Post-Disaster Wellness: Why Drinking Alcohol in High Stress Environments Should Be Avoided

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Hey there, ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals!  We are going to discuss how alcohol affects your physical training, and what physiological effects you must take into consideration.  Please understand: I am not “demonizing” alcohol or alcoholic beverages, and am not scoffing or scorning anyone who partakes in them in a normal, healthy manner.  Indeed, the scope of this article is not “moralistic,” nor am I a spokesperson for abstinence.  The intent is to explain how alcohol diminishes your recovery time and performance regarding your physical training.

You, the readers are a very demographically-diverse group from all walks of life and all ages, some with special health care needs.  I implore all of you to analyze your status and with your doctor come up with an exercise program for yourself.


Physical training and exercise are your best tools for preparation, along with proper study, diet, and rest.


Why You Should Avoid Drinking Alcohol in High Stress Environments

That being said, why am I writing about alcohol affecting training?  I do so because the proverbial “two drinks,” as well as the “after dinner drink,” and the “after work drink” are pervasive in our society and culture.  The Super Bowl just finished up, with hardly anything in the ads for your physical training, but a barrage from Budweiser to drink beer.  Consider me a quiet voice on the sideline, little more than a whisper in your ear recommending the physical training.

Alcohol deposits fat in your midsection, and also has a wasting effect on the thigh and gluteal muscles.  There was a study in 2000 done published in the Journal of Applied Physiology that found cortisol (a hormone we discussed in previous articles) rose 61% when alcohol was consumed after strenuous physical activity.  The reason for this significance: many people have physically-demanding jobs and wish to “wind down” with a beer or two, or a shot after work.

The cortisol (usually produced with stress) has an adverse effect on muscle maintenance and muscle growth.  See, alcohol has an effect that has gravitated man toward it throughout history: it holds similar effects to the drug Valium (or Diazepam, if you prefer) with calming, anxiety-relieving effects.  It also releases dopamine and endorphins within the first 20 minutes of consumption, substances that enhance pleasure when released by the brain…and in this effect, alcohol is almost akin to opium.

With low doses, alcohol increases stimulation in certain brain areas and the central nervous system, leading to feelings of euphoria.  So, with all of this, you may be thinking…shouldn’t I be taking an occasional drink of alcohol in conjunction with training?  The answer is an unequivocal “No!” on all counts.

Alcohol has the ability to severely depress brain function by interfering with the ion channels needed to fire neurons…that is, allow your brain to communicate to and with other important parts of your body…such as respiration, heart, motor control, and so forth.  Far from being a “sleep aid,” it can rob you of REM.  No, not the band from the late 80’s to early 90’s…but Rapid-Eye Movement sleep.  Alcohol can hurt your sleeping habits.  To say nothing of your love life.

Chronic consumption of alcohol is a libido-killer in both men and women.  It seriously lowers testosterone levels in men, and causes the testicles to shrink, as well as promoting impotence.  If you read the article I recently wrote for men on the importance of maintaining healthy levels of testosterone with weight and physical training, you’ll understand just how negative these alcohol-induced reductions are.

Alcohol increases the amount of recovery time that you need to heal and restore your muscles after hard physical labor or exercise.  Your liver works hard to excrete the alcohol and the toxins associated with it.  A substantial amount of energy is also needed to break down the molecules and process them.  If you work out for an hour in the gym and then go and have a beer or a glass of wine, you have just ruined or severely cramped the gains you may have experienced.

Tissue repair and the uptake of amino acids are also severely hampered by alcohol consumption.  Studies in the past have shown that a glass of wine will lower the triglycerides in the bloodstream and help prevent blood clotting.  This is true, but guess what?  So will a regular exercise program!  You can lower those triglycerides and build yourself up!  Alcohol also tends to reduce the uptake of essential vitamins and minerals, such as Vitamin C and calcium with long-term consumption.

Will it kill you or cripple you to have a drink every now and then, such as once a month?  Consult with your doctor first, but it probably will not harm you.  I still stand by the fact that you don’t really need it, and it can cause your training and physical fitness regimen to suffer.  I haven’t even mentioned the other negative effects that heavy drinking can cause, but you can figure them out if you haven’t experienced them yourself.

To summarize, alcohol has its uses and is not a “villain,” and neither are people who consume it responsibly villains.  Just keep in mind that this piece is not designed to “excoriate” alcohol, but to keep you informed of the negative effects it can have on your physical fitness training when it is consumed.  Feel stressed?  Put on the bag gloves and beat up the heavy bag for ten or fifteen minutes.  If you still feel that you need a drink, well, then down a big shake full of amino acids…that’ll serve you better!  Stay healthy, make gains, and keep in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Mental Preparedness: These Mental Gymnastics Will Sharpen the Mind

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ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this segment has to do with some simple things that you can do on a daily basis to keep your mind fresh and avoid the ravages of aging much better.  Naturally there is a lot to do with heredity and genes that go into such ailments as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease that you cannot control.  You can do some things that will help to prevent these ailments from affecting you, and they are simple remedies that take up little time and cost almost nothing.

Numerous (almost innumerable) medical studies throughout the decades have revealed that the more active you keep your mind, the greater your mind will function in the years to come.  The mind isn’t a “muscle,” however, it is an organ that can be developed, conditioned, and exercised in order to carry out preventative maintenance.  Your risk factors for decreased cognitive function are improper diet, consumption of alcohol and/or legal or illegal drugs, inadequate sleep, overwork, and high stressors.

Meditation (as outlined in numerous articles at ReadyNutrition) is a way to help your mind overcome the stressors, and I had recommended it at least twice per day: once in the morning, and once in the evening.  Meditation can be in complete silence, or listening to quiet, soothing, relaxing music.  I may not have mentioned it before, so I will add regarding music that it should be instrumental in nature.  The music should be of a type that is soothing and relaxing without any words.  The reason for this is that lyrics and words tend to steer your mind toward something and make it think in a manner that is not necessarily relaxing.

When you listen to light or soft classical music, or musical instruments with soft tones and no singing, you free your mind from the human “word,” so to speak: you don’t introduce into your mind something that will cause it to focus upon or associate it with a concept embodied within the word or words.  Meditation is a time for your mind to escape from the confines of day-to-day activity and to relax, not be channeled into some form that limits it and perhaps even adds more stress by associating thoughts that are negative with a word that may happen to pop up in the song with lyrics.

So, that is what can be done to relax your mind.  Now let us discuss what you can do to strengthen it.  Some things may interest you, and some may not.  You’ll have to decide for yourself.  Reading is very beneficial to mental acumen.  When you get up in the morning, it can be a very productive stimulus toward beginning the day.  When you go to bed, reading just before going to sleep can help you to fall asleep more quickly and smoothly.  Before I go to sleep, I try not to read anything that can be classified as “current event” oriented, or day-to-day news/problematic.  I try to read short stories and light fare that enable my mind to rest.  Perhaps this will work for you.  Short stories by Jack London, or Ray Bradbury, or such are some ideas.

Next, we have exercises that we can perform mentally.  Crossword puzzles, word quiz books, mathematics problems, and word trivia books are excellent tools to use to fine-hone your mental “gymnastics” and practice “exercising” your brain.  Research this on your own, but it is proven that such things help to strengthen your thought processes and “work” your brain productively.  They stimulate mental activity.  The brain has billions of cells and neurons that in many ways “atrophy” from lack of use, misuse, or abuse, the latter especially when drugs or alcohol are introduced into your system.

It is part of your preparedness for your later years…not just right now, while you’re young and either resemble Payton Manning or Emily Blunt in youth and strength.  You’re doing these things to prepare for later, to keep your mind healthy later in life.  When you do these word challenges, keep a dictionary beside you and look up any word that you don’t know or understand.  In addition to strengthening your mind, you will be increasing your vocabulary and learning new things.

Just as a “matter of fact,” I tend to pick up the dictionary each day and look up words…either to confirm what I already know, or to find a new one that I haven’t heard or one that I’ve forgotten about.  Inadvertently, I always end up looking at multiple definitions and cross-referencing what I was originally searching for with other words in the dictionary.  A good dictionary has a wealth of information right at your fingertips.

Word games such as “Boggle” or “Scrabble” are games you can play with your family to work on the concept as a team.  It is a cheap but productive way to spend an evening, and translates into true quality family time.  In addition, you are all going to benefit from the increased vocabulary use (especially the kids), and the fun of challenging one another with the words.  In this last case, a “weird” word is attempted and you find out whether it is really a legitimate word or not by using the dictionary.  I stress it is not a way to “kill” time, but a way to invest your time in something that is worthwhile.

So, present challenges to yourself each day that are beneficial challenges with the development of your mental acumen.  Sharpen each other’s “iron,” and you’ll find that your mind will work better and more efficiently.  It is something that will benefit you both in the short term, and in the long run.  Take care of one another!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Prepared Home: 5 Prepper Projects to Start in the Spring

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ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, as many of you know, planning is an important aspect of emergency preparedness. Each year, you should make new plans and practice your new skills. I wrote an article a little while back about planning (and possibly starting) an icehouse/root cellar during the wintertime.  As of this writing, spring is just around the corner (officially), and the cold weather is starting to retreat bit by bit.  We’re going to cover a few ideas for you to pursue during the spring months for building projects around your property.  Let’s jump right into it, with a description of the projects and the reason for building them.

Here are 5 Prepper Projects You Can Start in the Spring

  1. The Icehouse: As mentioned in the earlier article.  If you plan on doing it, you may just have at least 2-3 weeks where you can obtain some freezing temperatures.  This would behoove you to act, if you rent out a small backhoe and dig your cellar/icehouse.  Remember to go below the frost-line!  Fill up bins with water and let them freeze.  When the icehouse is finished, fill it up with these huge blocks of ice.  Sawdust is an excellent insulator, as is pine mulch (brown needles, not green, if you use needles).
  2. The Greenhouse: If you don’t have one, well, now’s the time to put one into place just before it’s time to plant and sprout your seedlings. There are almost innumerable styles and sizes to choose from.  Once again, you have about a month to get that baby up and running. Here is one greenhouse project you can do for less than $300. As well, consider the convenience of cold frames to get a head start on your garden.
  3. Underground (hidden) vault/cache point: Now this one will take a little bit of explaining. Once again, going below the frost-line, the key here will be to make a little “room,” so to speak, under the ground.  Make a foundation of gravel after you’ve dug out a cubicle/rectangular chamber.  Position this away from the house, where some government clown with a metal detector will not tread.  All the same, you can pick up a precast concrete module, or make it out of a culvert pipe.  You want to cover it up in the end with about 6” of earth, so that it’s not too much that you can’t get through it in the wintertime.  If you’re interested and indicate so in the comments, I can give you a good plan that I know works in a future article.
  4. Storage shed: Yes, build your own, if you have the time and resources.  Those pre-made sheds for sale in the building supply big-box stores cost a fortune.  You can do better by stick-building it out of 4” x 4” s and 6” x 6” s with pressure-treated plywood.  Make sure all your lumber is pressure-treated.  When you’re done, make your roof out of corrugated steel instead of shingles…it’ll save you time and energy during the winter with snow removal.
  5. Smokehouse: Now’s the time to prep that smokehouse for meat…months (or many moons, if you prefer!) before hunting season comes around again. This will involve perhaps the emplacement of a wood stove or the creation of a barbecue pit-type structure.  There are plenty of plans and diagrams on the Internet that you can weigh and balance against your needs.

This is the time to lay out all of your plans and figure out what materials you will be using and the costs for all of them.  In our rigidly-controlled social structures, there may even be a friendly government permit man or inspection man to meet…to find out how much they will take out of you before you start building.  Factor all of this into consideration prior to actually building, as it will alleviate headaches later.  You may want to do some smaller projects, such as a place to store firewood, or a small toolshed or such.  Do not allow the 5 mentioned in this article to dissuade you from some kind of project in the good weather for building.

Hopefully the weather will warm up soon, but this is an excellent time to lay the groundwork for what you have been thinking of building during the winter months.  The only limit is your imagination and to actually take action on the project.  The best plans in the world are only plans until they’re executed.  Here’s hoping you have some good weather and start the ball rolling on whatever project you decide.  Let me know about that item #3 above, and you keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Preppers – If You Aren’t Doing This Annually, You Won’t Be Disaster Ready

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Well, it may seem cliché to say that spring is right around the corner, as in most of the U.S. there’s still plenty of snow on the ground.  Winter still seems “deep” to some (especially Yours Truly, as I have almost 3’ of snow on the ground), and the cold weather has not broken.  Nevertheless, everyone out there in ReadyNutrition Land, the early bird gets the worm.  I’m referring to all your gear that you’ll be breaking out soon when the cold weather breaks.

Stay on top of your prepper gear 

Maintenance

Your gear can best be maintained according to a maintenance schedule and you can get a start on it now.  Some preppers do it twice a year when Daylight Savings Time hits. But it’s more than giving it a glance and it doesn’t just mean cleaning it.  It also means inspecting it for serviceability and function.  It means making sure that it’s well organized and that you can pick it up at a moment’s notice to “rock and roll” with it…be out the door and on the moor!  You can’t do that unless it’s ready.  Let’s discuss it, shall we?

How’s that rucksack?  If you’re the way I am, you absolutely hate anything that can detract from your load-carrying capabilities.  Inspect that rucksack!  Has it been sitting out in the garage or in the basement, on the cement floor?  I hope not.  Are your straps in order, and are there any signs of dry-rot, mildew, or water damage?  You need to find that out now, and even more:


Preppers – The time to find out about deficiencies was yesterday, and there should be a “zero defects” policy regarding them.


What does this mean?  If you’re serious about survival and prepping, and you really want to survive a disaster/SHTF scenario when it happens (notice I wrote “when” and not “if”), then you’ll be on top of this…all the time.  The conditions for the rucksack I mentioned should never occur.  They won’t occur if you follow a regular schedule of checking it and correcting anything that surfaces.  For the nylon on your rucksack you can use a shoeshine brush or a medium to stiff bristle brush to clean off any dirt and dust.  Maintain the straps in the same way.

Dirt or mud, clean it off…if it’s not easy with the brush, then take some warm water on a clean towel or rag and “damp scrub” it off.  The nylon of the straps and the pack clean up well, but you don’t want to leave it too damp.  Always place the rucksack off the floor.  Don’t allow it to contact the floor surface.  Inspect the connecting points of the ruck, and inspect every piece that snaps or buckles.  Everything should be clean and working.  Canteens should be emptied and dried to prevent funk from going inside of them, or (as JJ does) if you’re going to store water in them the water needs to be changed periodically (say every month) to keep the “grand Funk railroad” from slipping in.

Familiarization

This may seem an oxymoron, however, unless you have a photographic memory you’re going to have a hard time remembering how you packed your gear…what is where.  One way to solve this (as I mentioned in other articles) is to keep an inventory sheet of everything, listed on an actual diagram of your rucksack.  This enables you to look at the diagram of the ruck and see how it’s made…where the pouches are, etc. …and know exactly what is in it.  Guess what?  It won’t be enough, because when you change seasons (in this case, Winter to Spring) you should have a full layout of all of your equipment you will tote.

Why?  For accountability (know that everything you think you have you actually have), and for serviceability (to know it is all in working order).  Along with that rucksack is that jungle hammock, that one-man tent and all of its accoutrements, flashlights, radios (don’t open that tube and find leaking batteries!), and all of your other gear and gadgets.

If it all comes to a halt, you don’t have the time to do all of this…and it’s on you…nobody else.

Tents have those “friction rods.”  How would you like to find out when you’re in the middle of a torrential downpour and setting up the dome that the friction rods are “ganked,” or broken?  Or you want to open up that poncho and string the bungees at the corners and top…a temporary shelter…and find that the vinyl is all eaten up from some kind of acid or rot, and there’s a giant hole in it?


Ben Franklin: “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”


If you follow a regular schedule of inspection and maintenance, you won’t have a “can of snakes” spring open on you.  This seems overly simplistic, but it is the way of mankind to procrastinate…to move toward the path of least resistance.  It is the way of all of us…and what makes us win?  The ability to be able to fight that part of our natures and discipline ourselves…make ourselves do what it is that is right to do, although we don’t feel like doing it.  Your gear should be clean, serviceable, well-organized, and accounted for…in its place and you know exactly where it is.

I’ll fill you in on one of my techniques.  When I come across someone, I can assess them in an instant if they carry.  If I ask them to look at their weapon and it is rusted or dirty, or it has carbon on it, and is un-lubed?  Then I need know no more.  But if the bluing is worn-down where points of contact meet the holster…and it’s cleaned and oiled…and the holster appears a little worn, but clean and serviceable…I know that one “draws,” cleans the weapon…is one with it.  That individual I remember.

It’s a standard that I hold myself to every day.

In the 82nd Airborne, we had a saying (a mantra, if you prefer): “My weapon, my equipment, and me.”

Sound overly simplistic?  No, it’s ordered…I kept it with me in Special Forces…I keep it with me now.  My weapon’s continuity ensures that I can continue if under fire.  My equipment and gear enables me to live, to be sheltered, to carry food, medicine, and supplies.  These two taken care of, then I must take care of myself…eating, rest, and hygiene, along with physical conditioning.

See how much is in it when you take a really good look?  But I’m not trying to berate you, the Readers in any way.  I’m trying to give you of myself…in lessons paid for with time, experience, and much grief to learn them correctly.

Because iron sharpens iron, and in order to survive, you must be made of steel…you and your family.  Yes, President Trump is in, and we’re “riding the crest” of an upswing.  Remember: all is fleeting, and it can all change in the blink of an eye. Don’t blink for too long, or the moment will have passed.  You must prioritize.  Prep your equipment now, before the Spring hits, and follow a regular program of maintenance and inspection.  Be steel.  You can do it.  Fight that good fight, and fight it to win.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Prepare for Job Loss

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com Recently, a large grocery chain closed its store in our area.  I spoke with some of the employees and expressed my dismay that they were closing.  Although some of the workers managed to transfer to another branch, many were let go.  During the same week I found out that My Fit Foods a popular prepared food chain, abruptly closed all their stores nationwide, leaving many employees jobless.  I felt bad hearing about people […]

The post How to Prepare for Job Loss appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

10 Awesome Tips You Never Knew About Using Wood Stoves That May Change Your Life

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 ReadyNutrition Readers, we’re having a heatwave out here in Montana…it’s 9 degrees Fahrenheit while I’m writing this.  I hope you guys and gals are nice and warm and you have a good wood stove in front of you keeping it so.  You recall I wrote one on wood stoves not too long ago, and I wanted to supplement this for a few more things you can do with yours.  Aside from using wood stoves to stay warm and cook food on, here are a few tips you never knew on how to get the most out of your wood stove.

10 Ways to Make the Most of a Wood Stove

Ashes

One of the things you should consider is the potash that comes from your stove.  Yes, all that wood turns into ashes that can be recycled and used.  One of the things that you can do is to store them in a container (preferably a metal one that has a tightly-fitting lid) and use them later for producing your own soap.  The ashes are boiled down in water (yes, this too can be done on your wood stove!), and combined with lye and other ingredients.

Your ashes can also be used for metal polishing, for the likes of metals such as brass and silver.  It works really well straight up, or mixed with just a few drops of water.  The ashes can also be combined with your compost piles and used as a form of fertilizer to replace many valuable minerals and nutrients that comes from carboniferous materials being burned.  Why do you suppose a new forest sprouts up in a few years after a forest fire?   All of that burned wood goes into the soil and enriches it.  You can turn it into your gardens when you’re planting in the springtime for the same effect.

Charcoal

Charcoal is another product that you can take from your wood stove.  Used for a variety of things besides just cooking, charcoal can also be finely-crushed and added to your ash supply to make soap.  It can be set aside for use as cooking material or a fire-starting ingredient and even used to clean teeth.  Charcoal can also be used to filter water (see previous articles on water purification).

Soot

There’s also soot from the chimney (although you’ll probably have to wait until springtime to obtain it when you brush your chimney pipe).  Soot is the black substance formed by the combustion of your wood in the stove.  This is fine particulate matter that adheres to your pipe walls, and is blackened, consisting mainly of carbon that has not been completely burned. Soot is responsible for many chimney fires.  Soot can be mixed (in small quantities as needed) with a little bit of vegetable oil and some water to make your own ink.  A type of soot is called lampblack, and is used in enamels, paints, and inks from a commercial perspective.

That soot also has a great deal of unburned oils and resins in it (especially if you burn a lot of pine…don’t scoff…if you live in the Rockies, you will burn pine unless your last name is Rockefeller, believe me).  The oils, resins, and unburned carbon are excellent to mix with things such as sawdust and lint, with some wax for fire starters for the wood stove or camping and backpacking.

Dehydrate Food

The top of the stove is great for dehydrating food as well.  You have recipes from ReadyNutrition for pemmican and jerky.  You can make your own on top of the stove with small-aperture wire racks…of the type to cool off hot sandwiches and the like.  Lay your meat on top of the wood stove top on the racks and allow that heat to dry them right out.

We’d love to hear any suggestions of things that you have found to do with your wood stoves (along with heating your home and cooking, of course).  It is all part of your preps and homesteading and learning to economize and obtain the maximum use for all of the materials you have at your disposal.  Explore some of these and let us know what you think, as well as things you have discovered on your own.  Keep up that good fight, drink a good cup of coffee, and stay warm!

 

JJ

 

Don’t forget to join us March 9th 7 p.m. (CST) for a FREE interactive webinar about solar cooking. Click here for more details!

MARCH9G

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

6 Totally Insane Things That Will Happen If Our Power Grid Goes Down

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power gridImagine if you will, what would happen if you pulled an American family from the 19th century, and plopped them in the middle of downtown Los Angeles during rush hour. They’re not given a warning, they’re not given any kind of primer on what they’re about to experience, and the occurrence is completely inexplicable. How long do you suppose they would last before they cried uncle? Would they even survive? The odds probably aren’t so good.

Of course, the reverse is probably also true. If you and your family were wrenched from the comforts of the present and hurled back into a previous era, you might not fare so well either. Your survival odds would probably be a little better since you have hindsight and an understanding of germ theory. However, it would still be a pretty alien world for you. It would be littered with pitfalls that most modern people can’t even imagine.

Get prepared for the worst-case scenario with this best-seller!

6 Totally Insane Things That Will Happen If Our Power Grid Goes Down

And that’s why it’s so important for everyone to prepare for the possibility that one day our grid could go down in a big way, whether it be from a terrorist attack, cyber attack, nuclear war, or solar flare. If our society suffered a widespread power failure that lasted for weeks or months, it would be no different for us than if we were suddenly sent back to the 1800’s. It would be a strange and dangerous world, and for the average person, it would catch them off guard in the following ways:

  1. All commerce will cease. The ATMs won’t work, the banks won’t open, and the cash registers won’t…well, register. For a while cash will be king, but if the crisis goes on for more than a few weeks, then people will view it as worthless. We’d be back to a barter economy in short order.
  2. Communications will shut down. If you think you can rely on your cell phone to work in a disaster, think again. In a crisis, when everyone instinctively reaches for their phone, that limit is quickly surpassed and the radios on the tower get sluggish, thus causing the fast-busy signal. Mobile analysts estimates that a cell site can handle 150 to 200 calls per second per sector. When a large group are making calls at the same time, the network can’t handle the amount of calls. More importantly, communications with police, firefighters, and ambulance services will cease. Many of the workers in these positions will try to soldier on, and keep doing the best job that they can for as long as they can. However, without ordinary citizens calling them to report crimes and emergencies, they’ll be helplessly watching their communities burn down around them. It won’t be long before they give up, ditch their posts, and return to their families.
  3. Without electricity, all forms of fuel that our society relies on will stop flowing. All of our vehicles will be dead in the water, and more importantly, the trucks will stop delivering food. The grocery stores will be stripped bare in hours, and will not be replenished for a long time. Even if you live in an area that is rich in agricultural resources, there may be no food to be had, since those farms rely on fertilizers and farming equipment that must be delivered by trucks.
  4. And of course many of those farms will lack water, as will your plumbing. For a couple of days after the power goes out, you’ll still have running water since water towers rely on gravity to feed the water to your home. However, electricity is required to clean that water and pump it into the tower. Once it’s out, that means that you won’t be able to flush your toilet. So not only dehydration be a major threat, but without the ability to remove human waste or wash your hands, every community will face daunting sanitation problems.
  5. When the grocery stores are stripped bare, the pharmacies won’t be far behind. Millions of people who rely on life saving medications could die in the weeks and months that follow. But perhaps more shocking is what would happen to the people who aren’t using drugs that are immediately life saving. 13% of Americans are using opioid drugs, which are highly addictive and cause horrendous withdrawal symptoms. Another 13% of Americans are on antidepressants, and likewise, the withdrawal symptoms are pretty problematic. In other words, within a few weeks after the grid collapses, about 25% of your neighbors are going to be in an awful mental state that is not conducive for survival.
  6. And finally, one of the most shocking things that people will have to deal with, is the lack of GPS. The GPS satellites will probably keep running, but eventually the devices that read those signals will give up the ghost. These days people are pretty reliant on GPS for directions, and there aren’t as many paper maps lying around. The average person is going to be utterly lost if the grid goes down.

In summary, law and order will break down at every level, and death will be around every corner. It’s one thing to grow up and live in an era that lacks electricity, but to be sent back to such a time on a moments notice would be one of the most challenging things that a person accustomed to modern amenities would ever face.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Why Preppers Should Focus on Diversifying Firearm Calibers

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Ready Nutrition Readers, as you may have deduced from the title, this piece is a recommendation to acquire firearms of diverse calibers.  Let us discuss some of the calibers and the reasons why it is prudent to prepare in such a manner.  I’m not recommending any particular firearm, per se, except in one instance here that I’ll cover later for a reason that will be self-explanatory.

Firstly, forget about what will happen in the SHTF event.  Whatever it is, the reason for preparing by obtaining diversities among firearms calibers is to ensure you can obtain ammo for it.  This is not detracting from reloading whatsoever.  I guarantee, however, that situations will arise in which you have to load a firearm and don’t have time to sit around with your RCBS “Rock Chucker” press or your Lee Handloader.  You have a need to employ a firearm at the moment, and time is of the essence.

Common calibers ensure that you will usually have ammo for the weapon no matter where you go.  This is one of the reasons it is advantageous to own an AR-15.  Personally, I hate ‘em, because after 200 rounds or so, you have to clean the carbon off of them.  The AR-15 is so finely-tuned with so little leeway between moving parts such as the bolt group and bolt carrier that any severe carbon buildup is almost intolerable to firing the weapon.  That being said, we have had more than 5 decades of dealing with .223/5.56 mm ammo.  The military, law enforcement (state and local) all rely on the AR-15 family; therefore, ammo is obtainable.

The phrase “What if?” however, is your watchword.  If you have either a .308, or a 7.62 x 39 mm (AK), then you’ll also be in pretty good shape.  Law enforcement is switching back to .45 ACP, but there are still plenty of 9mm rounds to go around.  The .45 ACP round is a great round that is widespread.  Your .357 magnum and .40 Smith and Wesson rounds are not as common but are commonplace.  In essence, yeah, you need each of these.

One piece that I’ll finally mention is really unique.  It’s the P-320 Compact by Sig Sauer.  They have a system called the Grip Shell system.  This Grip Shell is the basis for the weapon, that accepts full size magazines and full length slide assemblies.  What’s so big about this?  You can switch out 9 mm, .357 sig., .40 S&W, and .45 ACP on the same frame: the frame will hold all four of those calibers.  Nifty, huh?  Not only that, but it is a “redefinition” of BATFE rules.

The Grip Shell is a modular frame that is a trigger group and receiver with a serial number.  Guess what?  It is this frame that has the serial number, and not each of the individual barrels that you can change out on it.  Ahh, I feel the gleam of many eyes reading these words now.  Isn’t that neat?  You can buy four calibers, but only one receiver is your serialized piece.  You run with the ball from there: imagination is the only limitation.

If you want prices, you’ll have to check with a gun dealer.  The basic piece will run about $700 more or less, and additional barrels will be more.  It’s all up to what you want, but you can pretty much cover the bases with it, as you’ll be sure to find something to fire through it no matter how short ammo may be in supply.  To take that “kit” and pack it up with you…well, that would be prudence and providence prepared by your own hand.  Just make sure to pick up a box of ammo initially for each caliber you decide upon.

For anything you shoot, you should also be able to reload, and I recommend a good stationary press akin to the one I mentioned before, as well as a Lee handloading kit with dies and accessories.  The latter you can pack in your rucksack, as you never know when you might need it.  So hopefully you’ll take some advice to stock up and “plow the field” on different calibers.  If you run across a supply that won’t feed your main piece, it would be good to have a backup piece that can fire what you find until your “lead sled dog” is “fed” and up and running again.  Keep that powder dry, no matter what the caliber, and stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Never Drop Your Guard: 7 Tips To Improve Your Situational Awareness

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  This article you should not only save, but also burn it into your memory for the finer points mentioned.  As you Guys and Gals out there in ReadyNutrition Land have deduced from the title, situational awareness is a topic covered before in many different articles and it is important all the time.

You must blend that situational awareness with actions to take immediately upon the perception that a situation has arrived.  Notice I said “perception” and not confirmation.  Know why? Because you need to react accordingly with the perception: the confirmation may be too late.

Scoffers are already picking this one apart, thinking “OK, well, you react…what if you overreact and nothing was really wrong?”  Guess what?  I wrote “accordingly with the perception,” meaning that if you are acting accordingly, you’re not overreacting and therefore not responding/taking action with more than what is necessary.

React accordingly, and after you’re in the clear, then you can assess everything that has happened.

Here’s the reason I’m writing this article:

The other day I parked my vehicle and was getting ready to walk into an establishment.  Just as I left the vehicle, two state troopers pulled up: one in front of my vehicle (head to head) and another slightly off to the first vehicle’s left, but facing mine as well.  A trooper left each vehicle, and although they had sunglasses on their attention was riveted to me.  They watched me and began to follow me as I walked toward the establishment.

Having nothing to worry about, I continued toward the building; however, my logic is that the time to worry is when there is nothing to worry about.  This is a day and age when cops shoot first and ask questions later.  Mistaken identity doesn’t bring a person back from the dead, and it’s better to err on the side of caution.  As I walked toward the building, I angled my approach and immediately placed both of them in enfilade.

This means as I stepped in the front of one of them, both were lined up (in a “line,” if you will) before me.  Neither had drawn a weapon, but the motion I made is instinctive…or “muscle memory” if you wish to label it.  Both were, if it became necessary, in my line of fire, and the first one (closest to me) was masking the fire of the second if they wanted to play.  “Masking” means to block another’s line of fire by (stupidly/unknowingly) placing yourself in between his fire and a potential enemy/target.

Now, obviously these two thought they “had something,” and from their movements and actions, it was also obvious that they soon realized I was not their quarry.  Dismissing it and them (while keeping an eye on them), I entered the building.  One of them poked his head inside the door, and the manager/proprietor looked at him.

“Don’t worry, what we’re looking for is not in here,” he said, and then left.

There was no incident, but I stress this to you: this was a situation.

For those who love law and order, do not take this as an indictment against those state troopers, but keep this in mind: the days of “Officer Friendly” are over.  Sometimes warranted by fear (in the case of city cops constantly attacked by gangs and other miscreants), and sometimes unwarranted, many times they’ll pull the trigger and not mete out the force that is commensurate with the perceived threat.  My thoughts?  I’m not bothering anybody, but if I’m in the ground because of their mistake, I’m the one who really pays for that mistake, right?

It’s better to face a jury of 7 than to be carried by 6.

The situational awareness will help you to avoid complications.  Be aware of your surroundings, and who is in those surroundings.  My wife and I gassing up her vehicle, and as I pulled up to the pump, there were two young men and a young woman just acting stupidly…right in front of the door to the convenience store/gas station.  My wife was going to go in and pay while I pumped the gas.  I motioned for her to stay put while I both paid for and pumped the gas.

The men were carrying beer and the woman carousing with both while all played the fools.  No matter.  I kept my eye on them and paid for the gas, then came out and pumped it as they moved off (“staggered off” being a better term) across the parking lot.

Situational awareness.  I didn’t have to say anything.  I avoided a situation.  Most of the times avoidance is the best answer.  Move out of the area and away from the potential situation before it escalates.  It will all be forgotten in no time.  It is important in the moment for the threat it potentially poses, however, in the long term it is not even worth the time of day.


Situations accomplish nothing if they’re allowed to escalate: avoid them as much as possible.


7 Tips To Improve Your Situational Awareness

Let’s cover some simple basics that you can use all the time.

  1. As with “Driver’s Education,” Get the big picture: see everything that is happening around you and take in the full view.
  2. Watch what people are doing, and what state they are in: whether they’re mad, inebriated, overly friendly…watch them and pay attention to their actions.
  3. Watch what people have in their hands or on their person (such as a knife strapped to their belt, etc.)
  4. Know where you are. Are you up against the wall as two men are approaching you from two different directions?  Do you have a narrow alley to walk through and a gang of thugs just took notice of you and they’re in motion?  Are you in the back corner of a dimly-lit diner, and in came the Hell’s Angels and they’re staring at you?
  5. Know what your escape routes are. In #4 above, do you have alternate routes to take?  Do the Hell’s Angels know about that small fire exit door beyond the restrooms?  Have a backup route to employ…in all things you do…whether walking, driving, or just sitting having a cup of coffee.
  6. Have a plan in place. If you’re attacked, how will you defend yourself?  Having a plan in place and knowing how you’ll execute that plan…rehearsing it in your mind…this will keep you from being completely unprepared.
  7. Avoid a situation by not allowing it to happen. You can leave the area.  If your bargaining skills/people skills are good, you may be able to talk your way out of it and defuse it before it occurs

Take it seriously.  Take each thing seriously, and remember that even the most harmless looking scenario can turn into a full-blown problem at any moment.  Think outside of the box.  Remember: lawbreakers aren’t worried about breaking the laws…the ones you are upholding.  You’ll have to assess the situation as it arises, and you must also assess it as it changes.  Take care of business when it occurs, and take care of one another.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Prepper Training: This is How to Prepare Your Body to Escape the Big City on Foot

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bugging out on footReadyNutrition Readers, this piece covers some of the basic fundamentals on road marching.  Yes, this is a typical military exercise, but it has several applications for you in terms of preparations and in training.  Road marches can be both physically demanding and challenging.  They should not be attempted without proper preparation, and if you have any underlying health conditions, consult with your doctor prior to doing them.

As I have mentioned in previous articles, I prefer the large-frame Alice Pack of the US Army, the one I have been using for many decades, now.  It is both sturdy and affordable, and can meet a person’s needs from a training and a survival perspective.  That mentioned, it is up to you to find one that feels both comfortable and offers you the support you need to be able to move on the road or cross-country with weight on your back.

Don’t road march cold: you need to take the time to do some light calisthenics to warm your muscles up prior to the physical exertion.  The weight you will tote with you will vary according to your abilities and physical condition, as well as the needs of the exercise.  It is a training event: you need to keep it as such and hold it in that regard.  You need proper footgear and comfortable clothing, as well as a water supply.  You need to prepare for it the night before, with a good meal and plenty of rest and fluids prior to your start.

Your stretches can include (but not be limited to) the side-straddle hop (referred to as “jumping jacks,”) as well as half-squats, squats, hamstring and calf stretches, and so forth.  I prefer boots to support my ankles, although I have seen many people using tennis shoes and hiking shoes.  Whatever your preference, as long as it gives your arch the support it needs.

Start out small, with a lighter amount of weight.  That will be on you to gauge.  Start by doing a mile, and then work your way up.  A good conservative plan for a road marching “schedule” can be one per week with lighter weights and shorter distances.  As you “work your way up” you’ll want to make the road marches less frequent.  The reason being is you don’t want to damage yourself with a potential stress fracture or a hairline fracture from continuously pounding the pavement with your feet and heavy weight on the shoulders.  Shin splints are a common occurrence over time, as well.

Medically, they’re referred to as MTSS (medial tibial stress syndrome), and are pains within the connective muscle and tissue surrounding your knee and the outside of your tibia.  It is a chronic “dull” aching feeling that arises in about 15 to 20% of people who run, walk, or (in this case) march long distances.  Ice packs and rest can enable you to recover in a short period of time.  For any question of it, consult with your physician if the problem persists.

The road marches will strengthen your legs and back, and also develop your cardiovascular capabilities.  You should time every one of them, and attempt gains each time you undertake a march.  Gains would take the form of quicker times, or more weight carried.  You have to do it gradually.  Eventually, your end goal is to carry what you normally would in a rucksack if the SHTF and you were out in the woods.  Cross-country is markedly different from doing it on the side of the road due to the uneven terrain as well as other factors, such as water, thick vegetation, an abundance of rocks, etc.

Weather is also a factor, and in the warmer months great care must be taken to ensure you don’t dehydrate yourself.  Remember: thirst is a late sign of dehydration, and means you’re already depleted when you feel thirsty.  It would also be good to undertake these marches with a partner, so that if an emergency arises you have someone with you to rely upon for first aid or to go for help.

Your endurance will improve with time, and it also takes adjustment for your feet to become accustomed to both your pace and the work.  It is an excellent lower-body exercise that still manages to work your upper body.  It requires discipline, determination, and preparation to accomplish.  Eventually you will see results, and can road march 2 to 4 times per month successfully as part of your physical regimen.

Remember to take account of the water you will carry when you initially weigh your rucksack.  You can pick up a good fishing and game scale that will enable you to find out exactly how much you tote.  Try it out.  It is cost effective and will give you some good results.  Happy rucking!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Green Beret’s Winter Survival Training Guide

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winterprep2Have you ever considered what you will do if you have to bug out in winter? Being exposed to the elements puts you and your family at risk and it is paramount to be ready for that scenario.

It’s time to learn the basics of surviving in harsh environments. These basics will help you to inspire confidence in yourself and your skills.  Winter weather and a cold environment with snow and ice on the ground presents challenges, but they can be overcome and mastered with practice – all that is needed is equipping yourself with the knowledge to do so.

Jeremiah Johnson, our own personal Green Beret, is helping us train to be winter ready. One thing he emphasizes in a lot of his articles is that our preps aren’t the only aspect of prepping that we should focus on.


“None of us are going to be completely prepared when the bottom drops out.  Knowledge and skills should be desirous over materials, because with these you can either acquire what is needed or improvise out of what can be fabricated into something useful.”


He has been writing quite a bit about winter survival lately, and now is the time to put theory into practice. With the right gear, you can blend into your environment and survive in the harshest of environments. Here are some great articles to help you focus on winter survival!

 

Gear

What To Wear in the Harshest Conditions

Take Care of Your Feet and Your Odds of Survival Increase

How to Blend into a Winter Environment

12 Budget-Friendly Survival Essentials for the Cold Outdoors

Don’t Get Caught in the Cold Without this Essential Prep

 

Health and First-Aid

Why Drinking More Water During Winter Is Crucial to Your Survival

7 Fundamental Requirements for Cold Weather Injuries

Frostbite: How To Survive Winter’s Unrelenting Brutality

10 Must-Have First Aid Supplies for Preventing Hypothermia

 

Survival Theory

Procuring Protein Sources in Winter

Critical Training Techniques to Overcome the Elements

When You Lose Power this Winter, Here’s What You’ll Need

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Intelligence Insider: How To Protect Your Assets From Critical Infrastructure Failure

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cyber-warfareIntelligence insider Jim Rickards has previously warned of asymmetric attacks using cyber warfare, financial warfare and domestic disasters involving chemical, biological or radiologicial events. The threat is multi-faceted and the consequences of such an attack, whether it takes the the form of state-sponsored cyber financial warfare or a rogue terrorist group detonating a dirty bomb, could act as a destabilizing event that wipes out everything from our power grid to the wealth stored in your digital financial profiles.

Having worked directly with intelligence agencies simulating and war-gaming the potential fall-out that could result, in his latest interview with Crush The Street Rickards explains the distinct Doomsday scenarios that could instantly collapse life as we know it in America today… and how to prepare for them.


These things are actually happening and your digital wealth is vulnerable to a number of calamities… critical infrastructure failures… whether it’s power grid, banking system, cyber financial warfare, etc.


(Watch At Youtube)

Last month cyber thieves figured out a way to steal $100 million from the central bank account of Bangladesh via the U.S. Federal Reserve. They could have gotten away with $900 million more had it not been for a small typo. The point, as Rickards notes, is that there is a realistic possibility of a much larger-scale attack that targets not a central bank, but the direct holdings of every bank account in America.

The only tool you have at your disposal to protect from such an attack, says Rickards, is gold:


You never want to go all in… I am saying that 10% of your wealth… put it into physical gold… put it in a safe place and that will be immune from power grid outages, exchange closures, digital asset seizures and cyber financial warfare.


And while the potential for a serious calamity that would affect our digital monetary systems is a compelling reason to own gold, in his book The New Case For Gold Rickards explains that a global monetary collapse is also in the cards. And that means gold could one day become the de facto global currency as confidence in a global economy awash in fiat money is lost.

In the interview Rickards takes on analysts who say that a currency cannot be backed in gold, arguing that supply of the precious metal through current official holdings, private holdings and existing gold mining operations is sufficient to support well managed currencies. And countries that refuse to follow sound money policies, he says, will simply have worthless currencies that will not be accepted on the world economic stage.


That’s the whole point of the gold standard… it’s to force governments and countries to do prudent things.

As it is now there’s no standard… there’s no enforcement mechanism… there’s nothing.

I’ve spoken to Ben Bernanke and the head of the IMF about it and they both used the same word to describe the international monetary system… it’s incoherent.


It appears that a gold standard is the end-game for countries like China and Russia considering that they have been aggressively accumulating the metal in recent years. And while the United States may maintain a monetary hegemony over global affairs right now, there will come a time when that will no longer be the case. With gold being used to back currencies, prudent monetary policy will be rewarded.


If people had confidence that you were doing the right thing they would happily sell you the gold…  if they lack that confidence [in your currency] they wouldn’t sell you the gold… but that is a market signal telling you you’ve got the wrong policies… you’ve lost the confidence of your citizens.


But we’re not there yet. A global monetary reset needs to happen first. And that means the government and Federal Reserve are going to stay the course, including quantitative easing for the people,  no matter how disastrous the next round of policies may be.

As Rickards suggests, this makes the case for $10,000 gold quite strong, because they will continue to push low or no interest rate policies while printing even more money to stem off a potentially deflationary environment.


Deflation is good for citizens… inflation is good for government. But if you’re fighting the government, the government will win in the long run even though it’s taking longer than they thought.

At the end of the day they’ll get the inflation… and you’ll be glad you have some gold. 


 

Check out Jim Rickards’ latest book The New Case For Gold.

For more interviews like this one visit CrushTheStreet.com. To learn how the smart money is positioning for gold’s bull run by acquiring precious metals assets click here.

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Winter Survival: Critical Training Techniques to Overcome the Elements

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 We’re deep into the winter, Readers out there in ReadyNutrition Land, as you well know.  Now, here’s a challenge for you: while the season is here, it’s time to put your skills to the test. Why?  Well, because you can practice doing a few things in a (semi) controlled environment.  This will enable you to gauge your weaknesses and strengths and iron out your problems, either for another “go” at it or for lessons learned to hone in the off season.

Essential Winter Gear

  1. Proper and effective dress: We have covered the importance of layering in previous articles. Everyone has their preferences; however, a good set of polypro thermals that wick off moisture and a good set of Gore-Tex upper and lower garments are a start.
  2. Backpack: I prefer the large Alice pack of the Army; however, what you need is to be comfortable with your gear, and for your gear to work. You need food, a source of heat, fire making equipment, a blanket/sleeping bag, a water supply that will not readily be frozen, extra clothing as needed, and the likes.  For a sleeping bag, I prefer the insulated issue bag with a Gore-Tex cover.  Don’t forget a ground pad of some type.
  3. Tools: A hatchet (preferably one with a hammer-head and a hatchet blade with one continuous piece incorporated into the handle; a good hunting knife, and a good utility knife (Swiss Army knife, or a multipurpose tool will fit the bill).
  4. Sheltering equipment: I prefer the Army issue poncho (that has grommets) and five (5) bungee cords for the four corners and the top (hood portion tied off) for an expedient shelter.  You can take a pup or dome tent, but be sure of how to put it up before you go out in the woods.
  5. Must-haves: these are things on your person when you venture forth – lighter, compass, thermometer (or device to compute temperature, such as wrist thermometer, etc.), flashlight, map of area for exercise. Use your judgement as to what other things you need.

Critical Tasks for Training in Winter

Let’s identify some critical tasks that you need to be able to perform in the wintertime.  These tasks pertain also to requirements you need to fulfill to be able to operate in the outdoors.

  1. For the first one, plan on just doing an “overnighter” or such, if you’ve never been outside overnight in a winter environment.  As with physical exercise: train, don’t strain.  Same principle here.  You want to see how well your skills work and what you need to improve upon.  It’s also a good way to test your equipment and yourself.  You are trying to learn by experience and not hurt yourself, so don’t push it beyond your limits this first time.
  2. For your water-carrying containers: use whatever you have that is insulated to a high degree, and if it is going to freeze?  You should leave about ¼ unfilled to keep your container from splitting.  Then, what do you do with it?  For wintertime, I have “special” one quart canteens, the older issue ones made from metal, with a screw on cap lined with cork.  The canteen carrier helps to insulate the canteens, but if they freeze…plop one on top of a small folding stove or at the edge of a fire and it’ll thaw that water out in no time.  In addition, the canteen nests in the canteen cup and you can thaw snow or ice to make water for yourself.
  3. Bivouac in an area that is close to home.  In an emergency, you can get home readily.  Now you can practice with that “safety net” if you need it.  Practice everything: making fires in the snow, making lean-to’s and igloos, and tree-pit shelters.  Practice your navigation with a compass.  This is where the military issue compass comes in handy, as it’s not liquid filled and not subject to freezing.  You should write down your experiences in some kind of a logbook or journal to use for improving later.
  4. Practice tracking your non-hibernating animals.  Learn the difference between a dog’s track in the morning, and in the afternoon when the sun melts the edges of the impression and expands the track, making it look bigger.  You’ve brought the ground covering mat and the poncho with you.  Alright.  Now, knowing you have that in reserve, practice clearing snow away from a patch of ground and using fallen pine boughs as ground cover.  Fashion a lean-to for yourself from the surrounding fallen timber.
  5. At night, practice building your fire and building a fire-reflecting wall.  Take constant notes on the things you observe: what you see, hear, feel, and smell.  Practice land navigation and orienteering in the daytime, and (until you’re comfortable) for short distances at night.  Learn to use the stars if they’re visible, as mentioned in previous articles.  If the S ever HTF, you’ll be way ahead of the power curve regarding living in the field and the boonies in a winter environment.

Mind you, these are all basics for you to try.  These basics will help you to inspire confidence in yourself and your skills.  Winter weather and a cold environment with snow and ice on the ground presents challenges, but they can be overcome and mastered with practice.  Stay warm, be safe, and keep up the good work!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Think Like a SEAL: Training Exercises to Toughen Your Mind

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In our fast paced hustle in life, we rarely have time to sit down and really spend time doing something just for us. For many of you, prepping has either been an ongoing part of your life, or you have just joined the tribe and are voraciously reading every type of prepper material you can get your hands on.

In our haste to get our homes ready, mental preparation is usually pushed far back on the list of priorities.  Following a disaster, people experience a variety of reactions, but two emotions they experience the most are fear and panic. Without being mentally prepared for a disaster, many succumb to the traumatic event due to their emotional responses. Inevitably, if you do not mentally prepare your mind for the disaster, fear, distress, shock, indecision, panic will set in and eventually you will give up altogether. I won’t lie to you, this is something that could make or break you in a true disaster and takes lots of training. Folks, mentally preparing yourselves for disasters needs to be a priority.

It’s All Mental, Baby!

First things first, here’s the secret to survival – it’s all mental. You want to be the person who is well prepared, understands the situation and is able to react fluidly to the changes that occur. You DON’T want to be the person who mentally breakdown, stresses and emotionally reacts – this is a dangerous person to be.

Be in control of your mind, don’t let your mind control you. 

If you can understand how your mind reacts to disasters, you can learn to quiet it, slow the thinking down and learn to make more rational decisions. This puts you in a more adaptable position to survive and get through the disaster.

SEALs training focuses on this very issue. This video explains the brain’s reaction to fear and panic and how to overcome these natural reactions.

Conquering Fear and Panic with Mental Exercises

Here’s the thing, we all want to avoid getting injured, looted, attacked and left exposed in a dire emergency. These are all fear-based thoughts and although they are a stark reality that some may face, they are also situations that many want to try to avoid thinking about altogether. Stress, fear and anxiety are all considered to be negative and destructive emotions. However, they can be channeled to your advantage and are the very situations we need to think about!

We forget how healthy a little dose of fear is. From a physiological standpoint, fear gives us an edge and is designed to alert your mind and body to the fact that danger may be imminent and then is triggered the sympathetic and parasympathetic response, which is the fight or flight mechanism of your nervous system.  It physiologically has to do with epinephrine and norepinephrine produced in your body, as well as your adrenal system. If you do not have control over your mind, fear can break one’s resolve and cause indecision. Remember, it’s all in your attitude!

In order to overcome the fear, you need to gradually/incrementally condition yourself to facing it. Your key to success lies in the way you condition your mind. Don’t let your fear dictate how you live your life. Expose yourself to these fears in a controlled and safe environment. This helps you to overcome them faster. You can read more on how to face your fears to gain empowerment.

4 Ways to Push the Boundaries and Train Your Brain Like a Navy SEAL

  1. Bring structure to chaos – Making preparedness lists, breaking down emergencies and setting small achievable goals trains the mind and keeps you moving.
  2. Mental rehearsal – Visualize and practice in your mind what the stressful situation is and how you will survive. That way, when you physically face it, you will have less reaction.
  3. Self Talk – The way you talk to yourself holds a lot of power in how successful your survival will be. Positive self talk can override the fear signal and likely to overcome the situation.
  4. Arousal Control – Controlling your breath offsets panic and gets more oxygen to the brain to perform better.

As well, a community or group of like-minded people will help you keep your head in the game, teach you vital skills and help carry the load. A prepper group are more likely to thrive than the “lone wolf” doing things themselves.

Remember your mental self talk. When you start feeling mentally frazzled and more inclined to think negatively, try taking these steps to center yourself. Depending on your schedule you will want to explore ways to meditate and times to conduct your sessions.  This will enable you to train yourself to be able to go into “relaxation” mode on command, when you so decide.

As writer, Jeremiah Johnson once wrote, “We can’t win every battle and come out on top; however, we can reduce the amount of the pain and suffering by toughening ourselves mentally.  This is one of the ways the human race has survived…as individuals and as a group.  We must use that most powerful tool that we have…our mind…and couple it with our hearts and the resolve to win. ”

Ultimately, you need to give yourself time and patience to practice mental preparedness. The time involved is the very reason why so many people put it off. Our minds should constantly be stimulated and exercised. If they are not, in a crisis you could panic and make rash decisions. This is definitely not what we want for you. Over the years, the writing team at Ready Nutrition have written countless articles on how to prepare your mind to be mentally tough for a shtf event.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Snow Camo: 12 Budget-Friendly Survival Essentials for the Cold Outdoors

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winter camo1I wanted to touch a little on winter camo and how to go about doing some things on both a budgetary and a practical side.  Firstly, it would not seem that winter camo would be all that important, and after all, I just did a piece recently on the Army issue winter camo top.

I also emphasized something that I wish to reiterate: you need synthetics on your exteriors, and cotton on your interiors.  You also need for the gear to be as close to white as possible.  This may necessitate cleaning it and bleaching it really well if that is possible.  It is worth it in the long run, especially if you’re in the role of a shooter.

12 Budget-Friendly Survival Essentials for Mock Winter Camo

Here’s some basics for you to pick up, if you’re not ready to go out and spend more than a grand as in the movie “Shooter” with Mark Wahlberg.  All whites, remember:

  1. Thick sweat-top, preferably with a hood
  2. Baseball-type hat with a brim (not a meshed one, mind you, but solid cloth
  3. Winter pullover cap
  4. White scarf or wraparound for the face
  5. Gloves (go to Murdoch’s for the leather gloves at about $15, extra -large, and then the packages of cotton inserts (3) pairs for about $4.00). On this you want the leather and not synthetic, because if you are changing a mag, messing with a bolt carrier or a charging handle, or touching a hot barrel, they won’t melt and dissolve.)
  6. Already mentioned the Army white camo overtop in a previous article
  7. Army white camo bottoms run about $20 to $30 in the surplus stores, or you can pick up either extra large scrubs or karate pants at the thrift stores
  8. Synthetic “veil” for overtop of you, your weapon…shower curtains (the mesh thin kind work best), or drapes are good for this
  9. Unless you can find “Mickey Mouse” Army issue white Vib (inflatable) boots? Pick yourself up a pair of Army Issue rubber overshoes (they’re green, with 3 loops per boot) and spray paint them…make sure it’s with white paint that takes to rubber and plastic
  10. A mat to lay on…and you can wrap a sheet (synthetic, mind you) around it to whiten it
  11. A white gym bag/backpack-type bag
  12. Long Johns – make sure these are white

There’s a set of duds for you.  All of your stuff such as tops and pants should fit overtop of whatever you’re wearing.  On pieces of equipment to throw in that bag, you need the following: a rangefinder, a good set of binoculars or a scope, and a method to measure temperature, humidity, wind speed, and elevation, like this.  Now I have an old West German (yeah, it’s that old!) barometer, and a really good thermometer that is also old, made out of glass, and as durable as rhinoceros hide.  I have an anemometer with the cups that actually checks the wind speed.

Remember: your low-tech stuff was made much better (more durable) than your high-tech stuff today.  Bring that wrist-compass/barometer/thermometer/toaster oven with you, but be advised: one EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) either from a weapon, or a solar flare will turn it into a non-working “fashion” bracelet in the blink of an eye.  Also, remember your issue Tritium compass, as you won’t have problems with the cold temperatures and it doesn’t require batteries.

Snowshoes are important and should be light and durable, like these.  They should be able to hold your weight and at least another 50 lbs. (including a pack, water, and a weapon).  Don’t forget your protective eyewear!  I prefer UV protective goggles, as these guys don’t fog up and they cling to your face better than regular sunglasses.  The eyes can’t be protected enough in the winter snow, as a lot of UV comes off of the snow in the form of reflected light.  Also, make sure you have enough veil to cover up your backpack, as you don’t want to appear to be a snowdrift with legs carrying around a green rucksack.

I’m sure there will be all kinds of suggestions.  Let us know what you have found that works as a suggestion for your fellow readers and for all of us.  We always value your productive comments and advice.  Stay frosty, and keep up that good fight in the winter wonderland!  JJ out.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Why Preppers Should Learn to Survive Without Brand Name Equipment

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living without survival toolsReadyNutrition Readers, this article is a “trumpet call” to continue your preparations, or to commence with them if you have not done so already.  We don’t know what the inauguration is going to bring, if indeed it does occur peaceably.  For one thing, everyone and their brother on the Left has threated everything possible, such as mass demonstrations, mass disruptions, and physical violence against the incoming president.  The bottom line: we don’t know what will happen, and it is best to remain in a state of readiness and preparation.

I’m also going to explain something of my own mindset regarding matters toward preparation.  With some of the pieces I have written, there have been a good deal of disparaging comments, especially directed toward pieces with recommendations for tools, equipment, food, and on-the-spot preps from bargain sources and Dollar stores.

The reason I have suggested things such as small tool kits and “piecemeal” equipment from thrift shops or the Dollar Trees is that there are tremendous numbers of readers that are either just starting out prepping or are on a limited budget…so limited that they can do it no other way.

I fully understand there are some people who cannot afford laser rangefinders, Gerber Multi-tools, or Fat Max Stanley tape measures.  I suggest alternatives for them.  Know what?  Here’s the bottom line on that:


None of us are going to be completely prepared when the bottom drops out.  Knowledge and skills should be desirous over materials, because with these you can either acquire what is needed or improvise out of what can be fabricated into something useful.


Obama just recently signed Executive Order 12333 into play.  This one removes the restrictions over the intelligence-gathering agencies regarding the sharing of information pertaining to terrorist suspects, ad infinitum.  There is also mention of procedures that reinforce previous NDAA policies of taking any and all actions necessary against terrorists, whether they are actual or potential.  In essence, the EO hands over the unchecked power to snoop into the hands of soon-to-be president Donald Trump.

Recall that in 2009, Bush Jr. gave the incoming Obama a manila envelope marked “from #43 to #44.”  As can be seen, the Patriot Act and the 2006 Warner Defense Acts already were in place when Obama assumed the throne.  Please do not think that things cannot continue to deteriorate just because Trump is assuming the office.  That is why we must continue to prepare and plan for an eventuality.  What is that eventuality?  It is not an event as it is a concept: eventually the United States will face a crisis of a magnitude that cannot be either easily overcome or (should the crisis occur) recover from.

This is why the advice is the way it has been.  Let the readers obtain what they can.  You guys and gals are intelligent.  You know the difference between a “Survival Knife” that runs $15 and is made in Pakistan to a BMF Gerber made in the US that runs ten times that price.

The point is to win with the tools and pieces of equipment you have available until you can make improvements to them.

Productive advice is always useful, but let’s keep it in the context of what it’s meant for.  There are many people who write to me and ask me what to pick up at least temporarily until they can replace it with something better.  Not everyone can afford a Cannondale, and some must be content with a Huffy…bought used…for a bicycle to pack in the back of their pickup truck.  The point of ReadyNutrition is not just for everyone to buy the same manufactured things akin to a bunch of clones, but to improvise and make do with what they have and back those materials up with knowledge and skills.

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that everything is just going to improve as soon as Obama leaves.  You must be prepared for all manner of disasters that can bring the SHTF to your backdoor at any given moment.  The final point I wish to make is this: I have a survey meter, but I also have a Kearney Fallout meter that I made with my own hands.  I can also repair and recalibrate my survey meter, and make more Kearney meters in addition to the one I already made.  Obtain it, or make it, and then become an expert with it and with repairing it.  This holds true for all of your supplies.

To encourage those who may need it: whatever tools you rely on, make sure they’re maintained and that you can use them.  It may be that your screwdriver set or hacksaw from the Dollar Tree are all you can afford, but take heart and make do: you’re at least doing something.  When it all boils down to it, if you have to cut one lock on a chained-up alleyway or unscrew one hasp to make a getaway…the dollar tools will have paid for themselves.

So: take these words of encouragement, and keep them close to heart.  You can find a way to succeed with what you prepare that works within your budget and abilities.  Whatever equipment you choose, know it through and through: let the equipment be an extension of yourself.  Do the best you can, win with the weapons at hand, and take care of your family.  Especially that last part: that will see you through.  Keep in that good fight.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Prepared Workplace: Lifesaving Supplies You Need Before the Emergency

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prepared workplace[Editor’s Note: On average, we spend over 50 hours a week away from our homes. Chances are, if a sudden disaster occurs at your workplace and you are forced to shelter in place for a given time, many coworkers (including yourself) could be unprepared. Would you have enough food and water to wait an emergency out at work? A disaster plan is only as good as your Plan A, B and C.]

So, ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, have you made a big batch of pemmican for yourselves yet?  If so, then I commend you.  If not, then get on the stick!  The beef stick, that is, because pemmican is one of the foods that is perfect to carry around.  I know, I know, between bug-out bags, micro-tools, thermoses, and the likes of which I have been writing about recently…you need to be an octopus to be able to carry all of it.  It is better to have, as you well know, than not to have something.  Let’s talk about food in this regard.

The Secret to Survival is Prior Planning

Undoubtedly you have laid up a supply for yourselves and your families in your home and have some packed in your “go” bags.  We’ll now touch on a few other areas: in your workplace and on your person. Some preparedness and emergency items for the entire office are:

Talk to your supervisor about the existing emergency plan and find ways of improving it. You could even create a preparedness month where each coworker donates money to get the office prepped!

Ultimately, It’s About You!

If your workplace shrugs off your attempts to get them prepped, that shouldn’t stop you from getting some extra food and provisions for yourself in your workplace (and also carry a little on you at all times). Keep in mind, this is about giving yourself an “edge” and perhaps buying you some time in a sticky situation.

If you have a workplace locker (the best are those that lock), a basket/cubby space, or a shelf for your things, you can stock up a few cans of food and some essentials.  Why?  Because that is what preparation is all about: the “what-if’s” that may arise.  What if you cannot go outside to your vehicle to get your “go” bag?  There could be any number of reasons: severe flooding, rioting, extreme cold weather, among others.  You may have to make do with what you have on your person or in your workplace.

As well, make sure you have some clean athletic socks and walking shoes stored on you. As well, have some extra change on hand in case you need to get items from the vending machines (items like water, nuts, crackers, etc., will run out quickly in an emergency).

Your Personal Workplace Prepper Pantry

Even if you just have a bag that you stash under a table or in a back room, you can throw extra canned goods in there.  Here’s a sample of what to place in your bag or locker (with a locker, remember, you can probably put some more food in there):

  • (4) cans of food (preferably heat-and-eat prepared dinner-ravioli, soups, etc.)
  • (2) 20-ounce or 32-ounce bottle of water
  • (1) Ziploc sandwich bag of a snack (trail mix, pretzels, dried fruit, etc.)
  • (1) Ziploc bag of hard candies
  • (1) small bag of dried meat (jerky, pemmican, beef sticks, etc.)

That will get you started, but you don’t have to stop there. There are many types of disasters that could occur while you are at work. What happens if there is a fire and you need to escape? Or, in a worst case scenario, hazardous material has leaked into the air. Why not have a gas mask on hand? There are many gas masks that are compact and can fit inside your desk.

Remember, these items are for your personal space/storage space in your workplace.  If you have an office and a desk, all the better.  If the desk has any drawers that lock, then it’s optimal.  Remember this rule:

If it’s a time of trouble or scarcity, whatever you need will also be needed by others.

Sesame Street rules aside, you do not need to advertise that you have a stash of extra food in your office drawer or wall locker.  Keep your supplies in a nondescript gym bag or other non-transparent/non-translucent carrier.

Their need is not a justification for your sharing, nor their shortsightedness for your “help” regarding preparations. 

One way to circumvent this is to get coworkers involved in getting the workplace prepared for these types of emergencies and have them create their own personal workplace pantries.

So, we’ve addressed the workplace, and now how about on your person?  Why?  Because it gives you an edge.  I have written articles in the past on the value of cargo pants with cargo pockets.  Here I am, recommending them again.  I carry a small bag of peanut butter-filled pretzels in my cargo pocket, as well as a bag of jerky, and about half a dozen hard candies (I like those Jolly Rancher ones).  There’s a good reason for it.

What if you’re trapped in an elevator?  Or (as mentioned before) something goes wrong, such as a power outage that leaves you trapped for a while.  What then?  It is a proven fact that the intake of simple sugars helps the human body during times of stress or crisis.  In addition, it is a psychological support you’ll give to yourself to help you deal with all of it.  The protein in the jerky and the peanut butter is important; the necessity to replace protein can never be understated.

The hard candies give you some simple sugar to throw into your bloodstream, and keep the mouth from drying out.  As I’ve mentioned in previous articles, if you can’t drink, then do not eat anything.  You will deplete yourself further; you must drink in order to digest your food.  The difficulty this presents is obvious, because if you don’t tote around a water bottle all the time, you’ll have trouble finding water when the need arises.  So, tote it around!  Everybody walks around all the time with coffee cups and soda bottles, so it won’t look out of place for you to tote around a 20-ounce PowerAde bottle with water in it.

These are akin to “tiers” of response levels: 1st is what you have on you, 2nd in your work area/locker, and 3rd in your vehicle.

One more key point: All the stuff not on you becomes a cache point if you can’t reach it, and you can go for the stuff later on.

You may have to forgo getting food out of your locked desk drawer because 10 other people may see it.  Who’s going to think of going into your desk drawer for food unless you make them aware it’s there.  Practice OPSEC, and re-read the article I wrote on the Nosy Neighbors…the ones who will eat your food and maybe you along with it if their needs call for it.  Keep it to yourself.  It’s better to wait until everybody is out of the area, and then obtain your supplies from your locked and unknown (to your “buddies” at work) location.  Ounce of prevention, pound of cure.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

When Seconds Count: 5 Items for Quick-Action Response

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1FIRST RESPONSE KITS

Picture This:

  1. You just hit a deer on the road about halfway between work and home on your 30-mile one-way commute. As you tried to avoid him, you swerved and hit a patch of ice and went off of an embankment.  Ramming a tree, you went unconscious.  You came to only to find a large laceration about 4” long running across your forehead
  1. You are just about to leave work when suddenly the entire building shakes. You’re up on the fifth floor, and a ceiling joist gives way, and half of the 6th floor of your workplace is now also on the fifth floor.  Even worse: you’re pinned under a beam and a big piece of jagged wood has gone right into your thigh.
  1. You’re in a very packed and congested shopping mall and suddenly, two guys with masks turn the corner with AK-47’s yelling in Arabic, firing their weapons in all directions. One of the bullets ricochets and hit you in the calf.

ReadyNutrition Readers, hopefully you are never in one of the examples…and really hopefully, not the same guy or gal in all three of them (that would really be bad luck, wouldn’t it?).  The point is that weird things, such as auto accidents, earthquakes, or terrorist Jihadists assaulting Chic-fil-A happen virtually all the time, now.  You may be just the innocent bystander or unwilling participant mentioned in one of these tragedies.  We hope that isn’t the case.

But if it is?  You had better be as ready as you can.  Let’s talk about some things that could give you a winning edge that you may be able to tote around on your person, either in your pockets or in a small bag.  We’re going to address some common problems that these unlucky individuals are facing in each of these scenarios.

Bad wounds – laceration, impaled wood, and a bullet.  All are serious, and each of them will require immediate medical attention.  The problem is you may not have the time to wait until trained personnel reach you, and (in the case of a SHTF event) they may never reach you.  But maybe you have these, for starters:

  1. Outdoor Wound Care Kit: with Celox, made by Total Resources, Int’l, accessible via totalresourcesintl.com.  The Celox clots the blood within 60 seconds.  The whole kit is about $8.00 at Wal-Mart.  Great for bullet wounds and lacerations…. think “Stop Gap,” and stop that bleeding, while you’re sealing up the gaps.
  2. The Army Field Dressing: Seriously, this one is a good one that you really need to pick up.  It’s listed as Dressing, First Aid, Field, Camouflaged, 4” x 6 ¼ to 7 ¼ inches NSN 6510-00-159-4883.  It has its own “tails” to tie it off and bind up that wound.
  3.  Fish Mox Forte: Fish Amoxicillin, comes in 500 mg capsules of 100 per bottle at about $40 per bottle. Good to throw a course of antibiotics on immediately when faced with a dirty wound.
  4. Electrolyte Stamina Power Pak: This electrolyte made by Trace Minerals Research is a type of ORS (Oral Rehydration Solution) that you mix with about 6 ounces of water. Provides all of your electrolytes, such as Sodium, Potassium, and Magnesium.  If you’re conscious, you can drink fluids with any of the above examples, and if so, these packets will give you a super-helping of electrolytes, as well as other essential minerals you need.
  5. St. John’s Wort: available at Wal-Mart under Spring Valley Brand, 300 mg capsules with 150 capsules per bottle, at about $8.00 apiece. St. John’s Wort is great for dealing with depression and stress.  It is also a powerful antibiotic that is effective against bacteria and viruses.  Take some according to the directions on the package.

To summarize, these are a few things you can tote around with you in a jacket or cargo pocket that will give you an immediate edge when a situation arises that calls for you to work on it immediately.  Spread it out and make kits as such for your family.  Remember: when something happens to them and you’re working on the problem, use their stuff…your stuff is for you, and if you “go down,” they can go to it and treat your problem…with your supplies.  Stay ready and rock steady!

A little bit of that prep beforehand goes a long way.  Familiarize yourself with it and all of the capabilities at your disposal.  A pile of supplies that you don’t know how to use is just a pile of supplies.  Keep fighting that good fight, drink coffee, make pemmican with my recipe, and have a good one!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Popular Hollywood Hallucinogenic Plant Could Have Dangerous Side Effects

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hollywood-drugReadyNutrition Readers, this article holds some important information and advice for anyone considering using naturopathic or holistic supplements in their diet.  As a certified Master Herbalist, in no way, shape, or form do I wish my words to be construed as “knocking” herbs and herbal supplements.  There is an article that recently surfaced, however, that bears mentioning, as it presents a substance in a light that is not objective.  The article is entitled Hallucinogenic Plant Ayahuasca Gains Foothold in the U.S.,” by Veronique Dupont of AFP, released on 12/25/16.

Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is a constituent of the plant, and it is illegal in the U.S., which makes study of it very difficult.  It is said to produce euphoric and hallucinogenic effects, and is claimed to have therapeutic use in helping addiction, trauma, and depression.  Scientists have looked upon it with wariness, as the South American herb has negative effects when mixed with other medications or when used by people with preexisting medical conditions.  The herb is, however, gaining popularity, and people are trying to use it under the protective blanket of its use in “religious rituals and ceremony.”  Here is an excerpt from the article; please take note of the “distinguished” individuals who (according to the article) recommend using Ayahuasca:

“Thousands are flocking to sample the elixir and swear by its therapeutic properties, despite warnings from scientists and users that ayahuasca can be dangerous and even prove fatal, especially when mixed with other drugs.  Ayahuasca’s proponents, who include celebrities such as Sting, Paul Simon, Tori Amos and Lindsey Lohan, say the plant offers a spiritual experience like no other. Many also say it has allowed them to overcome traumas that no other conventional therapy can tackle.”

Really, guys and gals, Lindsey Lohan?  Sting?  The point that I am making (and I am a trained Master Herbalist) is that scientific research and good laboratory work provide true and useful information that should not be ignored just for the sake of bucking the “Big Pharma” train.  Seriously, if you want good information, weigh any herbal supplement against lab data and scientific research provided for you.  In the past, I have mentioned such reference materials as Medical Herbalism” by David Hoffman (a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine), as well as the PDR for Herbal Medicine,” a compendium gathered by hundreds of Medical Doctors and Herbalists.  I have also mentioned traditional medical references, such as Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary.

These reference materials in no way detract from the principles of herbalism and naturopathic aids: rather, they reinforce them with research, study, and in-depth chemical analyses that are possible only in a laboratory setting.  They give dosages, contraindications, and specifics about the herbs that enable a person to arm themselves with knowledge that could prevent an illness or injury.  Part of your survival supplies is the knowledge to employ them.  Nothing could hold more true than with herbs and herbal supplements.

Most laypersons aren’t particularly fond of scientists and chemists; however, these people studied hard to win approval in their profession…with real and valuable information in their curriculums.  It is my firm belief that traditional medicine and herbalism need to support and complement one another, as they are interrelated, with the latter discipline being the older of the two.  Although there are plenty of laws that are not good, they are not the majority: there is common sense in stopping at a red light, common sense in being required to put a tarp over a dump truck loaded with gravel, and common sense with keeping a snarling dog on a leash and maybe muzzled.  Common sense and the observance of it help keep people safe.  If they “forget,” then the law is their guideline.  Without laws people really would eat one another.

In this light, many times some of these exotic herbs have been used for innocuous or innocent purposes with well-meaning, and through no fault of their own, people have gotten hurt or worse.  The reason for this is they didn’t really know the herb or know what they were doing in the first place.  The scientific research on lesser-known substances should be trusted and further researched before attempting to utilize these herbs, as well as consent and approval of a physician…an individual trained in chemistry and biology with years of practical experience in medicine and (we hope) a professional who places patient care first and foremost.

So, to summarize, learn about herbs and herbalism as much as you can when an obscure or “new” thing comes to light.  An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and your prevention lies within your references and the professionals you have at your disposal to question regarding your supplements.  There is no shame in asking questions, and it is just as important to know about your supplements and how to use them as it is to have a full supply.  Be safe, and have a Happy New Year!

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How Everyday Activities Creates a Complete Workout

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snow-shovelingReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, it’s a new year and there’s still work to be done!  Yes indeed, speaking for myself here in Montana, I’ve been shoveling snow every day for the past week.  Doing this helps me to do things, such as pull my vehicle out of the driveway, different structures on my property to not collapse or be buried…little things such as that.  Some days it has been dumping almost a foot of snow on me, and most I see about 4 to 6 inches.  What a pain!  But it’s not all complaints in this department, as it serves a purpose that perhaps you, too, can “latch” onto to make your own.

I’m referring to your daily activities for use as exercise.  When I shovel (I don’t like snow-blowers, and prefer the shovel…grid down, I still can remove snow), that counts as a workout.  Especially if it’s between 1-2 hours per day.  That’s just simple maintenance; however, I take it as a workout.  You can too!  This is not to say that I don’t lift weights on these days, but as a workout, my “yard work” supplements (or complements) the lifting.

Shoveling snow works the shoulder muscles (the deltoids), and the neck muscles (the trapezius), as well as the biceps and triceps in the arms.  It also works your legs: your quadriceps for when you squat and drive your shovel into the snow.  Your lumbar and lower back gets quite a workout for when you turn and throw the snow.  Oh yes, when you’re running “full tilt,” you work up quite a sweat. [Remember to stay hydrated!]

Before I shovel, I tend to stretch out for about 5 minutes with some deep knee bends (squat thrusts) and arm circles, as well as stretching out my chest, arms, and shoulders.  The snow-shoveling forces you to use your hip flexor muscles, as well as accessory muscles of breathing, such as interior and external obliques and transverse abdominus muscles, all located on and near the stomach.  In the gym, it would be hard to duplicate some of the motions you pursue in the mechanics of the shoveling.

I estimate with a damp, “wet” snow, each shovel I fill up weighs about 15 lbs. or so.  After you have done that several thousand times, you can see the point.  You also work on regulating your breathing.  I have a pattern of filling up and moving ten shovelfuls, and then taking a breath for a few seconds…assessing my work remaining.  It is good for the cardiovascular, as well.

To digress, the same runs for cutting and chopping wood.  Splitting wood is good for your arms, shoulders, and back.  You also practice some hand-eye coordination, and I’m here to tell you…you split a quarter or a half a cord with an axe?  You’ll get a good workout, believe me.

You should log all activities in your workout book.  I’m a believer in workout notes, because you can see what gains you make, what problems you face, and you can perfect your activities and training program, changing it to suit your needs.  With your woodcutting and snow-shoveling, note down the time you worked and the amount you moved (an estimate: it doesn’t have to be down to the pound).  It is also important to factor in a recovery, and here’s a rule that doesn’t require supplements.

You should consume some protein and carbohydrates within ½ hour of finishing strenuous activity.

The reason for this is twofold.  After a workout, your body breaks down tissues that will immediately scream for protein to repair them.  In addition, you need to infuse some carbohydrates into your system, because if your body doesn’t have the energy to begin the conduct of repairs, it will break down muscle tissue in order to secure that energy supply.  This article is not for the purpose of covering anabolism and catabolism or the glycogen cycle; however, you need to follow that guideline after your workout is complete.

And what if you don’t live in the Rocky Mountains?  And what of it?  You can still figure out what you do during the course of a day that is a “natural” form of exercise.  Are you a waitress or a health care professional?  Secure a pedometer and use it to figure out how many miles a day you walk.  Tie this in with your functions.  Many professions require a person to sit behind a desk all day.  Do you live within walking distance?  Well, this needs to be factored in, and you can figure out whether or not it gives you some of the exercise that you need.

Bicycling to and from work may be another method, if you live too far to walk and have a profession that requires more cerebral than physical activity.  Those in lines of work that require a lot of physical activity tend not to regulate them (in thought); nevertheless, they reap the benefits of consistent physical activity, such as construction men and bricklayers, as well as steelworkers or dockworkers.  Look at how those guys (and gals) are built, and tell me they’re not benefiting from the physical labor.

When you’re home and have yard work of any kind, incorporate the task and turn it into physical training for yourself.  In a SHTF scenario, you will probably not be able to visit HappyFitness Gym, but you still have a need to exercise.  It lowers the triglyceride levels of the bloodstream and builds up the muscles and stamina.  Exercise is a life-long function that needs to be pursued.  Consult your doctor on all routines you’re considering.  So, Happy New Year, and I hope this year brings you success in your physical training programs…one that you can potentially fill with your everyday work.  In the meantime, I have about three inches of snow to shovel, now, so I’ll catch you later!  JJ out!

Here are some other at-home workouts you could pursue:

4 Daily Strengthening Exercises That Will Push You to the Limit

The Wild Woodsman Workout

See How You Stack Up Against The WW2 Fitness Test

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

New Study: Running Instantly Increases Brainpower

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 We know that exercise is great for our bodies, but did you know it’s also great for your brain? A new study shows that running, even more than other aerobic or high-intensity exercises increases the development of neurons in the parts of the brain we use for learning and retaining information. Researchers saw that the hippocampus lights up on imaging scans during running (indicating growth and new connections) but stays dark during exercises like weight lifting.

I practice high-intensity interval training myself (with exercises like weight lifting or rope jumping) because studies show that exercising in this way burns more calories; however, the effects of neurogenesis only occur during sustained running (i.e., at a steady pace for 20 minutes or more). And compared to those who are sedentary, subjects who ran three times a week had 2-3 times more hippocampal neurons at the end of the study. While researchers are not exactly sure why these results are the case, there are theories about how sustained increased respiration (and therefore oxygen) and blood flow contribute to this brain activity. Running has even been shown to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in known patients and researchers believe there may soon be evidence that running can prevent the disease altogether.

This is all well and good, but what if, like me, you don’t currently run? Or what if you don’t work out at all? Starting a running routine can seem overwhelming, but there’s an app that can help.

Couch to 5K

The Couch to 5K app is exactly what it sounds like a program to get absolute beginners off of the couch and running 5K in just 9 weeks. 5K is 3.1 miles, which should take anywhere from 20-30 minutes to run at a good pace (i.e., just the right amount of sustained time to get those brain-boosting benefits). While the many benefits of running are extremely convincing, embarking on a run incorrectly is a surefire way to get injured (or at the very least, to overdo it and decide running is not worth it after all).

You can download the app to your smartphone and plug in your headphones. The program includes three detailed, timed runs per week with rest/recovery days built in between. The program tells you when it is time to walk, when to jog, and when to run. Each week has a slightly different routine to help you get accustomed to your routine. Alert texts let you keep track of your goals and stay motivated even in between runs.

Becoming a Runner

I started my Couch to 5K program last week. I was surprised at how simple it was to follow. The affable voice of Laura, the C25K coach, comes in over my music to tell me what I should be doing and when (I have an iPhone 5 but I’ve heard that those with earlier versions of the iPhone may have trouble listening to music while using the app—for me this would be a really big deal since I depend on my music to motivate me to work out. There is also a version for Android phones). The basic app is free, but an advanced app with GPS locator and other features is $1.99.

I was surprised by how quickly the first six routines flew by and honestly it was difficult to not keep running beyond the allotted times by the end of week two (but this may be because I’m used to exercising regularly, albeit not running). As with any exercise program, make sure you have approval from your doctor before you begin. You’ll also need appropriate running shoes and a safe surface on which to train (if you have access to a track that’s great, but I find running on natural trails to be far more engaging). Happy running/neuron growing!

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

You’re Wasting Millions of Gallons of Water Each Year and This is How You Can Change It

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water conservationReadyNutrition Readers, we covered a few basics on the importance of taking in enough water during the winter months.  We’re going to take it a step further and talk about the importance of supply and conservation.  Many of the western states, California and Nevada being a couple of examples have been experiencing droughts over the past summers.  With a lowered amount of precipitation during the winter and spring months, aquifers have declined, as well as several rivers that supply tremendous segments of the country.  A prime example is the mighty Colorado River, which generates power and provides drinking water for tens of millions of people.

Fresh water is no longer able to be considered as a simple natural resource that is infinite in nature.  Only three percent (3%) of the world’s water supply is fresh, and 2/3 of this amount is to be found tied up in glacial ice (the North and South poles).  The world’s animals and plants are therefore dependent on 1% of the world’s water supply.  In drought years, this can present a problem.

The average American family uses approximately 170 gallons of water per person each day.

The bathroom is responsible for ¾ of this amount: every time the toilet is flushed, 5 gallons of water is lost on average.  When you stop to consider there are about 315 million people in the United States who flush that toilet about 2-3 times per day, the amount of water is staggering.  To be sure, this water isn’t “destroyed,” but it is difficult to recover and render drinkable again.

Pollutants are introduced into our water supplies by industry and farming, and these pollutants seep into the groundwater to contaminate the water supplies and the crops that are raised upon them.  It is estimated that 338 billion gallons per day are drawn from surface and subsurface water resources.  90 billion gallons are for people, livestock, and crops.  The remainder?  It goes to industry, mining, and hydroelectric/nuclear power plants.

So, what can we do?  A good deal, actually.  There will be differences with you, the Readers as a percentage of you use your own wells, and others use a municipal water supply.  The conservation can be done by both groups, however, as conservation starts at your front door.  The reasons are not so much as being part of a “green” movement as they are of preserving resources for your own family’s use.  If you are responsible for your own resources, it benefits a community as a whole.  Self-responsibility (not legislated responsibility) is the method for conserving your resources and supplies…this is part of preparation.  There are a number of methods.

Firstly, be aware of information and resources that can help you.  Contact the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) in Washington, D.C., for information pertaining to water usage and ways to control it.  Yes, they’re a government agency, however, it is your tax dollars that fund them…you may as well pick up some useful information they have garnered…that you already paid for.  It is free to obtain, but you paid for it to be researched: use it!

If you decrease your time in the shower by just 1 minute per day…this will save 700 gallons of water per month.  By estimating how long you shower, you can add to this water savings drastically by planning your showering time.  VICTORIA AMAT CVRAM.  “Victory loves Preparation,” as the saying runs.  Most toilets have water-conserving features that affect the water flow.  Placing a half brick or a brick in your toilet tank does not interfere with the toilet’s function, but can enable you to save anywhere from 8-20 gallons of water per person, per day.  That is quite a bit of water, if you’re unable to compost your waste products.

Composting brings up another valuable point.  There are plenty of composting toilets available, if it is within your ability to do effectively.  Obviously if you live in a high-rise apartment building in Manhattan, you’re not going to be able to employ a composting toilet in your unit.  There will be a difference if you live in a remote area and on your own property with no zoning/neighborhood requirements limiting what you can do.  Research what will work for your area.  Also, refer to the articles I wrote previously on rain-collection for a water supply, and different measures for establishing water points and water storage for your home and family.

There is also information on water purification methods in these articles that details how to go about making your water drinkable.  I also suggest free resources such as www.howtopedia.com for downloadable, free plans on water collection points and storage methods, as well as how to obtain water from different sources.  The conservation is not a mere “greening” but an exercise in supply and logistics…stretching your resources to the maximum of their conservation and employment.  In this way, you are continuously preparing and honing a survival skill that will come in handy on a daily basis, and when the SHTF.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

50 Awesome Stocking Stuffers Every Prepper Will Love

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prepper-stocking-stuffersSometimes the best gifts are the ones hanging in the stocking on Christmas morning. Adding a few stocking stuffers that are preparedness centered is a great way to help the family get more prepared.

While there are a lot of prepper-inspired products out there, this modest list of prepper-inspired products are the ones that really caught my eye. These tiny treasures have the gift of practicality and deserve a place on your preparedness shelves.

50 Awesome Stocking Stuffers Every Prepper Will Love

  1. Pocket Chainsaw
  2. River Knife Eat n’ Tool
  3. Tactical Holster Shirt
  4. Tea Variety Pack
  5. QuikClot
  6. Iosat Potassium Iodide Radiation Protection
  7. Paracord Survival Kit
  8. Tanto Knife with Fire Starter
  9. Inflatable Solar Lantern
  10. Outdoor Dry Sack
  11. Tactical Flashlight
  12. Encrypted Thumb Drive
  13. Platypus Platy Bottle
  14. Doom and Bloom SURVIVAL! Board Game
  15. RFID Blocking Wallet
  16. Human Energy Concealment Facemask
  17. Windowsill Herb Kit
  18. Portable Camping Chair
  19. Essential Oils
  20. Emergency Sleeping Bag
  21. Tactical Kuba Kickz
  22. Camping Hammock
  23. High-Intensity Glow Sticks
  24. Tactical War Hammer
  25. Keychain Carabiners 
  26. Gardening Tool Set
  27. Credit Card Survival Tool
  28. Sawyer Mini Filtration System
  29. SOG Entrenching Tool
  30. Kevlar Tactical Gloves
  31. Folding Key Knife
  32. The Prepper’s Cookbook
  33. SAM Splint Fold
  34. Green Coffee Beans
  35. Wound Seal Kit
  36. Conflicted Card Game
  37. RFID Blocking Faraday Cage
  38. 10 in 1 Wild Survival Kit Briefcase
  39. Bread Dough Hand Whisk
  40. ESEE Fixed Blade Survival Knife
  41. Wild Flower Seed Kit
  42. Maple Syrup Tree Tapping Kit
  43. LED Nightlight/Flashlight
  44. Waterproof Matches with Case
  45. Pocket Blanket
  46. Firearm Protective Eyewear
  47. SOG Snarl Fixed Blade
  48. Survival Grenade Keychain
  49. Whetstone Knife Sharpener
  50. Cell Phone/Credit Card Wallet with RFID Blocking

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Thriving When It Counts: How To Use Bug Infested Food

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It is a fact that bugs in all of their life cycles can be harmful to your stored food sources. They are one of the true enemies of your food supply and can usually be avoided by properly storing food for long-term use. But there are times when they find a way to get into your food supply. While these infestations may prevent humans from consuming it, take comfort in knowing that all is not lost! But first, the facts!

Pantry pests damage food by contaminating it with their bodies and their by-products. According to an integrated pest management system, nearly all dried food products are susceptible to insect infestation, including cereal products (grains, oats, cornmeal, rice, spaghetti, crackers, and cookies); seeds such as dried beans and popcorn; nuts; chocolate; raisins and other dried fruits; spices; powdered milk; tea; and cured meats.

The Usual Suspects

  • The larval stage of the Indianmeal moth produces frass (excrement) and webbing, and some beetle larvae produce secretions that give food a disagreeable odor and taste.
  • Setae (hairs) from the warehouse beetle can irritate the mouth, throat, and stomach of people who eat infested products.
  • In addition, pantry pests might introduce microbes into the food that could produce mycotoxins (highly carcinogenic compounds), especially if the food is stored in warm, humid conditions.

In The Prepper’s Cookbook, it was emphasized that insects are most likely to infest food products that have been opened but are also capable of penetrating unopened paper, thin cardboard, and plastic, foil, or cellophane-wrapped packages. They may chew their way into packages or crawl in through folds and seams. Insects within an infested package begin multiplying and can spread to other stored foods not only in the same area but in other rooms in a home. All stages (egg, larva, pupa, and adult) may be present simultaneously in infested products. Source

That said, there are times that even though all precautions are taken at preserving your food supply, sometimes bug infestations happen. Here are some ways to reuse food that has been infested.

A Bold New Approach to Feeding Livestock

While infested food may be less palatable in certain circumstances, some dry goods can be fed to livestock. Dry grains and cereals are already given to chickens, goats, pigs and cattle as a nutritional supplement. As well, many animals naturally gravitate to ingesting bugs. Goats, chickens, pigs and even cows.

Infested dry beans can also be incorporated into livestock’s diet. Edible beans (e.g. navy, pinto, kidney) that are shrunken, broken and/or discolored will not make the grade for human consumption and may make their way into cattle rations for added protein. In an article on the subject, researchers believe that certain bug infested grains and foods can be fed to livestock for added nutrition.

A new article in the journal Animal Feed Science and Technology notes that insects literally breed like flies and are highly efficient (because they are cold-blooded) at converting their feed into body mass. Though it may need to be supplemented with calcium and other nutrients, that body mass is rich in the proteins and fats animals need. But the best part—questions of squeamishness aside—is that insects can thrive on manure and other waste.

The article reviews the state of research on livestock use of locusts, grasshoppers, crickets, black soldier fly larvae, housefly maggots, mealworms, and silkworms. Each has advantages and disadvantages in different habitats and for different species, but together they offer a battery of alternatives to conventional soybean and fishmeal feed.

Black soldier fly larvae are already commonly sold as pet food and fish bait. Studies suggest that pigs and poultry could do as well or better on a larvae-based feed as on soybean and fishmeal feeds. The larvae could also be a practical alternative on fish farms, particularly where customers object to feeding fish other fish. For some fish and for poultry, eating insects may also be a lot closer to their natural diet than are conventional livestock feeds.

Source

Note: this is not to be confused with feeding livestock moldy food. Doing so can introduce toxins to the livestock that can make them ill and possibly die. Moreover, molded feed contains fungal spores that, if inhaled, can cause a myriad of health issues such as respiratory allergies, or a type of pneumonia that prevents oxygen from getting into the bloodstream.

Why This Approach is Brilliant!

Farmers raising livestock for meat have been on the look out for ways to introduce for nturiets to the animals diets and cut down on feed costs. This sustainable approach could be the answer they have been looking for. A meal ground from infested grains and cereals can be fed to livestock and will drastically cut down on feed costs. As well, one can consider growing fodder to further supplement the livestock diet.

Using this “insect meal” is also beneficial in an organic garden and add needed nutrients to the soil. This promotes a more sustainable gardening method.

To ensure a healthy transition into this alternative food source, research what types of food pests could be added to your livestock’s diet beforehand. This could be a great way to add additional nutrition to the livestock’s diet and make better use of the food you would otherwise throw away.

According to Science Magazine, “regulatory agencies are beginning to weigh the benefits against potential safety risks, including the possibility that insects might accumulate environmental toxins or even transmit diseases to the farm animals that eat them. On 8 October, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in Parma, Italy, released its first report on the risks of using insects as food and animal feed. It concluded that the risks depend on the insect species used—and that more studies like PROteINSECT are needed before livestock or fish are switched to this new diet. But in other countries, the brave new world of industrial-scale insect farming is already on view.”

 

Recommended Reading:

http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/insects/find/insect-pests-of-stored-food/

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7452.html

http://www.chowhound.com/post/bugs-rice-edible-301992

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

2016 Ultimate Christmas Shopping Guide For Preppers

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 Who’s ready for Cyber Monday? I know that many of you are starting to make wishlists for some favorite products to add to your prepping supplies and we’d love to help you out with that. Each year, Ready Nutrition puts out an extensive list on some of the most popular prepping gear out there. Here are some Prepper Christmas ideas from recent years: 201320142015. These online deals may inspire you to snag some for yourself and bulk up your own preps!

Check out these prepper gifts for 2016

Gifts under $20

Daisy Slingshot

Slingshots have long been used for hunting small game, such as rabbits, doves, and squirrels. An advantage of this is that it does not require ammunition, making it ideal for teaching kids about self-reliance. In a shtf situation where you have run out of ammunition, this modest weapon could be converted into a more powerful tool. You can read more about the effectiveness of this silent weapon here.

The Prepper’s Blueprint

blueprint

This 462 page best-seller is a must-have for your prepper library. Each chapter uses real-life scenarios to help the reader prepare for any disaster and provides lists of supply suggestions. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Prepper’s Blueprint coaches the reader to make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and essential supply lists.

Sawyer Mini

The Mini Water Filter is the lightest and most versatile personal filtration system from Sawyer. It weighs 2 ounces and fits in the palm of your hand and allows you to drink from virtually any body of water. It may be small is size, but it allows you to drink up to 100,000 gallons of water without changing the filter! For less than $20 dollars, this is the gift that keeps on giving!

Gifts Under $50

Eco Handwasher Machine

Another great off-grid appliance to consider is mobile washing machine. We all know how dirty things can get in an emergency and having a way to keep clean will be paramount. Can also be used for small loads for single people and can wash 7 to 8 dress shirts, 10 T-shirts, 30 pairs of socks or 2 pairs of blue jeans per load. After finishing your washing cycle just attach the drain spout and it will automatically drain into the sink or bathtub. Then fill again with clean water for the rinse cycle.

GoTenna

Turn your cellular phone into an off-grid communication tool. This state-of-the-art cognitive digital radio creates its own 100% off-grid signal and coordinates with other units within range so you can text privately — 1-to-1 or with a group — or broadcast openly to any nearby goTenna. It even has apps included with detailed offline maps — free to download for any region in the world — so you can locate yourself and others while enjoying the outdoors, travel, and crowded events or even during emergencies.

Colt S.P.E.A.R. Tactical Arrowheads

Colt products are an American tradition built upon a lifetime of quality products. These arrowheads are the perfect addition to your survival kit and can be used for hunting, trapping, cutting, and even skinning.

Gifts Over $75

Tactical Gasmask

One SGE 400/3 BB Tactical Gas Mask + Two Multipurpose A2B2E2K2P3 FiltersThis tactical gas mask was originally developed for military and law enforcement use and is now available to civilians. This advanced breathing protection device is rated to protect against all CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear)-level threats and would make a great addition to your preps. The greatest sell point for Top Tier Gear USA is they take into account the family aspect of preparedness and have deals for families!

Outdoor Cast Iron Stove

There’s no doubt about it, this outdoor wood stove is built to last. With heating and cooking capability, it’s the ultimate “dual threat.” Perfect for camp, outbuildings and more. This well build outdoor stove keeps coffee and sauce pans hot, brings water to a boil and cooks bacon and eggs! The top selling point of this product is its portable and make from high quality galvanized steel.

Leatherman

Multi-tools are just plain awesome aren’t they? They let you save a ton of space by wrapping multiple functions into a single item. And since most little problems don’t need super specialized solutions, a few multitools can fix pretty much any problem around the house. The Oht Black Molle multi-tool is stainless steel leatherman and truly has it all. Black oxide is a powder-based metal coating and is ideal for situations where giving away a position would be costly. This it is widely used by the military for its effectiveness in reducing glare and reflection. Also, don’t forget to add a tool holster for easy carry.

VSSL Supplies

VSSL supplies contain the outdoor gear you need for short-term excursions. Whether you plan to be out for a few days or a few hours, having critical supplies in a compact weather-resistant case is an essential part of preparation. This is a great product to keep in your bug out supplies or in your vehicle preparedness kit. I love this product because everything is labeled so you stay organized when you’re on the go!

Wonderbag

Wonderbag Non-Electric Portable Slow Cooker with Recipe Cookbook, Blue BatikOff-gridders are going to love this product! The Wonderbag is a simple but revolutionary non-electric, portable slow cooker. Wonderbag’s clever insulation allows food that has been brought to the boil to continue slow cooking or warm while in the bag. No plugs. No Fuss. No electricity required, so it’s worry-free. This is a great addition for those wanting alternative ways to cook when there is an off-grid emergency.

Looking for a more personal gift?

Homemade gifts also make wonderful presents to put under the tree. There is still time to make a homemade gift for loved ones. Here are some that I or the writers at Ready Nutrition have written about in the past.

Merry Christmas and Happy Shopping to all of you!

Tess and the Ready Nutrition Writers

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Lifesaving Security Measures to Secure Your Home From Intruders

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home-securityMany believe burglaries are crimes that occur out of desperation, but this isn’t always the case. In fact, the motivation that drives many criminals is simply opportunity. Such is the case for why home break-ins occur around Christmas time while homeowners are away at work. All a criminal needs to do is make a quick entry, grab all the gifts perfectly surrounded by a Christmas tree and they are out the door faster than you can blink. Here are some facts to gain a better perspective on what you are facing:

  • According to the U.S. Department of Justice, every 15 seconds a home in America is burglarized and the homeowner typically suffers a loss of nearly $2,000 in stolen goods or property damage.
  • Most burglaries take place between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
  • The majority of break-ins are committed by burglars who live nearby.
  • Burglars tend to avoid homes with security systems.
  • Most criminals can burglarize a home in less than ten minutes.
  • Almost 30% of burglars enter a home through an unlocked door or window.
  • An astonishing 34% of burglars enter through the front door.
  • Burglars usually go to the master bedroom first.
  • The average property dollar loss per burglary is a staggering $2,251.
  • Someone is home during nearly three out of every ten burglaries.
  • Only 13.6% of burglaries in 2014 resulted in arrests.

Given these startling statistics, break-ins can be avoided altogether by using common sense and mindfulness. Here are some simple security measures to take to ensure your home stays out of the watchful eye of an intruder.

1. Keep security layers in mind

Having security layers in place is the best possible preventative measures to deter possible criminals from marking your home as an easy target. These security layers will advertise to intruders that they should avoid your home altogether. Designing a home defense system that includes multiple security layers is a proactive way to protect your home, family, and belongings. Fortunately, there are plenty of tools at your disposal for keeping your property safe. Most of them cost significantly less than an alarm system, and all together can provide several layers of security to your home. Below are seven awesome tools for keeping your place safe during the holiday season. These affordable items are a great start to beefing up your home security.

  1. Door club
  2. Wireless LED spotlight
  3. Fake TV burglar deterrent
  4. Digital lamp timers
  5. Sentry security bolt safe
  6. Hidden safes
  7. Security system
  8. Curtains and/or blinds on windows
  9. Use a wooden dowel on sliding doors and windows

Read more about these

2. Keep security supplies near vulnerable areas

Those that are preparedness-minded are always vigilant about ensuring the safety of their family members. In that same vein, children should know the basics of the family emergency plan and safety rules like not opening the door to strangers.

As well, having some basic safety/security supplies near the most vulnerable areas of the home (key entry points, garages, etc.) would be advantageous if you find yourself face to face with someone attempting to break-in. For examples, near the entry points in my home, we have a decorative basket that blends into the decor but has items such as flashlights, an emergency whistle, multi-tools and/or a knife. As well, if you do not have children in the home, you can also strategically place a handgun, clips or a non-lethal weapon if you choose. You can strategically place these items near vulnerable spots of the home.

  • The front door
  • The backdoor
  • The bedroom
  • Living room

Another vulnerable part of the home is windows. Burglars love to “window shop”. If you keep your curtains or blinds open, this will give them an opportunity to take a peek into the home. Moreover, if you have picturesque bistro tables and chairs, they can easily be used against you. Criminals will throw them against windows for fast entry. Installing shatter-proof window film on windows will help prevent this.

While we love a beautifully landscaped yard with shrubs and bushes cut low, this can also make for easy entry into the home. You can add bushes and landscaping to help deter criminals from marking your home. Plants with thorns such as roses, bougainvillea or blackberry bushes are great choices for securing the outer perimeter of the home. At the very least, secure the windows from becoming entry points with window alarms to alert you or your neighbors to a break in.

Speaking of yard and landscaping, how many of you have a ladder that you forgot to bring in? Criminals will look around for tools they can use to gain entry. The second story of a home is typically more lax when it comes to security. If you are guilty of this one, lock up your ladder in your garage.

3. Focus on the entry points

The most common way for an intruder to get into your home is through the door. Make this your first priority in reinforcing your security. The best method is to install door frame and hinge reinforcements on the front and back doors. This security solution is made of galvanized steel and can prevent single entry door kick-ins and stop intruders before they are inside. Moreover, you might also want to consider installing a deadbolt. Even the strongest reinforced steel door can be neutralized by one swift kick if your lock does not extend deep enough into the door frame.

As well, gaining entry into a garage is another essential entry point to secure. It takes less than six seconds to break into a garage if the criminal knows how. Here are step-by-step instructions on how to prevent this.

3. Be aware and know thy neighbors

Having a pleasant relationship with neighbors who stay at home is a beneficial relationship to have. They can keep an eye on your home while you are at work and you can reciprocate in a way that helps them out. Knowing who your neighbors are, what type of cars they drive and usually the time they are home, creates a neighborhood that is actively practicing OPSEC and awareness.

4. Don’t draw unwelcome attention to your home

We typically assume those living around us are respectful of property, but this isn’t always the case. Those living in residential areas bring unwanted attention to themselves when they rid their home of the large boxes marked with brand names or pictures of products. This happens frequently during Christmastime. That new flatscreen television box or video game system packaging will scream, “Come steal me!” to criminals. Be mindful and load up boxes and drop them off at a recycling center. This will reduce the eyes on the prize. As well, boxes are one the easiest items to repurpose. On a personal note, I have broken down boxes and used them to create a lasagna-style garden. This cut down on my trash load and helped me create a more sustainable lifestyle.

5. Let there be light!

Illuminating the perimeter is single-handedly one of the easiest security measures to take. Simply put, dark or poorly lit areas make it easier for burglars to go unseen. Motion sensing security measures will quickly signal you to trouble if it’s out there. As well, indoor timers for lamps and indoor lighting can help to fool anyone creeping around where they shouldn’t be. Remember, the main goal of burglars is to get in and get out unseen. If they think someone is home, they will think twice before entering.

Everyone wants to believe that they are safe and sound when they latch the windows and lock the doors. With the increase in crime, jobless rates, and increased food prices, home break-ins are likely to be on the rise. Take some incentive to review your family preparedness plans and beef up your home security measures! The investment in your home security will pay off for years to come.

 

Additional Resources:

Prepper’s Home Defense: Security Strategies to Protect Your Family by Any Means Necessary

The Prepper’s Blueprint: The Step-By-Step Guide To Help You Through Any Disaster

Home Security: Securing the Doors

Home Security: Securing the Windows

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Save the Conversation at Your Post-Election Thanksgiving Dinner

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dysfunctional holidaysSometimes going home for the holidays is hard (there’s a reason liquor sales swell during these occasions!). Often, Thanksgiving dinners bring far-flung family members together at a single table under one roof, and that, even in the best of circumstances, can lead to stress and awkward conversations. Add in the fact that this is an election year and you’re bound to encounter some strain while you pass those mashed potatoes across vastly different ideologies. I’ve heard from more than one friend or family member that they won’t be attending holiday dinners this year, and I think that’s really a shame.

I’d encourage anyone thinking about going that route to reconsider; the following tips can help to make your Thanksgiving dinner manageable and enjoyable and can help you focus on your families’ similarities, rather than differences.

Remember the Golden Rule of Polite Conversation

If you’re an activist of any sort this may be difficult to adhere to, but the two topics that are best to leave on the coat hook are your religious and political views. Remember last year when Uncle Joe successfully convinced everyone at the table to convert to his exact religious and political beliefs? Yeah, that didn’t happen. No matter how zealous your convictions, if you truly want to make the two hours of Thanksgiving dinner comfortable, you need to skip that kind of talk. Now is no time to be passive-aggressive either: leave the political-themed hats and t-shirts at home. Focus instead on the personal: how people are doing in their jobs, what hobbies they are participating in, how their kids are doing.

If someone tries to bait or lead you into a conversation that approaches one of the two danger zones, be nice but don’t engage. I once escaped a horrible conversation with a distant cousin by complimenting her earrings.  Really, this is no different than abstaining from talk about your digestive issues or the road kill you saw on the drive over—it’s just plain rude to go there. And if your family happens to all hold the exact same beliefs and convictions, well, how nice for you! (Though you should know that for years my family assumed I shared their same political opinions when I absolutely did not—consider this might be the case for the person next to you at the table.)

Thankful for Place Settings

 When I host Thanksgiving dinner at my house, each place setting has a little piece of paper with the subject heading “I am thankful for:” and 5 blank lines. I also give out fountain pens like these as a little gift to my guests. As everyone is seated, they fill out their lists. We take turns over the course of the dinner reading our lists. This is a great way to focus on what really matters to us and to help us share in our gratitude.

Do Your Part

Preparation is key in all situations, so having a couple of talking points in your conversation arsenal is smart. Avoid lulls in conversation by contributing. Think about something positive or meaningful that happened to you recently—a beautiful place that you visited or a great (non-political!) book or movie that you saw—and have an anecdote ready.

When all else fails, you can always talk about the food:  what your favorite part of the meal is, how certain dishes were prepared, and how good the wine is (but go easy on the wine!).

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Why You Should Pay Attention to the Anti-Trump Riots and How to Prepare

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in-the-streets

Outbreak of Violent Riots

A number of riots have broken out in Los Angeles, Oakland, Portland, Austin and Manhattan following the election of Donald Trump to the U.S. presidency. One anti-Trump protester in Los Angeles is quoted in a CNN interview saying, “People have to die” and graffiti on a monument in New Orleans reads “DIE WHITES DIE” in response to Trump’s election. Rioters are breaking windows of businesses, looting stores, lighting trash cans on fire, shooting flares and brutalizing people who might support Trump or disagree with their violent leftist ideology.

Shortly after midnight on Wednesday morning, a female driver in Oakland was hit by another car on the highway, and when she pulled over to the right shoulder, a group of anti-Trump rioters surrounded her car, broke the back window and she sustained multiple serious injuries. A shocking video which surfaced Thursday shows a man in Chicago being ripped from his car and brutally attacked by multiple anti-Trump agitators who are seen punching and kicking him in the head as one steals his car, dragging the man as he hangs onto the back left window. Many believe this is the handywork of financier George Soros who has funded multiple uprisings in recent years. What we can all agree on is this is worse than a zombie apocalypse; this epidemic of hate and criminal behavior will only lead to more unrest if allowed to grow.

At times like these, it is more important than ever to ensure that you have the knowledge and ability to defend yourself and your loved ones from threats that may come at the most unexpected times, possibly when you are stuck in traffic and physically unable to get away from violent degenerates who may be at your window seeking to cause you harm.

Situational Awareness

Let’s start with your general state of awareness in your day-to-day life. It is an unfortunate truth that many place themselves in needlessly volatile situations by not paying close attention to risks that they could face in their immediate surroundings, be it during simple daily tasks, like operating a vehicle or working around heavy machinery, or the more imminent threat of violent agitators that are now filling the streets in major cities, many of whom seek to cause damage to your property and/or harm to you and your loved ones. Utilizing techniques of avoidance, risk reduction, de-escalation and general situational awareness is essential to your survival.

How to Use Cooper’s Color Codes

A scale of situational awareness called Cooper’s Color Codes, named after Colonel Jeff Cooper’s combat preparedness methods, is often used in firearms training for situational awareness. The four colors are used as a measure of the degree of situational awareness which an individual may reach at any given point in the day.

White — In condition white, your state of awareness is one that is relaxed and largely unaware of your surroundings. Generally, the only time a person should be in condition White is if he or she is asleep or somehow incapacitated.

Yellow — In condition yellow, you may be relaxed, but you have a heightened sense of awareness for who is around you and what noises and movements occur in your vicinity. You are not captivated by a cell phone screen; you are keeping track of who is behind or near you, especially when near a crowd. This awareness is in no way a paranoia; it is a general sense of awareness for threats to the safety of you and your loved ones.

Orange — In condition orange, you have identified something that is likely to cause harm, and you are focused in on a particular person or situation that poses a threat. This means that should an attack of any kind occur, you would be expecting this and ready for it at this stage.

Red — In condition red, you know that there is an immediate threat in your presence. However, this is not necessarily the point at which one who is armed would fire upon a target. Instead, this is the point where one who is armed may draw their firearm and make commands for an attacker to stop what they are doing. It is important to take steps to de-escalate at all cost, there is no reason to use deadly force if a situation can be solved without it.

Those who carry firearms, especially those who open-carry where concealed carry is criminalized, are obligated to have a heightened situational awareness at all times because any person who gets within arms reach could possibly attempt to take the firearm from them. On a number of occasions, concealed carry holders have stopped attempted robberies by merely maintaining a condition Yellow situational awareness and being prepared to draw their firearm in the moments they had as the gunman turned away from them. Many who seek to cause you harm are not expecting you to be prepared to fight back, and they will run when they see that you are prepared to defend yourself.

Weapons of Opportunity

While firearms are effective tools of self-defense, they are not always available, and sometimes they are not practical; for this reason, it is important to consider keeping weapons of opportunity on your person, in your vehicle and even in your workplace. A weapon of opportunity is an everyday object that could be used as a defensive weapon if needed. Having situational awareness only becomes truly effective when you have the tools of defense at your disposal. Various weapons of opportunity are likely sitting all around your home and workplace; these are the heavy or sharp objects that can be grabbed at a moments notice, like a pen, key, belt or even a coffee mug. Various weapons of opportunity for your vehicle could be a crescent wrench, tire iron, lug wrench or crow bar. Make sure to check your local laws as there have been individuals who have been prosecuted for carrying opportune weapons like a baseball bat, but they had no substantiating evidence, like a baseball glove or ball, to show that they meant to use the item for its intended use.

Why Gun Control Kills

In some states, like California and New York, there have been such extreme gun control measures that  non-violent people have been prohibited from carrying firearms for self-defense. This means that non-criminals are treated the same as convicted felons in these states; this only endangers lives and forces well-to-do people into vulnerable positions in which they become defenseless targets of murderers and thieves, and as we see today, individuals are being taken out of their cars and brutalized by anti-Trump rioters, like in Chicago, on of the most anti-gun cities in the country. Laws have not stopped the illegal acquisition of firearms, but they have caused many peaceful people to be victimized by criminals, and it’s time that this bureaucratic overreach is reversed.

Reestablishing the foundations of self-defense and self-sufficiency in our society will require that we maintain awareness of threats to life and liberty and that we keep the tools of defense close by our side, ready to be used when the worst happens.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Eyes Have It: Eye-Protection in the Winter Wilderness

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File:06March-Sunshine 07.jpgReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this special segment of reporting for Winter First-Aid Trauma has to do mainly with preventative measures in dealing with eye protection, something that most people do not consider until after they have problems.  Your eyes are, arguably, the most important sensory organs that you have.  The eyes are (for what they are) fairly durable; however, there are limits for their function.  One of those limits is imposed by extreme cold and hazards associated with winter weather.

Prepare for any disaster with this step-by-step manual

Firstly we must understand what the eyes are and how they function.  The eyes are mostly comprised of water; therefore, it can easily be seen (no pun intended!) how frozen temperatures can adversely affect the eye.  The vitreous humor (the actual fluid portion of the eye) is kept warm by the ambient body temperature and also the vessels that supply the eyes with blood.  In periods of extreme cold, this temperature can be greatly reduced.  Blinking is one of the actions of the eye that both moistens it and also allows accessory muscles to give off heat that keep the eyes warm.  In addition, the closed and clenched eyelids can help to hold in some of the heat and protect against cold.

Now, here in Montana goggles (at some point) are a must.  I prefer lightly tinted wraparounds that allow outward “breathing” of the eyes (yes, the eyes do give off heat and moisture) and that are fog-resistant.  These goggles lock in the eyes’ ambient heat and protect them from the gale force winds and frigid temperatures.  When you are looking around outside (no pun intended, once again!) and the temperature is -25 degrees Fahrenheit or colder, you better be sure to have eye protection.

There are many different brands.  I do not have a personal favorite.  Just take note of this: the tinting on your goggles must afford UV protection (400 is the guideline you can work off of, indicating the percent of UV rays shielded).  This factor is important because if they are just tinted without providing the protection from ultraviolet rays, the eye and the retina can suffer damage.  This is because tinting in itself (because of the darker view) allows the pupil to expand.  Such will let in more light; however, more UV rays also penetrate, and this can lead to retinal damage and/or snow blindness.  Make sure they have UV protection (minimum 100%).

When it is cold, but not below freezing, I highly recommend sunglasses.  The sun is lower in the sky in the winter, and this allows for the human eye to pick up more light, especially in the form of the aforementioned UV rays.  Once again the same principle applies as with the goggles.  The sunglasses should have (as your guideline) a 400% UV protection factor.  Remember, these will help immensely against snow glare and potential snow blindness.  Among the problems besides direct or snow-reflected light are reflections from icy or shiny spots when you’re hiking or climbing.

Snow Blindness

Snow blindness occurs when a partial (or permanent) injury to the retina by prolonged or intense light exposure renders the eyes incapable of normal vision.  Prolonged light exposure would include long hikes without any eye protection as mentioned in the previous paragraphs.  In a survival situation where there are no sunglasses in the survivor’s first aid pack, this can (and often does) occur in flat, open areas when crossing in the daylight hours during peak sunlight exposure times.

Signs and symptoms of snow blindness are as follows:

  1. The sensation of sand/grit within the eyes, accompanied by pain and soreness both in and over the eyes. This pain is exacerbated when you move your eyeballs.
  2. Runny/watery eyes
  3. Redness of the eyes and the rims/edges
  4. Headache (increased duration usually increases the severity)
  5. Increased light sensitivity/pain in the eyes from the increased light

Treating Snow Blindness

The immediate first-aid actions to be taken are to remove your eyes from the light source/get out of the light.  Taking shelter in a darkened area can do this.  Another thing to do is to cover both eyes with a dark or thick cloth.  You can substitute anything that will interfere with exposure to the light…bandages, dark glasses, a knit hat doubled up and pulled over the eyes…use your imagination.  Of course, before you do this, make sure you’re in a safe area that you can rest and alleviate the exposure of the eyes to any light.

In this vein one can see that it is best to travel in either the backcountry of the Alaskan Yukon or in the ice flats of the Dakotas in the winter months with a field-partner.  One can assist the other in time of trouble and thereby cut down on the risk of something else happening.  With few exceptions, all types of winter tragedies and trauma can be prepared for to a certain degree with a minimum amount of funds and efforts.

To conclude, the eyes are very sensitive and precious instruments that need to be maintained and protected.  Should you suffer from any eye injuries as mentioned in this article, I highly recommend having an eye exam after you return home to make sure that no further complications may be underlying.  Plan and prepare, and in this manner you stand the best chance at making your outdoor excursions productive and enjoyable.  You’ll be able to rest assured that you have taken steps to take care of trouble before it turns to tragedy.  Have a good one, and “keep an eye out” for one another!

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Are Government Puppet Masters Using Riots to Incite a Civil War?

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american-riotReadyNutrition Readers and fellow warriors in the war of sustainability, the election may have been finished, but the unrest is not.  I mention “may” have been finished, as the electors of the Electoral Vote have not weighed in on their final verdict.  That verdict, due on December 19 may even be amended or reversed, with the entire thing not coming before Congress until January 6.  In the meantime, civil disorder is increasing throughout the U.S. in both frequency and locations.

As of this writing, riots and unrest along with demonstrations have occurred in the following large metropolitan areas: Miami, Atlanta, Salt Lake City, New York City, Birmingham, AL, Chicago, Washington, D.C., Eugene, OR, Portland, OR, Indianapolis, Phoenix, Denver, Baltimore, Las Vegas, and Fresno, CA to name a few.  These are no gangs of urchins around a burning barrel on a street corner: these riots and demonstrations are made up of thousands of angry protestors that have clashed both with Trump supporters and law enforcement, at times violently.

Law enforcement officers reported that more than 25,000 marched from Union Square in Manhattan all the way to Trump tower in midtown.  Protests and demonstrations were marked by frequent arrests and clashes with police.  On 11/11/16, a man was shot with two suspects detained in Portland, OR, where the clashes are intensifying; the man was shot on Morrison Bridge and law enforcement has stated it is related to the election turmoil.

Michael Moore, left-wing radical filmmaker was also in New York in an attempt to personally confront Trump at his Trump tower on Saturday 11/12/16.  He said the following:

“[Trump is an] illegitimate president and does not have the vote of the people.”

In Washington, D.C. protestors blocked the Interstate 395 tunnel that leads to Capitol Hill for several hours.  In Chicago thousands marched through the city streets and (what a coincidence) ended up in front of the hotel owned by Trump downtown.  In Indianapolis, two police officers were injured by protestors who hit them with rocks.  In Los Angeles the police estimated the protestors to be numbering more than 8,000 people.

Credit: CNN

Portland, OR placed a curfew in effect for minors in an effort to prevent kids from being beaten up or hurt in the middle of all of it.  10:15 pm is the curfew for those under 14 years of age, and midnight for everyone ages 14-17 years old.  In Baltimore the protestors marched from the Washington Monument on Charles Street to the Inner Harbor.  Police had to move two reporters from Fox news out of harm’s way when the protestors began throwing rocks and bottles and shouting insults.  There were also thousands protesting in Baltimore on Thursday night after the Ravens-Browns football game, blocking traffic for several hours in all directions from the stadium.

One of the interesting things to note is that in all of these cities, the placards of the protestors have many of the same motifs, and further: one type has “#notmypresident” printed on it.  Perhaps some of you readers have seen this and can clarify what that means.  The reason for the question is that the George Soros machine of destabilization so successfully employed in other countries, such as Ukraine, the former Yugoslavia (Croatia and Serbia, specifically), and Hungary…that machine is up and running in the United States.  Paid protestors and other rabble rousers are being paid by Soros and bussed into the target cities to foment riot and dissent. This isn’t the first time Soros has funded riots on American soil and it won’t be the last.

Credit: BET

Many protestors in Baltimore held placards with “People’s Power Assembly 443.221.3775” on the front.  This, too, bears the hint of more subversive efforts paid for by those behind the scenes wishing to take the country to the bottom.  Where does all of this lead?  Well for starters, keep in mind those two previous dates mentioned regarding the Electoral votes.  In addition to this, there is a petition circulating calling for the electors to reverse their original votes with more than 2 million signatures.

As if that isn’t enough, there are people openly calling on Twitter and Facebook for Trump to be “taken out,” in a myriad of violent manners.  As mentioned in other articles, under the John Warner Defense Act of 2006, Obama has the ability to declare a “catastrophic emergency,” defined as one that interferes with (basically) any and every aspect of our society from government to finance.  In the “interests of public safety” he can supplement that with Presidential Directive 51 (PD-51) and declare a state of martial law due to civil unrest.  He can also call in foreign outsiders (such as the UN) to help him “reinstitute order under the law.”

With that in mind, I wish to refer you to something worth considering.  All News Pipeline had an article (a good one in itself…Stefan Stanford and Susan Duclos with ANP are top-notch reporters and writers) with a comment posted that in my opinion truly summarizes what is happening here in this post-election period.  The comment can be found at www.allnewspipeline.com/Shocking_Maps_Show_Overthrow_of_America.php, when you scroll to the bottom after the article.  Posted by Andrew Mali, here it is in its entirety and well worth some deep thought for all of us as preppers, patriots, and concerned citizens:

“I’m probably going to get a lot of hate for this, but I feel it needs to be said.  There is no coincidence that Trump won by electoral vote and lost the popular vote.  This whole thing is a setup, to cause mass anger across the country.  Right now, the Left is throwing a fit because they think Trump will be the new president, while the Right is distracted by celebrating it.  He won’t.  It is in the works right now to reverse the decision when congress meets Jan 6 to approve the electoral votes (maybe even something before that).  This means the violence could last until then.

The purpose of this is to start a civil war that tears the country apart.  What the elite gain from this is the ability to take control of the country by U.N. force, and to call our republic and constitution a failure.  “Out of the ashes, the phoenix will rise.”  A new country owned by the U.N. with a new government and leader.  One does not simply walk into the National Archives and shred the constitution, therefore, we must tear down our country and way of life.  This keeps the elites from putting their fingerprints on our demise.

Should we fail to kneel to their will and destroy ourselves, they will use Russia to destroy us so much that any survivors will be left begging the mercy of the U.N. to take them as refugees to a country that is controlled by the U.N.  Now is not the time to be running off to fight a civil war, but is the time to be preparing, and praying that God confuses their plans.”

Quite a comment, and also spot-on.  Bottom line: it’s going to get worse before it gets any better.  You guys and gals need to stay on top of what is happening both nationwide and in your immediate locale.  As one eye is on the news, the other needs to be on the preps.  Bullets, beans, and Band-Aids are the rule of the day, with plenty of prayer around all of it…the truly indispensable part of your preparations.

Obama still has plenty of time to either take down the society with civil unrest as an excuse or by starting a war before he leaves office.  In either case (as the comment pointed out) we must remain vigilant and prepare for society as we know it to change with the blink of an eye.  The next few weeks will be a good indicator of what is to happen.  In the meantime, keep your powder dry, and keep up that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Mantracker: Covering Your Tracks and Avoiding an Ambush

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 There has been rioting in the streets of every major city of the United States after the US presidential election and all of the governors have declared states of emergency.  As you’re heading home from work, a presidential announcement is made that martial law has been declared, and the US government has temporarily suspended your rights under the Constitution.  An executive order demanding the turn-in of all firearms has been signed and placed into effect.  The federal government with the aid of local police departments and other state law enforcement agencies is now confiscating the firearms door-to-door.  

You’ve been catching all of this in a radio broadcast as the announcer in a faltering voice also states that the US is on the brink of war.  As you turn off the main highway, listening to the news and heading home, you notice that there are a number of vehicles…about a half dozen black blazers and several police cars…parked outside of your house with federal agents pounding on your front door.  The S has hit the fan, and it looks as if you might have to skip dinner.  You drive by without stopping, only to see the road blocked off about 200 feet down and similar operations occurring at your neighbors’ homes.  Parking your car off the shoulder, you grab your backpack and supplies from the vehicle.  It’s time to run.

Read part 1 of Mantracker here

It is the hope of all decent people that such events do not occur.  But what if they do?  It’s time to make a getaway and not play around with the semantics or second guess any longer.  This is just one reason out of innumerable that you may be on the run and the hunt has begun.  Now is the time to focus your energies on getting away.  Let’s cover some of the basics and finer points now, in this article to prepare you for bleak circumstances such as the outlined scenario.

Basic Escape and Evade Techniques

Part of your E & E, your Escape and Evasion is going to depend on how much notice you receive before you are actually being pursued.  The situation above is a bleak one: the hunted individual is about to be stripped of all of his belongings and equipment.  He must now retreat from what was to be his retreat and cut his losses.

1. Know the area of your immediate E&E

Urban, suburban, or rural, you have to focus on cover and concealment.  Cover physically protects you (in varying degrees) from gunfire.  Concealment may provide cover, but primarily it obstructs or prevents your pursuers/attackers from seeing you.  In an urban or suburban area, it is difficult to slip undetected into the woodline, due to the higher population density and the scarcity of woods.  Have you pre-planned a hide location until you can escape the populated area under cover of darkness?  Do you have some maps to aid you in your endeavors?

6 laws of survival

How to create a bug out plan

A rural area is a better start.  The woods can hide you, support you, and shelter you if you know how to use them.  When you enter the woods, you want to stay off any main paths or trails and “bust brush” as much as possible.

2. Keep your signature low, and cover your tracks

When you’re “busting brush,” you want to move through the woods and thickets through the paths of least resistance, taking care not to break off branches or step into places that leave a noticeable (and trackable) sign, such as a dried, muddy creek bed or open area with snow on the ground.  You can take a stout pine branch with needles (green is best) to brush away signs of your passage akin to a broom.  Make sure you take the branch off of the direction of your travel, so the trackers don’t see a branch removed from the tree.  Move stealthily and with a purpose, don’t just stagger through the brush with your emotions getting the best of you.  Focus and concentrate on taking care with each step, yet don’t move as slowly as a sloth.

3. Don’t make tracks if possible

One method is to take two heavy trash bags and place a good quantity of leaves and twigs in them.  Take two to three sticks and lash them to the bottoms of your shoes/boots.  Stepping into the bags, tie them off around your feet up by the instep.  This will break up the pattern of your boot-print and enlarge the surface area of your tread…spreading your weight out to prevent you from making a track.  You’ll have to fix and adjust the bags periodically.  The thick contractor-type bags are the best that can take the wear.  Don’t walk all over or step over things such as a moss-covered log that will show you’ve stepped there.

4. Move at night after the initial escape

Once you’ve put some distance between yourself and the pursuer(s), wait until it’s dark before you travel again. This is as the situation dictates, depending on how badly they want you.  It may be necessary to flee and postpone that normal wait time until it’s dark out of urgency.  When moving at night, be aware of the moon and the amount of light that is on you.  Cover up exposed portions of the skin, both to protect your body and to shield you from reflecting any light.

5. Mask your smell

Mud, dirt, and other “stuff” can be rubbed all over you to help conceal your scent, as dogs may come into play. If you wear cologne or any other fragrance, wash it off when the opportunity presents itself from a stream or creek.

6. Dogs could be your worst nightmare

A tracking dog can present a problem. Bleach or cayenne pepper can help to throw those dogs off the scent.  Another thing you can prep in advance is skunk scent.  You see one as a roadkill?  Remove the glands and store them in an airtight container, glass is best.  Later you can use this either through diluting (a container with water and a little of the gland/musk added to the container), and then spreading it in the area the dogs will travel.  The more the merrier.

Rule: You don’t beat the dog; you beat the handler.

If you come to a fence?  Happy Birthday, especially if the fence is a long one that’s high.  Chain-link is the best.  Where you can, cross the fence.  When you’re across run down about 30-40 feet, and then re-cross it, going back to the first side.  Run another 30-40 feet, and then climb across again.  Do this over and over again, the whole length of the fence.  Take care when you cross over it not to run right along it…go out and away from the fence, perpendicular to it by about 10-15 feet, and then come back in at the end of 30-40 feet.

The dog will have to keep the trail, and the handler will have to put the dog(s) over the fence, and then climb over to follow…the handler will be half dead after about a couple hundred feet of this.

The real art is at the end of the fence to take a “hide” sight, watch where they appear, double back, and then go across from the first (original) crossing point on the fence, and head on a 90-degree angle away from all of it.  That’ll kill them.

With dogs, take ‘em on a “joy ride” and give them plenty of fairly steep rocks to climb, hills to traverse, and bust through brush and stickers the whole time…this will give the dogs a hard time and half kill the handler.  It’s up to you if you want to ambush them when they’re most tired or when you see the opportunity.

Take out the handler or handlers first. The dogs are not your enemy: they’re a tool in the hands of men who know how to use them.  You should be armed: the 2nd Amendment gives you the permission, and it’s up to you to actually use it…it is one of your rights.  Use your own judgment as to whether to take out the dogs or not.  Don’t forget to capitalize on the resources the handler may have left you when you deal with him.  A radio might come in handy for the cross-chatter, and you may also have more equipment and tools.

7. Areas to avoid while fleeing

Open areas are an invite to be picked up, or to be seen from even a tremendous distance. Skirt the woodline, staying back within it by at least 30 to 50 feet.  Bodies of water should only be crossed when you must.  Don’t worry…the dogs can pick up your trail on the other side, and maybe even better when you’re dripping water all over the place.  Tunnels are death-traps; stay out of them at all cost, especially man-made tunnels.  Better to walk another ¼ mile than enter a concrete tunnel where even a ricochet bullet from a pursuer may find its mark.  Stay away from all human habitations and avoid any main roads or built-up areas with a lot of human traffic.

8. They know your needs and have the edge (so they think)

You have to drink, eat, and sleep. They know it.  They can work in shifts, and have the manpower to continue the search uninterrupted.  You must eat on the move, drink on the move, and sleep in “bursts” that give you enough time to rest, yet ample time as they move closer to you.

9. Use every means at your disposal

You have to get away, or you can end up in a FEMA camp, a prison, or worse. Live off of the land…that’s why you have been studying and training so much…it has to be in preparation for the worst-case scenario and this is it!  You’ll have to feed yourself from the rivers and streams, shield any fire that you may use, construct camouflage lean-to’s and “spider holes” to hide in.  You also need to plan on where you’re eventually going to go to completely evade the pursuers and give them the slip.  Adapt, overcome, and survive.

10. Know their relentlessness

Look at guys such as Eric Rudolph and the Unabomber.  They’ll hound you to the very corners of hell, and for decades.  When does it end?  It never ends…just as your preparations never truly end.

In the type of scenario that we just outlined at the beginning of this article, it ends when we have restored the Constitution of the United States to its primacy as the law of the land.  It ends when we can form a government of the people, by the people, and for the people that governs with such a mindset.  It ends when we can be safe and secure with our neighbors and our own family members…not having to constantly look over our shoulder to see if “Big Brother” is watching you.

Therefore, in reality, it never ends.  Even in times of good, you must always be vigilant that things do not take a turn for the worse and denigrate into what we have now.  Nothing is new under the sun.  We have seen such times before and we’ll see them again.  Prepare yourself mentally and physically for the challenges ahead of you, and keep fighting that good fight…one day at a time.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

ManTracker: How to Be One and How to Avoid One

Click here to view the original post.

manhunterReadyNutrition Readers, we’re going to cover some of the basics on how to track man, and some tips on how to keep from being tracked by men.  All of your camouflage is to no avail if you are awakened by a boot kicking you in the ribs as you’re curled up in your sleeping bag in a hidey-hole.  Please keep in mind: this is a post-SHTF action and/or a life-threatening situation that would call for the tracking of another human being.

Man is the Most Dangerous Creature of All

Be aware: this is not deer-hunting or tracking a game animal.  The rules are different, because a deer won’t double back on you, climb a cliff, and snipe you with a suppressed .308 as you cross a predetermined, pre-ranged spot.  If you are adept at tracking game, these skills can help you, but keep in mind you’re tracking the most dangerous, intelligent, and resourceful creature of all: man.  You’re tracking down a creature with the natural and learned instincts of a hundred thousand generations of hunters and killers…no matter what culture or creed.  Man is the most dangerous creature of all.  Never forget that.  Respect the potential of the guy or gal you’re tracking.  Respect it, and let it temper your emotions and judgment as you’re tracking.

To track a man, you need to be aware of your surroundings, the changes in it, and use deductive reasoning all in combination as you’re moving.  There are some questions you always need to ask yourself as you are following a man as well as observations you must make:

  1. Are you keeping aware of the potential for ambush?  Most people don’t like to be followed, and in a SHTF situation you can bet the other guy is playing for keeps.  Are you walking right into a trap?  As you study the terrain in front of you, are you “gaming” it in your mind?  Remember Rule #1: the hunter can (and often does) become the hunted at any time.

NOTE: THIS QUESTION # 1 AND RULE # 1 BOTH APPLY CONCURRENTLY AT ALL TIMES!  THEY ACCOMPANY AND SUPERCEDE ALL OF THE SUBSEQUENT QUESTIONS AND RULES!

  1. Minor deviations in the terrain (path) that would not normally be there:  Broken hardwood branches at chest or head height, broken or “moved/displaced” vegetation, the tracks on the ground, bark rubbed from the face of fallen logs…. all of these are good indications that man has come this way.
  2. Major deviations in the terrain/path: perhaps a small mound of earth in the woods with what appears to be a “dent” followed by a long groove and crushed grass to either side…a good indicator your quarry stepped on the mound and slipped. Perhaps some good-sized trees chopped down, or good sized branches removed with an edged tool.  These could be either fighting positions/lean-to’s/fortifications, or ground cover respectively.  Look for signs of the hand of man where it is obvious.
  3. Changes to the earth. This means the ground.  You’ve been tracking your quarry through a swamp, and now you emerge in a grassy field.  Look for signs of tracks, and for mud to be tracked through the grass as well.  If you’ve been walking through a dry riverbank with clay for a bed, then the color of clay will show up in front of you in the tracks of your target.
  4. Trash/detritus. Man is a messy creature, and no matter how careful he always messes up.  It could be a food wrapper, or a cigarette butt he forgot to tote out with him.  It could be a piece of paper or a dropped tool or even ammunition.  It could also be part of a meal…even something so innocuous as crumbs.  Your job as the tracker is to spot these deviances as they come out to meet your eyes.
  5. Smell. Man is (especially after several days in the bush or after physical exertion) a stinky creature.  Yes, you can smell many things of man: his sweat, his deodorants and perfumes, his tobacco products (you can smell a cigarette for a long distance in the woods), and, of course, his stool.  This last one (don’t laugh) is a really good giveaway, as most people will relieve themselves and not worry about covering up what they produce.  This is not mentioned relative to hygiene, however, but in relation to tracking.  Such people not caring about how they relieve themselves won’t give much consideration to someone using it to trail them.
  6. Noise. Man is, indeed, a noisy creature.  He breathes heavily, belches, flatulates, grunts, groans, complains, talks loudly, and snores.  All of these can be used to your advantage to find your quarry.  He also drops things, bangs and bumps into things, and clatters metal against metal.  He falls down, breaking branches and he curses or moans, depending on how badly he hurts himself.  He also communicates to his fellow humans, either with a radio or with his voice.
  7. Light Discipline: man is as stubborn as they come on this one.  Those flashlights are never “red lensed” and kept under a poncho or jacket as they should be…just everyone flashing the lights all over the place.  Same for the cigarettes.  Instead of cupping their hands around them and keeping the cigs low, there’s that orange dot right out to your front, head height.  Man loves to use the flashlight when he’s moving around at night.  It can be his undoing, and to your advantage if you look for your quarry being careless with the light.
  8. Changes to the quarry’s flight. A hunted man will always know he is being hunted.  You need to be aware of an increased pace, a change of direction, changes in elevation…all factors that will indicate either distress or concern on the part of your quarry.  The pace change can be noticed by footprints, especially the distance widening or shortening between them.  Widening means he’s taking off.  Shortening means the terrain is becoming more difficult or he’s tiring, or both.  The runner usually uses the balls of his feet with a shallow heel-print.  The walker sets his heels into the soil more deeply.
  9. Tread Depth: we covered this a little in #9, and in addition, if the guy has a size nine boot print and is really sinking into the earth? Well, he’s probably carrying some serious stuff in the form of supplies and/or weapons.

If your search is proceeding too well and too smoothly?  It’s an ambush.  We’ve covered these fundamentals, because believe it or not, it is easier to avoid the hunter if you first have been the hunter.  What we just covered forms the basis for avoiding someone who is pursuing you.  Believe it or not, you can practice this stuff in the woods with family and/or team members.  It makes for both a good workout and a challenge to actually implement stuff you learn.  Part Two we’ll focus on how to get away from the bad guys trying to find you.  Until then keep studying and practicing.  It’ll pay off in the end…especially after the SHTF.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

4 Critical Components to Getting Prepped for a Blackout

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Blackout Hurricane SandyPower outages can happen at any time. Just this summer, there was up to 14 days of blackouts across California, and while they were not necessarily consecutive days, these power outages can be devastating for those who may be without a plan – especially in the peak of summer. As well, those living in northern climates have seen their fair share of “lights out scenarios” when the cold weather affects the grid. And let’s not forget the massive blackout that occurred from Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

From refrigerators to cell phones, people have almost become completely reliant on electrical devices for their survival, and for this reason a blackout can have disastrous implications for the ill-prepared. You never know when a blackout could occur or for what reason, but it is important to know that it could happen at any time. It is important that you have what you need to survive in the wake of a catastrophe.

Read more about rolling blackouts and the electrical grid

In addition to blackouts, there are a number of other threats to the power grid, both natural and man-made, that should be taken into account when making preparations for such an event. For instance, hurricanes and tornadoes have been known to damage power lines and render them completely unusable. An electromagnetic pulse (EMP) is another threat to the power grid, and it could originate from a natural source, such as lightning or coronal mass ejections, or from an artificial source, such as a nuclear and non-nuclear EMP weapon. An EMP could affect the power grid by causing transformers to fail, and it could possibly cause irreparable damage to electronic equipment that does not have sufficient protection, which could mean just about any modern car with a computer, would likely experience disruption or failure. When preparing for a blackout, it is important to keep these other possible threats in mind.

Energy Conservation Measures

Energy conservation at home or at work is critical for minimizing blackouts, especially when high temperatures cause immense stress on electrical equipment during the summer months. It is important to turn off all unnecessary appliances or equipment and shut off all unused lights where possible. If practical, using an electric fan instead of air conditioning units can save quite a bit of power. Closing blinds or drapes to keep out sunlight during hot periods of the day can decrease the need for air conditioning as well. Excessive opening and reopening of refrigerators can cause unnecessary power usage for the refrigerator to maintain a lower temperature. Here are some other tips to stay cool when the air conditioner is off and how to stay warm if the heater does turn on.

Store and Prepare Food Off-Grid

Water is fundamental to staying alive, so make sure to have at least 1 gallon per person per day stored for each person in your household. A blackout can last multiple days, so it would be best to plan to store enough water for each individual in your household for at least a week. Perishable food will go bad without refrigeration, so it will be important to keep food that does not require refrigeration, like peanut butter, flax seeds, chia seeds or hemp seeds. Canned foods may be made to last long, which is why they are so often suggested as long-term survival foods, but they are generally lacking in nutrition and high in sodium, so nuts or seeds will make for a better option for meeting your nutritional needs when it really counts. As a side note, most medication that requires refrigeration during a power outage can be kept in a closed refrigerator for several hours without damaging the medication. Of course, if you are unsure, it would be best to check with your physician or pharmacist.

Alternative Power Sources

It is important to have at least 2 alternative power sources at your house in the case of a blackout. Luckily, you probably already own one: your car. If you connect an inverter to the positive and negative terminals on a car’s battery, you can use the battery to run most household appliances for a limited period of time, and you can run the car periodically to charge the battery. The primary difficulty in sustaining your car as a power source is knowing the wattage rating of the devices you intend to use. An inverter that is rated for 500 watts should be enough for a small family to power most vital appliances. If there are any high wattage devices plugged in, you will likely need the car to be running for the duration of the device’s use because the battery will run out quickly. You can also keep a store of charged batteries so that you can continue to use the inverter in the case that you run out of fuel.

Another device that you may want to consider purchasing as an alternative power source is a gas-powered generator. Gas-powered generators take about a quarter gallon of gasoline for each hour of use. This will require that you keep a store of plenty of extra fuel. For a blackout period lasting 3 days, it would be wise to keep at least 15 gallons stored in your house for use in your generator or car.

Survival Gear

This type of emergency is one of the many reasons to have emergency supplies set aside and a well thought out plan. Access to fire will be critical in a blackout. Make sure to have at least three different ways to make fire, such as a magnesium and steel fire-starter, matches and butane lighters. Lanterns will be effective alternative light sources as long as you make sure to keep kerosene in storage. Keeping in mind fuel that will be helpful, you may also want to have propane in storage for use on a barbecue or other propane-powered appliance. Having extra flashlights will make a fundamental difference in a power outage. Keep one extra set of batteries for each flashlight that you set aside. Of course, you want to have a first-aid kit with sanitizing gel. A radio with a crank generator will enable you to hear emergency alerts without having to use back-up power. Have at least 3 days of clean clothes prepared.

Preparedness is a lifestyle. Having the items you need when the worst happens can mean the difference between struggle and survival. More than anything, the knowledge that you know how to face disaster whenever it may strike is empowering. Build confidence in yourself and your family members by making sure that you have what it takes to face the next power outage today.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How Martial Law Will Lead to the Creation of the Totalitarian States of America

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fema-campMartial law was originally intended to be used when the United States was under attack during a war.  The precept was to maintain control and a semblance of order, and also to make provisions for the necessity of troops fighting in the United States and the shifting of civic and government assets toward the conduct of the war and wartime industries.  It is supposed to be utilized when the existence of the nation is in grave danger.  Unfortunately, that is not what its purpose is now, under the Obama administration.  Now it is the means to reach the end state: The Totalitarian State.

PREPARE FOR ANY DISASTER

Obama and his administration, to include such notables as Jeh Johnson, the head of the Department of Homeland Security have already formulated the plans for COG (Continuity of Government) operations to take place immediately following the implementation of martial law.  All of this has nothing to do with protecting the country, and it is completely nebulous and ambiguous, as the NDAA (National Defense Authorization Act) of 2014 effectively declared the entire United States and the world as a “battlefield in the war on terror.”

Such would ensure a “smoother” transition for Obama to declare the United States under attack even if not a single foreign soldier’s boot touches America’s shores.  Let us place this into a concept in the context of what we have covered:

When Martial Law is implemented, the Constitution will no longer have any effect, and the United States will then be under the rule of Totalitarian Law.

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Let’s Look at the Facts

Let those words burn in, Readers, as many are undoubtedly thinking, “This’ll never happen in the U.S.,” or “That’s just fear-mongering.”

No, it is happening in the United States, and it’s a warning based upon facts, not fear, arrived at from the actions of the Obama administration over the past (almost) 8 years.

It is a fact that Anwar al-Alawki, the American-born Muslim cleric was assassinated in Yemen by a drone strike without any attempt at extradition back to the United States and in violation of his rights under the Constitution.  It is also a fact that Christopher Dormer, a former soldier and police officer was killed by a drone strike on U.S. soil instead of bringing him into custody under due process of law.

There is no more due process of law.  The police shoot first.  If the circumstances are nebulous, did you notice how the perpetrator always “commits suicide,” or “he’s killed by police officers” and never makes it to the courtroom?

Another fact that is worse: we have a sitting U.S. president whose Secretary of State at the time (Hillary Clinton) allowed…. allowed, mind you…the Embassy of the United States of America…in Libya…to be destroyed, and the American Ambassador and four of his staff to be tortured and killed.  When asked what caused it all, Clinton responded with “What difference does it make?”  Look at Solyndra, look at Fast and Furious, look at ICANN and the Internet giveaway, look at Obamacare, look at Clinton’s e-mail scandal, and look at all of the unconstitutional Executive Orders and actions.

As soon as Obama can declare Martial Law, he will declare it; he’s creating the conditions leading up to such a declaration such as (but not limited to) war, economic chaos, civil unrest, and intentionally weakening the military of the United States of America.

History Has Shown Us All Along What Will Happen Next

History shows us what to expect under Martial Law and the eventual Totalitarian State that it will usher in.  Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn wrote “The Gulag Archipelago.”  For a primer on totalitarianism and its inception and creation, look no further.  Look to history, for it is not limited by cultural or linguistic boundaries: it is the history of mankind, and therefore it is our history…yours and mine.

“They took those who were too independent, too influential…too well-to-do, too intelligent, too noteworthy.  They arrested officers everywhere.  Thus the population was shaken up, forced into silence, and left without any possible leaders of resistance.” – “Gulag Archipelago I,” page 77

Call it Communism, call it Totalitarianism…it is all the same.  As you may well realize, they will institute these measures by playing upon the fears and base needs of the population.

“The United States will eventually fly the Communist Red Flag…the American people will hoist it themselves.” –Nikita Khrushchev, 6/19/1962, Bucharest, Romania

It was Benito Mussolini, Dictator of Fascist Italy during WWII that first coined the phrase Totalitarian Society.  He had as his motto:

 “Everything in the State, nothing outside the State, nothing against the State.” 

The stage has already been set in the United States.  The only thing that awaits is the right opportunity, the right moment.

“Never let a crisis go to waste.” – Rahm Emmanuel, Former Obama staffer, current Mayor of Chicago

A little-known work exists that documents the truth behind a society’s demise from free and open to totalitarian…the “Fundamental Transformation,” to paraphrase Barack Hussein Obama II’s campaign slogan.  The work is entitled “Vietnam Under Communism, 1975-1982,” by Nguyen Van Canh, ISBN 0-8179-7851-8.  Here are a few excerpts:

“In rural areas, all cultivated land had been confiscated and made part of agricultural cooperatives.  For dwelling purposes, each family was given a small lot on which to build a home and cultivate a small private garden…Ho Chi Minh, in early 1969, issued a decree saying that the lot allocated to each family was only on loan to it, since the real owner was the State.

State ownership, disguised by such phrases as “the people’s collective mastery of society” has been extended to virtually all forms of property.  In the official view, this means that man no longer exploits man; in practice, it means that the State exploits everybody.”

 “Vietnam Under Communism, 1975-1982,” pg. 23

Re-education camps sprung up all over Vietnam after the North took control of the South.  The book painfully chronicles how any undesirables, such as intellectuals, former elected officials, schoolteachers, doctors – basically anyone the Communists chose – were went to re-education camps.  The internees were subjected to a barrage of communist dogma and forced to regurgitate it flawlessly on paper and in speech.  Torture, medical deprivation, forced hunger, and summary execution were the tools employed in the camps.  The Vietnamese also have concentration/forced labor camps that they claim to “exemplify the spirit of collectivism.”

Another work that bears mention is “The Bridge at Andau,” by James Michener written in 1957.  If you want to learn about the heroic resistance of the Hungarians to throw off the yoke of the USSR, this is the book to read.  There is much to be learned from it, and here is an excerpt that shows how true rule under a totalitarian state is administered:

“If there is a single shot from any house, destroy the whole house.  If there are many shots from a street, shoot down every building in the street.” Pg. 76

Remember how Obama signed treaties in the years 2011-2013 with other nations that permitted foreign troops to be deployed on American soil?  Yes, Obama has that right under treaty with a provision that the foreigners are asked to come in to help restore order if he cannot execute the laws of the United States as the Chief Executive Officer.  There is great precedence here.  King George III imported Hessian mercenaries into the Colonies to fight against the Rebels.  In “The Bridge at Andau,” this was done by the Soviets, as cited here:

“…foot soldiers took over…troops patrolling Budapest were found to be Mongols from the Central Asian Republics.   Why had they been brought in?  Because the original troops from Russia proper had been garrisoned in Hungary…so long that they had become too human and could not be depended upon to shoot civilians.

            From this it would appear that Russia has adopted a Draconian policy of never using troops in their own native countryside, but always moving into disaffected areas shock troops from remote parts of the empire, and knowing that troops from any given area cannot be trusted to massacre their own kin.”

“The Bridge at Andau,” pages 82-83

When Martial Law occurs, then will come the FEMA camps and detention centers.  Then will come the “reeducation camps,” already suggested for the undesirables such as Constitutionalists, patriots, veterans, and government protestors.

The reeducation camps were actually “suggested” for the United States by none other than former Weather Underground convicted-then-pardoned terrorist William “Bill” Ayers…a man who bombed the Pentagon…and later became a mentor and sponsor to Barack Obama, the current U.S. president.

Travel will be restricted; communication will be suspended.  The economy will collapse, and there will be arrests, detentions, and executions.  The United States as we know it will either cease to exist or change in form.

Do not either be complacent or fall into a state of denial.  These things are metastasizing before our very eyes.  All that is needed is a spark to kindle the bonfire.  Read Orwell’s “1984” to see what it can progress to if we lose in our struggle.  The battle is already joined.  Anyone who you can make aware of what is happening and what will soon happen is perhaps one less person to serve the State and the regime that is coming.

Read the history books.  Regarding heinous things such as descent into totalitarianism, history does repeat itself, unless you use the positive lessons of what people have done to stop it and arrest it.  War is coming, and it will be a war that is used as the trigger to inculcate martial law.  Please keep in mind my caveat:

The next world war will begin with an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) weapon/device detonated over the continental U.S., followed by a limited nuclear exchange and then conventional warfare.

Resolve yourself to study and keep preparing: you are the resistance.  Keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

6 Non-Lethal Weapons to Carry Instead of a Gun

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Many of you have heard the saying, “Your freedom ends where mine begins.” A majority of us prefer to live in a peaceful, non-threatening lifestyle. That said, there might come a time when you will need to defend yourself. Self-defense can range from having a small defense weapon such as a tactical pen in your pocket to concealing a firearm for safety. For those who feel strongly about using non-lethal defense, consider the 5 following non-lethal alternatives.

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5 Non-Lethal Ways to Protect Yourself

While it is important to know how to defend yourself, it is equally important to remember not to make yourself a target, always engage in being aware of your surroundings, avoiding dangerous circumstances and be ready to act at a moment’s notice. To said, there may come a time where you will find yourself in a serious situation and self-defense is the only recourse. The following items are ideal to carry in a purse and should be easily accessible at all times. Check with your state laws to make sure you can carry these items freely.

  1. A quick, convenient method for protection is carrying pepper spray. The small size makes it ideal for walkers and joggers and you can’t really find a more simple method of protecting yourself. Even children and the elderly should have no problem simply pointing and pulling the trigger. Assailants will immediately experience temporary blindness, have difficulty breathing and go into severe distress. Brands like this one have a non-abrasive sleeve that stretches to fit your palm and a formula that delivers a stream with minimal blowback on the person doing the spraying.

  1. To take pepper spray to an even greater level, you might be interested in a pepper spray gun. The concept is the same as the hand-held variety, but a pepper spray gun is shaped like a traditional handgun and it is filled with several rounds of spray to create a chemical cloud. This allows you to be 10 times the safe distance (150+ feet versus 6-10 feet) away from danger while still being incredibly effective. Rounds on a pepper spray gun are powered by a CO2 cylinder, which is activated when a trigger is pulled. In addition, pepper spray guns have a kinetic impact with a round traveling approximately 320 feet per second (the equivalent of getting kit with a 50 mph fastball). Be sure to check the laws in your state, as pepper spray guns are not legal everywhere.

  1. A stun gun is another non-lethal method of defense you might want to consider. This one is small and attaches to your car keys to protect you when you are in vulnerable situations (such as a parking garage late at night). Stun guns use high electrical voltage to stun attackers, but because the amperage is low, no permanent damage is caused. Most are powered by regular 9-volt batteries and are usually the size of a small flashlight or smaller.

  1. self-defense keychain is a small, portable stick that is highly effective at channeling the force of a blow and causing pain or shock to the attacker (it’s something similar to brass knuckles in that it strengthens your force). It may not be the ideal tool if you are uncertain or unwilling to hit someone and it potentially requires more skill than mace or a stun gun. Still, it’s affordable, discreet, and can be used in close quarters if necessary and unlike mace it will never expire or malfunction.

  1. Tactical Handcuffs can come in handy if an assailant can be confined or detained by surprise. These can be especially helpful in situations of theft or assault where you are certain no weapons are involved. If you want to press charges for something such as vandalism or trespassing and you are waiting for police to arrive, you might want to consider using these. *Remember that in most circumstances, your best bet is to get out of harm’s way before resorting to the use of handcuffs.
  2. Kuba Kickz are the only non-lethal self defense tool available for your shoes and will deliver a strong “don’t mess with me” message. If you are strong on self-defense basics, these covert and lightweight weapons will be a great addition to your everyday carry items.

Knowing How to Defend Yourself is the Last Line of Defense

I am a large advocate for having security layers in place to prevent criminals from making your home their next mark. These items listed above are ones that you can carry and help you when you are out and about. Above all, know that self-defense is your absolute last line of defense and it’s important for you to know how to handle the situation. If you’re caught without any of the above non-lethal implements, it’s important for you to know (at the very least) a few basic self-defense moves. Here are a few articles on the subject.

In a split second anything can become a weapon when you need to defend yourself. Here are some great ideas for finding items in your home to use for self-defense. What kinds of non-lethal self defense items do you have to protect yourself with?

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Divide: The Roughest Post-Nuclear Film You’ve Ever Seen

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the-divide1ReadyNutrition Readers, as we approach (we hope) the elections, and the threat increases almost on a daily basis for a nuclear war, I find myself watching some films that I haven’t seen in a while.  One that I just recently watched is “The Divide,” a film that is more of a post-apocalyptic character study than a simple nuclear war survival film.  The movie was directed by Xavier Gens, and boasts a cast of such notables as Michael Biehn (star of the original “Terminator” movie).

The film opens with Lauren German staring from a high-rise apartment building in New York City as nuclear missiles are falling upon the city in the distance.  A frantic dash with her fiancée leads them and five others into the basement refuge of the apartment building’s superintendent, played by Biehn.  Others try and get in, but Biehn closes and seals the door, just as a nuclear fireball hits the building.

Biehn’s basement fortress is just that: he’s a 9-11 survivor who has been converting the basement into a doomsday bunker, complete with generator and many other supplies.  The building soon collapses around and on top of them, and the seven of them have survived the initial onslaught.

Please take note: If you watch this movie, it’s not for kids…and it’s hard on adults, myself included!

The reason it bears watching is that it can practically be a treatise on post-apocalyptic sociological-anthropological behavior.  The acting is superbly believable, and the actors play the parts of their characters to a tee.  The movie runs true to form as a disaster film in its “evolution” or progression from one state of human behaviors to the next.

Initially the group has a half-hearted attempt to cooperate with one another.  There comes a point when tensions begin to spike: over food, which Biehn is holding out on them: he’s just providing a bare subsistence.  A faction begins to form between three of the younger men who are resisting Biehn’s leadership.  Regarding said leadership, Biehn is not productive, in that he isn’t actively trying to foster good teamwork and cooperation among the group.

After a while, the group is intruded upon: by a pseudo-governmental entity in biohazard suits.  The encounter is not what the group has hoped for, and at the conclusion of the intrusion, one of the group is abducted.  Mounting an attempt at rescue, it fails, and subsequently radiation has been introduced into the shelter and the group realizes they are on their own.

Things denigrate from there.  All of the elements in the “progression of denigration,” the descent into savagery are present.  There is in-fighting, torture, licentiousness, and murder.  It is hard to believe upon first viewing it that Gens was able to so fluidly incorporate all of these elements, and more, into one film.

It shows the level that man can sink to when he decides to no longer control himself and his actions.

This film makes the Twilight Zone episode “The Shelter” appear to be a walk down Sesame Street.  It is dark and foreboding, with very few light moments or elements of goodness and compassion.  For my own part, I viewed the film as a total failure of Michael Biehn’s character to show true leadership skills and teamwork, both of which would have prevented the descent into barbarism.  In my opinion, in a real-world situation of when the SHTF, you have two options:

  1. Exclude everyone, in which case you’ll probably have to resort to force, or
  2. If you accept newcomers, you’ll need to fully inculcate them into the group/family with an understanding that you’ll help them, but there are rules that need to be followed in order for all to benefit.

The setting for the film is good, because it presents a survival situation in an urban area with supplies in place prior to the S hitting the fan.  Most of these films have the survivors in a semi-remote area.  In this case, the film is not so much about survival and preparing, but a microcosm, a “biome,” if you will of human behavior under apocalyptic conditions.  It is by far the hardest one you will ever sit through if you watch it.  It was hard for me.  Some might say, “Well, why watch it?”  The answer is to condition and prepare yourself for scenarios that might arise and to use what you see to “game” out methods to avoid things going so far.

Remember: you’re safe in your house, watching, and it hasn’t happened yet.  The shock that will come of seeing things around you as they are… cannot be overemphasized…for when the SHTF.  If you can prepare yourself beforehand by observing such things and using them for training tools, as I’ve mentioned in the past, then that shock value will be decreased somewhat, as self-conditioning with these types of films is a form of mental preparation for things that will be faced down the road.  It might just give you the edge, and help you to cope with issues better when the time arrives.  Until later, keep fighting that good fight, and hang in there.

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Hardcore Walking Dead Survival Tips for Preppers

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darylSeriously, folks, I know you’re all probably fed up with zombies, especially since this is an election year.  Political zombies aside, I wish to mention this series of pop-culture, “the Walking Dead” can be (I stress “can be”) more than just an entertaining series.  It can serve as a valuable training tool for you and your family to prepare for the onslaught of the 14political zombies and what they unleash on us and the country. Heck, even the CDC is using it as a training tool.

Firstly, forget so much about the zombies.  Yes, they’re gruesome and a large part of it is Hollywood theatrics and special effects.  But what about this point I’m about to make:

What if you removed the zombies and kept the rest of it?

In other words, you could remove the zombies completely and focus on what the characters are facing within the series…an overall apocalyptic collapse, the fight for starvation and the complex interpersonal and micro-societal relationships and events that occur with said collapse.

One could easily remove all of the zombies and supplant them with say, nuclear war, or a devastating plague (sans zombies, which are the results of a hypothetical plague), or a complete series of breakdowns after a collapse of all governments in the world.  The zombies (as this piece relates to a training tool) are merely “props” who appear in one degree or another for a small portion or a big scene.

The characters in the movie are from a diverse array of backgrounds and levels of life.  The problems they face relating to one another are what can be focused upon.  All of the wonderful ailments that torment man in today’s society are present: theft, betrayal, infidelity, two of one gender vying for the same mate of the opposite gender, religious matters…it’s all right there.

How to Train for a Walking Dead Scenario

There are many matters of survival to be watched and either emulated or renounced, depending on the situation.

  1. Security is paramount to the character Rick Grimes and his group.  When the series first came out, the group was barely more than a fragmented collection of individuals.  Now (about to enter its seventh season) they have purpose, drive, and teamwork that has enabled them to perform security functions much more effectively.
  2. There is a tremendous amount of character development that is worth studying.  Some members of the group who were no good in the beginning are turning out to be stalwart pillars that all are relying upon, showing man’s adaptability and willingness to change for the better.  The group does not lose its humanity or capacity to be humane completely even in the light of adverse situations that would challenge anyone’s moral compass substantially.
  3. Methods of gathering food and foraging as well as water procurement, first aid, and leadership techniques are delved into in-depth.  Situations that arise within the films do arise in real life and especially during a disaster.  Barring your objections to watching such due to religious and moral sensibilities, if you’re able to see it for what it is…a fictitious account…and if you’re not squeamish about the zombies, it can be riveting.  In this facet, it can be a good training tool for members of the family who might be bored by standard training films or “Hallmark Card” disaster-flicks…where the neat, clean family on the happy picnic emerges from the disaster without a speck of dirt…picking up their picture-perfect picnic right where they left off.
  4. Reality is oftentimes grim, and another excellent factor of watching these films is that it helps viewers to mentally prepare for things that may happen…yes, a form of conditioning…regarding the scenarios.  In past articles I have mentioned the importance of making your training regular, realistic, and really interesting.  How could this be used regarding “the Walking Dead” series, you may ask?  How about this?
  5. Watch the episode with your family.  Take notes on things…all of you, just short “bullet” comments about what you’re viewing and what sticks out in your mind.  After the flick, conduct an AAR, military jargon for an “After Action Review” to see what everybody thinks.  Use the flick as a tool to discuss the situations that arise and what your critiques are on them…the mistakes, the successes, and what you would do as a family differently if in the situation faced by the characters.
  6. Then, guess what?  Spice things up further by maybe taking the family out on a subsequent day out in the woods, or out on a range to practice techniques that would help you in a similar scenario.  Working on marksmanship even with air rifles on zombie targets with the kids can be one exercise.  Working on signaling techniques and communication, or different methods to rendezvous when hiking or backpacking is another set of exercises.

The best part of all, and the most important part in JJ’s estimation: you’re doing something with your family that combines instruction with participation, and bonds all of you even closer.  Because, dear Readers, without those close bonds and the ability to support one another and depend on one another…we’re not maintaining a community.  The family is the basic community unit, and family means not just those by birth, but those we love and care about, and that feel the same toward us.

So in conclusion, make it interesting, make it real, and use it as something to make the kids and family look forward to.  Another thing I do?  For those I instruct in my locale…I note different parts of the series (as well as other series of war and disaster), note down the time it appears on the DVD, and keep it as a sort of “reference library.”  I list the topic covered.  When I want to highlight a part of training, I use my little portable DVD player and pop in the movie…and scroll right to the scene.  One picture can be worth a thousand words, and this is how I use films to train.  This article is 1,000 words, and I hope they help!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Now That Obama Ceded Control of the Internet, Here’s What It Means

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 ReadyNutrition Readers, as you may or may not know, as of midnight, October 1, 2016, the U.S. control over the Internet was handed over to ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers.  Congressmen wrote letters, experts petitioned their protests, and four states lodged a complaint in a U.S. District Court in Galveston, TX.  Guess what?  Nothing worked, and in the latter, the District Court judge was an Obama appointee who denied any delay in the transfer of the Internet into foreign hands on September 30, 2016.  Foreign nations, such as Russia, China, Saudi Arabia, North Korea, Iran, and Cuba, to name a few, are now in control of the Internet and its functions.

This is very bad.

Already there are effects being felt.  There have been many comments on many different websites about the slowness of the Internet, coupled with the inability to log onto sites, especially those of the independent news media.  Personally I have experienced such, in the form of not being able to enter Alex Jones, Dave Hodges, or SHTFplan’s websites, the latter of which I write for.  Responses I have received on the screen vary from “Yahoo is unable to connect with this website,” or “Malfunction in connecting to this website,” or “This website is temporarily unavailable.”  Sometimes the page comes up and a message “[Whatever website] not responding,” and nothing can be accessed from the site.

Such has been happening for the past two weeks, now, prior to the handover of the Internet to ICANN.  Interestingly enough, after attempts to reach these websites, I was completely successful if I entered some left-wing or liberal one such as “The Huffington Post” or “The Washington Post,” with absolutely no difficulties.

Let’s look at some problems from an individual perspective that will soon arise from this transfer of the Internet:

  1. Loss of ability/decreased ability to access conservative, independent news media sites.
  2. Censorship of postings and comments for the aforementioned sites.
  3. Problems with e-mails and e-mail delivery
  4. Slowdown and/or delay of Internet service.
  5. An exponential increase in “trolls” and other disparaging, “nonproductive” commenters on sites.
  6. Inability or difficulty making purchases online, for varying articles of equipment or preparation (such as night-vision devices, adaptors, anything firearm related, and literature pertaining to prepping, survival, or current events perspectives from a non-globalist perspective.
  7. Complete monitoring of all personal business and private communications.
  8. Problems with personal finances: shopping, bank accounts, checking, bill payments, and anything in these categories that is done via the Internet.

Now let’s examine some of the problems that will affect us as individuals from a national perspective:

  1. National Defense: Ever since GridEx 2014 in Hawaii where we allowed the Russians and the Chinese to participate in drills with the United States military, we have been at much greater risk. The Russians and Chinese now know (courtesy of Obama) our vulnerabilities regarding our electrical power infrastructure, as well as how an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) would affect them.  Chinese hackers can now access our computer systems and no longer have to hack: The Internet has been handed to them.
  2. Shipping: all critical transportation systems for food, medicine, and other important necessities now have their inventories and shipping at the mercy of ICANN.
  3. Finance: it will now be a simple matter to either access or crash bank accounts, IRA’s, pensions, and business venues (such as Wall Street, the FDIC, and the Federal Reserve) can easily be shut down with the flip of a switch.
  4. Censorship: all of the countries mentioned will have a say in what is permitted, and they are not “icons” of freedom of speech in their own nations. They have long desired to see censorship imposed on the U.S.  Such will mean the loss of or the rendering as ineffective the independent and conservative news venues.
  5. Monitoring: monitoring us and all of our activities – and this has military applications for those nations, as intelligence is gathered upon the economic, social, and political actions of another nation.

Spotting Trolls and How to Deal with Them

As far as the “trolls” go, they are easy to spot.  They will appear on the site, and have usually never posted before, or if so, are under “anonymous” or some other generic, “nebulous” handle.  Trolls disrupt the normal flow and facilitation of information in a discussion, going “off topic” in an attempt to discourage readers, website hosts, and writers with disparaging remarks and things that are insulting.  Pay them no heed: continue to prepare, and sift the relevant data and useful information from the article and the comments.

Nobody is perfect: not writers, their sources, or commenters.  You can spot something amiss when you see the aim is either to disparage, discourage, or discredit…all negative actions with no positive use to the preppers and positive contributors on these venues.  Mark my words: this activity of negative slanders and unproductive comments will do nothing but increase with time.

Here’s another thing for you to be sure of: the trolls and collaborators working for the establishment trying to destroy the independent news sites are not going to be rewarded in the end by their handlers.  They will be taken down by those they serve.  To substantiate this, read Solzhenitsyn’s “Gulag Archipelago” and study the history of the formation of the Soviet Union.  Read “Animal Farm” and “1984” by George Orwell (Eric Blair, if you prefer).

I ask an open question: What are you experiencing in terms of the difficulties that I have mentioned, and additionally, what solutions do you see for us as a community overall?

We are not merely welcoming your comments in this instance: we are asking you for them, please.  Who knows how much time is left before such venues of communication between all of us are either prohibited or rendered ineffective?  Only time will tell, but tyranny is sure to increase before it either decreases or is checked.  But tyranny can and must be resisted, and you can do it.  Starts in your home, with you and your family.  To paraphrase that “Terminator” movie, “If you are reading this, you are the resistance.”  Keep fighting the good fight, and please write to us.  We’re all depending on your input.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

You are Legend: Remaining Focused and Dedicated in the Times to Come

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you are legendAre you curious about that title, Guys and Gals?  It isn’t a mistake; I can assure you.  It is a title that paraphrases a work of science fiction that you are very familiar with, but perhaps not the book form.  The movie “I Am Legend,” starring Wil Smith is the title, although I refer more to the novel that was written by Richard Matheson.  The book is quite different from the movie, and it is actually a short story…one that I highly recommend reading.

The sole survivor of a tremendous apocalyptic plague, Robert Neville is beset on all sides by the victims.  The irony is the victims are no longer victims, but have been made vampiric by the plague, a bacterium that needs blood in order to regenerate itself and its host.  Neville studies the disease intensely and goes about destroying as many of these “vampires” as he can by day, while he hides from them at night.

Presently he learns (to his cost) that many plague victims did not entirely change into the vampiric state…and they’ve formed a “new society” that lives in darkness and sleeps during the day.  Neville is captured by them, and they declare him to be a “monster” who executes these members of the new society by day…so they respond in kind by sentencing him to be executed.

He, Neville, had become the monster to the “new society,” and as he awaits his execution, just prior to daylight he sees them watching him, pointing up at him as he looks out from his cell window.  They are afraid of him, his difference, and the paradigm has shifted, as he closes his tale:

“Full circle. A new terror born in death, a new superstition entering the unassailable fortress of forever. I am legend.”

You are legend.

So what has all of this to do with you, and survival, and prepping, and all of the other tasks?  What can this possibly do for you?

You are legend.  You are the exception, rather than the norm.  Your grandmother and great-grandmother canned vegetables. You, however, are an anachronism…a complete exception that cannot be tolerated by a society of fast-food and SNAP cards, of entitlements that promote dependence and slavery, of handouts that increase the links in the invisible chains of serfdom.  The society has “morphed” into vampires, and you are the one hiding in your shelter, trying to wait out the storm.

Is this a “pep” talk?  It is.  It most certainly is.  You’re not going to be perfect in all of your undertakings…the imperfections define our humanity.

The perfection is found in the effort to try, to learn, to strive to prepare yourselves for what is coming.

We are in very perilous times, and your neighbors can “morph” into the informers who tell everything about you to the sacred authorities to save their own skins…or just because they’re “socially conscious,” or such.

Robert Neville tried his best and lost in the end, but he fought the good fight and gave it his best.  We are surrounded on all sides by vampires of the progressive, liberal, and Marxist ilks.  They are always so ready to condemn your behavior, just as they are always so ready to tax and take your money, never their own.  Their “social justice” is only the injustice of groupthink, and you must continue to fight them by preparing and not wavering in your commitment to not give in.  Just as iron sharpens iron, so we sharpen one another.

The way of the majority leads to tyranny (so outlined by De Tocqueville) and remember: you are the resistance.  Your resolve is the one factor we have that will triumph and enable us to throw off the yoke upon the necks of our country.  Such resolve will be remembered: by your family, your friends, and those depending on you.  It will be remembered, as will your efforts.  Hold tight to it, and to one another, and keep doing good…and doing it well.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

New ReGen Villages Redefining Off-Grid Living

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 By 2050 there will be nearly 10 billion people living on planet Earth. Clean water, healthy food, and arable land will begin to grow scarce and only those well versed in a self-sustainable lifestyle will be safe from a great negative impact. With the skyrocketing population also comes an increase in the aspiring class (the approximately 4 billion people who can afford to buy their way to sustainability). For those who can afford it, there is a recent boom in integrated neighborhood concepts: luxury off-grid communities that have power positive homes, private renewable energy sources, water management, high-yield organic food production, and waste-to-resource systems. The first of these communities is calledReGen Village, and it’s currently under construction in Almere, Netherlands.

A Look Inside a Luxury Off-Grid Community

ReGen Village will make use of all available technology to build what its creators are calling the “Tesla of Eco Villages.” The creators want to redefine off-grid living from being merely a way to sustain the basics of life into a culture of luxury and comfort. The developments will use their own technology to meet their everyday needs but, because of cutting-edge advancements, they will not have the same restraints and conservation rules that typically define off-grid communities.

Who Gravitates to the ReGen Concept?

In June of 2016, the concept of ReGen Village was introduced at the Venice Biennale, an arts organization and annual exhibition of architects and designers. The concept went viral with more than 20 million page views of the ReGen website and over 10 thousand emails expressing interest.

The pilot community is being built now but plans are in the works for developments in Sweden, Norway, Germany, and Belgium. CEO James Ehrlich says their goal is to expand at a global scale and to create regenerative neighborhoods for an elite group of residents. A center with 100 units should be ready for move-in in about a year, though the exact price to secure a position inside is not yet available. A smaller scale, 35-condo version is also being planned nearby in order to prefect the model before it is scaled.

Time will tell if this concept will be the new norm in off-grid living, but it’s certainly an interesting development.

 

 

 

 

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

A Green Beret’s Guide to Improvised Home Defense, Part 2

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 “Look around….choose your own ground.”

– “Breathe” by Pink Floyd, album: “The Dark Side of the Moon.”

Here we go, ReadyNutrition Readers, with “Part 2” on the series on prepping your home turf for battle.  In Part 1, we covered the things needed for those in a rural and suburban setting.  Now we’re going to focus our efforts on similar measures for those in densely-populated suburbs and cities.  As you have probably deduced, combat operations in a city area and the preps for them have a whole host of different factors for you to consider.  In the service, such operations were referred to as MOUT (Military Operations in Urban Terrain), and there are a number of military publications you can research online to cover such a broad topic.

`There are a number of these factors that need to be mentioned. We mentioned some terms such as cover and concealment in the first article.  To refresh, cover protects and can hide you, concealment usually hides you with a slight protection factor in many instances.  In an urban environment, there are many structures in a firefight to provide you with cover, such as brick or masonry buildings, and also large public works structures such as tunnels and concrete subway and sewer accesses and portals.  Due to the increased amount of structures that are very durable in nature, cover is more readily available in a city, and can also by its nature conceal you.

Conversely, this deals with the exterior of buildings.  The interiors are different matters.  Drywall (the universal construction “substance”) provides minimal or no protection from small arms fire.  Another drawback in high rises or townhomes are the windows…great for light, but not great for either providing concealment or cover for you.  The greatest challenge that you will face, however, is in the numbers of people you encounter in an urban environment.

“World War Z,” the movie with Brad Pitt has an excellent illustration of this toward the beginning of the film when he and his family are in New Jersey.  Watch the scene, and realize the sheer amount of humanity moving around you during a disaster, each one of them desiring the same things as you, with the same needs as you.  Now to factor into all of this is where you live.  Remember, if you live in a really big city (such as New York or Los Angeles), your primary consideration should always revolve around your city being a target in a nuclear war, in which case most of these considerations mentioned in this article are secondary in nature to what you will face with that.

Checklist for Apartment Dwelling Preppers Defending Territory

If you’re in a really high skyscraper-type apartment, it is critical to be abreast with the situation and get out of there beforehand.  If this is not possible, then there are a few things you need to assess as a checklist for yourself and your family:

  1. In a collapse, you may be on the 30th floor of a 50-story apartment building: what will you do without any power, water, sewage, or temperature controls (AC or heat)?
  2. How secure is that front door into your abode, and do you have the materials and resources necessary to blockade it and re-secure it if a forced entry is made?
  3. Who are your neighbors, and what is their disposition?  What would their disposition be if all of a sudden everything collapsed?
  4. Can you get out of there, via a set of stairs if the elevator is out, or a fire escape?  What is your plan to E&E (escape and evade) if the living situation becomes untenable?
  5. Is there an immediate common area that you can escape to and secure as a temporary hideout if your primary residence is compromised and/or overrun?
  6. How easy is it for the neighbors to “reach out and touch someone,” …not by telephone, but (for instance) jump from their balcony to yours and smash in your sliding glass door?  Those once-friendly neighbors…can you keep them out?

Preparation and planning are the keys here.

You need to have a plan of escape from that type of residential structure.  The exfiltration needs to be secure, silent, swift, and successful….in that order of importance for the first three with the last one being a goal.  As an example, you may have an abandoned storage building made of stone one block from your residence.  Here’s what you do.

  • Scope it out: pay it a visit, and find out what types of “amenities” are available…restroom, running water, place that you can hole up and lock the door
  • Any supplies on the premises that can be used for resources need to be known and noted or remembered
  • You need to watch the building for a whole day (that means a whole 24-hour period), and one of those days needs to be on a weekend…. this will show you what “creatures” normally frequent this locale and give you an idea on the human traffic in and out.

Remember: if you recognize it as a safe haven, another family will see it as such as well.

You must keep this in mind, as “your” safe haven is not yours until you make it yours.  English Common Law of Property and Chattels goes right out the window, along with the Marquis of Queensbury Rules for Boxing when your neighborhood “morphs” from “Happy Days” to “The Planet of the Apes.” You may even consider stashing a few essentials (that you can afford to lose) and prepositioning them in this building/structure, such as a quickly-accessible cache.

“Goodness gracious!  Somebody else’s property!” you may say.  I wrote “consider it,” and I am not advocating breaking any laws or doing anything illegal.  I said to “consider it,” and reflect upon such.  This article is information to provide you with food for thought to consider possibilities.  “When the time comes,” is the key phrase; therefore, without going any “deeper,” you had better be aware of not just what you can do, but what you will do to protect and provide for you and yours.

I know, I know…if you watch the potential secure location…you’ll miss the baseball doubleheader on Saturday, right?  Guess what?  We’re talking about something that can save you and your families’ lives.  This “stuff” is for real, and needs to be practiced and followed in earnest, not just paid lip service to or drilled in a half-hearted manner.

If your preps and training are not priorities, then neither is your survival.

You can also pick up a range finder to measure distances from your balcony.  Research any of the Infantry Soldier’s Handbooks to see how to emplace a shooting position within the window of a structure and set it back so as not to silhouette yourself.  The exercise is beyond the scope of this article.  If you wish to know about such subjects, then ask for what you want in the comments section and I will be more than happy to consider your topic for a future article.

To move to any of these fall back positions inside of your own building or outside of it, you need to prepare the ground, and practice moving back and forth with your family.  Again, I know there will be people who may be able to see you.  Consider it a test and/or a training exercise.  What better way to simulate something?  Guess what?  When the SHTF, you’ll have a whole bunch of people that you need to shield your actions from and avoid their cunning gazes.  Practice makes perfect.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Your Neighbors Could Be Your Worst Nightmare in an Emergency

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neighbors 

“I’ve always wanted to have a neighbor…just like you.  I’ve always wanted to live in a neighborhood…with you, so…let’s make the most of this beautiful day….”

 – Mr. Rodgers’ Neighborhood

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this piece summarizes one of the episodes of “The Twilight Zone” entitled “The Shelter” that bears mention for all who have neighbors, especially those they are “unsure” of.  In this (two minutes to midnight) preparatory lifestyle, it’s always important to know about those who live around you.

Today’s neighbors can morph into tomorrow’s marauders in the blink of an eye.

The fragile nature of our society is best described as the thinnest of veneers of civilization overlaying an underlying barbarism that can manifest itself at any given moment.

“The Shelter” is an excellent case-study of such a precept that I recommend to everyone to watch at least once.  This is of the original series, and the episode was written in 1961 by Rod Serling.

The story commences in the home of a neighborhood doctor where he and his neighbors are celebrating his birthday.  Everyone is festive, and the mood is one of good spirits, laughter, and indulgence in food and drink.  After a birthday toast, several birthday guests comment (abrasively) on the noise the doctor has had over the months from the construction of a bomb shelter in his basement.  The doctor kind of ignores it, and the party continues.

Soon the doctor’s son comes into the dining room (only adults are present) and announces that the TV has gone dead, and just prior it announced to go to the Conelrad station on the radio.  The following report came forth on the radio as everyone listened:

“…Four minutes ago the President of the United States made the following announcement.  I quote: at 11:04 pm Eastern Standard Time both our Distant Early Warning Line and Ballistics Early Warning Line reported radar evidence of unidentified flying objects flying due southeast.  As of this moment we have been unable to determine the nature of these objects, but for the time being and in the interests of national safety we are declaring a state of yellow alert.  The Civil Defense Authorities request that if you have a shelter already prepared, go there at once.  If you do not have a shelter, use your time to move supplies of food, water, medicine, and other supplies to a central place.  Keep all windows and doors closed.  We repeat: if you’re in your home, go to your prepared shelters or to your basement.”

Needless to say, all of the guests frantically depart.  The doctor and his family scramble around, filling up jars with extra water and moving some extra stuff down into the bomb shelter.  In the shelter were beds for the family and shelves with canned goods and medicines, as well as other gear and some chairs and a table.  The doctor returns upstairs, and then one of the neighbors, Jerry, begins rapping on the window.  The doctor opens the door, and Jerry worms his way in, slyly informing the doctor that he and his family are unprepared for what’s coming.

The neighbor wants to shelter himself, his wife, and two children in a shelter designed for three people.  The doctor leaves him and enters the shelter, locking the door and sealing it off.  Presently, more neighbors arrive.  One of them pounds the door, insisting that the doctor allow him to enter.  Soon even more neighbors arrive, and one of them is very belligerent.  Men and women are irate, and they’re demanding the doctor let them in.  It escalates very shortly, as the aggressive man belligerently makes the following demand with several other men beside him to the doctor after yelling his name:

 “You’ve got a bunch of your neighbors outside who want to stay alive.  Now you can open that door and talk to us, and figure out with us how many can come in there…or you can just keep on doing what you’re doing and we’ll [hitting the door] bust our way in there.”

The doctor refuses, and the men outside move away from the door, and then begin to argue among themselves.  There is already infighting about who (of the outsiders) will enter the shelter, as the men move out of the house.

“Bill, who are those people?” the mother asks.

“Those people…those people are our neighbors…our friends…the people we’ve lived with and alongside for twenty years.  C’mon, Paulie.  We better get up some of this furniture and this bunk so we’ll have some protection in case that door goes through,” the doctor said.

The half-dozen men return to the house, smashing up furniture in the dining room and trashing the house.  They enter the basement with a heavy pipe, and as their wives cheer them on, they begin battering the shelter door.  Presently they break through.  Just as they are stepping into the shelter, the radio in the shelter with the family announces that the previously-spotted objects were satellites, and the alert was lifted.

As the dust settles, the neighbors try to blow it off half-heartedly, but the doctor doesn’t really want any of it.  The neighbors had managed to smash in the door and force their way in.  The doctor summarized it quite eloquently with his description of what had happened:

“The kind of people we are just underneath the skin.  I mean all of us…a lot of naked, wild animals who put such a price on staying alive that they’ll claw their neighbors to death just for the privilege.”

The episode is excellent, and in under 25-minutes presents exactly what human nature boils down to…in a non-profane, “Hallmark” version with no blood or gore to offend the tender sensibilities.  The doctor made the following critical mistakes.

  All of his neighbors knew he had built a bomb shelter in his basement

  1. The shelter (although made to resist radiation) was not built sturdily enough to be able to resist the marauders
  2. The doctor did not have one weapon to protect himself and his family and drive off the angry mob
  3. He allowed “Jerry” to come inside the house, instead of locking and barring every part of it to keep the neighbors away

The old adage, “Know thy neighbor” holds true…and not just from a superficially-friendly, good time perspective.

What is important to know is that when the needs of the neighbors are not able to be met, those needs will be attempted to be filled at your expense if you are the one with the supplies and safe haven.  “The Shelter” is an oldie but a goodie, and a perfect tool to keep in mind that all of us can pass beyond the limits of the “better angels of our nature,” and the situation turn from “Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm,” to “The Road Warrior” in the blink of an eye.  Happy watching, and hope you take something from it.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Be More Productive: 5 Books To Improve This Life Skill Today!

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 It’s been said that the two factors that have the greatest impact on a person during adulthood are the people they meet and the books they read. As we get older, it becomes more and more difficult to make new, lasting connections with other people, but there’s no excuse not to be always be reading a book. I make reading a mandatory, non-negotiable hour of every day (I sometimes have to schedule it in like a doctor’s appointment, but it always gets done!) and it’s proven to be invaluable to me.

Reading books about productivity instantly makes me feel more productive—it’s definitely easier to motivate and plan for success with a guidebook. Whether they are about organizations, tips for time management, or methods for organizing clutter, this list contains some of my all-time favorite books for jumpstarting my productivity.

5 Books To Improve Your Productivity Today!

1. Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity by David Allen

This book came out in 2002, though I didn’t read it until around 2008, after a new job required me to become familiar with these methods. From managing your inbox to overcoming writer’s block, this book is full of helpful hints and tips for accomplishing your goals.

2. The One Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results by Jay Papasan

 The basic tenant of The ONE Thing is kind of a no-brainer: in order to accomplish anything, you have to focus your priorities and be protective of your time and effort. You have to be relentlessly devote yourself to a single task. It’s so very easy to be distracted in this day and age, and Papasan’s book touches on effective methods for getting larger projects finished and quieting the “noise” of our modern world.

3. Oblique Strategies by Brian Eno

Yes, this is THAT Brian Eno, immensely talented glitter rocker and musician who has collaborated with David Bowie and endless other artists and performers over the years. The original Oblique Strategies are a deck of cards   that can be flipped through during a project. Now, you can access these tips and tricks for free online (although I still prefer the physicality of shuffling through a deck). With advice like “Don’t stress one thing more than another” or “Make what’s perfect more human” this advice is sometimes odd, sometimes obvious, and always helpful–especially for your more artistic endeavors.

4. The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron

In the vein of Oblique Strategies, at first glance The Artist’s Way seems to be most helpful for artists and creative, but the strategies really lend themselves to any project that requires intense though (i.e. ALL OF THEM!). It’s the seminal book about creativity and the 12-week program will help you to map out ideas and kickstart new ways of thinking.

5. The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

I’ve written about this book a ton and I’ve talked about it even more. Kondo realizes that in order to be productive or successful in any endeavor, we have to get our personal space in order first. I’ve applied these principles not only to my work-space, but to my life in general. There’s a reason this book is on everyone’s list this year.

What are your go-to books or websites when you’re trying to get amped up for a project?

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Some Basics on Living a Self-Reliant Lifestyle, Part 2

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 ReadyNutrition Readers, we explored some precepts in the first part of this Self-Reliant Lifestyle Series a few weeks ago.  Part 1 covered a major component of such a lifestyle: identifying the needs of your family before you “jump into the water” and begin the lifestyle. This rule holds true in Part 2, as well, and I’ll repeat these major points I wrote in Part 1 that need to be kept in mind:

  1. Self-reliant lifestyles are going to have a different definition for different people.
  1. Self-reliance means you must provide for and take care of each family member’s needs, especially from a medical/caregiver standpoint.
  1. You must correctly assess what your needs are and realistically pursue a course of action to fulfill those needs in order to be self-reliant.
  1. Self-reliance is still going to leave you reliant on someone.
  1. We can return to the basics of living, and do it in a manner that does not inflict severe pain upon ourselves or our family members in the process of doing it.

These things having been mentioned, we can keep them in mind with this piece.  Now comes a time of some important decisions to be made.  There are too many resources on this site alone to tell you how to develop the most self-sufficient cabin and storehouse for all of your supplies.  Miss Tess Pennington has provided a plethora of resources for you to use in the information you will need to make a plan of action for home canning, gardening, and the like.  I have done pieces on survival medicine and for water procurement that you can research on ReadyNutrition’s archives.

Your Homestead/Retreat Should Provide These 9 Essentials

So really, what you need is an outline to go about planning in accordance with your geographical location, family’s special needs, seasons and times of the year, and the developing situation in your immediate location as well as nationally.  This last part, the situation, you can use this phrase to guide you:

            In order to prepare, you must first be aware.

The economy, and federal, state, and local laws are going to affect a great deal of what you do.  In order to camouflage your activities, you must not so much conform, but you must blend in so that your activities are unnoticed.  In this manner your preps are undiscovered by potentially hostile neighbors and you maintain a proper level of OPSEC, or Operational Security.  We’ll go into this more, as we begin our list.

  1. What kind of home/retreat do you have or are planning to have?  How are you going to provide for heat and fuel to do things such as boil water, cook food and can or preserve your foods?  You must take into account how long your growing season lasts, as well as how long the winter is in your locale.
  2. Each person requires about one acre of land to produce food for one year, times two. The “times two” factor involves rotation, because after one year of growing and harvesting, you must have a year that the land lies fallow and can be conditioned (with composting and other methods of fertilization) to be able to produce again the following year.  Micro gardening and terraced gardening along with greenhouses are your solution to this.
  3. Protein. Are you going to raise a whole lot of cattle, sheep, pigs, chickens, and other livestock?  Do you have enough forage and arable grazing land to sustain them?  Do you have the capabilities of slaughtering, preserving the meat, and replenishing your stock?  What are your family’s food needs in terms of protein?
  4. Hunting for your protein. Hunting and fishing may play a major part in your family’s sustainment if you are not going to raise livestock, and if you are going to raise it and cannot sustain it with arable land after the SHTF.  Are fish and game abundant in your area, and do you know their seasons and migratory patterns?  All of these questions are “food for thought” in order to help you plan for your family’s food needs.
  5. Solar/Geothermal/Wind/Water. What will be your heat and power sources?  Have you assessed what is within your budget, and how long you will be able to use your system?  Montana is a good example, because solar power goes out the window (literally) at times when there is little sun and a ton of snow and ice that need to be cleared from your panels during the winter months.  Geographical location and severity of the winter are factors that are crucial to determine your plan of action in this regard.
  6. Herb Garden. Do you have an herb garden that is not just for a savory meal, but for medicinal herbs?  This must be grown especially with the needs of any medically-dependent family members with special needs.  Do you have mugwort, Jerusalem artichoke, and juniper that is growing that can be used to make homeopathic solutions for a diabetic in the family?  Do you have Echinacea, oregano, lomatium, garlic, and other herbs for viral and bacterial infections growing in a controlled environment?
  7. Water. This is a biggie, because I outlined a rain catchment system for your use in previous articles.  This is where you have to know all of your existing laws in your locale.  Is it illegal to take the rain?  Well, guess what?  The way around this is to have the system in place and operational but not operating.  When it hits the fan, you probably won’t need to consult with a lawyer, and you can begin to harvest the water.  There needs to be a plan for obtaining water during the summer months and during the winter, because temperature doesn’t change the fact that each person needs 1-2 gallons per day, and don’t forget about any animals that you have, either as pets or as livestock.
  8. Waste. Human and animal waste (with the exception of the latter being cats, as they carry Toxoplasmosis in their stool) can be composted.  Once again, if you live in an area that prohibits such activity, you have to take this into account…and perhaps have a system ready to go at a moment’s notice after the SHTF.  The same for garbage.  It needs to be either recycled (such as aluminum foil, plastic bags, plastic bottles, steel cans) or used as fuel in a woodstove, or if it’s biodegradable then into the compost bin it must go.  The legal consideration exists until the SHTF, so know your local laws.
  9. With whom?  Who can you trust?  This is part of self-sufficiency, because the tenet “No man is an island” holds.  You will be self-sufficient to a point: we are a social creature with needs of interaction with others.  It would behoove you to develop your network of those who are trustworthy now.  I stress one point that may sound mean, but it serves a purpose, that being your survival:  Don’t just link up with people because they’re “nice” people: they have to have either some skill or something they produce that can contribute or be exchanged for your skills or products…or else they’re just a liability…or worse.

Regarding this last statement, I highly recommend watching “The Shelter,” an episode of the old “Twilight Zone” series, where a family builds a bomb shelter, and an air-raid comes about.  Watch the reaction of the neighbors and how things “morph” into a very bad situation indeed.  Having served in some very nasty areas of the world with the military, I have seen firsthand how these situations develop in the blink of an eye, so be forewarned that they can and will occur!

Skills, skills, skills.  You need skills…to develop the ones that already exist, and learn new ones that you don’t yet have.  Gunsmithing.  Can you reload?  Can you fix the firearms that are in need of repair?  Basic Mechanics.  Can you change the brakes on your vehicle?  Change your tires?  Put in a new battery?  Change the fluids?  Put in a new alternator or distributor?

Medicine.  Do you know how to give an IV?  Can you diagnose a life-threatening condition such as ectopic pregnancy?  Can you give CPR?  Do you know how to treat a patient for shock, as well as the injury he or she has sustained.  Herbalism.  Do you know how to dry and tincture herbs?  Do you know how to find herbs (wild-craft) that are medicinal in nature in your own backyard?  Do you know what herbs are nutritious and edible?

I could go on, but the point I’m trying to impress is that in order to live a self-sustained lifestyle, you have to be the butcher, the baker, and the candlestick maker.  You must be a jack of all trades and a master of all.  You must wear many hats, and assume the role in each hat, and take up another hat when another role comes along that you must fulfill.  In order to be self-sufficient you must prepare.  We had a very good saying that a First Sergeant in the 82nd Airborne Division used to say all the time that holds true, and it can serve you well here:

            How you train in peace is how you’ll fight in war.

Very true, and I know I’ve mentioned it before.  It is true, and it is important for us as preppers and survivalists.  In order to live a self-sustained existence, you must prepare, and practice what it is that needs to be done…so that you can actually do it and not just have it stored away in a book or in your files.  Hope this piece helps you to organize, and we welcome any comments or suggestions you may have.  Keep up the good work, and have a great day!

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Create Your Own Butterfly Kingdom with this Child-Friendly Project

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butterflyAs part of my ongoing summer effort to get my kids outside and keep them there, we recently constructed a butterfly haven. Butterflies are an excellent addition to any backyard or garden and attracting them is easy and doesn’t require much space. They gravitate toward bright colors and like to congregate in moist spots because they search for salt and other minerals in damp environs. Kids of all ages will get a kick out of building a haven and observing all of the butterflies that stop by to visit.

To build your own butterfly haven you will need:

  • A pie plate
  • Potting soil
  • Some flat rocks (these will weigh down the pie plate)
  • A few sponges in various bright colors
  • A pair of scissors
  • Water

How to Construct Your Butterfly Haven

Step one: Spread potting soil all in the bottom of the pie plate.

Step two: Arrange the rocks in the pie plate, making sure the entire plate is weighted.

Step three: Use the scissors to cut the sponges into shapes of all different sizes. Place the sponges between the rocks, so that all of the soil is covered.

Step four: Wet the sponges all the way through so the water seeps down into the potting soil. There shouldn’t be any standing water in the pie plate, but the sponges should be very wet.

Step five: Place your butterfly haven in the sun near other brightly colored flowers. Make sure your haven stays moist by watering it every other day or so.

That’s all there is to it! Once butterflies start to visit your haven, a book like this will provide a handy reference for determining which types of butterflies are visiting you. This is a great way to teach your kiddos the importance that butterflies and moths bring to the garden and world around them.

You can sit with your children and take photographs of the butterflies for them or you can give your child crayons and paper and have them sketch the different butterflies they see. Older kids might make a grid to record information such as the time of day when most butterflies frequent the haven and how long they stick around.

 

 

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

This is Why Our Anonymity is a Thing of the Past

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“Who are you?  Who who, who who…. I really want to know,”

– The Who

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, we’re going to discuss the topic of anonymity, and how the current society’s transformation from one of a free public to a totalitarian society is completely dependent on recognizing and knowing you.  Everywhere you walk you’re subjected to an array of CCTV (Closed-circuit Television) cameras.  When you’re in the convenience store, the shopping mall, in a restaurant…all of these cameras are continually capturing your photographs.  No big deal, right?  I mean, you’re a twitter and tweet social butterfly with e-mails, texts, and Facebook posts…what could be the harm in that, you may ask?

Except for the fact that they built a gigantic, $50 billion data collection center for the NSA in Ogden, Utah, larger than 10 football fields.

Where do you think these photos are going?  All of those e-mails, phone calls, text messages?  There was a movie in the late 1990’s entitled Enemy of the State,” starring Wil Smith and Gene Hackman about the surveillance state that was in its infancy back then.  Fast forward to the latest movie with Matt Damon on the Jason Bourne collection series.  Go and see it.  Really.  They can do all of the things shown in the movie: use remote cameras outside of your window to photograph you while using your cell phone and computer to pinpoint you.

Back in 2014 before the ouster of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, there were several anti-government protests outside of the parliamentary building in Kiev.  The cell phone numbers of every individual protesting in the public square were recorded and kept by the government.  Guess what?  That is in Ukraine, not the United States.

An article a few years back entitled Low-tech Solutions to High-Tech Tyranny,” by Brandon Smith gave some guidelines and suggestions on how to defeat IR and cameras.  Remember: those who wear masks for a purpose of disguising themselves (and it’s not Halloween or some carnival ball) are violating federal law.  But there are other things that you can do not to make yourself the visible targets for the data collection of the United States government.

Wear baseball caps and sunglasses.  Break up the outline of your face, your ears, and noticeable facial “quirks” and characteristics peculiar to you.  Do not allow so much of your body to be exposed for photos.  Those who have a lot of tattoos or ones that are in very visible areas would do best to cover them with clothing or with some kind of creams that block their images.  Avoid spending large amounts of time directly underneath the little camera-domes, camera lenses, and recording devices. Also, remember the 6 laws of survival.

Remember: they are even mounting cameras in state and national forests.  Why do you think they are doing this?  For your good or for theirs?  No matter how innocuous it may seem, it has a hidden agenda attached to it.  When the time comes for them to close the nets, you will not escape unless you have a plan.  They will realize their goal, and they are realizing it, with the deployment of cameras, drones, and the use of satellites.  They will realize their goals of tracking your every move with your tracking device…your cellular telephone…that transmits its position every 4 seconds…and your location along with it.

Their goal: the complete audio and video surveillance of every person in the United States. 

An estimate is that worldwide, more than 250 million surveillance cameras have been employed.  All of them have the equivalent of “fusion centers” in their respective countries…all of the countries have data sharing functions.  Advancements by corporations such as Microsoft and Apple have enabled even advertising billboards to use facial recognition programs (just as in the pop-culture movie “Minority Report”) to target consumers and store their images in a database.  A database that can be back-doored and utilized by any government agency with a piece of paper and a lame excuse to do so.

Want some more info on this?  Read Opinion: Facial recognition will soon end your anonymity,” by Tarun Wadhwa, published 6/4/16 that outlines many of the corporations and government entities collaborating on such projects.  We are going to have to monitor what they are doing and come up with new and elaborate ways to interact with society while not being herded into the collective net of information collection.  This will take some time and efforts, and is beyond the scope of this article to address.  We welcome your thoughts and comments on this matter and anything you may have learned to help offset such actions.  Keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Land Navigation: Finding Your Way in an Urban Environment SHTF Style

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 ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this is Part 3 for you in our land navigation series that touches on a subject that most do not consider.  In an urban environment, why would you need a map, right?  I mean, it’s the city…you just have to find the street, right?  Well, it is true that you need to know the streets and avenues, but it is an incomplete picture.  Urban Land Navigation poses different challenges in a survival situation than if you are in open terrain (rural).

6 Considerations to Keep in Mind When Navigation in an Urban Area

In an urban environment you need a map of the immediate vicinity of your home and your usual areas of travel on a daily basis.  The urban environment requires you to study various aspects of your home and home-range to figure out some things pertaining to exit/exfiltration.  Let’s list a few of them.

  1. Periodic points where you can take shelter
  2. Total distance you need to traverse to be free of the city/town
  3. Potential sources of food, water, and medical supplies you may need in your movement
  4. Physical danger locations: Is there a large dam near your house?  Unsafe bridges that may need to be crossed?  Large, swiftly-moving river with sewage/toxic chemicals, etc., that you may have to ford?
  5. Social “Hotspots”: Will you be traversing an area that passes through the “territory” of delinquent gangs (Crips, Bloods, etc.) that may place you at risk?
  6. Authorities: Remembering the “Good Guys” can turn bad at any given moment, where are the police stations, FEMA and DHS HQ’s, and National Guard outposts located regarding your departure path?

Now keep in mind, you’ll need a good map and it would also be a good idea to laminate it to protect it.  Then cut yourself a good, sturdy sheet of clear plastic sheeting to use as an overlay.  Dry erase is nice for a presentation, but what you want here is the old-fashioned “grease” pencils, like these. These are water resistant and can be used on glass metal and plastic. I highly recommend getting different colors of black and red pencils.  That is enough, as you don’t need to confuse yourself.  Use a binder clip to keep your overlay and your map together…your map shouldn’t be more than a square foot or so.  You’re attempting an exfil, not conducting a geological survey.  You also don’t want someone to find your map if you lose it and then know where you’re going.

This is a key point: You want to perform a route reconnaissance of how you want to leave the city.

Believe you me, you do want to leave the city ASAP!  The morning may have started out as “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” but it’s about to become John Carpenter’s “Escape from New York.”  Take your route from two scenarios: with a vehicle or on foot.  What might take you a few hours in a vehicle might take you several days on foot.  The “Bug-Out Bag” needs to be stocked up, and you need to know where everything is, and everything that is in the bag.

You don’t have time to “what if’ things, and dig for your handy compass-and-signal-whistle-flashlight.  You’ll have to move.  Other things that may help you are maps of subway systems that you can supplement with your main map.  Subways have places where you can potentially find sources for water, electricity, and field expedient tools that you may require.  Tie in the subway route with your planned evasion route.

Know where things are.  Know how many drugstores are in between you and your “finish line” for your route.  Know where there are any abandoned buildings, or sites under construction.  Know where there are buildings along the route that were previously classified (and placarded) as Fallout shelters.  Just because they removed the familiar black and yellow Civil Defense signs does not mean they aren’t still good to protect from fallout.

On your escape, you must keep this in mind: Always be ready for the original disaster to “morph” into multiple threats and/or a worse threat or threats.

An example would be an EMP.  Bad enough that you’re now back in the 1800’s in a millisecond.  Now you find that about ten miles away, a flash of light reveals itself, and here comes the mushroom cloud!  Your Casio G-Shock is not the only thing that may go dead if you do not take immediate action!

An urban environment is the most challenging of all places, because of the amount of people you’ll have to deal with and the number of confusing (and dangerous) situations that will arise when the SHTF.  Your land navigation fundamentals that we covered before still apply!  You will have to readily gauge the distance you travel and direction.  If you’re on foot, the challenges and dangers will be increased significantly.  The more you plot out where things are – potential grocery stores, drug stores, and places you can duck into and hole up in for a while – the better it will be for you.

Study all of the maps you can, and study the businesses that are in the area.  See what supplies and tools you will be able to scrounge when the SHTF.  It also can help you in terms of safety.  If you have to pass by a branch of the Dow Chemical Company, it might help to know what kinds of caustic or toxic chemicals are stored that might be ruptured in an attack and give you a “bad hair day” in addition to the attack.  All of this involves proper planning and coordination beforehand, but you have the time now.  Take advantage of this in your urban or suburban home, and lay out a good route for you and your family to take advantage of to get out of Dodge if need be.  Keep up the good work!

 

JJ

 

Check out the first two parts of this navigation series:

Part 1: Finding Your Way: The Pace Count

Part 2: Using the Stars to Navigate

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Fit to Fight: Preparing the Body and Mind

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disciplineReady Nutrition Readers, as we’ve been looking a lot at physical conditioning, we will expound on some of this by making a point that you may wish to keep in mind:

            Your physical conditioning and fitness will determine how you will fight.

Make no bones about it: in a survival situation post SHTF, you will eventually have to fight, one way or another.  There will be limited food, limited water, limited resources.  You will have stocked up all of your larders with racks and racks full of canned goods and dried foods…all of the best you could garner.  You’ll have medical equipment, and water stored, along with tools and survival supplies.  That’s great…you’re surviving, and that is the object.

But how long do you really expect to keep all of your supplies without a fight?  The firearms and other weapons are important, but I want to stress this point for you to help you:

            Your best defense is a fit body and sound mind, both trained to fight.

Whatever discipline you choose to study is up to you, and should not be made hastily, or without consideration of your condition from a medical perspective.  Consult with your family doctor prior to any fitness regimen or martial arts training.

That being said, you can train with boxing gloves and/or bag gloves and a heavy bag and a speed bag.  You can get a great workout from either, with different goals and objectives for each.  Your heavy bag workout is to condition your hands, arms, and shoulders to deliver a punch.  If you buy a good quality bag (I prefer either canvas or leather, with Everlast being the best), you should get one that weighs between 50-75 lbs.  That will be workable.  Heavier than this it’s pretty hard to move.

You want one that is solid that you can also practice your kicks on.  You’ll need literature and training for it that is beyond the scope of this article.  You can pick up hand wraps for yourself and bag gloves, and do a good workout on that heavy bag.  Try doing sets (rounds) of 1 minute for starters, with a 1-minute rest.  Do three “rounds” of this.  If you’re not used to it, you’ll be amazed at how it will “smoke” you.

Then with time you can increase your rounds and the time for them, as well as decreasing the rest interval between rounds.  For kicking, pick up some good instep pads and sole pads, and find an instructor or even someone who just exercises in this manner and pick up some instruction from them.  You’ll find a lot goes into it: stretching, strength, and coordination.  You don’t have to be Chuck Norris or Bruce Lee.  Just build a repertoire of two or three basic kicks, such as a roundhouse, a drop-kick, and a side kick for starters.  Master a few and then you can build on more to expand your repertoire.

The speed bag can give you a really good workout, as well as build hand-eye coordination.  It helps with your timing, as the bag moves faster than a human head.  Discipline and training are your keys, and they must be in conjunction with one another.

Train your mind as well. There are many ways you can prepare your mind and body.  The classic text by Sun Tzu “The Art of War” will seem strange if you haven’t read it; however, the principles are sound for armies and for individuals.  Mental discipline and concentration are premium for any fighter to succeed.  Find the best instructor you can, and make it worth his while to train you, even if it isn’t in a Karate dojo, or some large-chain gym.  Find a neighbor or a friend who is good at it, and get them to take you under their wing.  It’ll pay off big time for you later.

To conclude, these are all training tools you can incorporate into your workout regimen with a purely practical, utilitarian facet: to prepare you for the eventuality of a fight.  Remember, it’s not a matter of looking for trouble.  Rather, it is ensuring you can take care of trouble when it comes if you must go that route.  Avoid the fight if you can, but if you can’t?  Then win it.  Keep fighting that good fight, and do the best you can in all things.  JJ out!

            “Winning isn’t everything…it’s the only thing.”

Vince Lombardi, Coach, Super Bowl Champion Green Bay Packers

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

US Hasn’t Had Any Major Hurricanes in a Decade. Are You Still Prepared?

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hurricaneHurricanes are probably one of the most common disasters that preppers will face. They can destroy homes, cut off utilities, hinder essential services, block roads, and cause widespread panic among unprepared citizens who often strip store shelves bare before the storm arrives. One way to look at this, is that hurricanes provide a localized version of the social collapse scenarios that preppers often worry about. So if there’s a silver lining in this type of disaster, at least it gives us an opportunity to try out some of our preps in a real world disaster.

In case you haven’t noticed though, it doesn’t seem like there have been very many hurricanes lately. There have been a few small ones, sure. Aside from Hurricane Sandy however, which was a category 2 storm when it made landfall in the United States, these storms haven’t been making many headlines in recent years.

That’s because we haven’t been hit by a major hurricane in over 10 years. As shocking as it may sound, it’s been over 3900 days since a storm measuring category 3 or larger has hit the US, which is longer than any previous record by over two years. Florida hasn’t been hit by a hurricane of any size in 11 years, and America’s side of the Gulf Coast, which is notorious for hurricane activity, hasn’t been hit by anything in 3 years.

So where did all of these heavy hitting storms go? They still pop up in the Atlantic every year, but they keep losing steam before they reach our shores, and in many cases they don’t reach us at all. Scientists aren’t really sure why. As best as they can tell, we’ve just been ridiculously lucky.

Once our luck does run out however, the devastation could be far greater that what we’ve seen in previous years. Some researchers think that after more than 10 years without any major hurricanes, people living along our coastlines aren’t as prepared as they should be, and neither are their communities.

“Hurricanes are going to hit the U.S. again and people are going to be shocked by the magnitude of the disaster,” said Roger Pielke Jr., professor of environmental studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

The Associated Press reports Florida’s coastal communities have added 1.5 million people and almost a half-million new homes since 2005, the last time there was an onslaught of storms.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration projects that by 2020, the U.S. coastal population will have reached 134 million people, 11 million more than in 2010.

“Hurricane damage and destruction is a direct function of how much accumulated wealth there is,” Pielke said. “We’ve put a lot of stuff along the coast. If we’re in this 10-year drought, loss potentials in some places may now be two times higher than it was a decade ago.”

On top of that, there’s the simple fact that residents living in these areas may have let their guard down, and aren’t as prepared for hurricanes as they used to be. Plus you have millions of new residents living along the coasts who may not have much experience with hurricanes. When these storms start making landfall again, there’s going to be enough damage to make up for the past 10 years.

So if you happen to be living in an area that has been spared from hurricanes, don’t neglect your preps. Get ready for the next hurricane now before it’s too late.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Is Minimalism the True Secret to Happiness?

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 A few years ago my family of four packed up our household and moved across the country. We made the drive in our car while our belongings were hauled in a moving truck. We arrived to our new house with little more than some clothes in our suitcases, the kids’ favorite toys, and whatever necessities (some dishes, our coffee maker) we could fit in the trunk. Soon we found out that our moving truck was running late. A few days turned into what was ultimately more than 4 weeks as our belongings toured the country in a bizarre series of missteps on the part of the moving company. You might think this sounds extremely inconvenient, and of course in many ways it was; however, as a family we quickly became accustomed to having less. Now, when I think back about that month without our things, I think of it fondly, almost longingly.

What Brings Joy?

Marie Kondo has built an empire out of minimalism—her primary rule is to only keep material things that “spark joy” in the owner. I can tell you that after a week or so in our near-empty new house, it was difficult to even remember what we’d packed in that truck. I sometimes felt a pang for a particular book or record but the moment would pass. And suddenly life was about noticing moments, something I never seemed to do in our house full of things. So many things! Did we really need any of it?

Kondo believes that material things produce a kind of noise in a space, that having too much clutter creates stress in our lives. I tend to agree. Like most American families, we used to buy something almost every day (from clothes to toys to small kitchen appliances). It seems that we sometimes bought things simply out of boredom or on impulse at the grocery store. I’d been aware of this for some time, but it wasn’t until we were without our possessions that I began to realize how much “noise” those things created in our day-to-day life.

A Month Without Stuff

Without our truck full of things, there was less clothing to put away, fewer dishes to wash, fewer toys to clean up. No television to watch, no computer to fight over. My sons immediately got creative. They pretended their soccer ball was a pet dog and they spent days and days using a few pieces of colored chalk to decorate our patio floor in an intricate mural. There was no couch to sit on, so we spent more time outside or built blanket forts together. I did very little housework and I didn’t get too worried about the kids breaking things (there was nothing to break!) or messing up the floors because cleaning up was so much simpler without clutter. We eventually bought a few folding chairs and a neighbor let us borrow a card table so we could eat dinner together. That was when I realized it: we were happier than we’d been in months. We were better off this way, with just the bare minimum.

I’m not saying everyone should live out of a suitcase in an empty house, but I believe there is a happy medium. Once your house is comfortably furnished with necessities, why keep adding to it? Why not only buy the things we really need or things that “spark joy”? Why not keep furniture and knick-knacks and toys to a minimum? Or see how long you can go without buying anything at all?

Don’t get me wrong, I was excited when I saw our moving truck pull up, but the lesson stayed with me. When I was unpacking, I left maybe 40% of the items in their boxes. I put those boxes on a shelf in the garage. After a few months of disuse, I donated the contents: mainly toys and games we didn’t play, books I had meant to read for years, clothes we didn’t need. My grandma used to say no matter how much you think you want some material thing, one day you’ll be begging somebody to take it off your hands. Minimalism, she insisted, is the key to a peaceful life. I never really understood what she meant until the moving truck incident, but now I think she had the right idea.

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Navigate Using the Sun and Stars

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starnavTwo city guys bagged a deer, and they began to drag it by the feet.  After the antlers tangled in the brush for half an hour, one said, “Maybe we should try dragging him by the other side,” and the second agreed.  After four hours, the second one said, “This is definitely a lot easier.”  The first one said, “It is…but we’re going farther and farther from the truck.”

In a previous article, we discussed how to if you’re hiking across unimproved terrain, you need a pace count for yourself. We are going to take that information a step further and learn how to navigate without a compass.

Using the Sun to Navigate

Finding the right direction is just as important as traveling the right distance.  More, in many regards.  So how do we find our direction?  We start with the primitive, and work our way up to the advanced.  During the day, the sun’s course…traveling from east to west in the sky is your first field expedient tool.  This method is termed the Shadow Tip Method and can help you find true North. The following video will explain the Shadow Tip Method.

How to Find True North

Emplace a straight stick about a foot long into the ground.  The stick will throw a shadow.  Where the shadow ends (the tip) mark that point with a stone.  Then wait at least a half an hour.  The shadow will move, in the opposite direction of the sun’s travel.  Where the tip ends up, mark with a rock.  Then draw a straight line between stone #1 and stone #2.  This line gives your east-west axis line.  Remember: point number 2 will be back towards the east…on the right of the east-west line.

Now draw a line perpendicular, or 90 degrees through the middle of your east-west line.  That new line will be your north-south line.  North is the top, and south is the bottom.  Cool beans?  Let’s keep going.  In times of limited sunlight, you can find moss-covered bases of trees…the moss almost always thrives on the north side for some arcane reason.  In addition, use your larger rivers…they almost always flow from north to south.  These are field-expedient methods, but they work.

Navigate by the Stars

The stars are another one of nature’s navigation tools we can use. On a clear night where the stars are visible, you can use the Big Dipper.  The front edge of the “cup” …those two stars…the base star distance to the top edge star…stay in alignment with these two.  Use your fingertips to approximate these points, and then five increments (five times) that distance in the same direction as those two stars, and you’ll run right into the North Star.  It is not that bright, but it is solitary and singular.  And you can confirm it.On the opposite side of the sky, you will find the “Lazy-W,” also known as Cassiopeia.  This constellation…take the middle star in the “W” and using the left edge of the letter’s first two stars…do the same thing that you did for the Big Dipper with your fingertips.  Approximate five of these increments from that middle star in the “W” out from the center, and you will once again “hit” the North Star…also known as the “Pole” Star.  Of all the stars, the Pole Star remains constant.

Finding north is important, because if you know where you are in relation to where you want to be, the North Star can give you your direction…a straight line axis from your position.  South is opposite, and then you can draw an East-West axis line across it…to estimate your direction of travel.

Using a Compass

Now comes the “fun”lensatic compass part…the compass!  Taking the guesswork out of it.  There are many on the market, and JJ’s preference is the Tritium Lensatic Compass of the United States Army.  You can do much with this piece of equipment.  It will give your azimuth (direction based on the 360 degrees of a circle) for a direction of travel, as well as your cardinal N-S-E-W directions.  The tritium is a radioactive element that allows the whole thing to glow in the dark without the introduction of light to “charge” it up.

 

The compass will run you $70.00 on Amazon.com, and it is by far the most dependable one there is.  I have had mine for more than 20 years without any problems: the most common being “sticking” caused by severe impact numerous times.  The best way to avoid this is to actually take care of the compass.  Seems simple enough, but most people bang them up and do not keep them protected when not in use.  It comes with a lanyard that can be looped through your equipment.  Don’t hang it around your neck, as it is strong enough to garotte you if you fall and catch it on something.

Yes, there are a host of electronic gadgets by Suunto and Garmin, and all, but these work by battery, and some are GPS.  What to do when an EMP strikes, or you run out of juice?  But the lensatic compass will see you through, and point you in the right direction.

In the next part of the Series, we’ll cover the finer points of using that lensatic compass, from simple cardinal directions and variants to actual direction with the azimuth.  We’ll cover declination (a must for you to know in your geographic locale), and some points on walking with the compass and use of it with a map.  Until then, start gathering your reference materials from part one and your compass.  Then we’ll plan our trekking!  Until then, keep up the good fight!  JJ out.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Surprising Benefits to Letting Your Kid Play Video Games

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kids gamingWe’re heading into the hottest part of the summer and suddenly my plan to get the kids outside and keep them there is becoming more challenging. We definitely have to stay hydrated and regularly come in for breaks, but there have also been a few days where we simply give up and come home after only an hour or so in the heat. On those days, my resistance against screen time starts to waver and I’ve even given in and let my older son play video games a few times. It turns out that this may not be so bad for him after all. In fact, there are many benefits that playing video games has over passively watching television.

  1. Making new friends: People sometimes imagine kids who game as isolated, sitting alone in a dim room with a controller in their hand. In fact, multi-player online games provide intense connections and teamwork via strategy. Besides that, a friendship that emerges because of a video game will likely lead children to discuss interests outside of video games.
  1. Video games can be physical: Pokemon Go is sweeping the nation, getting people of all ages off of their couches and outside to catch these adorable creatures. Wii Fit has people losing weight and tracking their progress and Dance Dance Revolution is a fun way to get some exercise and learn some new moves. These examples have obvious physical links, but studies show that even games that only require a handheld remote provide full-body interaction. Kids who play sports games are also more likely to try those same sports outdoors.
  1. Video games encourage quick decision making: It’s well known that games stimulate hand-eye coordination, but they also encourage kids to make rapid choices. They learn to scan a situation for possible options and to arrive at a plan of action quickly. Kids who play video games also adapt faster and learn instantaneously from their mistakes. These same traits can be very beneficial when applied to everyday situations (and maybe even emergencies) in real life.
  1. Video games encourage empathy: Reading works of fiction is perhaps the most beneficial activity when it comes to building empathy—to really get inside someone’s head and see the world from their perspective, it helps to immerse in their internal dialogue. People who read fiction are often kinder, more open-minded, and less likely to fear people who are dissimilar to them. But narrative video games may do the same thing. Playing the role of both the hero and the villain and/or switching avatars regularly gives a good dose of “walking a mile in somebody else’s shoes.” Kids who get deep into a narrative video game will begin to grasp concepts like plot, flashback, and foreshadowing—all things that they can apply in their interpretation of other forms of fiction in their lives.
  1. Gaming may slow aging: like puzzles or other brain teasers, video games that require memory, reaction time, problem-solving, and/or strategy (and that’s pretty much all of them) can improve cognitive function and stimulate synapses.

Like everything, moderation may be key when it comes to how much you let your kids play video games. It also might help you to observe them as they play, ask questions, and try to get involved with your kids at their level. Anything that lets you engage can be a good thing if you let it!

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Synergistic Effects of Meditation + Exercise on Depression

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meditateYou’ve definitely heard of endorphins, the feel-good hormones that are released during physical activity. And you’ve probably heard about the head-clearing benefits of meditation, how being mindful can help to combat stress and anxiety. But what you may not have heard about is how combining these two activities (exercise + meditation) has an effect greater than the sum of each part. A new study shows that MAP training (mental and physical training combined) allows for increased results from both types of activities. These findings could drastically improve the quality of life for people with mild to moderate depression. Some even say the results are so good that certain individuals may find MAP training as beneficial as drug therapy.

Sitting Before You Sweat

Professional athletes have long known that meditation can improve performance. Sports rely heavily on mindfulness, the moment-by-moment awareness of a person’s feelings, thoughts, and physical sensations. Legendary Bulls coach Phil Jackson told Oprah in a 2013 interview, “As much as we pump iron and we run to build our strength up, we build our mental strength up so we can focus … and so we can be in concert with one another in times of need.” It turns out that even the most casual exerciser can experience improved performance after meditation.

Depression and anxiety are often fraught with ruminating thoughts—feelings of worry or anxiety that a person can’t see to get out from under. Both meditation and exercise can help with breaking these thought patterns, but when used in conjunction, the results are magnified.

In the aforementioned study, subjects (half with depression and half without) were taught a form of meditation called focused attention. This is a simple, entry-level form that involves counting your breaths up to 10 and then counting backwards. Participants engaged in this for 20 minutes and then moved on to a walking type of meditation for 10 minutes. After the 30 minutes of meditation, they participated in the aerobic exercise of their choice for 30 minutes. Not only did participants find that they could keep doing their aerobic activity for linger than they thought, they found the exercises easier to complete and felt positive about the process.

Synergistic Results

Subjects completed this hour-long routine twice a week for 8 weeks and were tested at various points along the way. The mental health results were significant: of those with depression, a 40 percent reduction in anxiety was reported. Those subjects said they felt free from anxious thoughts and felt more positive about their lives in general. These benefits peaked immediately following the exercise, but the gains were measurable even on the days when the MAP training was not done. The non-depressed subjects also noted a significant increase in their mood, concentration and attention.

No Reason Not to Try MAP

This study focused only on the mental health and well being of the subjects, but we of course know that exercise provides numerous physical health benefits as well (from endurance, improved heart rates, to the burning of calories). At only a 2-hour a week commitment, there’s really no reason NOT to try a MAP program, whether you want to improve your symptoms of depression or just improve your outlook (and your body).

Have you incorporated meditation into your workout? Comment and let us know!

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

What Miniature Cows Mean for Your Homestead

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jersey cowI recently returned from a month-long trip to Iceland. While there, besides the amazing natural beauty and the wonderfully kind locals, I also noticed something interesting and unique about their livestock. In Iceland, there is only one dairy breed: the Icelandic cow. These cows are descended from Scandinavian ancestors and they are small and compact in stature with vivid, exotic coats (including brindle, stripes, and a vast array of colors–over 100 possible combinations!). Their small size, coupled with their ability to produce rich, copious milk, got me thinking about miniature dairy breeds and how they could be useful on smaller farms in the United States. Of course, getting a cow from Iceland might be a difficult prospect, but there are there are more than 25 breed categories recognized by the International Miniature Cattle Breeders in the states. Some of the most popular miniature cow breeds are:

  • Belted Galloway
  • Dexter
  • Jersey
  • Panda Cow
  • Hereford
  • Lowline angus
  • Texas Longhorn
  • Miniature Highland
  • Holstein

As well, this book goes over some of the benefits of miniatures of all types and how they can be beneficial to your homestead.

  • Space: Okay, so it’s abundantly clear that dairy cows are big, but let’s talk about the size difference between a mini and a traditional cow. Minis range in size at three years of age from 36″ in height to a maximum of 48″. This is one-half to one-third the size of normal cattle. A traditional dairy cow can weigh over 1300 pounds and stands close to 5 feet tall. A mini-Jersey breed, on the other hand, weighs about 400-500 pounds and is about 3 feet tall. A smaller cow means a smaller space commitment (for both housing and grazing) overall—suddenly, the idea of having a dairy cow becomes feasible even for people with small homesteads.
  • Feed Conversion: These petite cows need only half an acre for grazing and a third of a ton of feed per year (as opposed to full-sized counterparts who need more than a ton of feed per year), yet minis still produce 50-75% as much milk as the bigger cows. This makes the feed conversion rate outstanding and efficient for a smaller farm or homestead.
  • Safer for families: The sheer size of a typical dairy cow means many precautions need to be taken to handle the animals. Younger kids who might otherwise be intimidated by a regular-sized cow can help with the daily care/maintenance of a mini. Children should, of course, always be supervised around livestock, but a cow the size of a large dog is definitely a safer bet for those with families.
  • Gentle nature: It’s more than only size that makes mini cows so easy to handle and get along with—they are particularly docile and gentle. They do less damage to pastures/fences when they walk, and many owners compare them in nature to golden retrievers.

Initial cost may be the only downside to owning mini cows—they can be $1,000-$2,000 more than a traditional dairy cow; however, when you do the math, the investment into feed + dairy output + accommodations over time likely still make minis worth it for your family. Adding another layer of self-reliance to your homestead is always beneficial, as we never know what the future holds, and for those nervous about making the leap to “farmer,” the mini cow could be a great first step.

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Identify Nature With These Cool Apps

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appIf you have an iPhone, chances are you’ve used a recognition app like Shazam if you’ve ever heard a song you liked and wanted to identify the artist. These recognition apps seem like magic, giving you a definitive answer in just seconds and providing a link to purchase the music you’ve just heard.

Once, while on a hike in the Hudson Valley with a friend, we joked that there should be a Shazam app for nature. At the time we were both living in NYC and we felt a big disconnect from the plants and animals we were seeing around us. Wouldn’t it be great, we thought, to have an app that would tell us which berries were dangerous and what kind of bird has a bright red chest? After doing a little research, it turns out that there are a few apps meant to do exactly this.

  • Bird Song ID is basically Shazam for birdsong. The app allows you to record birds’ singing and then a processor will let you know what species you’re listening to. Like Shazam, the clearer the recording, the better your chances are of getting a match. An added bonus is that don’t need an Internet connection to use this app, so it’s perfect for those remote hikes.
  • Merlin Bird ID is fast and simple to use while birdwatching. You’ll answer 5 quick questions to narrowdown a list of potential species. Millions of recorded observations help the app to make educated guesses.
  • Leafsnap allows you to take a photo of a leaf against a light-colored background and identify the plant or tree from which it came. The catalogue is extensive and it’s a free app—a downside is that you’ll need an Internet connection to use it.
  • IdentiPlant is an app for identifying flowers and plants. Like Leafsnap, this app works by using an image your snapped of the plant and cross-referencing it with a large database. There’s no need to take a photo against a light-colored background for this one, and the app provides extensive information about each plant.
  • Audubon’s Field Guide to North American Mammals can help you identify what animal just darted across your path. You’ll narrow down possibilities by size, shape, location, and habitat and you can even analyze the droppings or tracks the critter left behind.
  • For more advanced nature lovers, the What’s Invasive app lets people track invasive species they might encounter. A list of invasive plants or animals is provided by the National Park Service based on your GPS location. Look through the list before your hike and then keep your eyes open for species that threaten native plants and animals. Report what you see to do your part in keeping indigenous species safe. More advanced nature nerds will love this, plus, if you have small children, this app can give them something to watch out for and therefore hold their interest on longer trails. Also available for Android.

All of these apps are under $5 and most of them are free. Take advantage and download the ones that interest you before your next brush with nature!

 

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Some Basics on Living a Self-Reliant Lifestyle, Part 1

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self relianceReadyNutrition Readers, you’ve been prepping for a long time, and you diligently follow the exchange of information on this and other websites.  You have been laying in stores and provisions, equipment, seeds, books, medical supplies, tools, and specialty gear.  You have been planning, training, and preparing for that eventual day that everything as we know it comes to a halt.  We know that preparations are never complete, but you’re 99.9% there.  Now what?

It’s sort of akin to coming off of an adrenaline rush.  OK, you’re about as ready as you can be.  Now, the disaster/SHTF hasn’t happened yet.  So what do we do?  Here’s an answer to that question that you can blend into what you have already accomplished.  None of your efforts are being repudiated; you can attempt to continue your preparations by living as much of a self-reliant lifestyle as possible.

Thoreau and Emerson aside, there are ways of being self-reliant without just simply living in a cave in the woods (although caves can be an excellent residence or shelter).  Here is the first point to a self-reliant lifestyle, and it is one of the most important ones:

 Self-reliant lifestyles are going to have a different definition for different people

This statement is because the needs of one family are not the same as the needs of another.  The Jones and Smith families want to live lives as self-reliant as possible.  The Jones family has two twin boys who are 13, and an 8-year-old girl who is a diabetic.  The grandfather, Mr. Jones Senior needs the use of a wheelchair.  The Smith family has an 18-year-old daughter who is a very good athlete, and a 14-year-old boy who is blind.

The two families have different situations, and therefore in order to be self-reliant, there are medical conditions and physical limitations that must be taken into account.  The Jones girl needs a steady supply of insulin, a drug that requires refrigeration, and her grandfather needs the wheelchair to move about.  The Smiths have a boy who cannot see, and precautions must be taken to keep him safe and healthy.

4 Self-Reliant Concepts to Consider

1. Self-reliance means you must provide for and take care of each family member’s needs, especially from a medical/caregiver standpoint.

This seems as if it’s just common sense, but it is not.  I can’t even begin to tell you the amount of people who move to Montana because they want to live in the remote wilds, but are unprepared to support their family’s needs because they have either assessed those needs incorrectly or discounted them in the pursuit of their goals.

In order to be self-sustaining, you have to provide for yourself (prep) for when it hits the fan, but you also have to live in the “now” until the SHTF.

2. You must correctly assess what your needs are and realistically pursue a course of action to fulfill those needs in order to be self-reliant.

Where do you live?  Do you live in a state that has no property taxes?  What is your employment potential?  Do you have a means of making a living that you are not required to punch a clock and report to a cubicle?  Can you work in your home?

What kind of home will you choose for yourself and your family?  What kind of transportation will you need, and what kind of daily commute for yourself and/or members of your family?  Are you all in agreement as to the type of lifestyle you will live in?  Do you have a home-based business that all members of your family can (and want to) participate in?

3. Self-reliance is still going to leave you reliant on someone

Unless you’re going to the Thoreau/Emerson model, which still cannot be classified as self-reliance as these guys returned to human society after their self-imposed hermitages/exiles, your life of self-reliance is going to leave you reliant on someone.  Humans are social in nature.  You’re going to require something from someone eventually, either in the neighborhood of supplies, medical attention, or just someone to socialize with.  Unless you are either a gargoyle or some kind of a nut, you will, at the bare minimum, need some kind of human companionship.  So what can we do?

4. We can return to the basics of living, and do it in a manner that does not inflict severe pain upon ourselves or our family members in the process of doing it

We can cut wood for our woodstoves and heat our homes with them or the fireplace.  When the chainsaws run out of juice after the SHTF, we will need to use axes, bowsaws, mauls, and wedges.  We can learn to make our own canned goods by home canning, and grow our own food.  We can either raise livestock and/or hunt for our own food.  We can brain-tan hides and make our own furniture.  All of these things are crucial survival skills that we can also blend into our day-to-day existences.

And in the meantime, we need to keep up with maintenance on our property, taking care of repairs, taxes, mortgage payments, and the like.  The next installment of this series will suggest some home-based businesses that can be used to produce viable income and also generate supplies that can be used for barter.  We’ll examine the self-sustaining household, or “spread” in terms of its component parts, and try to further define what it means for each family to be self-sustaining in a world that is rapidly turning toward the “Soylent Green” model.  Until then, keep your powder dry and remember we’d love to hear your thoughts on these matters.

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Finding Your Way: Land Navigation Series, Part 1 – The Pace Count

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“A soldier is never lost, he’s just temporarily disoriented.”

– An old Army saying

Well, ReadyNutrition Readers, you’re not lost, as you have found this site!  Today we’re going to cover some of the finer points of land navigation.  “Map reading” is an oversimplified term that does not cover the broader, more comprehensive category of land navigation, or “land nav,” as we referred to it in the service.  It is very important skill to learn and takes time and practice to develop effectively.  Let’s get started.

I recommend the older Army publication for a reference guide, the one I’m familiar with that I can recommend to you by experience: FM 21-26 Map Reading and Land Navigation.  It gives you everything you need.  The newer manual is FM 3-25.26 (entitled the same), and although I’m sure it is worthwhile, I don’t know it.  I have to give you what I know, and what I know that works as your basis for land nav.

Learn to Pace Count

If you’re hiking across unimproved terrain, you need a pace count for yourself.  I have been “brought up” with Uncle Sugar…the Army’s method…that is in meters, as all military maps are in kilometers and meters.  Don’t worry: if you have one of the Army’s maps, it has a conversion scale to feet and miles.  If you feel the need, stick with English units, but the meters are easier to add and adjust while you’re backpacking along.  Now we’re going to show you how to figure out your pace count.

Start off by using a tape measure (the longer the better) to measure from a fixed point (point A), and measure off 100 meters, and mark that point (point B).  Trees are excellent for this, and you can tie off a ribbon or string to A and B to always be able to use them.  Start from point A, and take a comfortable walking step, and then another.  These two steps constitute a pace. Left, right is one.  Step with the left and count on the right, all the way up until you’ve reached point B.  The number is your pace without any equipment.  Mine happens to be 65.

How To Mark Meters

When you’re wearing a backpack, your pace count changes and is increased, because you have more weight to bear and you end up taking shorter steps.  When I have my rucksack on, my count is 70.  These numbers (unencumbered and encumbered) constitute your pace counts for each, respectively: you must memorize them!

Now what?  Well, once you have that, you then need to figure out a way to mark off your groups of 100 meters.  Pace count beads are what I used in the service.  It is nothing more than a string of 550 parachute cord with 9 sliding discs or beads, a knot, and another 4 sliding discs that terminate in a knot and the whole thing is tied off on your equipment (camelback, pocket, etc.).  As you travel 100 meters, slip a disc down, and so on.  When you’ve slid all of them down, then with your 10th hundred meters, slide one of the top four down and reset the bottom 9 back to their original position.  The top measures kilometers, or “klicks” that constitute 1000 meters per “klick.”  This distance equals 6/10 of a mile, for your conversion.

Therefore, if you travel 8 klicks, you have covered 4.8 miles.  Simple enough, right?  But it takes practice.  Other adjustments you must make are with regard to terrain.  The rougher the terrain, the more objects (stumps, large holes, rocks, etc.) you will have to bypass, and this will force you to adjust your pace count accordingly.  Night, inclement weather, water features, and thick vegetation will take both considerable practice and additional adjustments to gauge the distance you have traveled.  Bad guys add even more!

nav picI have enclosed this photo from Amazon.com where you can order them listed as “Army Ranger Pace Count Beads,” for $4.00 a set.  If you are the way I am, you can also make your own.  You’ll be able to figure out your distances up to 5 klicks (3 miles) using the beads, and then you’ll have to reset them and keep a count of the 5 klick increments.  Jot them down on paper, or put a pebble in your pocket for each increment.  The latter method works best in inclement weather.

If you don’t prefer to use the military method, you can take that tape measure and figure out a pace count in feet.  You can accomplish it by doing it in 100 foot increments, as it is then easier to add, but it will be time-consuming this way.  I strongly recommend using the metric system for your pace count.  You can easily convert to feet and after a while it becomes second nature where you won’t even have to write anything down and can do it mentally.  Also, you can always use a civilian map and convert the miles easily to kilometers (divide miles by 2.2), and if you come across a military map?  Oh, you’ll be doing good, because you’ll have the unit down…and military maps are very detailed.  We’ll discuss them later.

Your pace count is your key to movement and land navigation on your feet.  It is the basis for your two components of land navigation when traveling from one location to another: distance and direction.  In the next part of the series we’re going to cover the direction component.  Until then, happy pace-counting, and remember: practice makes perfect!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Protect Your Property with a Homestead Declaration

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homestead protectionReadyNutriton Guys and Gals, this article deals with preparation on a different slant: something you may be able to do in your home state to protect you from “Big Daddy” the Federal Government.  Remember, preparation is not only for ELE’s (Extinction Level Events) or an apocalyptic cataclysm.  I would venture to put forth that when one loses their home, this is an apocalyptic event in itself.  One of the things that you may be able to use to prevent this “capture” of your home by the Federal and State government is a Homestead Declaration, and I encourage all of you to pursue this simple avenue if it is available, as I have here in Montana.

The Homestead Declaration is a homeowner’s sworn statement that claims their property as their “homestead” and that claim is recorded with the clerk of the county courthouse.  This state law enables the property owner to ‘set apart’ their property (the homestead) and ‘designate’ it as such I the interests of protecting their home from a forced sale, thereby protecting its owner equity and denying such a sale to pay off creditors.

Sounds simple? Actually, it is.  This is how I did it in Montana for my property.  I went to a place that specializes in legal forms, and purchased my “Homestead Declaration” form for $9.00.  Then I filled it out in the County Courthouse.  The clerks helped me with it, as it is required to identify the property both by address and by the plat number they have in the courthouse.  You need to bring ID with you and any other persons who are on the actual deed to the property, as the document is notarized.  The fee to file here is $16.00 and it is done.

Here I was able to go directly across the hall, pay the fee, and obtain for 50 cents a copy of the document and a filing number.  The original is then filed, later registered, and in about a week or two they send you the original in the mail with the county seal on it.  There it is!  A done deal!

Let me tell you what this document does and how it protects you.  As mentioned, it is a Constitutionally-protected law, as the states that do this enact it on their own…a power reserved to the states.  In the grand scheme of things: to a certain assessed dollar value, they are not allowed to take your home.  For us here in Montana, that amount is $250,000, and rest assured, my home is much less than that figure.  Now let’s discuss what this does for you, and how it relates to the big picture, specifically Obamacare and Medicare.

The feds and states are almost completely “in-sync” with Obamacare.  What the feds can’t grab the states can scoop up, and vice-versa.  In Montana, if you do not have health insurance, the state government automatically enrolls you in Medicare.  The bills that rack up you will have to pay back, rest assured, for medical treatments under such.  They can grab your assets and gobble up your bank account, garnishing your wages along the way.

                                           But they can’t touch your home.

Same for the feds, because it is under the Constitutionally-protected laws of the state.

JJ’s advice: If you live in a state that permits this, fill out that Homestead Document ASAP.

 The Homestead Declaration is not to be confused with a Homestead Exemption.  This is completely different, and deals with exemption from property taxes and income and such.  Here is a list of states that offer you the chance to fill out a Homestead Declaration:
“Homestead rights don’t exist under common law, but they have been enacted in at least 27 states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. If you own, and live on, property in any of these states, you should definitely take the time to file this important document.”

Source: http://www.homesteadus.com/faq.htm

There you have it, Readers.  Remember, prepping is not just for a natural disaster or a global thermonuclear war.  You must also take care of business in the context of the present time, and this means protecting your assets, finances, and property in a standard, legal context.

JJ’s advice: While we live in a functioning (although dysfunctional) society, you must use all of the tools – business, legal, and social – that you can use to protect you and yours.

Plain and simple, the Homestead Declaration is a way that can help you safeguard your assets and maintain your home while the society is as it is.  Check and see if you are in one of the listed states and do the research to follow the requirements as I listed them for what I did here, in Montana.  States vary, but the procedure is basically the same, with fees varying and maybe some small changes in procedure or residence requirements.  Use this tool if you can, and if you are considering buying property for a retreat, consider one of the aforementioned states that satisfies your survivability requirements.  Should you commit, fill out the Homestead Declaration form, and protect your home: not just when the SHTF, but before, as well.  Keep up that good fight and tell us about your experiences.  We’d love to hear from you.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Finding Your Off-Grid Survival Retreat in Montana

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montanaReadyNutrition Readers, Survivalists, Preppers, and Homesteaders, lend me your ears!  I come to give you some pointers Montana land for a survival retreat, and a plug for myself in the bargain.  Why not?  And what would that plug be?  I have a piece of property for sale that would suit the interests of any off-grid, homesteading prepper who really wants to settle in the “American Redoubt” out of the way of the coming maelstrom.  Here are the basics on my property for sale:

20 Acres, private, off-grid, water rights, two-story cabin with woodstove, barn, shed, goat pen, tool room with workbenches, two-story chicken coop, gigantic root cellar, and two more storage buildings on site.  Low property taxes, as all structures are above-ground with no foundation and aren’t assessed.  $100K worth of timber on the site.  4,300 feet elevation, the mountains of the North Fork of Montana.  Other “perks,” we can discuss.  Serious inquiries only.  E-mail Jeremiah Johnson here, bigfanofultraman@yahoo.com for more, and “let’s make a deal!” I would be delighted to meet you and show you everything if you come out here.” Also: I’m not moving out of Montana; I have another place close by.

 There.  Someone once wrote that I just offer advice.  Well, here’s more.  I invite you to “play ball” in my neck of the woods.  Montana is excellent as a retreat location, seriously.  The property taxes outside of the small cities and towns are not excessive, and the land is not as expensive as many of the other states that are in the “Great American Redoubt.”  Let’s give you some more reasons to move to Montana as a retreat location.  Open carry is permitted, and concealed carry without a permit is legal and allowed everywhere except in an established town, and even there it is permitted when you’re in your vehicle and traveling with it as such from one place to another.

In Montana, if you have a Montana driver’s license, you can purchase a firearm and walk out the door with no waiting period.  In addition, private sales are legal and require no call-ins or background checks.  Just a handshake and exchange of the money and the firearm.  You go your way and the seller goes his.  Big Daddy Government has nothing to do with it.

In Montana if you build a house that is not on a foundation, you pay no property taxes on it…only for the land (as such is the case with my property for sale).  In Montana, if you want to live outside of a town (a must!) you don’t have any building codes or restrictions on what you put up.  You can live in a tent, a tarpaper shack, or a stone villa…you aren’t interfered with in any way.  Home improvements do not require any permits, licenses or any other garbage.  No zoning requirements, no restrictions.  None.

The population density is low (except during the tourist season), and believe you me, if you live anywhere in Western Montana (especially the Northwest, where I live), you are there in the “outback” and the wilderness of the Rocky Mountains.  Let me tell you more.  The area in and surrounding the Flathead Valley is extremely safe: there are no big target cities anywhere near.  The closest being Seattle, with four major mountain ranges to the west between them and Montana.  To the east are the missile silos, but it is to the east of the Continental Divide, with hundreds of miles and four major mountain ranges in between, plus the prevailing westerlies, meaning fallout would drift away from us, not toward us.

The area from a target perspective is completely safe.  There are no military industries or key industrial targets in the region.  The railroad line runs straight (east to west) through Glacier National Park, and also has a branch that runs North and South to Kalispell with a rail line that runs west as well.  The strategic necessity would be to preserve this rail line (from a domestic or foreign invader’s perspective) as it enables transport across the Divide, just a word maybe to most…but rugged and impassible in any way to transport equipment, materials, and supplies in a manner that saves hundreds of miles out of the way.

The towns provide the basic necessities if one needs supplies, and medical help is less than an hour’s drive if you set your homestead up right.  Kalispell and Whitefish have hospitals, and there are small doctor’s offices and care clinics in some of the larger of the small towns.  Everything is spread out, but not painfully so.  Four-wheel drive here is a must: refer to some of my other articles on emergency preparations and procedures when you or the family are driving anywhere in inclement weather.

My property is very close to the National Forest, but it is not able to be annexed in any way, by either the government or the timber companies.  There are many properties that border national forests or are nearby, and these are excellent properties that allow you to actually run to a safe place in the forests if marauders, foreign armies, or any others drive you out in a grid-down, SHTF scenario.  There is plenty of water, even during the drought seasons and the winter.

Be advised: the winters are rough, but then again, you want to rough it, don’t you?  All of your skills that you have been developing in theory will come to play here: from woodcutting to canning, log-splitting to snow and ice removal.  Montana has abundant game and is a hunter’s paradise, and as I have done, you can fill your freezer for more than a year with one elk.  So here it is!  Montana is more than worth considering, it is worth acting upon.  All the skills in the world cannot be employed in a state such as California or New Jersey, but you can ply your craft in Montana and be safe doing it.  Hope to hear from you all soon, and all comments and inquiries about the state that I haven’t covered are more than welcome.  Keep your powder dry, and keep fighting that good fight!

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Score Free Groceries (Seriously)

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 ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this is a piece dedicated to help you take a more proactive role in your urban and suburban food gathering.  A few tidbits you may have previously neglected or that have gone unnoticed can be categorized as “grocery hustling.”   In the end, it can help to trim down your grocery bills and provide some extra cash for survival gear or preps you will make in your home.  These are some simple tips, and they work…if you use them.

Prepare your pantry with this best-selling preparedness book

Learn how to hustle

“Hustle” as used as a verb is defined as “To sell or get by questionable or aggressive means,” as printed so thoughtfully in The American Heritage Dictionary.  If you ask me, the definition is a little skewed, because questionable can refer to something not agreed with in the norm, such as buying 300 cans of tuna fish for $20 from a man selling from a pickup truck bed.  Aggressive is looked at only negatively in a physical sense or by those in positions who do not want them threatened by those looking to make gains (yet will counter those moves with aggressive actions of their own).

No, aggressive should not be confused with taking the initiative.  That is what you’ll be doing here.  There is (most of the time) a superabundance of food, and with lowered sales, a superabundance of wasted food.  Here is the way to handle this to your advantage.  Visit your local grocery stores.  Make the rounds and make your contacts.  Meet the department heads, and have it cleared (if you can) through one of the assistant managers or general managers.

It’s all about the connections

The objective is to pick up fresh produce and meats on the fringe or just passing the fringes of the expiration dates.  You can do it.  Check, for example, with your fresh produce manager.  Ask him to sell you vegetables meant for the hog farm or the dumpster on a markdown special.  He’ll be more than happy to oblige, nine times out of ten.  The reason for this is that it is better for the company to take in a little bit on a product rather than throw it out.  Then it’s just a matter of your own personal standards.  A small present for them every so often can sweeten up the deal and make him or her even more amicable.

Does this sound “questionable?”  It shouldn’t.  Here is JJ’s point: If you won’t think out of the box now in easy times, you will not when the times are tough.

There are plenty of types of stores with managers that will sometimes even say, “Well, we have to throw it out…but I’ll put all of these bananas and string beans in a cardboard box and look the other way when I take it out back in five minutes.”

These guys are your contacts.  Wanna learn about barter?  Here’s your chance, nitty-gritty, style of da city!  Slip the guy five or ten dollars every once in a while.  He’ll be grateful, and then he’ll be more than willing to give to you what would have been thrown out, and you make his life a little better in the process.

It’s amazing what you can find if you just look around for it.  Here in the area where we live are potato farmers that’ll sell you a 100 lb. bag for $10.  The last time I checked, you might be able to get about 20 – 30 lbs. for that amount in the grocery stores.  The only limitations are the ones either you place upon yourselves or opportunities that you do not seek out.  Look in your thrift stores…they sometimes have a grocery section.  Forget the expiration date.  If you research it, with the exceptions of medications and dairy products, the date is simply the date that the product stays freshest…a sort of informal limit.

All of this activity will augment what you already do to save your pennies.  Many times you can even find sales on canned goods that you can use for your preps.  Your job is to find as many avenues as you can for you and your family to make ends meet and preserve one another.  The methods outlined here are not questionable…they’re unconventional, and require you to think with other than normative thought.  You’ll come up with a plan.  Just the fact that you read ReadyNutrition is evidence that you do not follow the crowd.  So, happy hustling for those groceries, and let us know about techniques and adventures that you have found to benefit you and yours.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Five Awesome Multitools That Can Get You Through Anything

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multitool shovelMultitools are just plain awesome aren’t they? They let you save a ton of space by wrapping multiple functions into a single item. And since most little problems don’t need super specialized solutions, a few multitools can fix pretty much any problem around the house.

That’s not to say that single use tools aren’t as useful. If anything they’re far more efficient. If you have the money and space to accumulate a wide range of tools, then you should absolutely do so. But multitools fill a very important niche in our lives, especially for those of us who are preppers. We need more space in our homes to store our preps, and with the ever looming possibility that we may need to bug out some day, we need tools that can give us the most utility with the least amount of weight and space.

However, not all multitools are created equal. Most in fact, are either made out of shoddy materials, or are encumbered with tools that would interfere with each other during normal use. If you’re looking for awesome multitools that get things done, consider the following:

Axe Shovel Combo

fobachi axe shovel

Nothing can beat a standalone axe, but if you’re backpacking or bugging out, its size and weight isn’t ideal. Neither is a standalone shovel for that matter. You’ll want a portable lightweight shovel that can do some hatchet work in a pinch, and the Fobachi folding shovel delivers. It also has a saw and weighs less than one and half pounds.

However, if you want a shovel that has more substantial axe capabilities, you should go with something that is longer and heavier like the Pagreberya folding shovel, which weighs about 2.6 pounds. It also includes a knife, magnesium rod, compass, and hex wrench cutouts.

Carabiner Multitool

true utility

The True Utility carabiner packs 20 different functions in a compact tool that only costs about 4 bucks as of this writing. It has four different wrench sizes, four different screwdrivers on a rotating disc, a bicycle spoke wrench, a file, bottle opener, pry bar, and a ruler, among others. It comes with a leather carrying pouch, or you can use the carabiner function to clip it onto a belt loop. Alternatively, you could use the clip to attach more tiny tools to the device.

Leatherman Tread Bracelet

leatherman tread

Almost everything Leatherman makes is useful and durable, and their tread bracelet is no exception. It consists of a series of interchangeable links that can be unscrewed and removed with a penny. Each link contains two tools, most of which consist of screwdrivers, Allen wrenches, and box wrenches. It’s perfect for travelers who are tired of having their multitools confiscated by airport security.

Honeydoo Hammer

honeydoo hammer

They say that if all you have is a hammer, then all of your problems will look like nails. That’s not the case if you have the Honeydoo Multitool. It includes an adjustable wrench, pliers, screwdriver, knife, file, and 12 different screws and bolts. While a small hammer like this would be inappropriate for serious nail work, it’s perfect for solving lots of little problems around the house.

Innovation Factory Axe

innovation axe

It should go without saying that while the axe shovel combo would be useful, you probably can’t split wood with it very easily. It’s only an “axe” in the vaguest sense of the word. But when you ditch the shovel and build a multitool around an axe head instead, it is a thing of beauty.

The Innovation Factory All Purpose Axe comes in two different varieties; one that was designed for truckers, and another for fire and rescue workers. Both include an axe head, hammer, nail puller, and pry bar. It’s a very simple and resilient tool that isn’t overburdened with too many gizmos. It only has a few tools that do their jobs very well. And at a little over two pounds, you could take this axe just about anywhere.

Also See:

Five Cool Multitools You’ve Probably Never Heard of

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Coal: An Underrated Fuel Source that Preppers Should Consider

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coal wikimediaIf you’re living in a rural area and you happen to have a wood stove, you’re probably living the dream. Not only are you experiencing the joys of living so close to nature, and the peace of living so far away from the city, but you’re also sleeping easy knowing that if the grid ever goes down, you can always cut down a few trees for the winter.

But wood isn’t the only thing you can put in your wood stove. These days most people have forgotten that there is another source of fuel that is far more attractive: the much maligned rock known as coal.

Though coal is still widely used as a source of fuel for power plants, its house-warming applications have fallen out of favor over the past few decades, likely due to environmental concerns. Even if you don’t believe all the arguments about Co2 and global warming, the smoke and ash from a coal fire can contain radioactive materials, arsenic, mercury, and other heavy metals. Coal is not something you want to burn in your house every day.

It should however, still of be of interest to preppers for occasional or emergency use. For starters, it has a very high energy density. It doesn’t have quite as many BTUs per pound as gasoline or propane, but it has at least twice as much energy density as wood. And unlike those aforementioned fuels, it doesn’t really require any special storage methods, and it’s not going to go bad. You can just leave it around somewhere on your property. Though it can catch fire, it’s not that easy to get it burning on accident. All in all it’s a very low maintenance fuel, but most importantly, it’s really cheap depending on where you live.

The location of your property is very important to keep in mind. Out of the ground, coal is nearly dirt cheap. The cheap stuff costs about $40 per short ton, or 2 cents per pound. But the cost of shipping can quickly dwarf the cost of the coal itself. If you live anywhere in the eastern half of the United States, then you don’t have much to worry about. The Western United States on the other hand has very few coal mines, so it’s probably going to cost significantly more for you there. You probably won’t be able to get a hold of any significant amount of coal in the West without incurring heavy costs.

Not only that, but you may not want most of the coal that is produced. The bulk of the coal that is produced around the world is known as bituminous coal. This is the stuff that contains a lot of those nasty substances I mentioned before, and it does not burn cleanly. You can still use it, but it would be wise to do so sparingly and mainly for emergencies.

If you can get a hold of it affordably, anthracite coal is what you want. In the United States it is only produced in Pennsylvania, and is a far superior coal compared to bituminous. That’s because it has a higher energy density, and burns with very little smoke.

Whatever you use, make sure that your stove is capable of handling coal. You don’t want to use some rinky-dink burner made of thin steel. Unless a stove is advertised for its ability to burn coal, you probably don’t want to trust anything other than cast iron. Otherwise you can use a fireplace, so long as you purchase and install a wood/coal-burning insert.

All in all, coal is a great fuel source for preppers living in rural areas. It’s something that can be cheaply and easily stockpiled on your property, and left on its own for years until an emergency occurs. You don’t have to worry about it rotting or going bad like wood or gasoline, and it doesn’t have the same storage dangers as propane or natural gas. You can just set it by your house and forget it till you need it. It will burn for a lot longer than wood too, sometimes for up to 24 hours, so you won’t have to stay up all night feeding that fire. If you want to have your home heating needs taken care of when the grid goes down, a big pile of coal is your best friend.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

ALPS Comfort Series Self-inflating Pad Review

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  The review of the ALPS Comfort pad is a result of working with the team of 3Beds.com, a website that reviews airbeds and sleeping pads. A word about ALPS Mountaineering The Mountaineering is just one of the sub-brands of … Continue reading

The post ALPS Comfort Series Self-inflating Pad Review appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

Venezuela: A Prepper’s Nightmare Come to Life

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venezuelan flag

Two years ago, Venezuela was a normal functioning nation, relatively speaking of course. It was by no means a free country, but the people still had a standard of living that was higher than most developing nations. Venezuelans could still afford the basic necessities of life, and a few luxuries too.

They could send their children to school and expect them to receive a reasonably good education, and they could go to the hospital and expect to be effectively treated with the same medical standards you’d find in a developed nation. They could go to the grocery store and buy whatever they needed, and basic government services like law enforcement and infrastructure maintenance worked fairly well. The system was far from perfect, but it worked for the most part.

However, this standard of living was a mirage. Venezuela was and still is a leftist socialist nation, and the only thing propping it up was their glut of oil reserves and $100 per barrel prices. The state owned those resources, and they provided so much wealth that even Venezuela’s highly inefficient command economy could provide everything the people needed. But socialist systems do not by their nature, respond well to shock and disruptions. They’re not flexible.

As soon as the price of oil fell, the country started crumbling rapidly. The infrastructure has fallen apart, leading to rationing of both water and electricity. Inflation is out of control. Price controls have led to shortages of basic necessities. Crime is skyrocketing, and vigilante mob violence is now commonplace. All of these trends have been building over the past two years, but they have finally reached a crescendo over the last few weeks:

  • What really kicked Venezuela’s slow motion collapse into high gear, was when their inflationary currency reached an absurd new level. At the end of April, it was reported that the government couldn’t print enough money to keep up with inflation. Their cash is printed overseas, and the central bank was so short on funds that they could no longer afford to pay the manufacturers of their cash. Venezuela literally doesn’t have enough money to buy more money.
  • The government began scheduling rolling blackouts to save energy, which eventually led to riots in some areas. President Maduro ordered all 2.6 million of the nation’s public sector employees to only work 2 days a week for the duration of May, in an effort to save electricity.
  • An autocratic regime can hold onto power for a very long time, so long as their soldiers and cops are well fed and paid. That’s certainly not the case in Venezuela, where on May 5th it was reported that 6 soldiers were arrested for stealing goats, because there was no more food in their barracks.
  • As shortages of every necessity you can imagine run rampant, many Venezuelans are now so hungry that they’ve resorted to hunting down cats, dogs, and pigeons. In their desperation, many have turned to stealing from their neighbors, which often doesn’t end well in a society teetering on the brink. One mugger was caught by a mob, beaten, and set on fire before the police could show up.
  • 5000 people reportedly stormed a grocery store after they heard that the store might have a few items that couldn’t be had elsewhere. Only a handful of police officers were on the scene to control the crowd, one of who was beaten by the mob. 2 people were killed, dozens were injured, and millions of dollars in property damage was caused. And that was just worst case seen in recent weeks in the country, which has seen countless lootings of grocery stores, pharmacies, and shopping malls.
  • Venezuela’s hospitals are turning medieval due to a lack of power and supply shortages. People are dying from easily preventable diseases, and in some cases the doctors themselves are looting the hospitals and selling expensive medical equipment on the black market. Equipment we take for granted like x-ray machines and kidney dialysis machines are in disrepair, as injured patients lay on the floor in pools of their own blood, waiting to be given a bed. Children are being hurt the most from this situation. The infant mortality rate has risen from .02% in 2012 to 2% in 2015, a hundred fold increase. It is no doubt far worse a year later.
  • The Maduro regime is beginning to crack under the pressure, as the collapse of his government rapidly approaches. A state of emergency has been extended for another 60 days as the state seizes crippled factories and arrests their owners. Maduro has claimed that the US government is threatening to overthrow him at the behest of the nation’s far right. Anonymous US officials responded by saying that they believe his regime won’t last through the summer:

In Washington, the US intelligence officials told reporters they believed a crisis was imminent.

“You can hear the ice cracking. You know there’s a crisis coming. Our pressure on this isn’t going to resolve this issue,” said one official.

Another said: “This is really not the case that the US is rooting for any outcome other than there not be an economic meltdown or social violence. There are reasons for concern that over the summer as Venezuela gives importance to payments on debt over imports that these events could spiral.”

If you’re a prepper, pay close attention to what happens next. What’s playing out in Venezuela right now is the kind of worst case scenario that many of us have been preparing for in the US. It should be very informative. It just goes to show that if you live under a corrupt authoritarian government that can’t manage its resources, all it takes is a heavy ripple in the global economy to send the whole system careening over a cliff.

I wouldn’t say the US government is in nearly as bad of shape as Venezuela’s. We have corruption, waste, and a degree of tyranny, though perhaps not on the same scale. But then again, Venezuela didn’t seem to be in very bad shape a few short years ago. Under the right circumstances, any government can collapse, and our system has many of the same vulnerabilities as theirs. All that means is that it would take a larger event to cripple our nation.

If you’re curious about what that may look like, keep your eyes on Venezuela for the next few months. They’re about to become the 21st century poster child for how easy it is for socialist pseudo democratic governments to collapse, and drag their citizens along with them. And unfortunately the differences between our system and theirs aren’t that vast.

Prepare for collapse: A step-by-step guide

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Turn a Car Battery Into an Emergency Power Source For the Home

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car batteryReadyNutrition Readers, this is a short primer to help you out in your troubleshooting with electrical problems.  The problems I am referring to are when you need to come up with a quick power source in a hurry for some kind of tool or device.  I’m not trying to preach advice on how to rewire your house.  Let the electrician handle the long-term jobs in your home and anything you even think you’re unsure of.  It is far better to err on the side of caution.

But what of when that killer hurricane is due to hit in a couple of hours and you weren’t able to evacuate?  You need to power up your jigsaw or circular saw, and all of a sudden, the power just died…this as you’re boarding up the house!  On that note let’s cover a few things.

Make a Lights Out Kit

Put together a good kit for yourself to begin with.  Here are some items you will need:

How to Utilize a Car Battery as a Power Source

Let’s go with some instructions for utilizing a car battery as a power source.  You will also need a power inverter.  This inverter “converts” the electricity into a usable form, and enables you to tap into a power source that would normally fry you.  The friendly wall outlets have died, and you really need to get that circular saw up and running.  The wall outlet is AC, or Alternating Current.  You need a new AC power source.

Your car battery is just that source, however, it is DC, or direct current.  With the power inverter, you can change that DC into the AC that will power your circular saw.  Guess what?  After you’re done with the circular saw, you can use the battery for your TV, or a lamp, or something else you may need.  Here’s how to hook up your inverter to the battery:

  1. First, connect the positive terminal on the power inverter (red terminal) to the positive (+) post on the car battery.
  1. Next connect the negative terminal on the power inverter (the black terminal) to the negative (-) post on the car battery.
  1. Now it’s time to turn the power inverter on, and you should then allow the inverter to warm up. Give it at least thirty seconds to be on the safe side.
  1. Now you plug in your circular saw into the power outlet provided on the inverter. Voila!  Done!

That’s a pretty simple fix that should not provide you with too much headache.  The main task is to positively and clearly identify the correct terminals on your battery and on the inverter.  Electricity is a pretty “mystifying” thing for most people who haven’t fooled with it very much.  I highly recommend obtaining some of those old Time-Life books from the mid 1970’s.  They are replete with excellent drawings and photographs that can take you step-by-step through simple and basic repairs.

The reason you should arm yourself with this knowledge is that when the SHTF, guess what?  You are now the electrician!  Yes, this frightening thought was not meant to discourage you, but to enable you to make preparations for the time when you need a little knowledge and skills in that area to see you through.

Safety First, Folks!

Just remember a few safety basics before you do anything.  Always disconnect your power at the breaker box/circuit box prior to any electrical endeavors you will undertake.  Make sure that you’re not sitting, standing, or kneeling in any water.  Remember that water conducts electricity and can give you an electric birdbath that will make you chirp sparks for a month!  Always better to err on the side of caution.  And study and practice this stuff before you make the actual attempt to fix something.  If you have to make a repair on the home, stick with the electrician and learn something.  You’re paying him, after all, and he can use an extra pair of hands.  He’ll probably be more than happy to explain what he’s doing when you hold a flashlight for him or run tools to him from his truck.

Electricity can be a great servant of man or a great danger.  Prepare and plan for the emergencies that you may be able to forecast for your own home in the midst of a disaster and lay in your tools and supplies.  When the power goes out it won’t be so much of a shock to you…pun intended!  Be safe and keep up the good work!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

You’re More Likely to Die in a Global Disaster Than a Car Crash

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Nuclear warIf you’re a prepper, then you’re probably inundated with doomsday alarmism on a fairly regular basis. It comes with the territory. While in the process of staying informed on all of the possible threats to civilization, you will inevitably run into fear-mongering claims that the sky is going to fall on our world tomorrow. These outlandish claims not only distract us from genuine threats, but they also make the prepper community look silly and paranoid to mainstream society.

However, there are real threats that we have to worry about. Real threats that the mainstream often thinks are just as crazy as the alarmist threats. Most people look at preppers and think that they’re crazy for believing that civilization could be destroyed by many different threats, leading to the deaths of millions of people, but it’s a very real possibility. It’s worth preparing for.

As a matter of fact, you might be able to scientifically prove that it’s worth preparing for.

See, most people would look at the countless threats to society, both the legitimate ones and the crazy ones, and just shrug their shoulders. “Why bother?” they would say, “why should I worry about this? It’s probably going to kill everyone anyway, and there are already plenty of normal things I have to worry about, like cancer and house fires and car crashes. Why should I spend any time, energy, or money, worrying about a pandemic or a nuclear war, which is far less likely?”

But they should worry about it, because statistically speaking, those catastrophic threats are more likely to effect them than some of the more mundane threats, like the aforementioned car crashes. In fact, a recent study looked at different threats that could lead to the extinction of the human race, and compared their likelihood to the threat of dying in a car crash, and the results were not what you might expect.

In its annual report on “global catastrophic risk,” the nonprofit debuted a startling statistic: Across the span of their lives, the average American is more than five times likelier to die during a human-extinction event than in a car crash.

Partly that’s because the average person will probably not die in an automobile accident. Every year, one in 9,395 people die in a crash; that translates to about a 0.01 percent chance per year. But that chance compounds over the course of a lifetime. At life-long scales, one in 120 Americans die in an accident.

The risk of human extinction due to climate change—or an accidental nuclear war—is much higher than that. The Stern Review, the U.K. government’s premier report on the economics of climate change, estimated a 0.1 percent risk of human extinction every year. That may sound low, but it also adds up when extrapolated to century-scale. The Global Challenges Foundation estimates a 9.5 percent chance of human extinction within the next hundred years.

Somehow I doubt that climate change could come close to extinguishing humanity, but nuclear war is certainly capable wiping most of us out.  And not only is that disaster becoming more likely due to current international tensions, but even during peace time there is always the threat of an accidental nuclear war.

But human extinction level events are hardly the only things we have to worry about.  The Global Challenges Foundation also looked at disasters that could kill 10% or more of the population. Pandemics are the most likely to cause those kinds of deaths, but they also explored some of the threats that aren’t talked about very often, like genetically engineered diseases, artificial intelligence, and geo-engineering.

Nearly all of the most threatening global catastrophic risks were unforeseeable a few decades before they became apparent. Forty years before the discovery of the nuclear bomb, few could have predicted that nuclear weapons would come to be one of the leading global catastrophic risks. Immediately after the Second World War, few could have known that catastrophic climate change, biotechnology, and artificial intelligence would come to pose such a significant threat.

Obviously it’s difficult to put a precise statistic on these existential threats, some of which may or may not even happen. However, when you put the likelihood of all these disasters together, as well as the number casualties they could inflict, it’s clear that they deserve just as much attention as anything else that might threaten your life.

So the next time someone tells you that you’re crazy for preparing yourself for a global disaster, you can confidently assure them that it makes just as much sense as keeping a fire extinguishers in the kitchen, or wearing a seat-belt.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Smart Technology Will Mean Nothing After an EMP Event

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smart tech 

“We are all just prisoners here, of our own device.” – Hotel California, by the Eagles

ReadyNutrition guys and gals, this article is designed to provide you with some food for thought regarding the devices of our modern technological area.  As a modern society, it is very rare to find someone without a cell phone or a hand-held computing device.  While saving time and enabling many different functions, it has also caused our society to become completely dependent upon these devices and has has set us up for a fall.  We already know that those devices are vulnerable to an EMP or a solar storm that can render society as a whole inoperable.  But what about the devices themselves in the normal course of use?  They can act as a monitoring system: a little “spy” in your pocket, transmitting data about you to others that can be acted upon to hurt you.

Former General and Director of the CIA, David Petraeus made a statement regarding simple appliances found in the home, stating that smart technology will make all of our life’s functions part of the “internet of things” someday.  This bodes a dire warning to all of us.  The smart refrigerator that will “order” your food from the grocery store, the cellular telephone that transmits a burst signal every four second to a tower with your position, and the smart “boxes” in your Lexus sedan are all examples of electronic control and tracking.

Shield Your Gear From EMPs

I have found that you can shield off your communications devices by placing them in an EMP-protective bag available online, and you can also use Mylar to block the transmission of the cell phone or I-pad’s signals from effectively reaching the towers.  There is a myriad of information all over the internet that shows how to protect such devices from an EMP or a solar flare.  The principle works in reverse as well, and we’re noting it here for your consideration in your personal planning posture.

The Easiest Way to Wean Yourself Off of a Tech Dependent Lifestyle

JJ’s suggestion is to take a time period – you determine the amount of time for yourself – such as a weekend or a few days during the week, and try to function without the use of any electronic devices, especially those such as hand-held communication.  Give yourself a set period as a drill and a training exercise.  This will help you learn alternative methods of communicating with your family and those you associate with, as well as begin to help you wean yourself off of your tech dependence.  You will be surprised how often you want to check your Facebook or social media during this time.  Such an exercise can gauge how effectively you will function if an EMP or grid-destroying event does occur.

I have suggested in numerous articles that Motorola radios, CB radios, and handheld communication devices such as portable Ham radios are effective means of communication that cannot be monitored as readily as the cellular telephones.  In addition to this, they only need a shielded power source and shielding to protect from the aforementioned disasters.  When the dust settles, the cellular telephones will not be up and running, but you can pull these devices out and use them.

Don’t Allow Your Equipment to Own You

Better yet, they do not continuously transmit your position and movements to Big Brother.  There is much merit in this.  Here is the mindset: we pay our income taxes, and the federal government uses those funds to inculcate ever-growing policies and technologies that further enslave us.  It is akin to paying a building contractor to construct a cage around you.  The same with the technology.  Owning it makes you subject yourself to continuous monitoring and perhaps much worse.  The federal government didn’t build a $50 billion facility for the collection of electronic data and phone transmissions in Ogden, Utah for nothing.

So the suggestion here is to “wean” yourself off of the technology that can monitor you and perhaps even lead to a totalitarian government tracking and scooping you up.  Use your equipment, but don’t allow your equipment to use you, or yourself to be used by it.  Don’t allow your tools to be the tools someone else employs.  Everything can “morph” in an instant and life as we know it come to a screeching halt.  It is better to prepare every day and be “wrong” in the eyes of others for 364 ¼ days out of the year than to not prepare for one day and be “right” when the bottom falls out.  Protect yourself from your own equipment, and keep it from monitoring you.  Don’t let it become a situation that turns into the phrase, “You can check out any time you like…but you can never leave.”

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

What To Do When You Have to Prep on the Fly

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empty shelves wikimediaPreppers who are truly diligent and committed have little to fear. They’re ready to tackle almost any disaster you can think of, be it natural or man-made. Truth be told, the only thing a dedicated prepper is really afraid of, is not being prepared. Unfortunately it can it happen to the best of us.

There are plenty of reasons why you, a person who is otherwise fully aware of how fragile society is, might not be prepared when a disaster strikes. Maybe you’re new to prepping and simply haven’t had the time to get started. Or perhaps you used to be well prepared, but haven’t been able to maintain your preps for financial reasons (here are 30 prepper items you can find at the Dollar Store). Or you might just be out-of-town and away from your preps when disaster strikes. Whatever the case may be, you need to know what to do when you have to prep on the fly. By that I mean you’re going to have to race over to the nearest stores in your neighborhood and buy up everything you need, as fast as you can (which is pretty a much a prepper’s worst nightmare).

Prepare for any disaster with this best-selling survival guide

Start Pooling Resources With Family and Neighbors

If you’re completely unprepared for an impending disaster, your highest priority will be finding other people who are in a similar predicament, such as friends, family, and neighbors. The more people you have working together, the more successful you will all be. As well, by combining forces, you can also combine supplies to help see each other though. As a side note, depending on what type of disaster you’re dealing with, it will probably be a good idea to start pulling cash out of your bank account, if that’s still possible.

Next, you will all need to start gathering supplies. Preppers do what they do to avoid this exact situation, but you won’t have a choice. You’ll have to wade through the mob of anxious people who are also trying to gather supplies at the last-minute. Plan for a worst-case scenario and concentrate your efforts on finding shelf stable foods. Societal breakdowns can quickly occur and happen when you least expect – even in a grocery store full of unprepared individuals – so know what you’re walking into. Before you read any further, I’d suggest you look up how to escape mob violence, how to blend in, and how to spot people who may be concealing a weapon.

Get Organized

Before you go out and brave the crowds, take an inventory of what you and any neighbors who will be riding out the disaster with you have. For a complete list of items that you will need to stay prepared, click here. Chances are, you will be able to eliminate a few items off your list. Going out to gather supplies under these conditions is going to be scary, which is why it’s important to find other people to work with. You’ll want every able-bodied person to be assigned to look for a specific type of item, such as food, tools, fuel, medical supplies, etc., and preferably you won’t have anyone venturing out alone. If possible, a minimum of two people should be working together at all times for efficiency and safety.

Avoid the Frantic Crowds

As for where to go looking for supplies, you’re going to have to think smarter than the mob to avoid the worst of the mob. Have you ever heard someone say “when the zombie apocalypse happens, I’m just going to raid the gun store and then head over to the grocery store to pick up everything I need?” Remember that, because that’s the kind of thinking most people are going to have.  They’re going to head straight towards the most obvious places and pick them clean before you get there. If you plan on going out, try getting to the stores as soon as they open so that you can avoid crowds as much as possible.

Granted, if you live right next to a grocery store you should be able to get there while the getting is good. Otherwise, start thinking about the stores that aren’t so obvious. By that I mean convenience stores, drug stores, mom and pop shops, and what have you. Other stores you might want to hit up include hardware stores, pharmacies, gardening stores, liquor stores, and gas stations. Again, avoid the big box stores if you can, and focus on the lesser known spots that are second or third on the list for frantic spree buyers and looters.

Finding less obvious solutions to your needs is the name of the game here. When you reach one of these stores, what do you see? Are they all out of toilet paper? Fine. See if they still have binder paper. Are they running out of canned foods? See if they still have dog food. This isn’t the kind of situation where you can afford to be picky or squeamish. You need to find as many vital supplies as you can, and fast.

Have an Alternative Mode of Transportation

You’ll also need to figure out how you’re going to get to any of these stores. If you live in the city, it would probably be wise to forget about driving. In all likelihood the streets will be far too congested, so consider investing in a bicycle or motorbike for ease through high traffic. As well, walking to your destination is going to be your best bet. Unfortunately that means you won’t have a vehicle to carry your supplies. You might have to steal a few shopping carts at some point. I know it’s wrong, but given the circumstances you can be forgiven for such a small transgression. As well, I would also recommend finding alternative routes to these stores.

And finally, if you have enough people working together, consider letting a few of them stay behind to protect everyone’s homes. Aside from fortifying and protecting these homes, these people should also be busy filling up bathtubs with water in case the taps stop working. With that said, make sure bleach is on your list of supplies, so that you can keep this water clean for the duration of the disaster.

As you can see, this isn’t a very pretty scenario. If anything, what I’ve listed above is the best case scenario for what you might have to do to survive. It’s just as likely that you’ll have to resort to some very unsavory measures to stay ahead of the herd. It’s best to avoid this situation entirely, and get prepared long before disaster strikes.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

20 Practical Ways to Use Bacon Grease

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bacon greaseBacon are little strips of heaven and always makes everything better, doesn’t it? My family recently bought half of a pig from a local farmer and guess what was eaten first? That’s right, the delectable bacon. But what about the leftover bacon grease? This happens to be one of the most thrown away items, but can serve more than one purpose. There are many ways to use this healthy animal fat and in our quest to be less of a throw away generation, it’s time we learn how this useful byproduct can be used.

Fats are one of the four main food sources that should be in your food pantry. Those who are prepper-oriented know of the important role that fats have in our nutrition, especially during times of emergencies.

  1. Fats are an essential component in any diet for proper vitamin absorption. Specifically, Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble, meaning they can only be digested, absorbed, and transported in conjunction with fats.
  2. Fats also plays a vital role in maintaining healthy skin and hair, insulating body organs against shock, maintaining body temperature, and promoting healthy cell function.
  3. They also serve as energy stores for the body.
  4. Fats are also sources of essential fatty acids, which are an important dietary requirement and also serves as a useful buffer towards a host of diseases. (Source)
  5. Fats are one of the 4 Things You Must Eat To Avoid Malnutrition.

As a southern girl, we always had bacon on the weekends and my mother would pour the fat into a metal grease collector and put in our fridge. When my mother needed to add some extra “flavor” to dishes, she would take a spoonful or two and add it turnip greens or to use for grandma’s famous biscuits. I could go on and on about how to cook with bacon grease (I did include a few in the list), but I know that you all probably know those secrets too. Instead, I wanted to share some more practical applications you can use bacon grease for. But first, you need to know how to properly store this animal fat.

To Store Bacon Grease:

2 pounds of bacon will create 3/4 cup-1 cup of bacon grease

grease crock

Reserve an old coffee tin or bacon grease crock and pour over a paper towel or strainer while it is hot to get out the little bacon bits. Lard will keep longer if you strain it because the meat bits are the first thing that will go rancid.

If you’re using a glass container to store bacon grease, allow the grease to cool before pouring it into the container so the glass will not to break  from the extreme temperature change. Some people have used coffee mugs to avoid this problem.

When the grease is cool it will be an off white to brown color depending on how the bacon was cooked and at what temperature.

Cover your container with a lid or plastic wrap to keep outside smells from flavoring your grease.  Many people claim that it can be kept indefinitely on the countertop but I keep mine in the fridge just to be sure. You can also freeze it for longer storage.

Bacon grease will last 6-9 months in your refrigerator or freezer.

20 Uses for Bacon Lard

Leftover bacon grease has many uses including a quick splinter removal or even making a quick candle (See how easy this is below). As well, consider these other additional uses for bacon grease.

  1. Those who are interested in natural living will be happy to know that it can also be used for biofuel. One a side note, if a vehicle was run solely on bacon grease, would that make it a bacon mobile? I kid, I kid; but if you plan on using lard for this, make sure the lard or grease is filtered to remove any bits of leftover food.
  2. Did you know that lard can be used as a preservation method? Many homesteaders swear by this method. Author, Carla Emery explains how to do this in her bestselling book, The Encyclopedia of Country Living.

    “The fat seals the air out… After slaughtering a hog, the fat was rendered into lard. Those cuts of the hog that were not cured for smoking, or made into sausage, like the shoulder, were fried. While still hot, these slices of pork steak were preserved through the winter by larding. In a large crock, layer on layer of the fried steaks was covered with hot lard. This meat was then used through the winter by scraping the lard off each layer. The amount necessary for a meal was removed and reheated. The used lard was reused in pies or other baking or cooking and ultimately for soap.”

  3. Make cookies just like grandma with these bacon fat ginger snaps.
  4. Reward your dog with homemade bacon flavored dog biscuits. Along those lines, you can also drizzle a little bacon grease in your dog’s food bowl and this will encourage Fido to eat his food.
  5. Season your skillet or your cast iron cookware.
  6. Make bacon gravy. Did you mom ever make cream gravy? All you need is some milk, flour and bacon grease and this will make your meal sing! Here’s a recipe you can use.
  7. Make a candle – Pour the bacon grease in a cup or can, and place a wick inside. Give the grease a few minutes to soak into the wick, and then place it in the fridge until it solidifies. Viola! You now have the best smelling candle that money didn’t buy (at least if you like the smell of breakfast).
  8. Bacon grease is a great substitution for butter. 1 tablespoon of bacon grease can be used in place of butter or oil in just about any recipe; and don’t even get me started on how delicious bacon grease is with sauteing potatoes!
  9. Make some handy firestarters for your next camping trip by dipping a cotton ball or a piece of tinder in the fat and storing it in an unused Altoids tin can. Voila! You could even use bacon grease that has accidentally been left out and gone rancid, to make the most of what you have.
  10. Who wouldn’t want to bathe themselves with some bacon soap? You can use just about any animal fat to make soap, including bacon grease.
  11. How about some tasty pemmican? This Native American superfood is made of fat (typically deer fat but any will do), jerky made from lean meat, and dried fruits and/or berries. You just ball up the ingredients in equal parts and tuck it away. Here’s a great recipe!
  12. If you’ve run out of your leather boot protectant and need a quick alternative, animal fat is the way to go! In fact, one of the secrets that backpackers have used to waterproof boots is with animal fats.
  13. Make a bird feeder! The Girl Scouts taught me this one. Take a pine cone and cover it with bacon grease and then sprinkle wild bird seed over it. This is a great craft you can do with your kids!
  14. Fix those squeaky hinges! Add a dollop of bacon grease to a rag and grease hinges. They should quiet down without a problem. This will also work on squeaky wheels!
  15. Trap bugs. You can trap annoying bugs by placing a plastic container of bacon grease and a bit of vegetable oil in a common bug area. The oil will be too thick for bugs to fly out of, trapping them for life.
  16. Moisturize your hands and heels. Cracked hands and heels can be very painful. Instead of Vaseline, rub some bacon grease on your heels. Apply a bit before bedtime, put on your socks and get cozy. In the morning, your feet will be brand new again and soft as ever. This is because animal fat contains vitamins A, D, K, and E.
  17. Grease your muffin, pie or cake pans. This will no doubt add just a touch of bacon flavor to your baked goods, but who wouldn’t want that?
  18. Stop boiling pots from overflowing. I just learned this handy little trick. By dropping a bit of oil or bacon grease into the pan when boiling pasta will help it not boil over.
  19. Take your sandwiches to the next level with baconnaise. Here’s the recipe. You’re welcome. You could even add a spoonful of bacon grease to condiments like ketchup or barbecue sauce to give it a little extra flavor.
  20. Pour used bacon grease into a tuna or cat food can, chill until firm, and wire the can to a tree to give your feathered visitors some food. Bacon grease may be gross to some of us, but it attracts bluebirds, crows, jays, ravens, starlings, woodpeckers and Carolina wrens.

Now that you know twenty more ingenious ways to use bacon grease, it’s time to get crackin’! This healthy animal fat is one of the most popular and one that adds the most flavor to any recipe. Best of all, it’s free with your bacon; so don’t let it go to waste!

How do you use leftover bacon grease?

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Trash to Treasure: 6 Everyday Items Will Be Worth Their Weight in Gold in an Emergency

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waterReadyNutrition Readers, we kicked off an article about metal bins and how to segregate different types of metals for future use.  Emphasis was placed on keeping the metals saved in their original forms, so as to be used in the original manner after forges/metal fabricators were down, post SHTF.  In light of this article, I wanted to touch on a few other avenues of recycling for the times following a collapse.  It is very important to improvise and just as important to learn how to “scrounge,” or gather supplies, so to speak.

Some Trash Will Be More Useful in a Long-Term Emergency

1. Plastic bottles and containers will be worth their weight in gold after an ELE/SHTF event.  For water, you can’t beat Gatorade or Powerade bottles in the 32-ounce size, the latter being my favorite for ergonomic reasons.  The bottles are extremely durable, and at a one-quart size, they are readily set up to decontaminate water.  Remember, with bleach it is 8 drops per gallon; therefore, 2 drops in a one-quart bottle.  They take a freeze really well, too.  Make sure you clean them up really well to remove the sugar from their former beverages.

Can you store water in them?  You bet you can.  Also, keep in mind that water weighs 7.6 lbs. per gallon.  That 5-gallon water can weighs just under 40 lbs., and it can be less cumbersome to move it around even in an equal amount if you have that 5 gallons broken down into 20 Gatorade bottles.  Clean up a bunch of ‘em and store them in a cardboard box; they’ll be good for barter as well.

2. Ziploc bags can be scrubbed out and used again and again.  Remember: what you do now is good practice and training for later.  When electricity is gone, you’re going to need to find new and ingenious methods for preserving and storing your food and protecting it from pests.  Many people like to save their condiment packets from fast food restaurants and the grocery store.  This is good to stock up on as well.  If there’s no refrigeration, how long is a 32 (sorry, they’re 30 ounces now) ounce mayonnaise jar going to last in the summer?  But you can take one of those big plastic “barrels” with snap-on lid and fill them up with condiment packets that can be used as one serving.

3. Paper plates and plasticware – It may not seem important, but the small comfort items will help you get through the tough times.  Save your plastic flatware: forks, knives, and spoons.  What harm is it to place them in a cardboard box and forget about them?  You’ll get use out of them.  Paper plates are not so easy to recycle, but it is good to have a good supply of them on hand.  Same with napkins from those restaurants and grocery stores.  Throw them in gallon Ziploc bags and save them up: for napkins, for backup toilet paper, for fire starter, and plenty of other uses.

4. Soda bottles – Two-liter soda bottles are excellent for storing water, as well.  Clean them up really thoroughly to remove all of the sugared soda before putting your water into them.  Plastic grocery bags are worth saving.  If you followed earlier articles that I wrote on how to set up a home “aid station/hospital,” and how to disinfect water, you’ll remember that a portable toilet is priceless for your preps.  The bucket/pail can be lined with these plastic grocery bags, and the waste taken and burned later.  [Remember, this is post- SHTF].

5. Food containers that come from the grocery store for things such as macaroni salad or potato salad are (on many occasions) just as reliable and sturdy as Tupperware.  After you’re done with the contents, scrub and sanitize them.  Even if you don’t need them now, don’t worry, you’ll need them later, either for yourself or to barter with.  The same holds true with plastic and glass food jars.  You’ll have to gauge them according to your needs and what you think will be practicable later on.

6. Newspaper and telephone books are always useful as fire starting material, and also for insulating material (vs. cold, or heat) in many projects.  Glass is worth saving, as well, especially anything by Pyrex or Corning that can be heated to a high temperature.  Use your imagination.

Read more about 50 ways to re-use your trash

While none of us at ReadyNutrition are advocating or advising “dumpster diving” (you have to check with your local laws and codes first before pursuing such activities), you can often find many valuable materials for construction: wire mesh, lumber, plywood, siding, nails, screws, and other hardware.  It is a mindset that needs to be developed.  It is a form of recycling, and you’re saving money and obtaining something useful for your supplies.

Recycling and scrounging are two skills it would behoove you to develop prior to a collapse.  It is part of our legacy as hunter-gatherers to be able to seek things we need in an opportunistic manner.  We welcome any and all comments, and hope you will take the time to share your own experiences and adventures in these matters.  Until next time, happy “hunting,” and may each day help to hone your skills for the times to come!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

8 Powerful Liberty Quotes That Will Inspire You To Live Free

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freedom-in-the-shape-of-a-crossBy Joseph Jankowski

Within the United States today, we see ever increasing bureaucracy with a strong stranglehold on the personal liberties which we are supposed to believe we are in total possession of.

With the rise of the police state, NSA spying, and extremely dangerous executive orders, America has fallen in many of the metrics that rank countries based on their level of freedom.

The American way of life that once looked at government as an entity which the people should avoid being parasitic to, and as an institution that should remain as small as possible, has gone completely to the wayside.30

A profound example of how large the U.S. federal government has grown is the fact that the Department of Health and Human Services is set to spend over $1 trillion in 2016. That is just one agency out of hundreds.

Our once free society now labors to pay off big government.

In America today, it is those who cherish freedom who are labeled as dangerous.

According to this Department of Defense manual, people concerned with “individual liberties, states’ rights, and how to make the world a better place” are potential extremists.

Freedom is under siege in America.

Of course, the only way to turn this around and restore our liberties is to get motivated.

Here are 8 liberty quotes that will surely get you in the spirit to live free:

6dc591cd1c8398ea949c07c9e0101d7af06d423e86371fa295214255a475bab4858e2d4e0f97a759cf91d4e4129fa6c8EmilysQuotes.Com-inspirational-great-liberty-freedom-George-Washington4a57db361090221ecb7fe62bbe2361c3Benjamin-Franklin-Quotes-On-Liberty-And-Security-1Lew-Rockwell

 quote-people-willing-to-trade-their-freedom-for-temporary-security-deserve-neither-and-will-benjamin-franklin-54-46-44

 

 

 

Joseph Jankowski is a contributor for PlanetFreeWill.com. His works have been published by recognizable alternative news sites like GlobalResearch.ca, ActivistPost.com and Intellihub.com

Follow Planet Free Will on Twitter @ twitter.com/PlanetFreeWill

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

4 Daily Strengthening Exercises That Will Push You to the Limit

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FITNESSReadyNutrition Readers, hopefully the icicles on the edge of the roof are melted down and the snowfall has stopped wherever you live.  It’s time: emerge from the cavern of winter hibernation!  Come forth, my fellow patriots and survivalists…come forth!  Emerge from that winter slumber, for spring is about here, and it is time to lose all those lipids from the long winter’s rest!  Yawn, stretch, and put on those sweats and t-shirts!  Time to get back into shape!

See How You Stack Up Against The WW2 Fitness Test

The Many Benefits Exercise Has on the Body and Mind

On a serious note, exercise is one of the most important things that you can do.  You don’t have to be a world-class, Olympic athlete…just think as if you’re one, and use those positive thoughts to push yourself to make gains.  Many guys and gals out there have some physical problems that may limit you; therefore, you’ll have to tailor-make your individual program to accommodate your needs and limitations.  Consult with your doctor prior to undertaking any fitness regimen and see if it meets with his/her approval.

Incidentally, the doctor can be a big help if you have a condition such as hypoglycemia or diabetes…they can find out just what your blood sugar levels are, and give sound guidelines to your limits.  The goal of an exercise regimen is to “train and don’t strain,” so first and foremost do not exacerbate your condition.  Check with them to see what is the best course of action.

That being said, the benefits of good exercise are manifold.  Working out lowers the triglyceride levels of your bloodstream.  Exercise strengthens your muscles and your heart (which is a muscle), as well as improving your circulation.  Losing weight and getting in tone will give you many physical and psychological advantages for when the SHTF and also just in the normal course of your day.

Weights are great.  I lift hard and regularly, and my program pushes me to my limits.  Weights are not the sole thing you can use to get in shape, by any means.  Calisthenics are simple, effective, and they aren’t expensive.  Let’s cover some of them that you can use for starters.

Four Daily Strengthening Exercises You Can Do At Home

Push-ups

They strengthen the arms and the pectoralis muscle group.  They are a winner.  Women in the service do them using the knees as the base of their triangle, as they have less volume of pectoralis muscles there, as well as the breasts to contend with.  This is just fine, and you gals do not fret it: you’ll see the results in a short time.  The key is a good, straight, rigid body position, and extend fully on both the upward and downward motion, going “all the way to the ground” with the latter.  These push up bars are great for freestyle. Variations include incline push-ups (where your feet are resting elevated slightly), wide-armed push-ups, and the diamond push up.  These latter three develop the pectoralis in-depth and breadth, the shoulders, and the triceps (respectively).  Start at your own pace…3 sets of 10, for example, and work your way up.

Sit-ups

These are for the abdominal muscles and the hip-flexor muscle group of the thighs.  You may need to hook the instep of your feet beneath something first.  There are plenty of contraptions out there that enable it to be done with the contraption hooked to the bottom of a door frame.  Ensure you interlace your fingers and place your hands behind your head.  Start from a sitting position, and go smoothly to the ground as one unit, and then return to the sitting position.  Again, start out with 3 sets of 10 and increase your sets and reps gradually.

Flutter kicks

Lay flat upon your back with your palms facing downward and the backs of your hands underneath of your buttocks.  Start with both feet (the heels) about 3-4 inches from the ground.  Then lift your legs alternating left then right, lifting to about a 45-degree angle and then returning it to hold about 3-4 inches from the ground.  This exercise is great for your abdominal muscle and your quadriceps (thighs).  Figure your own pace…start with 3 sets of 30 seconds and a minute to rest in between.

Dips

You can use two good, sturdy chairs for this one.  Place one chair in front of you.  You’ll have to measure accordingly.  Using the other chair, take a firm grip with both hands on the corners of the chair.  Then place your heels up on the other chair.  Be careful the first time you do this!  You want to make sure that when you raise yourself up by the arms, you are balanced and your heels are on the chair in front of you (the seat) firmly and securely.  Then raise yourself up for one repetition, and when you go down, the middle of your back should “dip” below the edge of the chair where your hands are braced.  This is excellent for the triceps muscles, as well as the rotator cuff of your shoulders.  The other variance (version) is to have a “U” shaped bar and do it from the front, while supporting your body’s weight entirely by your arms.  Again, start off small…3 sets of 10 will be more than enough if you’ve never done them.

These exercises will be able to be supplemented with a good jump rope, and also a heavy or speed bag and some bag gloves to practice with.  The reason I mentioned these calisthenics is that when I was in the Service, we used to do them even when we were in the field.  This prevented our muscles from any atrophy, as well as the aforementioned health reasons.  They can be done simply and effectively.  I strongly recommend a notebook to jot down what you are actually doing to help you monitor your progress and to make improvements.

Exercise is very important to keep in good physical shape, as well as mentally toughen you.  Innumerable studies have proven that those who are in good physical shape are able to withstand disasters, sicknesses, and the trials of daily life much better mentally than those who are not in good shape.  You must view your body as a piece of the puzzle for your readiness and preparation.  Good diet (high proteins and low fats) is essential, as well as getting the proper amount of rest and recovery time.  In the end, you will be the winner when you develop a winning program that enables you to excel.  You guys and gals are winners now: get in good shape, train hard, smart, and safe, and keep up that good fight!

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Make a Powerful Bow in Your Garage for $15

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arrow target wikimedia

One of the benefits of archery is that in the long run, it’s not a very expensive hobby. Unlike firearms, you don’t need to spend an arm and a leg on ammunition to maintain your proficiency. And since bows aren’t as loud or destructive as firearms, there’s a good chance that you won’t need to pay to visit an archery range unless you live in the city. Your backyard would be sufficient for that.

However, there can be some steep up front costs. Still not as bad as the cost of a firearm in most cases, but a really high quality bow can you set you back. If you’re just starting to get interested in archery and you’re not sure if you want to commit to those costs, check out the video below. It’ll show you how to make a very powerful and effective bow with little more than PVC, paracord, and driveway markers.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Post-Collapse Bartering: This Overlooked Item Will Be a High Commodity

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post collapse metalHey there, ReadyNutrition guys and gals!  Hope you’re all seeing a bit of thawing out now that spring is about to arrive.  This article is about some suggestions and reasons to start saving some metal for yourselves.  We welcome any comments and suggestions that you guys and gals have that entail the way you do this.  Some of you probably have your own anvils and a forge all built, ready to craft those broadswords and horseshoes.  This article is just to get those started on the idea who are at the other end of the spectrum.

With a complete societal collapse, the value of a simple thing such as a tin can will increase exponentially.  And why not?  The large steel plants of Pittsburgh and so forth may either be glowing radioactive craters or simply not functioning.  There are many things that we view as trash today and take for granted in our daily lives, but will have inestimable value when the SHTF.  We will outline some of the uses toward the end of the article for the different types of metals.

               JJ’s rule with metals: Save the metal in its original form

Steel food cans can be stripped of their labels, washed out, and allowed to air dry.  Put them in a bin.  Group your metal bins by type of metal.  You can further subdivide this category into form/function of the particular type of metal.  Aluminum beverage cans are another.  Try to get the can “whole,” that is, undented or uncrushed.  Keeping them in their original size and shape lends them more uses.  Aluminum beverage cans can be rinsed out and air dried as well.

How about silverware/flatware?  Imagine all of the good barter value that forks, spoons, and knives will have when they are not able to be obtained anymore.  Metal coat hangers are a keeper…they should have their own bin, all to themselves; and let’s not forget copper.  On this, it is good to save it in its original form.  Why?  You can always modify it later, but it is ready-made, for its original purpose!

Here is a chart you can use for the melting points of your metals:

Melting Points of Various Metals

 

  Melting Points
Metal Fahrenheit (f) Celsius (c)
Aluminum 1218 659
Brass 1700 927
Bronze 1675 913
Cast Iron 2200 1204
Copper 1981 1083
Gold 1945 1063
Lead 327 163
Magnesium 1204 651
Nickel 2646 1452
Silver 1761 951
Steel 2500 1371
Tungsten 6150 3399
Wrought Iron 2700 1482
Zinc 787 419

 

Try and concentrate on metals that are not painted or coated over with enamel or Teflon.  These are best left to some scrap metal dealer, not for you to deal with.  Iron and lead…. old cast iron pots and pans…. lead in the form of old curtain-corner weights, or lead from used batteries.  Make a bin for each metal and set it aside.

Some uses for what we have covered?  Take large, steel coffee cans or large food cans, for example.  You can make an excellent, small camp oven out of these, or fill them with cement and make a boat anchor out of them.  The aluminum beverage cans?  These are the early warning devices you can string up on your property with nylon line.  Punch holes in the bottom to allow for water drainage, and put a dozen pebbles in them.  They’re aluminum; therefore, they won’t rust.

Steel cans can be cleaned out well and be used for fish hooks, or coils of very-sharp, homemade/field-expedient “razor” wire for lining your windowsills with when the SHTF.  They can also be used (depending on the size) for small “cookers,” or even cooking “pots” if that is what remains to you.  You can make broad heads, spear points, or knives out of them.

  Remember:  All of these items can be used for barter, so use your imagination.

The most versatile are the coat hangers.  You can make almost anything out of them: handles and hooks for use on a campfire, skewers to roast fish, and a form of field-expedient wire, or fastener.  They can be unraveled to unclog drains, sinks, or toilets.  Their uses are only limited by the imagination.  They can even be used to hang clothes, hence their name “clothes hangers,” right?  Seriously, they are really great.

The bottom line is that all of these things that appear to not be worth much may appreciate in value.  If you can make a little space, allocate some bins and make a good metal collection.  Whether you’re going to make a new snare to trap game with or a new pot to melt shavings/pieces of soap with, you can find a use for these metals.  Long after the plants stop producing these metals, you may have a supply to work with for your needs for many years to come…after the SHTF.  Have a good one, and happy metal-gathering!

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Urban Survival: When the Cities Fall Apart, These Strategies Will Keep You Alive

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 Collectively speaking, there are many of us who have been preparing for emergencies for a while and have read our fair share of prepper fiction and watched enough apocalyptic thrillers to know that the higher the population density, the more dangerous it is. As well, when resources like food and fuel have to be transported from outside the city limits, then your survivability rate lessens. So what about those who have to live in the city? Should they just stop prepping all together? Would they stand a fighting chance at surviving?

According to the last census, 80.7 percent of the U.S. population lives in urban areas. In fact, many choose to live the higher populated areas because of better paying jobs and better schools located in the city. So the probability of a shtf event happening while you are in the city is likely. As well, because many commuters spend a large majority of their time away from their homes, I recommend having these 20 items on hand to get you back home.

In an interview by Rory from The Daily Coin, he asked me in an interview if it is possible to live out a shtf scenario in an urban setting. The answer is yes, but for a majority of us, we must ask ourselves if we are up to the challenge. Because while I do believe someone could get by in an urban setting, it could prove to be more challenging for the Average Joe.

Urban Survival – Is It Even Possible?

If you are forced to stay in the city after a disaster occurs, all is not lost. I do believe urban survival is possible, but you may need to get creative. Ultimately, being able to survive in an urban setting during a major ordeal depends on multiple factors: specifically, the type of disaster, if basic infrastructure is still up, where you are located, what you have with you and your skill sets. Moreover, I believe that whether you are surviving in an urban setting or a rural one, you need the same things for survival: food, water, shelter, protection (sound familiar?). The difference is you will need to rely more on your skills and ingenuity in finding opportunities to use to your advantage in a post-disaster city. In both scenarios, rural and urban survivors will also have to find a way to carry on for long durations. That is, when your short-term reserves are tapped out, what’s your long-term plan?

Above all, the population density will be your greatest threat and your resources will quickly be depleted. If you are not familiar with Selco’s story from SHTFSchool.com, he survived in an urban setting and tells his story and shares ways that he and others survived on his website. Some of the critical needs he outlines are:

Food – No city can feed it’s people on its own and when the supply trucks stop running, supplies will quickly be depleted. It is wise to have food on hand. I outlined 25 must-have versatile foods for your pantry.

As well, I highly recommend storing a variety of heirloom seeds. These can be to grow sprouts for emergency nutrition and for gardens for long-term food sources. You could also plant edible flowers. Not only will they be lovely to look at, but they will provide sustenance when you need it the most. Alternatively, if you can locate food packing plants or warehouses in your city, that may be a good place to allocate additional food reserves if yours runs out. This article can provide information on foraging for weeds.

Water – Municipal water sources can become tainted and it will be up to you to locate water sources. Water could look crystal clear and still contain very dangerous contaminants. – so avoid this all together and make sure you have some water stored away. Your skills will come in handy here if you are actively practicing how to survive. Here are five different ways to find water when there is none to be had. As well, consider having a map on hand of water sources in close proximity to you.

Fuel – Due to so many who are getting out of dodge and leaving the city, the fuel stores will quickly be depleted. As well, this could be problematic for running your generators. Many preppers prefer to have some alternative fuel on hand, or even biomass briquettes. Make sure you follow the proper safety guidelines for storing fuel, especially those who live in apartments.

Many suggest solar panels as a good power alternative. While I like this idea, I think it can also draw unwanted attention, so further security measures should be put in place to hide the solar panels from view.

Power – The failure of the power grid will prevent things from getting back to normal. When the majority of the population realize things aren’t going to change any time soon, and the above listed items aren’t available, there will be breakdowns to the level of social collapse. Many feel this very reason is why it’s important to be ready to bug out on a moment’s notice. If you are caught in this, it could be very dangerous.

What You Will Be Up Against

While it is entirely possible to survive in the city, you need to know what you will be up against. I realize that I am painting a very bleak picture, but those who stay behind and choose not to bug out are either under prepared, trapped in the city or have enough skills and know-how to make it on very little stored resources. The latter will not be the majority. Therefore, be prepared for roaming gangs, thugs and desperate individuals who have resorted to a more primal version of themselves. They will do what they need to in order for their needs to be met. If they haven’t eaten in days, they will smell your food from miles away, so you need to know how to mask the smells of your food or you could be welcoming unwanted visitors whose primary focus is to take what you have.

Security will be crucial in surviving in an urban setting and having a group you can depend on will make it all the more secure. Many neighbors and friends living in close proximity will band together and help to fortify the homes or find a suitable location in a higher location so you can get a bird’s-eye view of the scenery.  One aspect that the city offers is a plethora of building materials to use for fortifying a home. If you start looking for fortifying plans now, you will have a better idea on what materials you will need. I also cannot stress how important it is to have a means of protecting yourself. If someone kicks in your door, they aren’t only looking for a cup of sugar. Having a firearm and knowing how to use it could make all the difference in the world.

As well, having a keen grasp on communication skills with your group to ensure your perimeter is safe and make sure you will have alerts to possible threats. Communication is key and you should have multiple forms of communication, especially if a family or group member ends up being separated. One of the greatest threats we all face in cities are terrorist attacks. They target highly populated cities with dirty bombs and chemical weapons, and what we saw in Brussels that is can happen in peaceful cities, as well. Today it was Brussels. Where will it be the next time they hit America? Protecting yourself is the only option to ensuring your family has what it needs, including gas masks to gauge against chemical and biological attacks.

Start Finding Ways to Think Outside of the Box:

As I mentioned previously, to survive in a post-disaster urban setting, you will need to get creative in the way you work problems. Nothing should be wasted and everything could be used. Trash lying around can be repurposed and fashioned into something more useful. As well, start reading resources that can help you in your future preparations. The following books have great information on this type of survival.

SAS Urban Survival Handbook

The Prepper’s Blueprint

Where There’s a Will, There’s a Way

The human species has always found way to survive and times aren’t all that different. In order to thrive in an urban environment, you need to be aware of what’s stacked against you: the lack of resources, possible threats, roaming gangs and violence. If you can change your line of thinking, utilize key skill sets and become more fluid with the problem, your odds improve.

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Hobby Homesteading: 3 Backyard Livestock Breeds Every Home Should Have

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backyardhomesteadGiven the state of our economy, many suburbanites and rural homeowners are resorting to raising their own small livestock in order to slash their budgets and provide food essentials for their family. Because of this increase in suburban homes keeping livestock, many are taking a stand against HOAs to change their intolerant policies on no livestock in the neighborhood. Regardless, if prices continue to escalate on basic food necessities like eggs, meat and dairy, we will be left with no choice but to raise our own.

Getting Started

Purchasing livestock for the first time, whether you are in suburbia or are a rural homeowner is both a nerve-wracking and an exciting adventure. I prefer to start with “trouble-free” breeds that are hearty and can, for the most part, take care of themselves. Of course, when you first start raising livestock, it can be overwhelming and dare I say nerve-wrecking to say this least. When I first started caring for my chickens and rabbits, I was afraid that I would make detrimental mistakes. But, like everything in life, there is a slight learning curve, good people to help and eventually the confidence to continue on. I recommend doing ample amounts of research. Find out about shelter sizes, how many animals would be best for providing for your family, how to care of them and what supplies you will need. I highly recommend “The Backyard Homestead: Produce all the food you need on just a quarter acre!” It’s a great primer for getting started and using the most of the space you have.

Favorite Breeds for Hobby Homesteaders

It goes without saying, but finding livestock that are relatively quiet and will not disturb neighbors is ideal when living in close proximity with others. Quiet livestock choices like quail, guinea pigs and rabbits are ideal in this case. As well, many backyard homesteaders choose small breeds that are easy to care for and require minimal upkeep. Micro-livestock, such as chickens, quail, guinea pigs, ducks and rabbits are, by far, the most popular livestock breeds amongst new homesteaders simply because they are the easiest to care for and require less space, and less food. In exchange, the animals provide your family with meat, eggs and rich manure for the garden.

Here are some excellent points on the great exchange small livestock provide:

  • More nutritionally dense food.
  • Better feed conversion (amount of feed it takes to make one pound of animal).
  • Small breeds are less expensive to purchase and produce much more per pound of animal.
  • Small backyards are not an issue with small breed animals.
  • Your livestock can also help you to prevent things from going to waste that would normally be thrown out, such as vegetable peels and scraps, leftovers, and stale bread.
  • If you plan on butchering your livestock for food, the butchering time is minimal and the blood and bones of the animals make blood and bone meal which are excellent soil amendments.

There are many homesteaders who recommend goats as a beginner livestock choice, but there are some challenges you will face and goats are not suited to live in smaller yards like those found in suburbia. As well, many neighborhoods frown upon pigs, even the smaller breeds like the American Guinea Hog because they destroy the yards. So I prefer to stick with the breeds below. Here are some ideal small breed choices and some future reading you can do to familiarize yourself with the breed before purchasing.

 Chickens:

Which Kind of Chicken Breed Is Best For Your Backyard Flock?

Homemade Chicken Treats

10 Foods You Should Not Feed Your Chickens

Quail:

Why You Should Consider Quail For the Urban Homestead

Sustainable Farming: Starting a Quail Flock

Raising Quail

 Rabbits:

The Complete Guide to Raising Rabbits

Expert Advice for Breeding Rabbits

Raising Kits to Harvest

Recently, I suggested some easy strategies to get you motivated to start a small homestead in your backyard. Hobby homesteading can easily be transitioned into sprawling suburban neighborhoods provided you find livestock that are small and relatively quiet. While chickens may not conform to certain noise ordinances in neighborhoods, rabbits and quail would be a wonderful alternative.

What to Feed Livestock

To live in a self-reliant manner, you want to look at this project as a big cycle: You want to grow food to feed your animals, who in turn will provide eggs and/or meat for your family, as well as, manure for your garden. Many backyard homesteaders prefer growing their own feed so they know the animals are consuming high-quality nutrients and avoiding chemicals, pesticides, and antibiotics. Knowing some natural sources to feed your livestock will need to be researched, but can drastically cut down on the animal feed bill. If you plan on growing your livestock’s food sources, look at this article for more direction. As well, you’d be surprised that seeds like sunflowers are feed favorites for small livestock that chickens and goats.

I had a lot of success with a small flock of chickens and three rabbits. I have had a few issues with predators, but once I understood how the predators got into the cage, the issue was resolved. I have an overflowing amount of organic manure composting in my yard and should be able to use it for my spring garden. As well, when spring time comes, the eggs will be overflowing and will be able to make some foods made with eggs. I even plan on expanding these homesteading products (at the hesitancy of my husband). I love that we have livestock and feel better knowing we have fresh food sources if the economy continues to decline.

If you already have some livestock in your backyard, leave some helpful advice or tips you have learned along the way for the beginners!

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

9 Steps Preppers Should Take to Mentally Prepare For a Major Disaster

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mantraAs I sit here, ReadyNutrition Readers, I am indulging in some Nacho Cheese Doritos, the “breakfast of champions.”  There is no point: I’m just sharing with you.  But even if you don’t like them, perhaps you will enjoy the tips I present in this article to help with the way in which you relax.  I have found that it is necessary to clear your mind and focus when you are preparing for a significant event, as well as after the event occurs.  There are several elements to performing this, and they can be used for just about anything you may face.Events that occur suddenly and without warning are a little harder to prepare for, and some of them not at all.  Stress is something that can build up to a degree that renders you incapable of doing anything, if you do not learn how to deal with it.  I must also add that the better shape you’re in (proper diet, exercise, and rest), the better you’ll be able to deal with whatever comes your way.  These are things that I do, things I have done when in the military and since.  They’re not hard and fast rules, and you can refine them to suit your own needs.

Depending on your schedule you will want to explore ways to meditate and times to conduct your sessions.  This will enable you to train yourself to be able to go into “relaxation” mode on command, when you so decide.  Here are the main elements:

A Quiet Place

This element makes all the difference in the world.  A quiet, comfortable place is good to remove you from stressors and distractions and enable you to succeed.  The requirement is it needs to be a place where you are comfortable and not disturbed.  A park, a favorite room, or a place in the woods are a few suggestions.

Time

This is going to vary, and it will change.  The variance will depend on the upcoming event, and how soon it is going to occur.  You may have three hours before a grueling marathon, and yet you may only need 15 minutes to relax and clear your mind.  With time, the change may be that you only need 5 minutes.

Now you have your quiet place and the time you need.  Here is what you can do, keeping in mind these things have helped me greatly on deployments:

  1. Sit in your chosen quiet place in the most comfortable position possible (laying down, sitting back, or sitting cross-legged, for example.
  2. Consciously allow your muscles to loosen up and physically relax them
  3. Breathe in deeply and exhale slowly: nothing forced, just try to introduce some regularity in it.
  4. Focus your eyes upon a stationary object that is “tranquil” and non-moving
  5. Clear your mind, yet think briefly about what it is that you face. What you are doing is imprinting the event and making it more harmless in your mind.
  6. Allow your eyes to close, focusing upon your breathing, and regulating it
  7. Think positive thoughts: that you will overcome the upcoming challenge
  8. Minimize the challenge: tell yourself that (even if it is not good) it is not so great that you cannot overcome it.
  9. When you feel ready, end the session and stand up slowly

Taking these steps before you face something will help you prepare to clear your mind.  Your stress will diminish, and your performance will increase.  You’ll handle things better.  With time and practice, this simple meditation process can be trimmed to be done in about 5 minutes, and in this manner you can face challenges in a few hours in the same manner that you can face them with several days or weeks to prepare.

After an event, do the same thing, focusing not on what happened but on what is in front of you.  Sometimes a soothing beverage or water can help you before or after, however, do not partake of it until after you have meditated without it.  The reason for this is you will divert your focus to the beverage instead of preparing for what is going to occur/what occurred.  Focus on the task at hand.

It takes practice, and I have found that doing this twice a day – once when you awaken, and once just before you go to sleep – helps immensely with developing your techniques and making them more effective.  It is a developed skill and requires practice, but it can take a big “bite” out of what happens both before and after the event.  These things can make it easier on you in the long-term.  Any comments or suggestions you wish to add from your own experiences will be appreciated and valued, and I look forward to them.  Rest up, and have a good day!

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Essential Emergency Protocols For Family Members Who Are Apart

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talking to families with communications are downReadyNutrition Readers, this piece is designed to give to you some methods that work that will make your daily travel more secure.  To and from work, school, or running errands, it is important for you and your family to know where each one is, what you’re doing, and when you’re due back home.  Rest assured, it is designed to give you a format so that you can look out for one another on a daily basis or when the world takes a nosedive.

By performing these steps on a daily basis, you will be practicing for an emergency, whether temporary or apocalyptic in nature.  I’m not advising you to do anything that I do not have in place.  It does take for granted that you and your family members get along, or even if you do not, that you care for one another enough to set aside your differences when it all goes down.  Should that not be the case, this is something you will need to address on your own and it runs beyond the scope of this article.

Communication is Key

So, what does this mean?  From a practical perspective, keep in mind that my wife and I live in Montana, which is different in terms of geography and climate from many areas.  You must take these suggestions and tailor them to fit your locale.  In Montana, especially during the winter time, if you do not take certain precautions just driving to and from work (when you’re out in the boonies, as we are) and the vehicle breaks down?  You can die.  Cell phones (if you use them, and we do not) have a limited range, and can prove unreliable in a catastrophe.  Regarding vehicles, Triple-A will not go out when a snowstorm is dumping 2 feet on you.  The temperatures here can go from 32 degrees Fahrenheit to below zero in no time.

Take it seriously if your loved one is late checking in.

First things first.  When my wife goes off to work, and I’m home, I have her call me when she gets in.  We know the exact time that it takes for her or me to cover the distance.  If she’s late, I give it ½ hour, and then I call.  If she hasn’t arrived, I suit up and prep my vehicle, and give it another ½ hour.  I then call again, and if she’s not there, I’m on the road at about 10 mph, all the way in, scanning both sides of the road for her.

Have multiple forms of communication on hand.

We also have radios, and even with interrupted line of sight, they have a range of about 50 miles.  I have recommended the Yaesu models in previous articles, as they can be used either as a ham radio or as a long-range handheld during emergencies.  Yes, in an EMP (to address the observant concerns), the radios would be paperweights.  JJ, however, has two sets: one for use, and the other set in Faraday cages.  We’ll see what happens, but it follows my personal EMP posture: you need two of each electronic item, and one has to go into a cage.  You can use Motorola’s and CB radios, but the range is limited due to line-of-sight limitations.  If you all live together, a good base radio for the house is worth its weight in gold.

Be ready to bug out on the fly.

We have all covered enough info on “go” bags/Bug-Out bags (I call them “A” bags) to know there must be one in each vehicle with the basics: food, ammo, fire-starting equipment and materials, spare clothing, first-aid supplies, flashlight, a good knife, and a weapon of some kind.  This is a good list to go by. During the winter, we each have a military issue extreme cold weather bag with Gore-Tex cover packed away in a compression bag and then an Army-issue wet weather bag.

For signaling, I highly recommend several road flares for the vehicle.  They also make excellent fire starting devices when needed.  Supplement these with light sticks powered by batteries.  Obtain the ones that do multiple colors.  We’ll get to the reason shortly.  Supplement the light sticks with cyalume sticks/chem-lights to give you an edge if the batteries die.  For wintertime: stainless steel water bottles are the way to go, supplemented with an empty one-quart canteen and an Army issue canteen cup with “elephant ear” handles that fold in on itself.  The stainless steel bottles fill up ¾ of the way to allow for expansion if it freezes.  Then just place it over or near a fire, and the ice will melt to give you drinking water.  With the canteen cup, you can melt snow or ice to pack it in the one-quart for immediate use…not long-term, or it’ll freeze.

Keep your immediate needs in mind.

When it’s really cold here (-10 to -20 degrees Fahrenheit) we go out with Aladdin thermos bottles filled with hot water.  We wrap ‘em up in thick quilted towels and blankets and stick them in cardboard boxes filled with shredded newspaper that can double as fire starting material if need be.  The towels and newspaper further insulate the thermoses.  You’d be amazed at how good it is to have hot water if you need it immediately.  Another “goodie” are packets of food in thick Mylar that are ready to eat, or MRE’s if you do prefer them.  You can stuff these inside of your shirt and partially warm them up with your body heat, then crack them open and eat as you need them.

When Mrs. Johnson comes home, I’m there waiting to meet her, suited up and ready to hit the road if need be.  She calls me when she leaves work, and once again, we know the distance and time.  If the weather is pretty rough, the radios are on the whole way, and she gives me a position every couple of minutes, as well as a situation report…weather, traffic, obstacles.  When she makes her final approach, I use the light stick, as I ask her on the radio what color she sees and she tells me.  This lets her know that it’s me, and lets me know those headlights I see are hers.

It All comes Down to These Points

We also have prearranged signals in the event there is trouble.  Use your imagination and find what works best for you and your family.  There are just the two of us, so it’s a bit easier.  When there are many family members, it can become tough to juggle.  Bottom line: it’s all going to depend on how important it is to you.  Let’s summarize some of our main points and review.

  1. Travel with all of the supplies and equipment you need to match the locale and the season
  2. Have good radios and communication sets, and do not rely only on cell phones
  3. Signaling devices for nighttime use: flares, light sticks, chem lights, and flashlights
  4. Coordinate your movements: Who is leaving, and when, for what distance, to arrive when? Who is monitoring the travel and meeting them?
  5. Quick Response: When the family member runs into trouble, someone has to go out and get them.

Doing these simple things can help with your team-building skills as a family, and teach you how to coordinate such movements together.  It is a matter of individual and team discipline, and its success is going to depend on how dedicated you are to following the organizational framework and procedures that you put in place.  Get in some good practice now, while the time is right.  You will find that all of these things fall into place naturally when a true emergency surfaces.  This type of planning is just as important as garnering supplies, and it is a skill that requires practice, as it can become perishable when not used.  Keep up the good work, and help one another day by day.  That’s what it’s all about.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Forecasting an Economic Collapse: These 7 Indicators Are All You Need to Know

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 Good Day to you all, ReadyNutrition Readers.  This article is going to focus some key areas of the U.S. economy to keep an eye on to help you determine when it’s all going down the drain.  As we speak, the volatility of the markets (and especially commodities) are causing what is termed as “severe jitters” among traders and businesses.  That terming does not encompass what is happening…the underlying problems that amount to far more than a little “angst” in the business world.  We are talking hundreds of billions of dollars and an interrelated world economy that generates a ripple effect.

So how does this affect you?  In every way, it affects you.

The Baltic Dry Index (BDI) at the time of this writing is at 345.  This indicator measures the costs of resources and raw materials shipped worldwide.  As you probably are aware, the cost of a barrel of crude oil has been in decline since last year, with the price hovering around $30 per barrel currently.  The problem is with the oil companies and oil exploration and drilling firms.  Many of them are in default, and most in the red for the year.

Just the other day it was revealed that 47 American drilling firms filed for bankruptcy.  All of this is significant in every realm of the economy, and for you personally.  For a really good eye-opener on just how significant all of this is, I encourage you to read Tess Pennington’s article, “When the Trucking Stops,” to tie in all of these price fluctuations and contracts that cannot be exercised, causing a cessation in the flow of goods.

Macro- and Microeconomic Factors To Look At

So what, you may ask?  So there are a few things you can watch from a Macroeconomic perspective to give you the “heads up” on when things are really going into the end-game, and they are as follows:

  1. As mentioned, the BDI: the most accurate tool you can use, as these raw materials drive virtually every industry in the world.
  2. As mentioned, the price of crude oil per barrel…oil drives the world’s economies…and therefore drives the world
  3. Precious metals: what you’re looking for are a substantial rise or fall in the spot price per troy ounce…and also, concentrate on what the nations are doing…buying a lot or selling a lot of it
  4. T-Bills and Treasury securities: other countries buy our debt, such as Japan, China, and Great Britain. When countries begin to dump these securities and cash them out, it shows they either lack confidence in our money or in our economy.  Research will show that several nations have made large dumps within recent months
  5. S. Corporations relocating: recently, Coca-Cola’s main bottler announced a decision to move to Ireland, as did the firm Johnson Controls, to avoid the increases in taxes by the U.S. government…significant in the fact that the domestic tax base is reduced, as well as domestic manufacturing/production (in an already 80%-consumer-driven economy).
  6. Severe market volatility: this isn’t the regular “belching” of a few hundred points up or down…but major movements either all at once or successively over a period of days.
  7. Government-Instituted Cash Controls: A nationwide “bank holiday” and bank closures, directed by the Federal Government.  This also includes cash controls at the nation’s borders and airport terminals…this is a very late sign.  If you see this?  Then you need to batten down the hatches, because the storm is imminent.

Microeconomic factors are the ones you can more readily see in the immediate locale where you live.  The list is much longer, as there are an infinite amount of variables just as there are variances in geography and demographics that influence them.  Here are a few that you can use, always remembering to tie them into the macroeconomic factors for the complete picture.  Some are as follows (this list is by no means complete):

  • local businesses shutting down in large numbers
  • prominent local businessmen and leaders leaving the area/state
  • grocery stores and big-box stores bereft of necessities and inventory
  • the price of food and necessities rising astronomically
  • layoffs and unemployment notices locally
  • your local bank beginning to institute forms of rationing or checks/controls
  • an increasing amount of social unrest
  • cessation or severe curtailment of regular shipments of goods (food, gasoline, medicine)

Many of these things are beginning to be seen now, as the United States economy continues on its downward spiral.  By looking around you at the big picture as well as the snapshot in your immediate locale, you give yourself better odds at having a fighting chance to pull the plug at the right time.  Common sense and scrutinizing observations must go hand-in-hand.  Keep your eyes open, and keep up the good fight.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

What Should You Do When a Bear Attacks?

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grizzly bear wikimediaFor most people, pleasant thoughts don’t generally come to mind when bears are mentioned. At best they are pests that try to steal our food, and at worst they can be vicious killers. In reality, bears have an undeserved reputation. Of all the millions of people who visit the wilderness in North America every year, only a handful of them are actually killed by bears. You’re far more likely to be killed while driving to a state or national park, than you are to be eaten by a bear after you arrive. Even the grizzly bear, which is notorious for its viciousness and aggressive tendencies, is most likely completely uninterested in killing you.

But as we all know, not all bear encounters are that adorable. On occasion they do get violent with humans either because they are provoked, or because their victim accidentally surprised them while eating, or because they have cubs and are more protective than usual. Here’s what you can do to prevent such an encounter, as well as what to do if the situation turns ugly:

  • Make noise while you walk. Talk, sing, whistle, fill your pockets with change. For the most part, bears are afraid of humans and they will usually run if they hear you coming. Some people even wear bear bells that are purpose-built for this reason.
  • Don’t travel in bear country alone. The more people there are, the less likely you are to be attacked. If you are with 3 or more people, the odds that any of you will be attacked is practically nil.
  • Regardless, if you run into an aggressive bear, don’t flee. They’ll view you as prey if you do, and they can run twice as fast as the average human. Don’t think you can climb up a tree either, as they are very good climbers.
  • Try not to make eye contact, as this will only convince the bear that you want to fight. Instead, you should slowly walk backward and without letting the bear out of your sight.
  • If this doesn’t work, then the bear will probably charge at you. You should always stand your ground because most of the time, the bear is bluffing. It will probably charge and circle around, perhaps with the intent of bluff charging you again.
  • Throughout your encounter you should talk calmly to the bear. This not only shows that you’re human (and thus, not a part of its typical diet) but it also shows that you’re not a threat.

Now here’s where the rules change, and there’s some debate among experts as to what you should do. If at this point the bear intends to go on the attack, you have several choices to make. If it’s a black bear, which aren’t as aggressive, you should fight back. There’s a good chance that they’ll back off at some point. If it’s a brown bear, it’s usually recommended that you play dead since the odds of you winning that fight are very low, and fighting them will only increase their aggression. Lay down on your stomach, keep your backpack on, cover the back of your neck with your hands, and spread your legs so it’s harder for the bear to turn you over. The bear will most likely leave you alone once it realizes that you’re not a threat.

Of course, this is only a good idea 99% of the time. On extremely rare occasions, the bear fully intends to eat you from the start. If that’s the case, you should always fight back. So how can you tell the difference between a bear that wants to scare you away/disable you, and a bear that wants to eat you?

As a rule of thumb if you stumble onto a bear, it just wants to scare you away. This especially applies to female bears with cubs, and bears that are in the process of eating prey when you found them. However, if it stumbles onto you so to speak, you’re it’s lunch. If a bear tries attacking you while you’re in a tent, or is trying to stalk you, then you must fight back.

Obviously, anything you can use as a weapon is fair game. Knives, large sticks, rocks, and even your backpack can be swung at the bear. The most vulnerable spots are on its head. Aim for the eyes and the snout with whatever weapon you have. And unlike my previous advice, now is the time to scream and yell as loud as you can and make eye contact, which should intimidate the bear. Stamp your feet and make yourself look big by standing tall and holding your jacket open. And as horrifying as this might sound, if you’re out of options, you can always try to reach down the bear’s throat with your fist. Last year, a man who was being attacked by a grizzly did just that, and it managed to scare the bear off.

Now here’s where many of you might be thinking that if you were carrying a gun, you could just shoot the bear and it would never come to this. You may be right. It’s certainly possible to shoot and kill a bear, but ask yourself, are you a really really good shot with whatever you’re carrying? Are you still a good shot when you’re quaking with fear? Even if you hit the bear, it might not do you any good. If the shot doesn’t instantly kill or incapacitate the bear, it’s going to shrug it off and maul you.

Guns have been known to scare off bears with warning shots, and kill them when they attack, but bear mace is far more effective. Statistically speaking, you’re twice as likely to be injured by an aggressive bear when you use a gun, as opposed to bear mace. So keep that, everything else in mind the next time you’re in bear country.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Stock a Prepper Pantry

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 The overall goal of our emergency food pantry is to have a wide array of nutritious foods stored away in order to carry us through an emergency. In my book, The Prepper’s Cookbook, I wrote how firmly I believe in each household having an emergency food pantry. Whether those emergencies are from Mother Nature or if we have hit a rough patch in our lives, having food on hand will be less burdensome and will help free up money for other living expenses. The key is to a well-stocked pantry is to have lots of nutritious shelf stable foods at your disposal. Foods filled with lots of nutrition will carry you farther in an emergency than lots of junk foods.

The Meat and Potatoes of a Prepper Pantry

Over the years, I have made recommendations for the best types of foods to put in your pantry, how to save on emergency food stores by learning how to can and dehydrate your own food sources, as well as provided the best rules to go by when creating an emergency food pantry. Ideally, you want the food you put in those coveted pantry spots to be versatile and serve many uses.

I like to start with shelf stable basics like wheat berries, rice, an assortment of beans, dry milk powder, peanut butter, drink mixes, etc., and then add-on to my pantry with home canned and dehydrated foods. This creates layers of different types of short and long-term food stores and gives me more functionality in my pantry. Having layers of different food sources as coincides with the prepper rule of having back-ups for your back-ups. Here is a shopping list that first-timers can use to get a pantry started. Keep in mind this is for one person. If you have additional family members, use this calculator to add-on appropriately. Another way to add essential vitamins and nutrients to your food supply is to stock up on sprouting seeds. Inside these small biogenic (living) foods lies essential nutrients and vitamins that can assist in providing a good portion one’s daily requirement of nutrients. Sprouts can grow anywhere, during any season, and requires minimal work.

Where To Get Bulk Pantry Foods

As many of you know, preparedness is an investment and doesn’t always come cheap. One of the best places to buy bulk shelf stable foodstuffs that I have found is at the LDS food storage warehouses. I am not Mormon, but this church has opened its doors to non-members in order to create a more prepared community; and I am very thankful for this. I am able to purchase cases of canned beans, rice, dry milk, etc. and it’s already packed and ready for long-term storage. This frees up so much time! Here’s a link to their locations. As well, purchasing the larger, bulkier bags at Sam’s or Walmart is also very economical, but make sure you transfer your food items into long-term storage containers to protect your food investment. As well, don’t forget about storing water or having a way to treat it – this is crucial to survival.

Other Food Pantry Items

As I mentioned earlier, we like to layer our preparedness pantry. I buy meat on sale and freeze or can it for a later date. As well, we stock up on freeze-dried foods. For my family, freeze-dried foods are our last resort. If we run out of our pantry items, and our garden fails, only then do we turn to our freeze-dried food supply. My purpose in this is that I don’t want to solely rely on this type of emergency food source. I’m thankful it has a 25-year shelf life, but there are a lot of preservatives in freeze-dried foods that can cause constipation and stomach upsets. Therefore, I want to have enough of the natural foods my family normally eats before I turn to my freeze-dried foods. In addition, I also have garden seeds on standby so that we can grow a garden immediately if there is a widespread event.

Hopefully, this primer will get you started on your food pantry endeavors. As well, here are some additional articles to help you create a long-lasting and dependable food pantry.

11 Emergency Foods That Last Forever

Five Family Friendly Food Pantry Organizing Tips Anyone Can Do

Prepping With Wheat Allergies

5 Ways to Stretch Your Meals SHTF Style

Food Pantry: Take Care of Your Basic Needs

72 Hours Without This Will Kill You: Survival Water Fundamentals

Those of you who plan to take the first steps toward preparing for emergencies may feel a bit overwhelmed at first. After all, there is a lot of food to choose from at the grocery stores. We all know how confusing it can be getting started and luckily, there are lots of articles from Ready Nutrition and other great prepping websites to help with that.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Surviving Occupied America, Part 2

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 Readers, we briefed you here in the last article in this series on the needs for the two keys to survive an occupied United States: resolve and patience.  You are an intelligent and informed readership who knows about basic fundamentals of survival and then some.  This “venue” or “arena” (the better term) is your country under occupation, either by a tyrannical dictatorship (we are in a soft dictatorship at the moment), and/or a foreign army or armies.  Ladies and Gentlemen, fasten your seatbelts.  This info is “hardball” and you will need it; you need all the tools you can acquire.

Now that CISA was passed into law and (by Ted Cruz’s admission on national television) the government is monitoring approximately 100% of all telephone calls, you will see how serious this article is.  First, let’s take care of this disclaimer:

The information presented in this article is for information and entertainment purposes only.  Many of the procedures and items here, if practiced would violate Federal, State, and local laws and statutes.  The owners, editors, and writers of this site are not advocating acting in any way contrary to Federal, State, or local laws or statutes.  Furthermore, ReadyNutrition.com and its staff do not condone, recommend, or approve of violent acts, actions or techniques outlined in this article.  Consult your lawyer for questions pertaining to any of the information in this article and obey all applicable laws and statutes.

Scenario

It is a Friday evening, and you’re on your way home from work.  Your son and daughter are making dinner for you, and you’re looking forward to the weekend.  You have about three more miles to go to reach your house in a middle-class suburban neighborhood.  Suddenly your Lexus goes dead and starts to coast on the road to a stop, just as you look out your passenger-side window: it appears to be a star, but very near, with a type of “halo” around it up above.  The star flickers out, and all of the street lights, the lights in the homes, the businesses, and cars nearby flicker out.  You realize two things: you’ve been hit by an EMP, and the dinner plans for tonight with the family will probably be postponed indefinitely.

That is how quickly it will happen when it happens.  Self-assessment and situational awareness are your first priorities.  Quickly! Let’s run through it.  Is your “go” bag in your vehicle, with enough food for three days, water for one day, a weapon, ammo, extra clothing, and all of the things we covered in previous articles?  Quickly!  Do you have good hiking boots?  Change into them now: you’re walking, because the Lexus just became a two-ton paperweight.  Commo?  Did you pack a Yaesu hand-held shortwave in Mylar layers and material to shield it from the EMP, or Motorola’s?

Better get moving.  “Red Dawn” just started…in the “open-air” theatre…and you’re in it.  Do you see how critical it is to have all of this stuff done yesterday?  Hope the kids know and rehearsed the drills…hope there is a plan of initial contact, when the event occurs.  It’s dark, with a modicum of light on the horizon…. but you see a tremendous multitude of planes coming in from the west, and what looks to be popcorn dropping from the sky.  Nope: they’re parachutes, because the airborne operation is taking place, just at the turn from dusk to nightfall.

Refer to the previous articles on staying out of FEMA camps as well as the one on the 6 Rules for Survival to refresh on basics.  School’s out, here, and the occupation has begun.

You know the situation in the world.  The Russians and the Chinese do not play softball, and they are on a war footing at all times.  The invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968 followed after Soviet doctrine (and the military doctrine of then is currently in use by Russia now), as such:

“The strategic offensive has one alternative form.  This is sometimes known as a “Friday evening” offensive…. The operation therefore begins…. with a surprise attack by a group of Fronts against one or more countries…this operation caught the Czechs off guard – profiting by the Friday evening relaxation…after a working week.”                 

  (“Inside the Soviet Army,” by Viktor Suvorov)

Such a Friday attack, as can be seen here, isn’t coincidence: it’s doctrine, and it’s intelligent doctrine.  Such was the venue for the remake of the “Red Dawn” film with the EMP accomplished right after the Friday football game.

What Do You Do?

Now what do you do?  You go home, as quickly as possible.  You will have 24-48 hours of total confusion and chaos.  Hopefully you do not live in an area that is a nuclear target.  Hopefully you have at the ready a good supply of cash, precious metals, food, and supplies in the home and the means to take them somewhere and get out of dodge.

JJ’s scenario preference is the invasion by the foreign power over that of the totalitarian governmentThe reason: a war of the totalitarians versus the people is a war of attrition that only weakens the nation overall and still leaves it ripe for conquest by a foreign power while it is in the throes of weakness.  With the invasion, you will know on sight who the enemies are and that you must engage them.

Engagement: to oppose, combat, harass, or interdict an enemy or opponent.  The mission of the U.S. Army Infantry is simple: to close with the enemy and destroy him.  Canning season is over, and that greenhouse project you planned on finishing in the Spring may have to wait indefinitely.  Congratulations!  You just stepped into the shoes of the Founding Fathers!  Now comes the time to “water the Tree of Liberty,” and Jefferson’s words will have to be kept in mind as you put into practice the words of Francis Marion, the Swamp Fox, and Rogers’ Rangers.

 Are you trained up?  Are you a part of a small group, or are you keeping it in the family?  I hope you studied those infantry tactics and small unit tactics mentioned in other articles.  You need to be fully trained up on first aid, communications, and you should be in possession of a smattering of whatever language the foreign invader speaks.

There are three big differences between a foreign invader and a totalitarian dictatorship.  Firstly, the latter is already here in the U.S. and almost “omnipresent” regarding all 50 states.  Secondly, their supplies are here, and resupply is readily available.  Third, the culture and language is not alien to the dictatorship: they have an “edge” regarding the control and understanding of their citizenry.

Under the dictatorship, all commerce will either halt completely or be completely nationalized (remember that EO that Obama signed, the Defense Preparedness Ready Resources Initiative, nationalizing everything, including human labor under his “czars,” his cabinet in time of national emergency).  Under the dictatorship all movement by the citizens will be monitored and controlled: some form of internal passport will emerge.  Under the dictatorship, all Constitutional rights will be abrogated and relegated to the pages of history.

Better learn about this stuff while there’s still time.  Here’s a great work that will elucidate many things for you: Government by Emergency,” by Dr. Gary North, Ph.D., American Bureau of Economic Research, Ft. Worth, TX, 1991.  It has it all: bartering and “black marketing,” evasion, breakdown of controls over the economy, collapse of the banks, depression, and tyranny.

How about when MRAP’s and armored assault vehicles cruise down Main Street into Happyville?  How will you deal with them?  Here’s another great work for you: “The Bridge at Andau,” by James A. Michener, 1957 (no Card Catalog Number or ISBN: sorry!  It’s out of print, but you can find it on Amazon.com if you look it up).  It is the true story of the Hungarian Revolution against the U.S.S.R. of October 23, 1957, and the civilian resistance before the Soviets crushed them.

Guerilla warfare is what this is, whether against a foreign invader or a totalitarian dictatorship.  This will take years to fix with a high price and no guarantee of victory.  Remember those two keys I gave to you last week?  Resolve and patience.  It is the only way.

Subjects for your personal study and research:

  • Black marketing/underground economies (read of occupied nations under the Third Reich during WWII)
  • Infantry and guerilla tactics (Sun Tzu, Machiavelli, and US DOD publications)
  • Special Forces manuals and literature (how to form teams, train them, and how to conduct unconventional/guerilla warfare).
  • There are other disciplines to study to help you in your “schooling,” that you can imagine but will not be mentioned here in this article, regarding firearms and tactics and their ilk.  Use your imagination.

Keep up the study, the prepping, and an eye out for more to come.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Five Components Determine How Healthy You Are

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healthA few years back when my kids were still pretty young, one of my girls and I and the family dog took a short walk in National Forest not too far from where we live. I had let the dog off the leash to stretch its legs while my young daughter and I enjoyed a leisurely stroll down a familiar trail. Free from the leash, the dog shot off down the trail only to come to an abrupt stop several hundred yards away, her hackles up, and staring intensely into the thick manzanita that lined each side of the trail. It was a bear with cubs.

I yelled, “run!” and my daughter took off like a rocket back the way we had come. Within seconds, I followed hoping the dog would distract the bear long enough for us to make it safely back to the vehicle. Time loses all meaning in moments like that and what could have been minutes felt like seconds. I quickly realized that the shock of accidentally crossing paths with a bear sow with cubs and the sudden burst of speed had stressed my heart. I was nowhere near close enough to the car and it already felt like my heart was going to burst and the muscles in my legs were on fire.

At the same time, the old saying, “I don’t have to outrun the bear, I just have to outrun you” flashed through my head. I was very glad to see my daughter running down the path and over fallen trees with the speed and agility of a deer. And I took comfort that, although I loved my dog very much, she would probably give her life to protect me from the bear…until she shot past me like a bullet.

I’m glad to say that we made it all out safely, including that damn dog that I wasn’t loving so much at the moment, but it was a sobering lesson. I was not in as good a shape as I thought I was. Also, thinking that my body would just know what to do in an emergency or that adrenaline would allow me to rise to the occasion like a lot of people think just wasn’t the case. When the SHTF, sometimes it’s a bear and sometimes it’s not. I wasn’t ready for any of it.

How Fit Are You?

It is a fact that past generations were more in shape compared to modern times. A healthy body that’s ready to take on whatever is demanded of it to the best of their ability should be the top priority of any prepper, not just for their own security, but also the security of loved ones that depend on them. I know that I could count on any one of my immediate family members if I ever needed help, but I also know that I have a personal responsibility not to overburden them in a crisis, and the best way I can do that is to make sure I am as healthy as possible before the SHTF. I would never want to put any of them in a potentially life threatening position to save me because I hadn’t bothered to take the time to get fit enough to save myself.

As well, many of us have physical limitations that can stop us from being as fit as we should. In an article on the subject, Tess Pennington writes, “As we get older, many of us are plagued with some type of physical limitation. Recognizing our physical weaknesses and figuring out how to make things work despite those weakness will be vital to our survival.”

Your Health Depends on These Five Components

Health, in this context, isn’t necessarily about weight, pants size, or any of the other standards of beauty frequently seen in fashion magazines. In this case, I’m talking about the ability to get the job done or get the hell out and that could mean different things depending on your own SHTF scenario.

Physical fitness can be measured by assessing five components of health: cardiovascular and respiratory, muscular strength, muscular endurance, body composition, and flexibility. If you’re neglecting any of these areas, you won’t be ready to respond.

Cardiovascular and Respiratory Fitness

Each type of fitness effects the body in different ways and they all support each other. If you’re lacking in one type of fitness, it will diminish the performance level of another. In my case, I frequently hiked, but rarely at a pace that would bring my heart rate up. Cardiovascular exercises that require endurance and raise the heart rate like those performed by runners, rowers, cyclist, and swimmers, increase the size and strength of the left and right ventricles of the heart.

“The left ventricle is one of four chambers of the heart. It is located in the bottom left portion of the heart below the left atrium, separated by the mitral valve. As the heart contracts, blood eventually flows back into the left atrium, and then through the mitral valve, whereupon it next enters the left ventricle. From there, blood is pumped out through the aortic valve into the aortic arch and onward to the rest of the body. The left ventricle is the thickest of the heart’s chambers and is responsible for pumping oxygenated blood to tissues all over the body. By contrast, the right ventricle solely pumps blood to the lungs.”

Source

My heart wasn’t strong enough to supply the boost of oxygen-rich blood quickly enough to keep up with the demand. Respiratory health ties into this- although lung function doesn’t change dramatically, oxygen that is taken into the lungs is used more effectively.

Muscle Strength

Muscular strength can be measured by the force your muscles are capable of exerting (example: lifting or pushing) and endurance is the measurement of how long your muscles can exert the force without tiring. A sudden sprint away from a bear requires both. Lifting heavy sacks of feed, children, and any number of daily activities as a mom on a farm had given me plenty of strength, but hadn’t really prepared me for endurance.

Muscles are comprised of two types of fibers: fast twitch and slow twitch. Fast twitch fibers contract quickly and use a lot of energy, but they also tire out quickly. Slow twitch fibers, on the other hand, can work for a long time without getting tired and they also require a lot of oxygenated blood. Different types of endurance training will increase one type of fiber more than the other, but both types are important for running for your life.

Body Composition & Flexibility

Body composition is simply a relative measurement of muscle, bone, water, and fat in your body. We all know that carrying too much fat, especially around the waist, is bad for our health. Many people use the Body Mass Index (BMI) to determine their fat percentage, but the BMI is not without controversy:

“BMI does not take into account age, gender, or muscle mass. Nor does it distinguish between lean body mass and fat mass. As a result, some people, such as heavily muscled athletes, may have a high BMI even though they don’t have a high percentage of body fat. In others, such as elderly people, BMI may appear normal even though muscle has been lost with aging”

(Source)

If you feel you’re carrying too much body fat, you probably are, and you should make every effort to reduce it to a healthier level. By doing so, you’ll be more physically fit, stronger, and have more endurance to meet the increased stress and physical demands of an emergency.

Flexibility, the range of motion across a joint, is also an important factor in being prepared. It’s much more difficult to perform a task when one isn’t flexible and it greatly increases the chances of injury. Flexibility exercises help increase he range of motion of joints, ligaments, and tendons so that muscles can perform at their peak.

Conclusion

In the years since, I’m happy to say, I’ve made a concerted effort to get physically fit and now at 50 years old, I’m probably in the best shape I’ve ever been in. I can hike eight miles with a 30-pound pack and a 1000-foot elevation gain in under two hours. It certainly wasn’t easy and there are times, especially around the holidays, that I let things slide. I probably still can’t outrun that damn dog, but I feel pretty confident that I can outrun you!
Next up, we’ll talk about some frugal ways to incorporate fitness into your everyday lives without breaking the bank so you too can get in shape to survive the bears in your life.

Ruby is a first generation Californian who grew up in the heart of the Central San Joaquin Valley farming community. She’s been involved in agriculture for 40 years and learned to preserve food, traditional home arts, to hunt and fish, raise livestock and garden from her Ozark native mother.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Hardcore Survival: What To Wear in the Harshest Conditions

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winterThis article is going to give you some pointers on dressing for the winter weather to maximize your heat, minimize your moisture, and to enable you to be ready if the SHTF.  The article’s title holds the word “tactical,” and in this New Year I feel it is important to make this emphasis to you:

Every situation is either tactical or has the potential to become tactical in the blink of an eye.

Needs and Capabilities

Your needs and capabilities in this regard are going to vary in accordance with where you live (geographical/climate locale), and what you do during the course of the day.  Some may have an easier time with this, as they may be employed where they can wear what they want…few and far in-between as this may seem.  Others must wear a uniform or a suit and tie/business apparel.  No matter.  The first group (to paraphrase the band “Nirvana”) can “come as you are…as I want you to be.”  The second group will have to rely on the telephone booth akin to Clark Kent as he did when he “changed” into Superman.

Footwear

Footwear is as varied as the imagination.  I prefer military footwear and wear it all the time.  I have a pair of desert winter boots with Vibram soles that I switch up with a pair of Rocky Gore-Tex issue boots.  The majority of the time these days, I have a good pair of rubberized boots with leather instep, Kamin waterproofs, a necessity here in Montana where it snows about every day.  With socks, I like a thin pair of cotton, covered over with a thick pair of wool.  The cotton absorbs the moisture from your foot, and the wool wicks it away.

Essential Layers

I layer with long johns, a decent synthetic type by Russell, and over these I wear nylon jogging-type/sports pants with a thin cotton underlining.  They lock in the heat and they do breathe.  Over this are the pants, and as I mentioned in previous articles, only cargo pants will do for me, my preference being Riggs by Wrangler.  This triple layer keeps layers of air circulating between them and also insulates me thoroughly from the cold.  Here it has been about 20 degrees F during the day, and 0 – 7 degrees F at night.

Topside I wear a cotton t-shirt with a synthetic/polypro long sleeve undershirt.  If you can find shirts with wicking ability, it can help your body maintain your core body temperature. Over this I have a sweatshirt with hood, and I wear an Army issue uniform top: they’re durable, and I like the newer generation tops because of the amount of pockets.  Over this I throw a nice Marmot Gore-Tex jacket, and then it’s just my gloves and a hat. Remember, folks: wearing a hat will keep warm heat from escaping on your head. This is very important! When I’m all suited up, JJ’s ready to go!

The Doctrine of Contrasting Colors

You all know about the importance of layering, and now let’s cover a few things from a tactical perspective: the doctrine of contrasting colors.

What if “big daddy government” morphs into that totalitarian state we can all foresee and dread?  You are on the run.  Here’s the principle: they’re looking for a guy with a red jacket, and he disappears into a public restroom.  As people come out, there is nobody with a red jacket, but you went right by them…because you stripped off your top layer, discarded it (hopefully you can recover it!), and emerged in a gray sweat top.  The key here is to be able to alter your appearance and “change up” on the target they are looking for…and expecting.  The mind and eyes tend to focus on a target and keep it in mind.  This is our honing instinct, and it is as old as mankind.

If you’re wearing tan khaki cargoes and a red jacket (does that classify you as a SF ’49er fan?), how much better if you emerge wearing black nylon sweats and a gray sweatshirt?  The colors must contrast; that is, bear a marked difference to one another in the combination you’re wearing them both before you’re followed and after you give them the slip.

Now I’m sure a lot are going to comment that it “doesn’t matter with infrared,” and “you can’t avoid the cameras.”  No, actually, it does matter.  The goons that are on the ground do not have all of that equipment in their hands and right in front of them.  Not yet.  There’s a disconnect between what Stanley the Tech-guy is reporting to him in his ear and what he sees on the ground.

In addition, you want to wear hats and gloves, maybe a good scarf or a balaclava to keep warm and also to break up your outline that gives a signature.  I want to put in a word about the Gore-Tex.  It is the best thing since sliced bread in my opinion.  I wear the civilian Gore-Tex jacket so as not to be so obsequious, although here in Montana camouflage is a year-round sight and in some areas can be easily confused with evening formal wear.

The important tactical consideration here with the Gore-Tex is that you want to stay warm and dry, and a fire may be “inconvenient” for you until the initial fervor of the disaster passes.  A good acid test is to dress in the manner I outlined and then lay in the snow for about 15 minutes with no ground pad or insulation between you and the snow.  If you can say you’re still warm even after 15 minutes, then you may have found a winning combination for yourself.  Layers also help enable your skin to breathe and to reduce heat that could potentially be trapped and elevate your temperature too high.

The cargo pants and Army top help you with the pockets to store things that are essential to you…small tools, fire starting equipment, and the like.  You want your ensemble to be as rugged and durable as it can be.  When it hits the fan, you don’t know when you’re going to have a change of clothing.  You’ll start it out “as is,” so to speak: what you’re carrying and wearing is what you’ll have, at least initially.  Remember: when you have to hide, a lot of times you’ll be hunkered down or in the prone.  You have to keep warm, dry, and insulated, especially if you must lay on the ground.

So whatever your environment, dress accordingly for that environment.  Remember this doctrine of contrasting colors, and choose your garments for their utilitarian functions rather than for style or appearance.  Take the time to consider any physical limitations and plan your wardrobe accordingly.  Always take the time to assess the situations in the news and what is happening around you, and be ready to do the Clark Kent to Superman change as soon as the balloon goes up and you have determined it’s genuine.  Have a great day, Guys and Gals, be prepared, and stay warmly-dressed, and “frosty” in your mind!  God bless!  JJ out.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Here’s How to Protect Yourself From Mob Violence

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riot policeHuman beings have a peculiar duality. We love to imagine ourselves as rugged individuals, but we’re extremely susceptible to herd instincts. We are after all, social creatures, and our instinctive need to “go with the crowd” has helped us survive and thrive in a world where going it alone can be a death sentence. Unfortunately, that same urge often drives us to do things that are violent, stupid, and ultimately self-destructive.

That sort of behavior was on full display in Cologne, Germany on New Year’s Eve, when a mob of around 1000 people, many of them refugees from Middle East, lit fireworks, robbed and assaulted pedestrians, and groped dozens of women (at least two cases of rape have been reported). They essentially formed a gauntlet of several mobs that passengers coming out of the Cologne train station had to fight through.

Frankly, it’s shocking that such an event could happen in Germany, a country that is (or at least was) prosperous, stable, and orderly. It just goes to show that no nation is immune to mob-like behavior, even when there is no natural or man-made disaster to inspire these acts.

The politics surrounding this incident have been thoroughly discussed already, so there’s no need to tread that ground again. Instead, I want to talk about what you can do to protect yourself, if you ever find yourself wrapped up in a belligerent crowd. Here’s what you need to know:

The Borg

When faced with a mob, the normal rules of human behavior are thrown out the window. That’s because you’re no longer dealing with a group of individuals. When people join the mob, they stop thinking for themselves, and start acting in the interest of the group, even when it doesn’t necessarily benefit them as individuals. What you’re really dealing with, is one person with many bodies. This is what makes the mob so cohesive and dangerous, but as you’ll see in a moment, it’s also its greatest weakness.

Don’t Fight the Crowd

Any situation that involves dangerous people is going to spark your fight or flight response. With a mob, both of those options could end disastrously, though fighting a crowd of people is arguably worse. You’re not going to win that fight. In some cases, brandishing a weapon might convince members of the crowd to snap out of their groupthink, but it’s often the case that a mob can’t be reasoned with, even if their lives depend on it. Inhibitions are low for members of the mob (even without the influence of drugs and alcohol, which are often present) and these people feel safe, and sometimes invulnerable. I don’t care how much of a badass you are, you can’t fight everybody. If you try going toe to toe with a mob, they’ll tear you to pieces.

Don’t Run From the Crowd Either

The moment you try to flee the mob, it becomes blatantly obvious that you are not a part of the mob, and are thus a target. This is where the uniformity of the crowd becomes its weakness. The best advice I’ve heard on escaping a mob comes from this article from offthegridnews.com. Rather than fleeing, start acting like everyone else in the crowd so you don’t stand out.

Then, slowly drift away from everyone else until you reach the edge of the mob. Eventually you can duck out and hide by slipping into an alley way or store front. If the mob starts moving into a different direction, go with them, but at a slower speed. Eventually they’ll just leave you behind.

Stay Calm and Aware

In case you haven’t noticed already, normal human instincts don’t serve you well in this situation. If anything, it’s normal human instincts that cause mob violence in the first place. Since your fight or flight response will get you in trouble, it’s important to remember that you have to stay cool, and be aware of your surroundings. In a sense, everyone in the mob has tunnel vision. They’re very focused at the task at hand, whatever that may be.

If you keep it together, you’ll have a significant advantage over them, because you’ll have so much more awareness. You’ll see gaps in the crowd that you can drift through. You’ll see where the mob is moving to before any individual within the group knows it. You’ll notice when the police arrive before they do. And more importantly, you’ll see opportunities to escape while the mob is preoccupied or distracted. So stay calm, blend in, and drift away before anyone notices you. It’s not guaranteed to save you in every situation, but it’s still the best way to escape the grasp of any mob.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition