide which recipes are best for food storage purposes and how to calculate how much of each ingredient  you’ll need.

9.  Start rotating that stored food, if you haven’t done this already. This is simply the process of using the oldest food on the shelf and replacing it with new food. If you’re conscientious about food storage conditions, heat, especially, your food will stay fresher longer, but if you have food that is more than 5 years old, begin using and replacing it.

10. Stock up on comfort foods. If your kids love macaroni and cheese, buy macaroni in bulk and repackage it for longer shelf life or buy it from a food storage company that has already removed the oxygen and sealed it in a can. Buy cheese, butter, and milk powders, and you’ll be able to make that mac-n-cheese years from now without having to buy any fresh ingredients! Chocolate chips, jelly beans, and other candies are other comfort foods to consider.

LEARN MORE: Use a vacuum sealer, like a Food Saver, to repackage foods like nuts, chocolate, and more. Here are my video instructions:

11. Don’t get lazy when it comes to repackaging food! Rule of thumb: if a food comes in a cardboard or flimsy plastic bag, it must be repackaged. I have full details in this article.

12. Add a little something to your food storage every time you go to the store, even if it’s just a single can of store brand soup. It really does add up over time.

13. There’s more to life than food, so also include cleaning supplies (I buy a lot of white vinegar, baking soda, and bleach) and toiletry items. These categories lend themselves very well to coupon shopping.

When you stock up on food, you are buying it at today’s prices and planning ahead for a time when those prices will increase. Food price inflation is tricky because it isn’t always about the number on the price tag, but the size of the package and the number of ounces the package contains. When I compare cans of tuna for sale now with cans of tuna that I’ve had in my pantry for a few years, the older cans are noticeably larger — but the price is the same! Food price inflation is happening but most people aren’t aware of it.

More resources for you

food storage resolutions

Organizing the Pantry with Reusable Labels

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My weekend project: Organize the pantry with reusable labels | PreparednessMama

My pantry was out of control! Perhaps you can relate to my messy dilemma. We have three cooks in the house and we all like to use herbs and spices while cooking. That means that things often do not get put back where they belong. It becomes one big jumbled mess of unorganized jars and we […]

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Food Storage, another look!

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Food Storage, another look!

food storage roomFood storage is easy, storing food to get the most length of storage out of it and to keep it as safe as possible while not taking up the entire house with towers of cans can be a bit more work! However, since food is essential for life, it’s worth doing it right and taking a bit of time. Once you get used to doing it, it becomes habit.

My first and foremost rule to storing food for the longest shelf life and no pest issues is this: IF IT COMES IN A BOX OR PAPER BAG, REPACKAGE IT! There are many bugs that live on the glue in those packages. Pests of all kinds can get through regular store packaging and decimate you food preps. How do you repackage it to ensure long life and safety is a question I am often asked. Here is what I do after a normal shopping trip:

Food Storage another lookI arrive home with a great sale item, last week it was Betty Crocker Scalloped Potatoes on sale for $0.78 a box! I got 18 of them. Way too much for just putting on a shelf and hoping for the best. I got out my scissors, my vacuum sealer and bags. I opened the package, cut off the directions, put the bag of potatoes and sauce mix in the bag along with the directions. I partially vacuumed the bag (so as not to crush the taters) and then sealed it. After I had them all done, I took them to my pantry and tossed them in the bucket marked “flavored potatoes”. Done. (yes, I put a piece of tape with the date on it too)

I do this with pasta, beans, some sugars and rice. Simple, easy and effective. They should be good, safe and ready to go for 5 years.

11-6-15 Mylar-bags-in Food StorageLong Term Food Storage is basically the same, but I use lined 5 gallon buckets and oxygen absorbers. For instance, I got bags of whole wheat that I will use when my flour runs out. I got a mylar bag, and put it in the bucket, opened it up and added the wheat. I tossed in about 2000cc’s of oxygen absorbers. I then hand expressed as much air as possible.

I  use my iron to seal the bag almost to the end. Then I fold up the bag and expressed the last bit of air and seal to the end. I put the lid on the bucket and mark the bucket with the contents and the date. I do this with white sugar, oats and cornmeal. Most of it will last for 20 years.

I can stack the food storage tubs, which are filled with meal size packages. I can also stack the buckets which are mostly filled with single bulk items. These are tucked away in all sorts of places. I am lucky to have a dry basement, but many people use spare bedrooms, home offices, closets or under the bed space. At times, I have used drapes over my tubs and used them as end tables. I know one person who pulled her couch out from the wall and stacked her tubs, put a cloth over them and calls it her “sofa table”.

Much of my food storage is normal, every day stuff that we eat daily or weekly. These are mostly canned goods. For those, I have a rotation system like a grocery store. I put the new items I purchase in the back and bring the rest forward. The expiration dates are already on them, but if you want, you can use a marker and put the date you bought it on the can. I have learned that most items are good well beyond the “best if used by” date. If you are uncomfortable with that, then buy the items with the farthest away “use by” date and make sure you keep rotating. (tip: look at the back of the shelf in the grocery. Sometimes they have different dates from what is in front). By storing what we eat and eating what we store, I rarely have a problem with anything going “out of date”.
Protect your food from freezing, moisture and air. If you can do this, it usually is protected from pests as well.

Re-posted with permission from APN

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Home Canning is Making a Comeback!

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Get Started! Home canning is making a comeback | PreparednessMama

People are discovering this money saving tool once again. Many of us remember our grandparent’s rows of mason jars, or avoiding the kitchen as a youngster in order to maintain freedom on canning days. If you do process your own food then you know the feeling of accomplishment it brings after a long day of […]

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Freeze-Dried Cheese: A Tutorial

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freeze dried cheeseCheese is one of those staples that many of us have difficulty doing without. It’s used as a key ingredient in lots of things, from cheese and crackers to tacos and casseroles. Unfortunately, the kind of cheese we tend to buy from the grocery store in shrink-wrapped blocks is not made for long-term storage, which is a major problem for those of us who like to plan far ahead.

Some recommend taking your cheddar out of the plastic wrapping to wax it and then leave it at room temperature, but this is controversial because the moisture content of softer cheeses — meaning anything that’s not rock-hard, like Parmesan — can cause the cheese to go rancid, or worse.

Luckily, science has given us freeze-dried cheese to solve just this problem! It may look pricey, but it’s well worth the cost, simply because of its remarkable shelf stability, flavor, and the fact that when rehydrated, it tastes and melts exactly like fresh cheese.

Unopened in the can, it has a shelf-life of 20 years. Manufacturers recommend that it be used within a year after opening. Compare this to regular cheese, which goes “iffy” if you leave it out of the fridge for a while and grows mold after a couple of weeks even when refrigerated.

Don’t be put off by the idea of “cheese in a can”. This isn’t that suspicious “cheese” mix that you put on macaroni. This is actual cheese. Freeze-dried cheese can genuinely be used any way you use regular grated cheese. And the best part is that it comes in several varieties, so you’ll be equipped to make lasagna with mozzarella, enchiladas with cheddar, and quesadillas with Monterey Jack!

I’ve been known to snack on it directly from the can. Tastes a lot like Cheez-It crackers!

How is freeze dried cheese made?

Before the late 2000’s, I only associated freeze-dried items with the “astronaut food” packets you can purchase in science museum gift shops: fun, weird, but not terribly practical for regular people. Today, however, freeze-dried foods are a food storage staple. (Read about the history of freeze-drying here.)

Regular freezing causes ice crystals to form within the food, which can damage the texture, color, flavor, and nutrients of the food. Think, if you will, about frozen strawberries in the frozen food section and how sad they look once they are thawed. In contrast, freeze-dried food is flash frozen so quickly that ice crystals do not have time to form, which preserves texture, structure and taste. From there, the frozen food is placed in a vacuum. This allows for sublimation, so that the water molecules evaporate off; the water goes from solid to a gas without passing through the liquid state. The end result is cheese that looks, smells, and behaves like cheese when used for cooking.

What can you do with freeze dried cheese?

Just about anything! I’ve made pizza, quesadillas, used it with tacos, and have made all kinds of casseroles with freeze-dried cheese. No one in my family noticed any difference, not even my picky toddler. I wouldn’t recommend using it for fresh eating, as with crackers or in a cold cut sandwich, but only for reasons of convenience: it’s pre-shredded, and thus carries the danger of falling off the cracker.

Pizza is one of the most popular items to make with freeze-dried cheese. This recipe uses a tortilla as the crust, which makes for a quick and easy meal.

Ingredients

6 Soft-Taco size flour tortillas
1 t. dried basil
1 t. oregano
1/4 t. garlic powder
1 T. clarified butter
3/4 cup Freeze Dried Mozzarella Cheese 
1/2 cup freeze dried turkey, freeze dried chicken or freeze dried ham*
1 cup freeze dried green pepper, diced*
3/4 cup freeze dried tomato chunks*

Instructions

Rehydrate ingredients according to directions on can.

Preheat oven to 400°F.

Combine basil, oregano, garlic powder, and olive oil in a small bowl. Lightly brush one side of tortilla with mixture. Sprinkle equal amounts of meat, green pepper, and tomatoes on each tortillas.

Top with cheese, place on middle rack of the oven and bake for 8 minutes or until crisp.

*Fresh versions, using the same amounts, can be used instead of freeze-dried.

freeze dried cheese

Why Honey is the PERFECT Survival Food

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Honey is a miraculous super food. Books have been written on the benefits.

Did you know that Honey, if stored properly, can literally last a lifetime or longer. There have even been accounts of 2000+ year old honey found in tombs that is still edible. That is why Honey is the perfect survival food and an excellent item to keep stocked in your pantry.

The Bible has 60 different verses on honey alone. If the Bible boasts of its benefits, we might want to listen up!

Most of us love it because it tastes incredible. It’s great to bake with and full of flavor. There is something about honey that makes you feel like you are doing something good for your body.

Ultimate Year Supply

Some compare it to sugar but the benefits of honey can’t be outmatched. There is simply no comparison.

Did you know:

  • Honey is much more healthy and nutritious than cane or beet sugar.
  • Honey has 15 nutrients whereas refined sugar has essentially none, other than “empty carbohydrates.”
  • Honey contains healthful enzymes, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.
  • The minerals in honey include zinc and selenium, which could play a role in preventing the spread of viral infection.
  •  The enzymes in honey help predigest our foods, lessen the work of digestive organs and relieve the stress on the digestive glands.
  • Honey is an aid to digestion when taken in the raw state because of its enzyme content while sugar interferes with digestion. 
  • Honey enters the bloodstream slowly, at about 2 calories per minute. In contrast, sugar enters quickly at 10 calories per minute, causing blood sugars to fluctuate rapidly and wildly. 
  • Sugar causes calcium leakage from bones, contributing to osteoporosis while honey does not.

Where to Find the Best Honey?

  • Local farm honey is excellent. Farmer’s markets and local stands will typically carry all kinds. Local honey can also help build immunity to certain allergens. Spring will be here soon so it’s a good time to get your body prepared if you suffer with seasonal allergies.
  • Whole food and health stores typically carry a great selection but can be expensive.
    • Consider trying The Ready Store brand. They are selling today a 5 lb. bucket for 20% off along with other items. This is a creamy version and will store well. You get a lot for your money in a 5 lb. bucket.

Ultimate Year Supply