How to Can Diced Tomatoes – Enjoy Garden Tomatoes All Year Long!

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Learn how to can diced tomatoes and not only will you be able to enjoy the delicious taste of summertime tomatoes any time of the year, but you will also save time and money! Every year, as the tomatoes begin

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4 Easy Recipes Canning Cherries

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Enjoy 4 of my delicious recipes for canning both tart and sweet cherries

I am very blessed to be the Canbassador for Northwest Cherry Growers in Washington. For three years now I have created exciting recipes with their freshly shipped fruit.

In years past, I have created Savory Cherry Chutney and Peach Pistachio Conserve using juicy peaches and gorgeous sweet cherries.  This year, I went a bit more of a traditional route creating a pie filling and salsa.  But do know, pie fillings make excellent dessert toppings for ice cream and fill more than just pies – they make excellent filling for cupcakes, scones and crepes.  And this salsa – YUM!

This year I was sent another batch of sweet cherries from Washington!  And for you tart cherry lovers, I had 10 pounds frozen from last years harvest.  Let’s just say I had a cherry festival in my kitchen these last few days!  It was so worth it though!  Enjoy my latest 4 cherry canning creations and be sure to share with a friend.

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Pie Filling – Dessert

Sweet Cherry Berry Pie Filling  (makes approx. 5 quarts or 10 pints)

My family found its new favorite pie filling with this gorgeous blend of blueberries and cherries.  My daughter suggested the undertones of vanilla which really brought this filling to life.  Note, the vanilla extract is optional and can also be substituted with almond extract.

Ingredients

12 cups sweet cherries, pitted and coarsely chopped or halved

12 cups frozen blueberries, thawed

4 cups juice, from fruit

1 cup Canning Gel or ClearJel

4 cups raw sugar

2 Tbsp Vanilla extract

1/4 cup lemon juice

Instructions

If using fresh cherries and berries, be sure to chop/halve the cherries and lightly mash the blueberries to break the skin to release their juices.

Place cherries and berries into a large colander atop a large bowl.  Drain juices from mixture for up to 2 hours or until you have captured 4 cups of juice. Cover mixture with dish towel while draining to keep pests away.

Measure 4 cups of juice in a large liquid measuring cup.  Add Canning Gel and whisk until dissolved.  Place into a large stock pot and whisk again.  Add sugar and vanilla extract.
Using medium high heat, whisk sugar until it dissolves, and continue to whisk mixture often as it increases in temperature.  As juice begins to bubble, add lemon juice and whisk well.  The juice will start to thicken quite quickly so continue to whisk to avoid scorching.  Once it begins to thicken, immediately add the cherry berry mixture all at once.  Turn off heat.

Use a large spoon and fold cherries and berries well so they are coated with the thickened juice.  Ladle into wide mouth jars (preferably) keeping a generous 1″ headspace.  Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace as necessary.  Wipe jar rims with a wash cloth dipped in vinegar, then add lids and rings.  Water bath both quarts and pints for 35 minutes.  Remember, you timer doesn’t start until the water has come to a full rolling boil.

 

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Jams & Jelly

Cherry Preserves (makes approx. 4 pints or 8 half-pints)

I love fresh berries in my preserves.  Chunks of yummy goodness with every spread is a jar filled with pure deliciousness.  Enjoy this cherry-filled preserve on fresh bread, sandwiches, a cheese tray and alongside any turkey or pork dinner.

Ingredients

5 cups pitted cherries, frozen or fresh

2 cups raw sugar

3 cups juice

1/2 cup Canning Gel

1/4 cup lemon juice, if using sweet cherries

Instructions

Place cherries in a large colander atop a large bowl.  Drain juices for up to 2 hours or until you have captured 3 cups of juice. Cover mixture with dish towel while draining to keep pests away.

Measure 3 cups of juice in a large liquid measuring cup.  Add Canning Gel and whisk until dissolved.  Place into a large stock pot and whisk again.  Add sugar and whisk.

Using medium high heat, whisk sugar until it dissolves, and continue to whisk juice often as it increases in temperature.  As juice begins to bubble, add lemon juice if using sweet cherries, and whisk well.  The juice will start to thicken quite quickly so continue to whisk to avoid scorching.  Once it begins to thicken, immediately add cherries all at once.  Turn off heat.

Use a large spoon and fold cherries well so they are coated with the thickened juice.  Ladle into jars keeping a 1/2″ headspace.  Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace as necessary.  Wipe jar rims with a wash cloth dipped in vinegar, then add lids and rings.  Water bath both pints and half-pints for 25 minutes.  Remember, you timer doesn’t start until the water has come to a full rolling boil.

Tart Cherry Jelly  (makes approx. 6 half-pints)

Typically when draining cherries for the required amount of juice to make pie filling there will be upwards of 3 or 4 cups of juice left over.  Especially if your cherries were frozen then thawed.  Use this easy recipe to make jelly with remaining juice.

Ingredients

4 cups cherry juice

4 cups raw sugar

1 cup Canning Gel

Instructions

In a large stock pot, whisk juice and Canning Gel until dissolved.  Add sugar and whisk.

Using medium high heat, whisk sugar until it dissolves, and continue to whisk juice often as it increases in temperature.  The juice will start to thicken quite quickly so continue to whisk to avoid scorching.  Once it begins to thicken, remove from heat.

Ladle into jars keeping a 1/4″ headspace.  Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace as necessary.  Wipe jar rims with a wash cloth dipped in vinegar, then add lids and rings.  Water bath half-pints for 15 minutes.  Remember, you timer doesn’t start until the water has come to a full rolling boil.

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Salsa

Tart & Tangy Cherry Salsa  (makes approx. 4 pints or 8 half-pints)

Fruity salsa is amazing!  There is something special happening on our palates when heat and sweet are combined.  Even more so, this recipe gives you a bit of tang expanding its uses and its flavors.  Enjoy on the end of a tortilla chip, stuffed inside a pork loin or create a delicious appetizer atop a brick of cream cheese.

Ingredients

8 cups tart frozen cherries, thawed

4 Tablespoons raw sugar

1 1/4 cup red onion, finely chopped

3 large garlic cloves, minced

1 large jalapeno, finely chopped (keep seeds for more heat)

1 cup cilantro leaves, coarsely chopped

1/4 cup lime juice

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Instructions

Combine all ingredients in a large stock pot and bring to a boil over medium high heat.  Once at a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes, stirring often.

Using a slotted spoon, fill each jar 3/4 full of salsa.  Ladle remaining juice over salsa keeping 1/2″ headspace.  Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace as necessary.  Wipe jar rims will a warm wash cloth dipped in vinegar and adhere lids and rings.  Hand tighten.

Water bath pints for 20 minutes and half-pints for 15 minutes.  Remember, the timer doesn’t start until water is at a full rolling boil.

 

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Pitting Cherries

Be sure to head to your local cherry farm and purchase these gorgeous beauties while in season.  Do not shy away from using frozen cherries (or berries) as they were picked, prepped and frozen in the height of their flavor.  Especially if you are creating recipes where juice is a required ingredient.

Fresh cherries are perfect for any recipe!  Just be sure you properly pit them.  I used a Leifheit cherry pitter and was disappointed when almost half of the cherries still had their pits!  I had to hand cut each cherry to ensure not a single pit made it into my recipes.

The surefire way to ensure you remove each pit it to use chopsticks and physically hold each cherry in your hand to do so.  Now it all depends on the amount of time you have available so I leave it to you to decide which method is best.

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Have fun creating one, or all, of these delicious cherry-inspired recipes!  Be sure to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram at Canning Diva for more recipes, tips and techniques.

Happy Canning!

xx,
Diane Devereaux, The Canning Diva®
www.canningdiva.com

The post 4 Easy Recipes Canning Cherries appeared first on Canning Diva | Canning Classes, Recipes and Supplies.

 

More Great Articles to Read!

The Importance of Proper Headspace When Home Canning
Three Main Elements to Safe Canning Practices
The Benefits of Pressure Canning
From prep to finish: The making of Canning Full Circle cookbook
BookCon 2017

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An 18th Century German Recipe

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This recipe for “Farina Soup” comes from a 1795 German Cookbook, the title of which translates, “Instructions Of All Kind Of Cookery And Pastry.” Thanks to Kayla and Karen at Old Salem Museums and Gardens, who are presently translating two 18th Century German cookbooks, we can finally bring you some delicious German food! Be sure to visit Old Salem’s website!

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The Secrets To Perfectly Canned Salsa – Recipe Included

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As canning season begins, you should know that there are several secrets to making the perfectly canned salsa.  Salsa is by far, one of the most popular recipes that is made from ingredients in a backyard garden. Many people grow

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Homemade Pickling Spice – Never Buy It Again!

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It’s time to ditch store-bought pickling spice and make your own! Making it is super easy and there is no need to worry about if it is safe for preserving. Actually, pickling spice has nothing to do with the actual

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8 Reasons to Support Local Farmers

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Think about all the items you put in your cart at the supermarket or mega-store. Do you feel you paid a fair price for that product? If you have questions about a particular item, would you know who you could speak to for answers? Where did those potatoes come from, how old is that carton of eggs, and who is being supported by your hard earned dollars? Probably not local farmers.

local farmers

Chances are, it would be difficult, if not impossible, to get satisfactory answers to those questions when you buy food at any grocery store. However, when you buy from local farmers, it’s a completely different story.

The following are some reasons why you should support your local farmers whenever possible.

Prices from local farmers

With a big family that includes three teenage girls and two preteen boys, keeping everyone fed at my house is certainly a challenge. Just to make a taco dinner usually requires 4 pounds of ground beef to fill everyone’s belly. With the average price of $3.99/lb for ground chuck, that is $15.96 for just one element of one meal! Yikes! One homemade taco dinner could easily total over $35!

Obviously the grocery bill could quickly get out of hand if the average meal totaled that high every night. Fortunately for my family, we are able to purchase a half beef every spring for an average cost which costs far less than what can be found at the grocery store. Even better, this low cost not only applies to ground beef. We enjoy savings on all wonderful things beef, such as steaks, ribs and roasts. Honestly, without the benefits of buying from local farmers, my family would be eating a lot of Ramen noodles and five-dollar pizzas.

Buying local, though, isn’t always the cheapest way to go, since they are not factory farms that rely on artificial growth hormones and unnatural living conditions for the animals in order to maximize profits. Call local farmers directly, ask about their livestock, what they are fed, and their prices in order to determine what will best fit your family’s needs and budget.

If the price of a side of beef, for example, seems outrageous, be sure to figure how many meals will be made from the meat, and you may find, like I did, that it really is the best way to go, and the least expensive.

Get answers from local farmers

Of course, there are many other benefits of buying from local farmers other than just price. Buying local means I can talk to the farmers about the feed and medicines used for the market beef we purchase. Many facilities will take you back to see where the animal was raised. If I wish, I can speak to the actual human being who was in charge of raising the animal that feeds my family. Information about any chemicals that were sprayed on my vegetables is also available. Questions abut genetic modification can be asked and many farms offer recipe suggestions. Farmers love to discuss their products and they should. They invest hours, days and months to get their products perfect for purchase!

A good way to talk with several farmers at once is at a farmer’s market. At one I attended, I had the opportunity to chat with a local beef farmer and learned a great deal about how beef is categorized and the challenges he faces raising his cattle. He was a wealth of information that helped me decide what I wanted to buy.

Personal experience

In the summer, I can buy produce directly from roadside markets. Nothing makes me feel more like a domestic goddess than selecting fruits and vegetables so fresh you have to shake the dirt off.  How rewarding it is to rummage through the baskets and bins of product and selecting ears of fresh sweet corn or the perfect melon. I do not have to worry about another hurried patron with shopping cart road rage pressuring me along.

Tradition

From these produce stands, I can see the fields of crops being handpicked and brought by the bushelful to the small, family-owned stands. Many times, these farms allow you to pick your own produce for an even cheaper rate. The family farmers are usually on site and although extremely busy, they’re usually willing to answer questions about the fruits of their labor. By purchasing from local farmers, you help keep tradition alive. Many farmers today are third or fourth generation or even greater! This is a great reason to support local farmers whenever possible because the small, family-owned farm is an endangered lifestyle and one I want to support when I can.

Create memories for your children

The two farms located on each side of the small town where I live have been there as long as I can remember. I have memories of going to the north farm with my grandma and picking up bushels of cabbages and tomatoes. She would buy one bushel of tomatoes just for the family to eat that afternoon and a couple others for canning and stewing. When I was younger, I remember sitting under the shade of the big pear tree in the front yard and grabbing tomatoes straight from the bushel. I was eating them like apples with my grandma, aunts, uncles and cousins. Grandma would round up the entire family to go pick strawberries from the south side farm. The rest of the afternoon was spent eating them right out the little green quart containers.

It is important to take our children to local farms and let them see how the food gets to the table. With the convenience of supermarkets and online shopping, little ones today might not grasp the concept of farming that may be a common mindset to older generations. Ask a farmer to talk to them or even show them around. A farm can be an exciting place with tractors, bright and beautiful colors of the produce and all the hustle and bustle of the workers planting, sorting or harvesting.

Local economic support

It is a rewarding feeling knowing the money you spend in your community stays in your community. Fresh produce at prices often lower than what is found in grocery stores is certainly a perk of shopping local farms. Supporting these local farms is important for the livelihood of our community as well. Both of the farms in our town have been in operation for as long as I can remember and are an important pillar of our local economy. Each farm provides summer employment to many local teens and adults needing a seasonal job or supplemental income.

Be sure to shop, though, at peak season for the best prices for you, and help farmers get rid of their produce at just the time they likely have huge harvests to move.

There’s nothing like the taste

Food grown in its ideal season and picked at the perfect point of ripeness tastes much better than product mass-produced in a greenhouse in the off season. Of course this is a matter of opinion, but I am confident that the majority will agree.

The one item I can tell a vast difference in taste between prime season and off season is tomatoes. Nothing is better than fresh tomatoes off the vine. Image those warm, juicy and flavorful tomatoes sliced for that charbroiled cheeseburger, diced and mixed with fresh basil and extra virgin olive oil for that perfect bruschetta topping or cut in chunks for that garden fresh salad. Nothing beats tomatoes at their prime. Personally, I think tomatoes grown in the off season with manufactured growing processes generally result in a waxy, flavorless tomato-like substitute.

Nutrition

Buying produce from local farmers’ markets and roadside stands generally means you are getting an amazingly fresh product. Often times, produce is picked in the early morning and delivered straight to the stand for sale that same day. When produce is picked at the peak of freshness, the nutritional value is also at its peak. Each day that produce is off the vine, tree, plant, etc., the nutritional value, as well as taste, decreases.

Think about the produce in big markets and find out where it comes from. Grocery stores carry tomatoes from Mexico and bananas from Brazil. Much of our produce comes from afar. Even with today’s sophisticated logistic methods, the produce you buy at chain stores and larger markets could be days old by the time you put it in your cart. Some industrialized farms harvest produce, like tomatoes, while they are still green so they do not bruise or spoil in transit. Distribution partners then use gas to ripen them for market! Not only is the product picked before it reaches its nutritional peak, but the product itself is not up to par when compared with from field to table product.

Small farms across the land are what helped build our nation. Hard working folks work 365 days a year growing and raising food the old-fashioned and natural way are finding it hard to keep their farms running. Often the consumer dollar is thrown toward mega-marts and superstores. Why not support local farmers? You can take advantage of the better taste, price, nutritional value and other intangible gifts of those delicious fruits, veggies, meat and eggs!

As they say, “On the eighth day, God created the farmer.”

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Homemade Lemonade Recipe – Simple, Yet Delicious

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Nothing is more refreshing on a hot summer day, than an ice-cold glass of lemonade. Especially if that lemonade is homemade! I remember when I was a child setting up a lemonade stand in our tiny little neighborhood, hoping to

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Hoe Cakes

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Don’t Be Confused About This Simple Quick Bread “Hoe Cakes”

We’re back at George Washington’s Mount Vernon! Once again, we’re joined by Deb Colburn and today she has a recipe for “Hoe Cakes”. A delicious and easy Cornmeal Pancake that you have to try!

Hoe Cakes are cornmeal flatbread. An early American staple food, it is prepared on the Atlantic coast from Newfoundland to Jamaica. The food originates from the native inhabitants of North America. It is still eaten in the West Indies, Dominican Republic, Saint Croix, Bahamas, Colombia, and Bermuda as well as in the United States and Canada.

The modern johnnycake is found in the cuisine of New England,[3] and often claimed as originating in Rhode Island.[4] A modern johnnycake is fried cornmeal gruel, which is made from yellow or white cornmeal mixed with salt and hot water or milk, and sometimes sweetened. In the Southern United States, the word used is hoecake, although this can also refer to cornbread fried in a pan.

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Texas Sheet Cake-The Best Recipe You Will Ever Make

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This Texas Sheet Cake recipe has been around for at least 30+ years, I see almost the exact same recipe in old cookbooks, new cookbooks and on Pinterest. Well, who doesn’t love chocolate, right? The cake is made totally from scratch and is moist and tastes even better the next day. This makes it a perfect recipe for Sunday dinner dessert or for family reunions. One thing I wanted to do a few years ago was to test making the cake in a regular 9-inch by 13-inch pan as in your favorite lasagna or cake pan. Yes, you can still make it on a cookie sheet that is a jelly roll size that’s approximately 11-inches by 17-inches. But, a cookie sheet/jelly roll pan is hard to transport in the car. You cover it with plastic wrap or foil and the frosting never looks the same by the time you get to your party.

So, a few years ago I started baking my Texas sheet cake it in a 9-inch by 13-inch lasagna pan that has a metal lid. It was just like the one my mom had when we would take a casserole to a church party years ago. My favorite pan.

Texas Sheet Cake

Who doesn’t love chocolate, right? It’s so moist and yummy, family and friends will ask you for the recipe, if they don’t already have it. Just giving you heads up here. If you have a family reunion coming up, your family will love this recipe! I have a printable recipe for you below.

Texas Sheet Cake

Ingredients:

2 cups flour

2 cups sugar

1 cup butter (the original recipe calls for margarine)

1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa

1 cup water

1/2 cup buttermilk

1 teaspoon baking soda

2 eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease the pan of choice below. Combine the flour and sugar in a bowl. Bring the butter, cocoa, and water to a boil. Turn the stove off. Add the buttermilk, soda, eggs, and vanilla to the pan with the boiling mixture. Use a hand mixer to combine the flour and sugar in the pan, blend until smooth. Pour into a greased pan.

Baking time: jelly roll/cookie sheet, 15-20 minutes

Baking time: 9-inch by 13-inch pan,  28-30 minutes

Frosting

Instructions:

1/2 cup butter

5 tablespoons buttermilk or regular milk

1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa

3 cups powdered sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 cup chopped nuts optional

Grab a medium saucepan and melt the butter, add the cocoa and the milk. Bring to a boil stirring constantly, add the powdered sugar, vanilla, and nuts. I make this frosting while the cake is baking and then spread it on the semi-cooled cake.

PRINTABLE recipe: Cake by Food Storage Moms

Cake Recipes by Food Storage Moms

I hope you enjoy this Texas sheet cake recipe as much as my family does. Enjoy!

My favorite things:

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Zucchini Bread Recipe-The Best One In The World

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Don’t you love baking zucchini bread? In the summer it seems we all have a lot of zucchini plants growing in the garden. I will be honest, the last two years I have had a struggle growing zucchini plants. I really have to laugh because NO one has trouble growing zucchini, right? Right. Well, luckily I had a few plants that produced some this year before the heat got up to 115 degrees. Today, I got my Kitchen Aid mixer out and the metal grater that attaches to it. Now, I could have used my cheese grater but I was afraid I might grate the skin on my fingers. I think I could have done it by hand faster than the Kitchen Aid, but that’s okay, the zucchini is grated and life is good.

This recipe is from a neighborhood cookbook printed when I lived in Sandy, Utah. It looks like the date on the cookbook may say 1980. Don’t you just love old cookbooks where you recognize names of neighbors that meant a lot to you when you lived near them? I’m thinking several people in this cookbook are probably deceased by now. Wow, this cookbook is 37 years old and it still brings me joy, even if the cover is missing.

Zucchini Bread Recipe

Ingredients:

2 cups sugar

1 cup oil (I used vegetable oil)

3 eggs

1/4 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 tablespoon cinnamon

1 tablespoon vanilla

2 cups grated zucchini with skins and all

3 cups flour (I used white bread flour)

Instructions:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Cream the sugar, oil, and eggs. Combine the spices, the zucchini, and the flour with the creamed mixture. This recipe is so old it says to sift the flour, but I didn’t. The recipe says to cook in two bread pans for 1 hour. I filled three one-pound loaf pans. I baked my smaller loaves for 50 minutes.

This is the size bread pan I used to make my bread and also to make this zucchini bread. Fat Daddio’s Anodized Aluminum Bread Pan, 6.37 Inches by 3.75 Inches by 2.75 Inches

PRINTABLE recipe: Recipe by Food Storage Moms

Add-ons for zucchini bread:

1 cup chopped walnuts

1/2 cup grated carrots

12-ounces chocolate chips

Extra cinnamon

Extra vanilla

Nutmeg, a little sprinkle

1 cup Raisins

Please tell me the add-ons you like to add to your zucchini bread, I love to hear from you. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. May God bless you and your family.

 

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Sweet Tomato Jam Recipe – Out Of This World Tomato Flavor!

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Sweet tomato jam – where have you been all my life? I first tried sweet tomato jam at a local bistro years ago.  A friend of mine had ordered an appetizer that consisted of toasted baguette, crackers and a variety

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Parched Corn, The No-Meat Survival Food Pt. 2

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In last weeks episode we demonstrate several methods for preparing parched corn. Today is all about preparing our corn to eat in the easiest and most palatable ways.

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Parched Corn, The No-Meat Survival Food Pt. 1

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In today’s episode we demonstrate several methods for preparing parched corn, including methods from a pamphlet on maize written by Benjamin Franklin.

Another super food that predates early American history, parched corn was considered the original trail food by the pioneers. … Using dried corn kernels, parched corn is prepared in a skillet on the stove top much in the way that pop corn was prepared in the old days.

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The Best Chocolate Chip Parfait Cookies

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Have you ever heard of chocolate chip parfait cookies? I’m always on the lookout for a new recipe to make chocolate chip cookies. When I think of a cookie, the first one that I think about is chocolate chip cookies. The second one would be my pumpkins cookies. Have you ever been to Jacob Lake in Arizona? Well, they have the most spectacular camping area and the best cookies made in the world. You can tell by the parking lot and all the people sitting outside eating cookies on the benches and rock formations. It’s a halfway mark from southern Utah to Flagstaff, Arizona. They also have a gift shop and a restaurant. There are always lines of people waiting to buy their cookies. Who would guess we would pay for cookies when we can make them at home? These cookies are different.

First of all the cookies are huge and a bit pricey, but we all buy them because we need to stop for a potty break, stretch our legs and get a snack after driving for two hours on a two-lane road with speed limits of 65 miles an hour or less. They have cookies of all kinds to please any palate. They have a cookie called “Chocolate Parfait” that is our family’s favorite. I have been working on a recipe to duplicate that cookie for months. It’s here!!

Chocolate Chip Parfait Cookies

Ingredients:

1 cup butter

1-1/2 cups sugar

1 egg

1 tablespoon vanilla

1 teaspoon salt

2-1/2 cups flour

2 cups milk chocolate chips

Instructions:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. I used my Kitchen Aid stand mixer to make these yummy cookies! You can use Silpat sheets or grease your cookie sheets. Cream the butter, sugar, egg, salt, and vanilla together. Add the flour until thoroughly mixed together. Gradually add the chocolate chips. I use my 1/8 cup or 2 tablespoons cookie scoop. Bake for 9-10 minutes and let them cool before removing them from the cookie sheets. This recipe makes approximately 3 dozen cookies.

Chocolate Chip Parfait Cookies

PRINTABLE recipe: Cookies by Food Storage Moms

My favorite things:

OXO Good Grips Medium Cookie Scoop

OXO Good Grips Silicone Cookie Spatula

Silpat 11-5/8″ x 16-1/2″ Non-Stick Silicone Baking Mat

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How To Easily Freeze Spinach – A Great Way To Preserve Fresh Spinach

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How to Freeze Spinach… Do you rely on frozen spinach boxes in the middle of winter for your dips, soups and casseroles? Why not do it yourself and freeze spinach from a fresh batch this summer? Every year it seems

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How To Make Homemade Playdough For Kids

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Playdough is not just for kids. It’s about how to make homemade playdough for kids today. I have made this recipe for over 30 years for my daughters and my grandkids. I talked yesterday about making playdough being a vintage skill, pioneer skill or just one more plain skill to teach the next generation. This is a very easy and frugal playdough that all kids love to make. This recipe is not gluten free and you do not have to add food coloring or flavors, they are optional. I bet you can picture the kids molding playdough every day of the week and all you have to do is store the playdough in an airtight container to keep it soft and pliable. Baggies or pint jars work great! You can also make this playdough for birthday gifts and put different colors in pint mason jars placed in cellophane bags with a ribbon. I love homemade gifts!

I think anytime we can have our kids and grandkids interacting with each other rather than an electronic in their hands it’s a win-win situation! I have to admit my grandkids teach me how to use my cell phone and several things on the computer.

playdough

Playdough Recipe

4 Cups Flour
1 Cup Salt
2 Tablespoons Alum (it’s a spice)
2 Cups Water
2 Tablespoons Oil (Vegetable Oil is the ONLY oil that works for me)
1-4 Packages Dry Unsweetened Drink Mix (This is for color and fragrance in the play dough:1-4 colors)
1-2 Bottles Food Coloring (Optional)

Mix all the ingredients (no cooking required) in a mixer (I use my KitchenAid or my Bosch). Knead like you would your bread and store in plastic bags or airtight jars. You can add more food coloring if the dry unsweetened drink mixes don’t give you the color you want. I like my play dough “bright” in color so I sometimes need additional food coloring.
I pull out chunks of the dough and put them in separate bowls and add the food coloring to the dough in the mixer. I keep adding coloring until I achieve the color I like. You do not have to use any unsweetened drink mixes….the kids think it’s really awesome if the play dough has a little grape, pink lemonade, lime or fruit punch fragrance. It’s optional, just so you know.

Prep Time 30 minutes

Yield 6 jars, depending on size

Playdough

PRINTABLE: Recipe by Food Storage Moms

This is a great recipe to have on hand because you can make some playdough for your family today for fun, or for your family after a disaster. Have fun and let the kids help you make the playdough!

50 Things Everyone Should Know How To Do

My favorite things for playdough:

The post How To Make Homemade Playdough For Kids appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

The Power of herbs for Prepper’s series “Marshmallow Root”

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The Power of herbs for Prepper’s series “Marshmallow Root”
Marshmallow root a powerful demuculant that soothes the membrane walls of organs , intestines, throat, stomach and urinary tract. It is also said to have some germ fighting properties and inflammation relieving phytochemicals as well as compounds that stimulate the immune system. It possess’ high concentrates of mucilage and pectin which are the powerhouses of aid in the irritated membrane walls.Its spongy, gummy mucilage soothes sore membrane walls and beginning the healing process. The concentrates of pectin found in this herb is a soluble fiber that keeps the gastrointestinal system running regularly and helps tame blood sugar.

The Mucilage becomes gel like when mixed with a little water use it in a poultice on inflamed or bruised skin as needed. Also you can use the gel to calm and heal irritated areas around your mouth during the winter month from wind burn especially.
A few Good Uses for Marshmallow root are (but not limited to):
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Sore Throat
  • Uriart tract infection
  • diabetes 
  • Gallbladder problems 
  • Bronchitis
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • Respiratory Problems
  • Sores
  • Wounds Ulcer
  • Toothache
  • Burns
  • arthritis
  • Asthma
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • cystitis
  • colitis
  • crohn’s disease
  • sunburn
  • inflamed tonsils
  • veracious veins
  • carbuncles
  • boils

Dosage:(ADULT)
Roots: 1/8 to 1/3 cup of marshmallow roots daily
Tea: 1 teaspoon of dried leave or roots in 8 ounces of boiling water steeped for 15 to 20 minutes daily.
Extract: 1/2 to 1 teaspoon 3 times daily
Syrup: 1/2 to 2 teaspoons daily
Tincture: 1 to 1 tablespoon 3 times daily

Notes: Due to the high levels of mucilage and pectin present it may effect the rate of absorption of other medications. Also discoloration of urine is common 
A powerful Marshmallow root Syrup to aid soreness, sooth inflammation and has antibacterial and anti viral properties
You will need:
  • 2 tablespoons of dried marshmallow root
  • 1 teaspoon of chamomile flowers
  • 1 /2 teaspoon of dried thyme
  • 2 cups of distilled water
  • 1 cup of honey

Directions: bring 2 cups of distilled water to a hard boil then add all dried herbs, Cover and bring to a low simmer, simmer for 15 minutes or until reduced to half. The cover allows any essential oils present to remain in the concoction( base liquid of syrup) let cool  and strain and press in a potato ricer add honey and use for 
Burns, Eczema, insect bites, heat rashes, sunburn skin inflammations and irritations; 
Use as needed EXTERNALLY.
For internal Use  Adults use 1 tablespoon twice daily
This is good for tonsillitis, sore throats, inflamed larynx, hemorrhoid, anal flares, upset stomach, 24 hr, bug, inflamed intestines due to food allergies.
A Powerful Burn wash:
You will need:
  • 2 tablespoons of dried marshmallow root
  • 3 tablespoons of  dried tea tree leaves
  • 3 teaspoons of lavender flowers
  • 3 teaspoons of chamomile flowers
  • 4 cups of distilled water

Directions: bring 4 cups of distilled water to a hard boil then add all dried herbs, Cover and bring to a low simmer, simmer for 15 minutes or until reduced to half. The cover allows any essential oils present to remain in the concoction
Note: For severe sunburn or sun poisoning add 1/4 cup of PURE aloe vera juice( not the juice you drink as a snack) to the concoction AFTER IT HAS BEEN STRAINED< PRESSED and COOLED and mix well refrigerate and shake well before each use.
Dosage:
USE AS NEEDED TO EFFECTED AREAS EXTERNALLY ONLY

Homemade Sloppy Joes Recipe – Better and Healthier Than Store Bought!

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Have you ever looked at the ingredient list on the can of Sloppy Joes sauce? If you haven’t, the most likely first ingredient will be High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS). Don’t stop reading there, you may also find regular corn

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How To Make Homemade Corn Tortillas

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I have got to show you how to make homemade corn tortillas today! I have a friend, Melissa Richardson AKA, “The Bread Geek,” who shared her recipe with me several years ago. Now, I may have tweaked it a little, I can’t remember. But once you make these you will rarely buy them at the store. If you have some buttermilk and the Maseca corn masa flour you are good to go.

No mixer needed, just dump and stir, then knead a little. Oh, I better mention I store my Maseca corn flour (in a plastic bag) in the freezer to keep it fresh. Grab a bowl and get ready to make these.

homemade corn tortillas

Here is another trick…..I am famous for not reading directions…..well you need to spray the plastic wrap with vegetable spray or you won’t be able to get the tortillas off the press! You can see I flattened the balls with my hands before placing them on the tortilla press.

homemade corn tortillas

You can see I pressed the dough into a 6-inch circle, give or take. I then carry the plastic wrap with the tortilla over to the griddle and ever so slightly remove it from the plastic wrap and place it on the griddle. These honestly taste like gourmet restaurant corn tortillas. No fat, oil or sugar! Gotta love it! You do not need a tortilla press, but I grew up with my mom using one just like this one: Norpro 6-Inch Tortilla Press, Cast Aluminum You do not cook them on the press, it just flattens them. I have this one: Victoria 8 inch Cast Iron Tortilla Press and Pataconera, Original Made in Colombia, Seasoned Now you are ready to bake your tortillas on a hot griddle.

homemade corn tortillas

Yep, I immediately emailed all my daughters after making them and said, “oh my goodness…you have got to make these!!!!!!!” My family went crazy over them.  They are so delicious! These are NOT like the store purchased tortillas…..trust me! Thanks again Melissa for giving me the courage to try and make these….easy peasy! Get your griddle hot!!

Homemade Corn Tortillas

Ingredients:
  • 2-1/2 to 3 cups Maseca (Mexican corn flour)
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
  • 3 cups warm buttermilk
Instructions:
  1. Combine the dry ingredients (start with 2-1/2 cups Maseca) then warm buttermilk and add to mixture. Mix by hand until everything is wet. Cover and let sit 10-15 minutes. Knead lightly and add Maseca until a finger pressed into the ball of dough comes out mostly clean. Make two inch balls with the dough. Press, heat, and serve!

PRINTABLE recipe:  Homemade Corn Tortillas by Food Storage Moms

I thought you might like to see the difference between 4 types of common corn:

1. Dent or Field Corn: this is the corn typically used in Mexican cooking like tortillas. This corn is low in sugar but high in starch.

2. Sweet Corn: this is the corn usually found in cans or corn on the cob. It usually is white,  yellow or a combination of both.

3. Popcorn: this corn has a high moisture content. When you heat the kernels they explode from the steam, thus resulting in “popped” corn. Yummy with butter & salt! And caramel!

4.  Flint corn: mostly used as animal feed, usually ground into corn meal, this corn is used in many processed food items like chips and cereal.

I could eat these homemade corn tortillas every single day with beans and salsa! My mouth is watering right now.

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3 Great Ways To Preserve Strawberries – And How To Store Fresh!

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Strawberry season is among us which means we begin to receive many questions on how we preserve strawberries so the fruit can be enjoyed all year-long.  There is nothing more satisfying than taking a bite out of a fresh picked

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Dinner Planning with Freezer Meals + Tips

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Dinner planning with freezer meals can be easy, but thinking ahead and planning is the key. Be super smart, and save time and money with these dinner ideas | PreparednessMama

The freezer meal philosophy is a simple but powerful one. Make a plan for next week’s meals, purchase the ingredients, and make the meals ahead of time. Some people actually do all the cooking and then package the meals for freezer storage, others put the raw ingredients together and freeze it so it’s ready to […]

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Banana Split Energy Balls (Raw/Vegan/Deliciousness)

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You may have seen in a few recipe posts, that I’ve been working towards eating a more raw vegan diet lately. It’s a work in progress and I succeed about 85% of the time I’d say 🙂 I definitely try to minimize animal products and keep the rest of my diet consisting of whole foods including lots of fruits and vegetables. It’s not always easy to have healthy fresh fruits and veggies on hand every day, so I’ve been super grateful for my food storage foods (which I always keep upstairs for everyday use anyway) while I’ve been adjusting to this new way of eating. Sometimes I miss being able to have a yummy treat to just pop in my mouth when I need a little afternoon pick-me-up. Enter this recipe for Banana Split Energy Balls and my life is now complete. With a couple of little tweaks and using the Thrive I already had on hand, this recipe was easy to whip up and so so delicious!

Ingredients:
2 cups cashews (divided)
8 dates (divided)
2 T. almond milk
1/2 c. freeze-dried strawberries
1/2 c. freeze-dried pineapples
1/2 c. freeze-dried bananas
1 1/2 T. cocoa powder
1/2 T. peanut flour

Directions:

  1. Make four bowls of individually flavored mixtures as follows:

    Strawberry
    Pulse 1/2 cup cashews in a food processor until they turn to a coarse bread crumb consistency. Add 2 dates and strawberries and pulse until crumbly. Add in 1/2 T. almond milk and pulse until it holds together slightly. Move to a bowl and set aside.

    Pineapple
    Pulse 1/2 cup cashews in a food processor until they turn to a coarse bread crumb consistency. Add 2 dates and pineapple and pulse until crumbly. Add in 1/2 T. almond milk and pulse until it holds together slightly. Move to a bowl and set aside.

    Banana
    Pulse 1/2 cup cashews in a food processor until they turn to a coarse bread crumb consistency. Add 2 dates and bananas and pulse until crumbly. Add in 1/2 T. almond milk and pulse until it holds together slightly. Move to a bowl and set aside.

    Chocolate
    Pulse 1/2 cup cashews in a food processor until they turn to a coarse bread crumb consistency. Add 2 dates, cocoa, and peanut flour and pulse until crumbly. Add in 1/2 T. almond milk and pulse until it holds together slightly. Move to a bowl and set aside.

  2. Take 1 tsp. of each mixture and combine in the palm of your hand to form a ball. Each ball will taste like a banana split in your mouth! You can also form individual-flavored balls if it is taking to long to make the combined version. I made this one and tried to make it look like a real banana split shape. haha. I found the pineapple and strawberry varieties to be my favorite so it was yummy to have individual ones to snack on in my favorite flavors too.


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Canning Equipment – The Must-Have Tools For Canning Season

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Whether you are new to canning or an experienced canner, having the right canning equipment is crucial.  As canning season approaches, we thought we would answer some frequently asked questions about what type of canning equipment that we use and

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Slow Cooker Sweet + Spicy Pulled Pork

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The next time you think about making slow cooker pulled pork, remember to use apple juice as the liquid and play with the spices you have. Sweet and spicy are my family's favorite. What are yours? | PreparednessMama

Freezes well and feeds a crowd. My husband has always liked to cook and BBQ. When we moved to Texas a few years ago the BBQing got kicked up a few notches. He will cook hamburgers, chicken, steak and even ribs. The one thing I crave and can’t get out of my head is the […]

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5 Secrets To Making The Perfect Potato Salad – Amish Potato Salad Recipe Included

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Making potato salad doesn’t have to be complicated. There are a few key steps that will help you make the perfect potato salad each and every time! 5 Secrets To Making The Perfect Potato Salad   1. Pick the Right

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Drunken Chicken Recipe – Out Of This World Chicken! Crockpot & Instant Pot Recipes!

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If you have never had Drunken Chicken, you must give this chicken recipe a try!  We first ate Drunken Chicken at a Cajun inspired restaurant called J. Gumbo’s.  It was love at first bite!  However, the problem is that we

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Three Easy Cakes To Make From Scratch

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Can you use three easy cakes to make from scratch? I know summer is coming and we are starting to hear about family reunions. I love taking cakes to family reunions. I can still remember a very yummy cake that Mark’s aunt brought to the Loosli family reunion every year. I swear we all fought to get in line to get a piece of her cake. It was a white sheet cake, topped with real whipping cream and topped with homegrown elderberries or loganberries in a rich gooey sauce. Oh my goodness, I can almost taste it, right now!

Have you heard about the famous chocolate Texas sheet cake? I’m not sure if it was REALLY a Texas cake or not. Maybe it started in Texas, I don’t know. In Utah, we tend to take this cake to every funeral or family reunion because it’s easy to make and serves a lot of people. I think anything with chocolate is always my favorite. So let’s get started with three of my favorite easy cakes to make from scratch.

Easy Cakes:

Texas Chocolate Sheet Cake

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup butter or one cube
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1/4 cup cocoa-dry
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon real salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
 Instructions:
  1. Put the butter, water, and oil in a medium size pan. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat and add flour, sugar, cocoa, soda, salt, and vanilla. Blend in the slightly beaten eggs and buttermilk. Pour into a greased cookie sheet 12″ by 17″ or a 9″ by 13″ cake pan. Bake the cakes @ 350 degrees. Bake the cookie sheet cake approx. 20 minutes. Bake the 9″ by 13″ cake pan for approx. 37 minutes.
  2. Frosting: melt one cube butter in a saucepan, add 4 tablespoons cocoa and 5 tablespoons milk. Bring to a boil. Mix in 4 cups powdered sugar and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Pour over cake while it’s still warm. This cake is very moist and never has any leftovers.

PRINTABLE recipe: Texas Chocolate Sheet Cake by Food Storage Moms

Carrot Cake

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 tsp. soda
  • 2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 cup oil
  • 4 eggs
  • 3 cups shredded/grated carrots
  • 1 tsp. vanilla

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Combine the flour, sugar, soda, seasonings, and oil. Add the rest of the ingredients and thoroughly mix together. Grease a bundt cake pan or two 9-inch cake pans. You can also make 24 cupcakes.

Baking times:

Bundt cake: bake 45 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean

Two-9-inch cake pans: 30 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean

Cupcakes: bake approximately 20-30 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean

PRINTABLE Recipe: Carrot Cake by Food Storage Moms

PRINTABLE recipe: Cream Cheese Frosting by Food Storage Moms

Oatmeal Cake with Brown Sugar Glaze

1-1/4 cup boiling water

1 cup regular uncooked oatmeal (not instant)

1/2 cup softened butter

1 cup sugar

1 cup brown sugar

1 tsp vanilla

2 eggs

1-1/2 cups flour

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1 teaspoon cinnamon

Instructions:

Pour the boiling water over the oatmeal and let it set for 20 minutes. Grab a bowl, use a mixer to beat the butter until creamy, add the sugars and beat until fluffy. Blend in the vanilla and eggs and thoroughly blend until smooth. Add the remaining ingredients and mix them together. Pour into greased pan and bake for 30-40 minutes at 350 degrees, depending on altitude. While the cake is baking mix the frosting recipe below and spread carefully on the cake after it is done. Put the cake back in the oven and broil until the glaze bubbles.

Frosting, combine the following ingredients and spread on the hot baked cake:

1/4 cup butter, melted

1/2 cup brown sugar

3 tablespoons cream

1/3 cup chopped nuts

3/4 cup shredded coconut

PRINTABLE recipe: Oatmeal Cake with Brown Sugar Glaze by Food Storage Moms

Sometimes we just need to make some easy cakes and enjoy a treat with family, friends, and neighbors. Who wouldn’t love a piece of cake from a friend? Thanks again for following my blog and giving me input so we can learn together.

My favorite things:

KitchenAid KHM512ER 5-Speed Ultra Power Hand Mixer, Empire Red

Danish Dough Hand Whisk / Mixer 11″

Top Rated Bellemain Stainless Steel Non-Slip Mixing Bowls with Lids, 4 Piece Set Includes 1 Qt., 1.5 Qt., 3 Qt. & 5 Qt.

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Strawberry Rhubarb Jam Recipe – Incredible Flavor, And No Pectin Required!

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When I first made strawberry rhubarb jam, it was purely out of necessity. As a young 20 something year old,  I had received a bundle of rhubarb from a friendly neighbor, and had absolutely no idea what to do with

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Zesty Wheat Berry Black Bean Chili

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I’ve been transitioning to a vegetarian diet over the past few months and have discovered that most food storage recipes are fabulous for this new way of eating. I love that I can try new recipes and know that they fit in with the way I want to eat right now, as well as are full of ingredients that I have in my long term food storage. I made this Zesty Wheat Berry Black Bean Chili using my Instant Pot and it turned out amazing, wasn’t too time consuming and is fairly inexpensive with all the food storage substitutions I made! Win-win-win.


zesty wheat berry black bean chili

Zesty Wheat Berry Black Bean Chili

Ingredients:

2 T. olive oil
1/2 c. freeze-dried chopped onions
1/2 c. freeze-dried red bell peppers
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp. chili powder
1 1/2 tsp. ground cumin
1 tsp. dried oregano
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. freshly ground pepper
2 c. instant black beans
2 14-ounce cans no-salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained
1/4 c.freeze-dried green chili peppers
2 c. vegetable broth
2 tsp. brown sugar
2 cups cooked wheat berries (about 1 cup dry)
Juice of 1 lime
1 avocado, diced
1/4 cup freeze-dried cilantro

Directions:

1. Cook wheat berries in your Instant Pot for quickest prepping. Stovetop will work fine too. The recipe requires two cups of cooked berries so you would need about 1 cup of dry wheat to get that. I did a little extra just to make sure I had enough.

2. Heat oil in a large pot. Add onion and bell pepper and heat just until slightly browned. Stir in garlic, chili powder, cumin, oregano, salt and pepper and let cook for about 1 minute.

3. Add instant beans, tomatoes, chili peppers, vegetable broth and brown sugar. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 25 minutes.

4. Stir in cooked wheat berries and heat through, about 5 minutes more. Remove from the heat.

5. Stir in lime juice. Garnish each bowl with avocado and cilantro.

6. EAT!


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Hot and Spicy Garlic Dill Pickle Recipe – Our Secret Recipe!

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Jim tells everyone about our Hot and Spicy Garlic Dill Pickle recipe. So for today’s recipe of the week, we decided it was a good time to share our most famous pickle recipe.  These pickles are a favorite to anyone

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Early American Dairy

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Early American Dairy

Published on Apr 10, 2017

Today Hannah Zimmerman from Historic Locust Grove sits down with Jon to discuss the history of early American dairy, as well as demonstrating the process of making butter.

Locust Grove Website ▶▶ http://locustgrove.org/

Help support the channel with Patreon ▶ https://www.patreon.com/townsend ▶▶

Twitter ▶ @Jas_Townsend
Facebook ▶ facebook.com/jas.townsend
Instagram ▶ jastownsendandson

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3 Mouth Watering Deviled Eggs Recipes – Which One Is Your Favorite?

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Are you looking for the Best Deviled Eggs recipes? Check out our three favorite ways to make deviled eggs so that your whole family is satisfied. Although there are several ways to make deviled eggs, we have included the ones

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One Week of Food Prep in One Day

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Cooking from scratch is the best way to save money in your family budget. If you can do one week of food prep in one day you will be ahead of the game.

Cooking from scratch is the best way to save money in your family budget, but it can be time-consuming when you don’t have a plan. If you can do one week of food prep in one day you will be ahead of the game at dinner time. I’m excited to have my daughter Allison Easterling, […]

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How to Cook Garlic Scapes

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Have you ever heard of garlic scapes? If you are a garlic lover and grow some yourself, chances are you already know what a scape is, but you might still be wondering how to cook garlic scapes.

If you have never grown garlic, you may have no clue just what a garlic scape is!

I’m Annie, and Marie has invited me to tell you about one of her favourite vegetables! I started growing garlic years ago when I put 12 cloves in the ground. My husband and I love garlic so much, we grew more each year and finally started Bradley Creek Garlic Farms! Now we grow fields of garlic and ship it all across Canada, to people looking to start their own garlic patches. I know a thing (or three) about garlic and appreciate it for the healthy, delicious, versatile bulb that it is. (And look for Marie’s posts this autumn as she finds out if Bradley Creek Garlic grows as well in Nova Scotia)

See those beautiful curly things in the photo? Those are garlic scapes. Aren’t they pretty? If you look closely you can see the white seed pod on the end.

There are two general varieties of garlic: hardneck and softneck.

Softneck garlic is usually grown in southern states such as California. It grows where the winters are very mild.

Hardneck garlic grows great in Canada and the northern US. Anywhere with a cold winter is a great place to grow some hardneck garlic. Here at Bradley Creek Garlic Farms in BC, we grow a lot of hardneck garlic that we ship across Canada. That means we also grow a lot of scapes!

Garlic Scapes

These pretty things are garlic scapes.

What is a Garlic Scape?

When you grow hardneck garlic, a shoot will start to grow and come out of the central stalk of the plant. This is going to be the scape. Every plant will send up one scape and usually growers snap these off the plant.

The best time to snap off the scapes is when they have finished making a full curl. If snapped earlier, the scape may try to regrow.  Since most people want the garlic bulb underground to grow as large as possible, they don’t want any of the plant energy going to growing out that scape. This is why they are removed.

Garlic scape curling

See that pretty curl? That’s what you’re watching for.

At the end of the scapes are creamy coloured garlic seed pods; inside are tiny garlic seeds called bulbils. You can plant these little seeds and get garlic, but it will take a few years for them to develop full grown heads.

The faster way to grow garlic is to remove the individual cloves from a bulb and plant those.

But … back to the scape. What to do with it?

Cook it! There – that’s the short answer.

Scapes are a wonderful garlicky treat to enjoy, well before garlic bulbs are available. Those bulbs in the grocery store are probably NOT fresh, by the way! Garlic in Canada is harvested around the end of July. If you are buying grocery store garlic in April, it was imported.

How to Cook Garlic Scapes

Here are four ways to cook garlic scapes. You can either cook them whole or cut them just before the white seed head. Let me share with you some very simple garlic scapes recipes that I believe you’ll enjoy.

Steamed – You will likely need to cut the scapes in half or thirds so they fit in your steamer. Just steam them over water in a steamer basket for about 5 minutes. If you like them softer instead of crunchy, just steam them for a few minutes longer.

Grilled – Lightly steam them for about 4 minutes and then lay them on your grill. Brush them with sesame oil and then place on the grill. You can lay them on foil if you like, but you don’t have to.

Grill them for about 3 minutes, then flip them over, brush with a bit of oil and grill for another 3 minutes. Along with grilled steaks and a nice salad, this makes for a wonderful summer meal.

Fried – Start off with heating 4 tbsps of sesame oil along with 2 tbsp soya sauce. Add the scapes and fry for about 10 minutes on medium heat. Remove and pat them with paper towel to remove excess oil.

Pickled – This method takes more time of course, but is a great way to enjoy scapes all winter long. I like to cut the scapes in uniform lengths so they fill the jar, like a pickled bean would. Some people just chop the scapes into pieces and toss all sizes into the jar before pickling. Here’s a recipe for Pickled Garlic Scapes.

You can find garlic scapes in some chain grocery stores as the grocers are realizing the popularity is increasing. If you can’t find them there,  look in smaller ethnic groceries and at your local Farmers Markets.

Perhaps you will want to grow some of your own garlic this Fall and produce your own this year – especially now that you know how to cook garlic scapes!

Mississippi Pot Roast Recipe – Flavor Heaven! Slow Cooker or Instant Pot Recipes

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The Mississippi Pot Roast craze is almost as big as the Instant Pot craze. If you haven’t heard of Mississippi Pot Roast, just take a moment on Pinterest and you will!   This recipe has gone viral and after taking one

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3 Survival Breads Pioneers Made Without An Oven

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If you’ve ever baked bread from scratch, then kudos to you. Most people wouldn’t even know where to begin. But chances are, you used an electric oven, and there could come a time when electricity is either too expensive or completely unavailable. That’s why you should learn how to bake bread without an oven. There […]

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7 Secrets To Successful Canning – How To Preserve This Year’s Harvest!

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Now is the time to get ready for a successful canning and preserving season! One of the best things about growing your own food is keeping it the year around for great homemade taste! For an individual who wants to start

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Homemade Zuppa Soup Recipe – Copycat Olive Garden Version

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Zuppa soup is one of the most craved soups in our household.  Although its formal name is Zuppa Toscana soup at the Olive Garden restaurant, in our house, we shortened it to plain old Zuppa soup.   In an effort to replicate

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A Complete Guide to Bone Broth

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What Is Bone Broth?

Have you heard of bone broth? Maybe you’ve heard it mentioned, or you have friends who gush over how much they love it, but you aren’t quite sure what it is why it is so highly praised by many.

Bone broth is a liquid obtained from simmering bones from chicken, turkey, pork or beef in water.

Honestly, that’s it. What everyone calls bone broth today is what Grandma called ‘soup bones’ and Mom called ‘broth’ – it comes from long, slow simmering of bones in water. The biggest difference between bone broth and regular stock is that bone broth is cooked a lot longer. The end result is a tasty liquid that’s delicious on its own, but also makes a wonderful and nutritious base for soups and stews.

Nutrition is one of the main reasons people make and consume bone broth regularly. Of course it’s also very tasty, but more on that in a minute. When you boil bones for a long period of time, you leach all sorts of nutrients, minerals and other things that are good for you like glucosamine and collagen.

It’s also good for your immune system. Remember Mom or Grandma making a big pot of chicken soup anytime someone would get sick? The same principal is at work here. Think of bone broth as a more concentrated version of Grandma’s healing soup. The broth may even help you sleep better at night. Sip a cup of the tasty liquid before bed. It’ll work better than the hot milk your mom used to bring you.

To make bone broth you take bones like those from that leftover chicken or turkey carcass that’s still sitting in your fridge from last night. Cover it with plenty of water and simmer for several hours. How long you cook your broth is up to you. Twelve hours gives you a very decent broth, but cooking it even longer makes it even more nutritious. If you’re using the bones from a roasted chicken, consider tossing them in a large slow cooker and making your broth right in there. They can safely bubble away as you go about your day. A pressure cooker makes incredible bone broth and cuts the time down considerably.

You can drink the finished hot broth as is, season it up with your favorite herbs and spices, or use it to make a pot of soup or stew. The cooled broth can be stored in the fridge for about 4 days or in the freezer for up to a year.

The next time you pick up a rotisserie chicken from the grocery store or roast that Thanksgiving turkey, don’t toss out the bones when you’re done. Use them to make a batch of delicious bone broth. Once you try it, you’ll be surprised just how easy it is to make and how truly wonderful it is.

Why Make Bone Broth?

Okay, it’s fine for me to tell you that bone broth is good for you, but what exactly do I mean by that?

It’s Tasty

My mother’s excited that I featured her freshly made bone broth. Thanks, Mom!

Let’s start with the obvious – homemade bone broth tastes really good. If you haven’t tried making any of these, do yourself a favor and get on it. Bone broth has a deep rich flavor that you just won’t get out of a cartoon of chicken stock.

Drink the broth on its own, or use it as the base for soups, stews and sauces. You can use bone broth in any recipe that calls for broth or stock. Or try simmering your rice or vegetables in the broth for added flavor and nutrition. Rice that has been cooked in dark, nutritious bone broth rarely requires any other seasoning.

After you taste your homemade broth, and then try cooking with that insipid colourless stuff from the grocery store, you’ll be convinced.

It’s Frugal

Bone broth is made from water and the bones you’d toss in the green bin (or garbage if you don’t have compostable pickup). It doesn’t get a lot more frugal than cooking … let’s face it … garbage! For no more than the cost of a little power to simmer the bones, you have something that’s even tastier than high-end stock you buy at the store. Mom says the old folks just called this ‘soup bones’ – and it simmered forever on the back of the wood cookstove.

If you’re buying quality chicken, turkey or beef, you can make the most of every dollar you spend by using every little bit including the bones. Then take it even further by making soups and stews with the broth. It’s a great way to make even little bits of meat and veggies go a long way.

It’s Good For You

Let’s not forget about the health benefits of bone broth. There’s a reason Grandma would put on a pot of homemade chicken soup when someone got sick. Bone broth is full of minerals including magnesium and calcium. The fat content in the broth helps our bodies absorb the various minerals. It’s also full of collagen and gelatin which are good for your skin, hair and joints. Add to that the immunity boosting properties of a good cup of broth and it’s no wonder this has been praised for centuries.

There you have it. Bone broth is one of the tastiest and inexpensive health foods that you can make right in your own kitchen. Grab that chicken carcass leftover from last night’s dinner from the fridge, get out your large stock pot and get cooking.

How To Make Broth

Bone broth gets better the longer you simmer the bones in the water. Good bone broth has cooked for at least 12 hours. Great bone broth takes a good 48 to 72 hours. There are a few different ways to make it. We’ll go over them in more detail, but the general idea is to either use a stock pot on the stove, put your slow cooker to work, or make something called perpetual broth where you continually cook and use the broth.

The method you use is a matter of preference. If you are going to be around, use the stove top method. If you work outside the home or want to keep the broth going overnight, a crockpot will be a better choice. And if you have a pressure cooker, that’s probably the fastest, most energy-efficient method. Pick what works for you and start making some of this delicious broth.

Pressure Cooking

You can also use your pressure canner to preserve your broth for later!

There are two ways to pressure cook, and I have done both. I have a 23 Quart Presto Pressure Canner/Cooker (despite several years of insisting that I’m getting rid of it, I haven’t yet!) and an 8 Quart Gourmia Electric Pressure Cooker.

On the stovetop, simply bring your big canning pot full of bones and water to pressure and then lower the heat so that it cooks at 10 PSI (adjust if you are at a higher altitude) for an hour. Let the pressure decrease naturally until the safety lock opens, and then carefully open the lid.

My electric pressure cooker has a Soup option that runs for 25 minutes. I actually run it through that twice in order to get intensely rich and flavourful broth.

Stock Pot Broth

This is the traditional way of making broth and when I made it on my wood cook stove, this is the method I used. I use my 21 gallon pressure canner pot – it has a good solid lid and is heavy enough to handle hours and hours of slow cooking. You can make a large batch of bone broth and use even the largest batch of bones or the Thanksgiving turkey carcass.

The easiest way to make your first batch of bone broth is to start with a cooked chicken. Roast it yourself or head to your local grocery store and pick up a rotisserie chicken. (Home cooked is best, but those pre-cooked chickens are definitely convenient!)

Pull the cooked meat of the chicken and serve it for dinner. Store any leftover meat in the fridge to use later on to make chicken and noodle or chicken and rice soup with the bone broth you’re about to make.

Put everything that’s left – all the bones and any remaining bits and pieces of meat – into a large pot that has a lid.  I include the skin, too, because it has nutritional value that is better off in my broth.

Fill it with plenty of cold water. The more water you add, the more broth you’ll get in the end.  Don’t fill it all the way to the top or you risk the liquid bubbling over.

Next, add a good splash of apple cider vinegar to the pot.  If you don’t have the vinegar in your pantry don’t fret it. You can add a splash of red wine or white vinegar if you have that, and even some fresh lemon juice works. The acid in the vinegar helps get all the minerals out of the bones and into the broth. But again, don’t worry if you don’t have it. Your broth will be just as tasty and almost as good for you without it.

Cover the pot with the lid and crank up the heat until everything comes to a full boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook your bone broth for a minimum of 12 hours. Letting it simmer even longer – up to 72 hours – would be perfect, but you don’t want it on the stove while you’re out of the house or sleeping. Of course you can use your slow cooker for that long, but what if you don’t have one?

Start the broth in the morning on a day when you know you’ll be home, using a heavy pot that has a very tight lid. I use my heavy duty pressure canner since it seals tight. Simmer it all day until you’re ready to go to bed, and then turn up the heat just long enough to bring it to a boil. Turn off the burner for the night, and make sure the lid is on tightly, but keep the broth sitting on the stove. Do not remove the lid. In the morning, as soon as you wake up bring the liquid back to a boil without taking off the lid. After it has become bubbly hot again, lower the heat and continue simmering.

This is actually, in my experience, safer than trying to cool down that big pot of broth quickly enough and then bringing it back to boiling.  The trick is to bring it to a boil briefly in the evening and then again in the morning, both times with the lid on.

The broth will be tasty after a few hours of simmering but will get better with time. After it has cooked for 12 hours you can start to use it. Just replace the liquid you’re taking out with more water to keep stretching the broth.

Strain some of the finished bone broth into a smaller pot, add the shredded chicken along with some rice or noodles and leftover veggies to make some soup. Or just drink the broth. It’s delicious.

Strain the liquid and store it in the fridge for 3 to 4 Days. You can also freeze the broth for up to a year.

Crock Pot Broth

If you don’t want to “baby-sit” your broth all day or continue to simmer it for 24 to 72 hours straight, and you don’t have a pressure cooker, put your slow cooker to work. This works particularly well for a chicken carcass or any small batch of bones. (Why don’t you have a pressure cooker or canner?)

Put the bones in the crockpot and cover them with plenty of water. Again, adding a splash of apple cider vinegar will help get the most nutrients and minerals from the bones. Cover and cook on low as long as desired.

Strain out the liquid and if you’d like, start another bath with the same bones, since you’re using a lot less water than if you were using a stock pot. You can get up to 3 batches of bone broth out of each batch of bones.

Perpetual Broth

Last but not least there’s something called perpetual bone broth. The basic idea is that you have a pot of broth simmering at all times. You dip out what you need to drink or cook with, add more water and bones as needed and keep it going. You can do this on the back of the stove, turning it off at night, but unless you have a wood stove it may be safer and more efficient to make your perpetual broth in the slow cooker.

This is a good idea if you’re sick and are trying to get a constant supply of hot broth to sip on without a lot of work. Put your chicken bones in the slow cooker along with any herbs or seasonings you like, cover with water and cook for 12 hours. Then start dipping out a cup or two of broth at a time, refilling it with water each time.  Use the broth for 3 to 6 days, then remove everything from the slow cooker, clean it and start over.

What Bones Can Be Used?

Bone broth can be made from just about any type of bone, but for best result, make sure you include some larger bones containing marrow and some knuckles and/or feet (chicken) to get plenty of collagen. Let’s look at some of the different types of bones you can use and where to find them.

Chicken Bones

Here’s something easy. Chicken bones are the perfect “gateway” bones to make your first batch of bone broth. Go buy a nice organic chicken. Roast it and enjoy the meat for dinner. Toss everything else into a large stock pot, cover with water and simmer at least 12 hours.  It’s a great way to make sure you’re using up every little bit of the bird and you and up with some tasty broth.

If you have a farmer in your area that raises chickens for meat or eggs, ask what they do with the bones. You may just find a source of chicken bones free of charge. You can make broth from raw bones, but the flavor will be better if you roast them in the oven first.

Turkey Bones

Turkey works just as well as chicken. You may just want a larger pot. Before you toss that turkey carcass leftover from Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner, make a big batch of broth. Bone broth freezes really well. Make a big batch and run the broth through a strainer. Store it in containers and freeze until you’re ready to use it.

Bones can be boiled several times to make more batches of broth. Make one batch to freeze and then another one to use right away. Use less water the second time around to still get a flavorful broth.

Beef and Pork Bones

Both beef and pork bones make for some amazing broth. They are a little bit harder to find though. Talk to the butcher at your local grocery store and ask him to save the bones for you. Sometimes you can even find inexpensive soup bones in the meat department.

Your local farmers market is another great place to source your bones. Talk to the farmers. Even if they don’t raise beef or pork themselves, they can get you in touch with someone who does.

Roast your bones before you make the broth for best results. Just spread them out on a baking dish and bake at 450 F for 20 to 25 minutes. Allow them to cool until they are comfortable and safe to handle. Put the bones in a large stock pot, add plenty of water and boil for at least 12 hours. Use a combination of marrow bones and knuckle bones to get the best broth with the most health benefits.

Bison and Wild Game Bones

If you’re lucky enough to have a hunter in the family, ask him to save the bones for you. Or call up your local game processing business and ask about buying bones from deer. You treat them just like pork or beef bones.

The same goes for bison bones. If you have a bison farm in the area, it is worth making a call. While you’re there, pick up some ground bison too for some of the tastiest burgers you’ve ever had.

How To Use It In Cooking

You’ve made a big batch of broth and end up with more than you can possibly drink before it goes bad. Freeze what you can’t use right away and thaw it down the road to use in your everyday cooking.  Store your broth in glass jars or plastic containers and store them in the fridge or freezer. Thaw them as you need a big batch to make a pot of soup.

Another option is to freeze the finished broth in ice cube trays. Once they are frozen solid, you can transfer them to a freezer bag. Pop some of the frozen broth cubes into the pan / pot whenever you’re cooking veggies for a little extra boost of flavor and nutrition.

Aside from drinking fresh broth by the cup, you can use it anywhere you would use chicken broth or vegetable stock. The obvious first choice is of course as a base for soups and stews. The bone broth will add a lot of extra flavor and nutrition to all your favorite soups. Instead of adding water, or water along with a couple of bouillon cubes, use your bone broth. The broth gives all your soups and stews that yummy homemade flavor. Even something you throw together quickly will taste like you’ve cooked it for hours on the back of the stove.

But don’t just stop there. Try boiling your rice in beef broth instead of plain water for a tasty side dish. Not only will it taste much better, you’re also adding a lot of extra nutrition. You can do the same with pasta. Boil your noodles in the broth, then serve the broth in bowls before the meal.

Speaking of meals, we like to enjoy a cup of bone broth at meal time. In addition to adding lot of minerals and other good nutrients, it fills us up faster and keeps us from over eating.

If you’re making mashed potatoes, add a couple of splashes of broth to thin them out as needed. Much tastier than using water and better for you than adding more milk. Or go all out and make a batch of potato soup instead of mashed potatoes.

If you’re cooking a big pot of dry beans, replace some of the water with bone broth. You’ll get a lot of great flavor without having to add a ham bone or bacon. Give it a try the next time you put on a pot of pinto beans.

Storing and Freezing Broth

Do you remember that first little batch of bone broth you made? Chances are that it was gone before it had time to cool all the way down. Since then you’ve invested in a much larger stock pot and you’re buying soup and knuckle bones by the pounds. The end result is a lot more broth then you can use up right away. Making big batches is a lot easier and more efficient. Now let’s find out how to store everything you can’t use up right away.

Storing Bone Broth In The Fridge

Allow your bone broth to cool completely after you’ve finished boiling it. Anything you haven’t used up by this point should be strained into clean jars and stored in the fridge for up to a week.

You can use the broth straight from the fridge in your favorite soups or stews. If you want a cup to drink, pour some in a small pot and warm over the stove. Add a few herbs and spices to taste. This will come in particularly handy after the broth has set for a few day and doesn’t taste quite as good as the first day.

Freezing Bone Broth For Long Term Storage

If you have more broth than you can use over the course of a few days, it’s probably a good idea to go ahead and freeze the majority of it. Once your pot of broth and bones has cooled enough to be safe to handle, strain the liquid into a large bowl or pitcher.

Depending on how you plan to use the broth later on, you can either freeze it in glass jars or plastic containers, or pour it into ice cube trays for smaller portions of broths that you can add to veggies as you cook them, think out mashed potatoes etc. Or use a combination of both.

Get your freezer containers ready and stir up your broth to make sure all the nutrients are equally distributed. Pour the broth in the freezer containers and allow them to stay on the counter until they have cooled down to room temperature.

Label your containers with the contents and today’s date and move them to the freezer. When using ice cube trays, set them in the freezer for a few hours or until the broth is frozen solid, then pop them out and transfer them to a freezer bag. Label the bag and put it back in the freezer. You can grab individual bone broth cubes as you need them.

Stock vs. Bone Broth vs. Vegetable Broth

It can get a little confusing and many of the terms are used interchangeably. Let’s break down what they mean and how each type of liquid is prepared. Before we dive in, please be aware that there is no standard as to what is called stock and what’s called broth. A recipe may call for stock or you may buy chicken broth at the store. In those instances think of the terms interchangeably. In other words, if a recipe calls for stock and all you can find is broth, go with it. Don’t stop making a recipe because it calls for one of them and you have the other. If you’re making it at home from scratch on the other hand, you can make true stock or broth.

Next, let’s get vegetables out of the way.

When it comes to vegetable broth and stock, they truly are the same thing. You’ll see in a moment that the difference between stock and broth has to do with meat and bones. Since neither are found in vegetable broth or stock, they are the same thing. To make vegetable broth, you simmer things like onion, garlic, carrots, celery, broccoli etc. in a large pot of water. You can even add potatoes or sweet potatoes for extra body. Use whatever you have on hand. Even scraps will work. Boil them in water for an hour or until your broth has a good flavor. Strain and store.

Now let’s get to the meat and bones. We’re talking stock, broth and bone broth here. They can be made from chicken, turkey, beef, pork, etc. You can mix and match but most of us will focus on one type of meat at a time to make chicken stock or beef broth for example.

Broth is usually a lighter liquid. To make it you simmer bits of meat and sometimes bone along with some vegetables and herbs in water. Broth is only cooked for an hour or so and the finished liquid will remain liquid when cooled.

Stock on the other hand includes a lot more bone and cooks for at least a few hours. When I make it, I like to include a mixture of cooked meaty bones and raw bones. Meat and vegetables, herbs etc. are often included as well for more flavor. The longer cooking time allows things like cartilage and fat to dissolve into the broth.  The end result is a liquid with a lot more flavor and body. It also tends to firm up (at least part of it) when cooled. Broth is a lighter liquid while stock has more body and more nutrients.

Bone broth is actually more of a specialty stock. As you’re reading this, if it’s familiar from childhood, you might have had a super frugal mom like mine. Bone broth is the only kind of stock I knew!  It is made mainly from bones without much meat left on them and vegetables are optional. Good bone broth has cooked for at least 24 hours. Adding some apple cider vinegar helps dissolve the cartilage and bring out the nutrition from the marrow. In fact, when I make beef bone broth, I try to crack the big bones to get all of the nutritious marrow into my broth.

Adding Variety to Your Broth With Veggies and Spices

Once you’ve made a few batches of plain bone broth it’s time to spice things up and add a little variety. The beauty of making your own homemade broth is that you can add just about anything to it. It’s your broth and you can fix it how you want it.

There are two ways to do this. You can add some veggies, aromatics and spices during the cooking process, or you can spice things up once the broth is finished.

Adding some spices and seasonings after the fact is a great way to change up the flavor of individual bowls of broth. It also helps your bone broth flavor after it has sat in the fridge for a few days. Bone broth will always be its tastiest right after it’s cooked. But it’s easy to doctor things up with a little garlic salt, some pepper and anything else you like in your spice cabinet.

Keeping things basic when you make a big batch of broth makes it easy to use the broth later. You can boil your rice in it, add it to your favorite stew or drop a little (just a little!) in your green smoothie. With relatively neutral flavor of pure bone broth, you will get good results no matter what you make.

And as mentioned before you can season it to your liking after the broth is done. Here are a couple of herbs, spices and the likes you may want to add to your broth:

  • Salt and Pepper
  • Garlic Salt
  • Onion Powder
  • Green Onion
  • Fresh or Dried Herbs :
    • Parsley
    • Basil
    • Oregano
    • Rosemary
    • Sage
    • Chive
    • Thyme
  • Spices:
    • Cayenne
    • Turmeric
    • Curry
    • Cumin
  • Soy Sauce
  • Hot Sauce

Of course this isn’t an all-inclusive list. If it sounds tasty, try adding it to your broth for added flavor.

The other option is of course to add herbs, spices, veggies and aromatics to add during the cooking process – just remember that that can limit how you use it later.  When you start your bone broth, look through the fridge for veggie scraps. Onions, carrots, celery, garlic and leek are all great options. Add them to the broth as it starts to boil. Even peels and scraps will work since you’ll be straining the broth. Just make sure they are clean before you toss them in the pot.

Dried herbs and spices can also be added in the beginning. When it comes to fresh herbs though, I wait until the end of the cooking process. Most fresh herbs are fairly delicate and you’ll lose all the good flavor and any nutritional benefits if you boil them for 12 hours or longer. Just hold off and throw them in for the last few minutes before cooling and straining your broth.

Now, at the end of this, do you understand how to make bone broth and why you should? This is what Grandma had simmering on the back of the stove for days, but you can make it, too!

Corned Beef and Cabbage Recipe – An American Irish Tradition

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 So maybe corned beef and cabbage really didn’t originate in Ireland, however, it has become a meal time tradition on St. Patrick’s Day here in America.   And if you are wondering about what the term corned beef means, don’t

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Quick Pressure Cooker Recipe Rosy Meat

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There are days when I love my electric pressure cooker and days when I can’t find a single recipe that works. Despite all of those recipes that I have which, honestly, work perfectly well.

Perhaps you struggle with that, too, wondering how to make something in your electric pressure cooker that makes it worthwhile to lug that heavy contraption out.

Rosy Meat is a recipe that I have been making for years, long before I ever knew what an electric pressure cooker was.

I’ve made it in a slowcooker and on the stovetop, including on the wood cookstove. I’ve made it with commercially canned products and homemade, and everything in between. It’s versatile and delicious.

And it is almost perfectly designed for the electric pressure cooker.

The ingredients really can’t be simpler. You need:

1 pint cranberry sauce – homemade cranberry sauce with whole berries, or cranberry jelly, or the commercial equivalent. Once my mom wanted to make it with whole frozen cranberries. We added 1 cup water and 1/2 cup sugar – it turned out great.

1 pint tomato sauce – I’ve made this with pretty much every variation of tomato+sauce, including commercially canned tomato soup, chunky primavera pasta sauce, and barbecue sauce. They all turn out differently but they’re all good.

and some meat. Meatballs, chunks of cooked ham, a few raw chicken breasts … a lot of different things work with it. We’re using meatballs today – maybe three pounds?

This recipe is just made for flexibility. Hey, do you notice the lid on that cranberry sauce? Don’t believe people who tell you to toss your home-canned food after a year. March 2017 it is, and that cranberry sauce is every bit as good as when I put it up. How’s that for energy-saving food storage?

Home-canning is basically a time capsule in a jar.

Just wash off the lid really well before you open it.

Here’s a secret ingredient today – I’m adding a drained pint of carrots. We have one little boy who insists he hates carrots.

He doesn’t. But he thinks he does.

So I’m pureeing the tomatoes and carrots before adding them to the electric pressure cooker.

No carrot chunks in there.

This recipe is so simple my nine year old makes it.

Mix the tomato sauce and cranberry sauce. Add meat. Heat through. Obviously raw chicken breasts take longer than fully cooked meatballs, and the sauce will look slightly different in the end.

It doesn’t really look so great before it cooks, but most things don’t.

I’m making it in my electric pressure cooker today. You can use a crockpot. You could put it in a covered casserole and put it in the oven (although that seems like a waste of electricity). And if you want to put it in a covered pot and let it simmer on the stove, that works, too!

Cover the pot, though, because it makes the same splattery mess that tomato products always make.

It’s good stuff.

When it comes to serving this, the sky is the limit again.

It works well with plain white rice.

You could serve it over mashed potatoes.

These meatballs are positively delicious in a meatball sub.

You could probably take them out of the sauce, stick toothpicks in them and call them appetizers.

Don’t toss out any leftover sauce. It keeps just fine in the refrigerator for several days, and you can add a different kind of meat to it. Maybe meatballs tonight and a few chicken breasts a few days from today?

Dried Cranberry Banana Bread

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So I did test out my dried cranberries and, of course, there were no recipes for bread using dried cranberries so I made one up. I used the cranberries right out of the bag and because they are so light most of them rose to the top. I might try letting them soak in water next time and the bread was a little dry so that might help with the dryness as well or I might use milk instead of water and see if that helps. The flavor however, was outstanding. Such a nice light banana taste with just a touch of cranberry. It was wonderful.

Dried Cranberry Banana Bread

Grease two loaf pans. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

4 cups flour
1 1/2 cups sugar
3 tsp baking powder
2 tsp salt
1/2 cup margarine or butter (1 stick)

Combine these ingredients in a bowl and cut in butter until pea sized.

Add:

2 eggs
2 bananas, mashed
1 1/2 cup water

Mix well.

Add 2 cups dried cranberries. Pour half of the batter into two loaf pans. Bake for 1 hour.

Orange Marmalade Recipe – Ready To Enjoy In Just 30 Minutes!

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I have to admit, I have never been a huge fan of orange marmalade.  However, I do enjoy, and often crave, the popular Chinese take out dish of Orange Chicken. Which has now led me to start loving orange marmalade.

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The Best Marinated Carrot Salad Recipe In The World

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This is the best marinated carrot salad recipe in the world! Oh, my gosh, Mark and I were invited for dinner the other night to some friends house and Mark mentioned to them that I am trying to stay clear of meat and dairy products. First of all, I try not to tell anyone about the healthy way of life I am working on. So this darling couple had every vegetable you can imagine on beautiful dishes to munch on and chitty chat around the table, oh how I loved this! They fixed the best salmon on the barbecue for the three of them and I was loving the rice, salads and all the fresh vegetables. Well, I asked if I could share this marinated carrot salad recipe on my blog. She quickly gave me the recipe and then I passed it on to my daughters because I knew this was one they would all love!

Here’s the deal, you can use sliced carrots or baby carrots for this recipe. My mouth is watering just thinking about eating this for lunch. I used my pressure cooker to cook the carrots last night and chilled them to make the salad today. I used my Fagor pressure cooker on high with one cup water and set it for three minutes. I used the quick release and carefully removed the lid and drained the carrots. Any pressure cooker or pan can steam carrots, but I love my Fagor pressure cooker since it saves me precious time. Mark and I eat a lot of carrots so this recipe is a hit at our house! I doubled the dressing ingredients because I knew I would be adding more carrots over the next few days. You can also use this dressing on other vegetables, it’s so yummy! You can use sliced carrots, grated carrots or baby carrots.

You may be asking yourself “why is she using her pressure cooker to cook the carrots?” Well, I always have 10 things going on at once and all I have to do is put the carrots in the pan, add one cup of water, lock the lid and set it for 3 minutes on high. That’s it, set and go do the laundry or whatever. Yes, I could have boiled/steamed them but then I would have had to watch the pot on the stove. Please remember when using a pressure cooker to be sure and check your manual because my two different pressure cookers state “do not fill more than 2/3 full” to allow for the pressure to build up.

Suzie’s Marinated Carrot Salad

Ingredients:

5 cups steamed carrots, drained (I used a pressure cooker, 3 minutes on high with one cup of water)

1 medium white onion, thinly sliced

1 small green, yellow, or red pepper chopped into bite size pieces

Dressing:

2 cans cream of tomato soup

1 cup vegetable oil

1 cup sugar, or less as desired

1-1/2 cups cider vinegar

2 teaspoons prepared mustard

2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce

2 teaspoons salt

2 teaspoons pepper

Instructions:

Steam the carrots and chill overnight. Add the remaining vegetables with the carrots in a large bowl. Combine the dressing ingredients in a separate bowl and pour over the vegetables. Chill in a covered container. Enjoy!

PRINTABLE recipe: Suzie’s Marinated Carrot Salad shared by Food Storage Moms

My favorite things:

Fagor 670040230 Stainless-Steel 3-in-1 6-Quart Multi-Cooker

Presto 02970 Professional SaladShooter Electric Slicer/Shredder, White

The post The Best Marinated Carrot Salad Recipe In The World appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Delicious, Light and Fluffy Eggless Pancakes Recipe – Amazing Flavor!

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Are you looking for an eggless pancakes recipe that is just as fluffy and tasty as traditional pancakes? Well look no more!  Due to allergies and dietary preferences of a few members of our extended family, we wanted to find

The post Delicious, Light and Fluffy Eggless Pancakes Recipe – Amazing Flavor! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Homemade Apple Cider Recipes To Die For

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Homemade Apple Cider Recipes To Die For   My grandma made the best apple cider from an old English recipe. My mom has an old dutch recipe that is pretty good too. I went hunting the internet for a collection on apple cider recipes that I could share and I think I have found a …

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The post Homemade Apple Cider Recipes To Die For appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

How the Early Pioneers Preserved Food and What They Ate

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How the Early Pioneers Preserved Food and What They Ate Imagine living in an era when there is no refrigeration. Ever thought about the foods our pioneer ancestors ate, and ancient people before them? Foods from 150+ years ago or long before that. Compare that to the “food” we eat for decades before we woke …

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The post How the Early Pioneers Preserved Food and What They Ate appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

How To Make Whiskey Step by Step

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How To Make Whiskey Step by Step Who doesn’t like a shot of whiskey on a cold night? I love it. My granddad has been taking a shot of whiskey every night before bed for over 50 years and he swears it keep him healthy. I did a post on how to make watermelon moonshine …

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Breakfast

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This is just a quick little post about what I had for breakfast yesterday. My cousin had posted a video of these baked eggs on toast and I just had to try it. It is nothing but a piece of bread you mash down in the center to make an indent large enough to hold an egg. Crack the egg into the indent. Then butter around the edge of the bread (I am not sure why it needs this but I did it anyway) and sprinkle with cheese around the edge. Then bake it for approximately 10 minutes. I used my little convection oven to bake it.

I added some green onion from an onion I have growing in my onion bin. These were pretty good and a nice change from regular poached eggs on toast which I usually have.

And speaking of green onions. I have added some onion bulbs to a large tub that hold my small rosemary plant and they are growing good already. I have never had any luck getting onions to grow large bulbs but I do like the green onions anyway. 

 And here is just a pretty pot on my porch. I am loving the little blue irises. 

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo Recipe – A New Orleans Classic

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Although most popular on Fat Tuesday, chicken and sausage gumbo is a wonderful comfort meal any time of the year.  I fell in love with gumbo while visiting New Orleans a few years back and have tried to replicate that

The post Chicken and Sausage Gumbo Recipe – A New Orleans Classic appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Chicken Fajitas

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So I am trying to get more vegetables into our every day dinner dishes. We always have a vegetable but I want it to actually be part of the dish. A little less meat and a bit more veggies. I have saved several videos on facebook and I try them from time to time. This one just seemed appealing this week. It was made as a single serving in parchment paper on facebook but I needed an actual meal for us. I thought Michelle was going to be here too but she left with a friend instead so looks like we’ll have leftover for lunch for a few days.
Anyway, it starts with peppers and onions. I got 5 peppers marked down at the grocery store today, yellow and green. I used them all because…I don’t want any just sitting in the fridge.

 Then I cut up a nice size onion. I put some boneless, skinless chicken tenders on top,

 salted with pink salt, drizzled on oil, sprinkled on a packet of taco seasoning,

spread a 24 oz. jar of mild salsa on top, and then sprinkled with cheddar and Italian shredded cheese.

It went in the oven covered with foil,  on about 375 degrees for about 30 minutes, then removed the foil for the last 15 minutes. 

It was really good! Definitely a recipe to make again.

Quick And Easy French Bread You Can Make

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This is my quick and easy French bread you can make at the last minute for any meal. It’s very simple to make, it’s moist in the center and a little crispy on the outside. This recipe is an old family recipe, and my four daughters would sell the bread door to door to make a little spending money when they were younger. We sold it at church bazaars and at school functions. We got orders ahead of time when people were having spaghetti and meatballs for dinner. It’s a favorite bread when taking dinner to neighbors with a pot of chicken noodle soup.

The original recipe from almost 40+ years ago calls for shortening. I use butter these days, but most any oil could be substituted. Here’s the deal with this recipe, it says it makes three loaves. You could make two larger loaves or make the three skinny loaves I made with a pan I have had for years. You can make this bread dough in a large bowl or use a Bosch bread mixer like I did. As you know, I love pictures to visualize what I am going to make, so today here are my pictures for this bread. I have a PRINTABLE recipe available at the bottom. The thing I like about this recipe is that it doesn’t need eggs. If you have chickens that produce eggs that is great, but I rarely buy eggs these days because I am trying to eat less dairy. So let’s get started with this easy French bread recipe.

Just so you know, I dump everything in my Bosch and start mixing. Yep, I start it on low and work up to high, it’s an easy to make this recipe, I promise. It’s actually a no-fail recipe that anyone can make. You can actually make French bread rolls with the same recipe. Just mold them differently and cut the cooking time according to how big you make the rolls. You can make these loaves on a greased cookie sheet as well. You may remember, I worked at a fabulous Kitchen store and I loved to buy the fancy kitchen tools because I enjoy cooking and baking almost everything.

Easy French Bread

Ingredients:

2-1/2 cups hot water

4 teaspoons SAF instant yeast

3 tablespoons sugar

1 tablespoon salt

1 tablespoon shortening (I used melted butter)

6 cups white bread flour

Step One-Instructions:

I dump everything in a bowl or my Bosch bread mixer and mix the dough about 6-8 minutes.

easy french bread

Step Two:

I then cut the dough with a dough cutter into three sections. OXO Good Grips Multi-purpose Stainless Steel Scraper & Chopper

easy french bread

Step Three:

I roll out the three pieces of dough into a rectangle shape and roll up into a tube shape and place on a greased cookie sheet or French bread/baguette pan as shown: Chicago Metallic Commercial II Non-Stick Perforated Baguette Pan

easy french bread

Grease some plastic wrap and cover the dough and let rise until double in size. Just before placing the loaves in the oven to bake, use a sharp knife to slice a few shallow cuts on the diagonal on the top of the dough. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees and bake for 25-35 minutes or until golden brown. Lightly brush the baked loaves with butter on the tops and serve while warm.

PRINTABLE recipe: Easy French Bread by Food Storage Moms

My favorite things:

Bosch MUM6N10UC Universal Plus Stand Mixer, 800 Watt, 6.5-Quarts with Dough hook, scraper and double beater.

Kelly Kettle Ultimate Stainless Steel Small Trekker Camp Stove Kit. Boil Water, Cook Fast, Survive.

Nordic Ware Natural Aluminum Commercial Baker’s Half Sheet

The post Quick And Easy French Bread You Can Make appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

A Return To The Old Paths: How To Make Pemmican Like The Native Americans

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A Return To The Old Paths: How To Make Pemmican Like The Native Americans Pemmican is a concentrated nutritionally complete food invented by the North American Plains Indians. It was originally made during the summer months from dried lean buffalo meat and rendered fat as a way to preserve and store the meat for use …

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Chocolate Fudge Cake – With A Surprise, Healthy Ingredient

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Our son ate 3 pieces of this chocolate fudge cake and said, “This is the best chocolate cake that I’ve ever had!” He had no idea that the secret ingredient that made it taste so good was cauliflower.  Seriously, I

The post Chocolate Fudge Cake – With A Surprise, Healthy Ingredient appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Quick And Easy Chicken Soup Recipe For Colds-Flu

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This is my quick and easy chicken soup recipe for colds and flu that anyone can make easily. My neighborhood is experiencing a cold or some kind of virus that is lasting 3-6 weeks. Some of the people have bronchitis, coughs, sinus infections and they are feeling drained of energy. I have talked to two neighbors who have been sick since Christmas and they just can’t seem to kick the cold symptoms. One mentioned her husband thought he was on the mend and then BAM he was flat in bed. This must be a bad virus, flu, cold or whatever is going around. My husband and I have been taking meals to families and today I’m going to make the biggest pot of my chicken soup recipe and put it in quart jars to deliver to more people. If you have neighbors that are ill this recipe can be taken to them in quart jars or disposable containers. All they have to do is heat it up and enjoy this chicken soup recipe that is homemade.

Here’s the deal with chicken soup when people have a cold or influenza without complications, of course, it soothes the throat and helps clear the nasal passages. I would call it a comfort food we all grew up on that Grandma made for anyone who was sick. We rarely went to the doctor and somehow the soup made us feel better. This is truly the best homemade chicken noodle soup in the world. I have made this for years and now my grandkids ask me for the recipe. The reason I think this is the best chicken soup recipe is the fact that 99.9% of the ingredients are right there in your pantry, freezer, refrigerator or food storage pantry. You can interchange chicken in cans or use frozen chicken or leftover chicken.

You can make your own noodles, or use my secret ingredient noodles: Grandma’s Frozen Egg Noodles. Of course, you can boil your packaged noodles/pasta of choice and add them later when the soup is almost finished cooking. I use my electric slow cooker so I can do other things because I usually have ten things going on at once. So I set the slow cooker on low and go about my day doing stuff we all do each day. I call it my set and forget dinner. It really is a very yummy smooth soup with just the right amount of spices. It practically fills my 3-1/2 quart crock pot. Cuisinart 3.5-Quart Programmable Slow Cooker

Secret Ingredient

Best Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

My favorite noodles

Best Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup | via www.foodstoragemoms.com

Here is a picture of my favorite frozen Grandma’s Egg Noodles (as close to homemade as I have ever tasted).

Chicken Soup Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 2 cans of chicken (12.5 ounces each) drained or substitute 2 cups of cooked chicken
  • 6 cups water
  • 1/4 cup Better Than Bouillon Chicken Base or substitute equal amounts of water with chicken broth
  • 3/4 cup freeze-dried onions or 1 fresh onion chopped in bite size pieces
  • 3/4 cup dry dehydrated carrots or 1-1/2 cups diced fresh carrots
  • 3/4 cup dry freeze dried celery or 1-1/2 cups diced fresh celery
  • 1 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 1 teaspoon dried sweet basil
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • salt to taste
  • 1 package Grandma’s frozen egg noodles (11 ounces) cooked and separated as directed or boil your pasta of choice
  • 2 cans cream of chicken soup undiluted (optional)

Instructions:

Combine all ingredients in a slow cooker, BUT add the Grandma’s Noodle the last two hours or they will be mushy. Enjoy!

PRINTABLE recipe: Chicken Noodle Soup by Food Storage Moms

If you have some neighbors who are ill this week, they will love this chicken soup recipe, I promise! Keep up the good work by storing water and adding one can at a time to your pantry.

The post Quick And Easy Chicken Soup Recipe For Colds-Flu appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

7 Great Depression Recipes That Grandma Used To Make

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One great thing about the Internet is having access to literally tens of thousands of delicious recipes. The only problem is, most of them are needlessly complicated. I know some cooks like to fancy themselves gourmet chefs, but when I cook, I like a simple recipe that has no more than 10 ingredients and doesn’t […]

The post 7 Great Depression Recipes That Grandma Used To Make appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Grandma’s Ciabatta Bread (Made With Whey)

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ciabatta breadThis ciabatta bread is a whiz to whip up and heavenly to eat!

I was telling my grandmother one day that I had almost a gallon of fresh whey leftover from a cheese making project and didn’t know what to do with all of it and she suggested that I use her family’s bread recipe. She told me that after her mother was finished making cheese, she would set aside a little whey to bake bread with and give the rest to her chickens (whey gives chickens added protein for egg production). I had no idea that she had a bread recipe that used whey. It just goes to show that our ancestors certainly have a lot to teach us still. Since she shared this recipe with me, I (of course) would like to share it with all of you.

On a side note, the whey really activates the dough, so get ready! I read that the yeast love the presence of the lactose and sugar in the whey and that is why is rises so well. I can see why this recipe has been in my recipe for so long, it’s definitely a keeper.

Happy Baking!

Grandma’s Ciabatta Bread Made From Whey

  • 2 cups of whey
  • 5 cups bread flour
  • 1 teaspoon of dry active yeast
  • 3 tablespoons of sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt
  • 2 tablespoons of melted unsalted butter
  1. In a small saucepan, melt butter and set aside to cool for 10 minutes.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, combine all of the ingredients together and the knead the dough for about 5 minutes.
  3. Cover with plastic wrap and allow dough to sit at least 8 hours or overnight.
  4. After dough has risen, sprinkle flour on a work surface and shape dough.
  5. Place the dough onto a greased baking tray. Sprinkle on a little more flour and  cut a few shallow, diagonal slashes into the top of the bread.
  6. Bake the bread in a 375 degrees F (190C) oven for 40 minutes or until it is golden brown.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Make Honey Moonshine

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How To Make Honey Moonshine Okay, before you start to do anything with regards to making moonshine, please check your local, state, federal and national statutes to make sure you won’t be breaking any laws by building a still to prepare your blend of moonshine. Most states have certain laws in place against making alcoholic beverages that exceed …

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A Kitchen Miracle! 5 Great Reasons To Own An Instant Pot Pressure Cooker

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If you enjoy soups, stews, slow cooked meats, steamed veggies, rice or beans, you won’t believe what an Instant Pot will do for you! The time and electricity that you will save makes the cost of the purchase worth it

The post A Kitchen Miracle! 5 Great Reasons To Own An Instant Pot Pressure Cooker appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Natural Solutions for a Healthy Liver

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Natural Solutions for a Healthy Liver
The Liver is a “Vital organ which effect all the main systems, particularly the Central Nervous System.
Before  “ANY” effective healing can happen a properly detoxed liver must be present and functioning.Secondly, Healing of Damaged alpha nodes with herbs is vital. Alpha nodes are nodes within the liver that both produce and maintain healthy insulin levels. as well as maintain healthy Sodium and calcium channels.
The third step is to supplement the liver with a healthy diet preferable a juice diet for at least 2 weeks than to slowly migrate to solid foods all within a months period.
Herbals:

A few Powerful Herbs to aid the Liver:
  • Burdock Root
  • Dandelion
  • Milk Thistle
  • Turmeric
  • Licorice Root
  • Goldenseal Root
  • Ashwaganda
  • Cinnamon
  • Barberry

Nutrition:
Nutritional supplementation is also vital to produce healthy makeup and maintain a healthy transmission(s) to the central nervous system. A powerful and very healthy was is to deliver b complex to the liver through the intake of bee pollen. Be pollen because of its cross pollination(s) patterns by the bees is the “PUREST” for of B complex one could ingest. No synthesization  is required for a new b vitamin to form. 
Powerful Nutritional support for the Liver:
  • Slippery Em Bark
  • Bee Pollen
  • Wheat Grass juice
  • Chlorella
  • Spiruilla

Juicing:
Juicing is another powerful way to aid the liver thus creating a high rate of enzymes absorbed. And added benefit to juicing is the ability to deliver oxygen to the blood stream a good example is chlorophyll from juiced wheatgrass. This not only aids in the absolutions as well but in the overall healing process.
Healthy Juices for the Liver:
  • Apple Cider Vinegar Se tonic recipe below
  • Beet
  • Spinach
  • Celery
  • Ginger
  • Turmeric
  • Dandelion
  • Watermelon
  • Apple
  • Cranberry
  • Grapes
  • Parsley
  • Cilantro
  • Sweat potato
  • Wheatgrass
  • Barleygrass 
Recipes:

A few good herbal teas and cool tonic  and Combinations & Recipes:
Dandelion /Goldenseal/Licorice: This combination will detoxify the blood and lower organs as well as detotx the liver by its antiseptic properties and then begin to heal with the powerful healing enzymes of the licorice root.
Ashwaganda/Cinnamon/Licorice: This combination will sanitize and heal the liver while the ashwaganda   begins to aid the adrenal glands which to wrks directly with the liver and central nervous system by continuously delivering a healthy insulin flow. As well as regulate and maintain a healthy hormonal(chemical) balance. 
Burdock/ Goldenseal/Slippery Elm Bark/Licorice: A powerhouse of a blood purifier/detox. While with Slippery Elm being fully capable to constantly deliver    nutritional supplementation and  healing to all the main systems. 
Barberry/Slippery Elm/Licorice: Barberry is a powerhouse of a herb particularly for diabetes thus through its detox properties through the berberine enzyme which delivers ciracumin with aid to a overall healthy liver and adrenal glands which in turn regulates and maintains a healthy glucose/insulin levels. Slippery Elm again provide vital nutritional values to all the main systems while also beginning to produce all the healing needed for the livers well as all main systems.
Recipe:

Tea:
Take One teaspoon of each herb let steep in 8 ounces of boiling water for 15-20 minutes. press and strain soaked herb be careful to let soaked herb to cool a bit , strain and drink hot as a tea. “ADULTS” drink Daily 
Tonic:
Let cool and  add 1/4 teaspoon of bee pollen stir and let dissolve “completely. and drink daily. “ADULTS” drink Daily
Be pollen: will supply the purest form of B Complex vitamins “Directly” to the Liver and aid the overall performance while providing optimal health maintenances’ while supporting ALL the main systems but more particularly the Central Nervous system and adrenal glands.
Add 1/4th to 1/2 teaspoon of bee pollen to 8 ounces of warm water stir till mostly or all dissolved if it does not fully dissolve do not throw away any granuals at the bottom of the glass. Adults drink daily 
Apple Cider Tonic Recipe:
This tonic recipe will not only detox the liver of all toxins and neurotoxicity but will provide a natural form of healing and energy.
10 glass warm filtered water 
2 tablespoons of raw organic apple cider vinegar 
2 tablespoons of raw wildflower honey
4 ounces of pure lime juice 
A powerful Juice Tonic Recipe for the liver:
This tonic recipe will provide many nutritional values such as potassium, magnesium, manganese and more. Drink 8 ounces daily.
  • 1/2 Beet
  • 4 apples
  • handful of dandelion

Directions:

Juice all of the following by stating with the dandelion first then the beet then finished up with the apples core seeds and all.

Cooking with Peanut Flour

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Cooking with peanut flour - How to store it, where to get it and how to make a peanut butter replacement | PreparednessMama

This year, in an effort to diversify my food storage, I am trying to add new items to my plan. Have you ever tried peanut flour? I started out looking for a shelf-stable peanut butter substitute and arrived at peanut flour instead. Nutritionally speaking peanut flour is gluten-free and low in carbohydrates. Two tablespoons of […]

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Pizza-Stuffed Bell Peppers are the Best Reason to Eat Your Vegetables

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Pizza-Stuffed Bell Peppers are the Best Reason to Eat Your Vegetables Nothing beats fresh veggies from the garden, but getting the kids to eat them can be quite a challenge. Casseroles and pasta dishes are great ways to incorporate vegetables into the menu, but they can get old after a while. If you’ve exhausted all …

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Easy Frugal Sauces You Can Make Yourself

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I’m sharing some of my easy frugal sauces you can make yourself today. For some reason, if a dish of food has a sweet spicy sauce, I’m all over it. If the dish has a sauce that is creamy or accents the food, it seems more satisfying for some reason to me. I like meat with gravy, potatoes with gravy, stuffing with gravy. Gravy and sauces are similar to me, just different ingredients. What can I say, I love sauces and gravies. I love dips, but today it’s all about frugal sauces.

I hope you enjoy these different sauces as much as my family does. The thing about some of the recipes below, you can make a white sauce and add Parmesan cheese and you have a “light” Alfredo sauce instead of using cream. You add some sausage crumbles to the white sauce and you can make sausage and biscuits! I realize some of these have a lot of butter or sugar, that’s how my mom made them and I carry on the tradition. Now, you can cut down the butter and sugar, depending on your taste buds.

Frugal Sauces

White Sauce:

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup butter
  • 1-1/2 cups flour
  • 1/2-gallon milk (more or less depending on the consistency you like)

Instructions:

Melt: 1 cup butter (I am cringing that I am really admitting I use 2 cubes of butter)

Add: 1-1/2 cups flour, stir constantly to make a roux (a mixture of fat and flour).

Add: 1/2-gallon milk, stir constantly, I really do mean constantly. LOL, or you will have lumps!

You can make creamed chipped beef on toast or biscuits with this sauce by adding chopped beef. You can also make macaroni and cheese by adding cheese to this sauce and pouring over cooked macaroni. Creamed tuna on toast was a meal we had almost every week when I was growing up.

Egg Foo Young Gravy/Sauce:

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups water
  • 2 bouillon cubes or 1 tablespoon Better Than Bouillon
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce or Bragg’s sauce
  • 4 tablespoons cornstarch

Instructions:

Place these ingredients in a medium saucepan and whisk until smooth. Bring to a boil while stirring constantly. Serve warm over egg foo young.

Jalapeno Pepper Jelly Sauce:

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup chopped red bell peppers
  • 1 cup chopped green bell peppers
  • 1/3  cup diced and seeded jalapenos (use gloves to chop them)
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • 6 tablespoons liquid pectin

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in a large saucepan over medium heat and stir constantly until sugar dissolves. Let it cool before placing the ingredients into your blender and blend for 5-6 seconds. Now, return the mixture to the same pan and bring it to a boil. Skim the foam off the top of the mixture. Now turn the heat to simmer for 5 minutes. Add the pectin and bring the mixture back up to a boil again.  Let it slightly cool before serving over your favorite Mexican dishes or meats.

Sweet Meat Glaze/Sauce:

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup brown sugar (packed)
  • 2 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 cup cold water
  • 4 tablespoons soy sauce or Bragg’s sauce

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in a pan, stir constantly like a white sauce until it thickens. This sauce is almost like a barbecue sauce that you pour over a pork roast, pork chops or a pork tenderloin that’s been cooked. Broil the meat with half of this sauce poured over it in a 9-inch by 13-inch pan. Please watch this constantly as it will burn very quickly. Remove from the oven when it starts to caramelize.

PRINTABLE recipe: Sauces by Food Storage Moms

My favorite things:

OXO SteeL 9-Inch Whisk

Danish Dough Hand Whisk / Mixer 11″

OXO Good Grips Egg Beater

Farberware Classic Stainless Steel 4-Quart Covered Saucepot

Cuisinart 77-412 Chef’s Classic Stainless 4-Piece 12-Quart Pasta/Steamer Set

The post Easy Frugal Sauces You Can Make Yourself appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Book Review: Stories and Recipes of the Great Depression of the 1930’s, Volume IV

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Reading about how others survived hardship is a great way to prepare to survive. The book Stories And Recipes of the Great Depression os a great resource to do just that. This book is a continuing historical documentation of the impact the Depression Era had in the homes of those who struggled to keep their […]

The post Book Review: Stories and Recipes of the Great Depression of the 1930’s, Volume IV appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Quick-Easy Appetizers For Every Party

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I know we are all wanting to get to know our neighbors, so I have to share my quick-easy appetizers my family makes for every holiday. Not all of them are used every time, we switch our favorites for different holidays. I love to have people over to my house and one of my favorite ways to entertain is to have a HUGE array of appetizers so friends can grab a plate and eat appetizers as we laugh and have a good time together.

If you have a slow cooker or two you can make these a few hours before the party and just relax right before the get-together. These recipes are great for holidays like I said, but awesome to take to parks for family reunions. I think every family has made at least one or two of these over the years because we keep passing our favorite recipes on to friends and new family members. I have to tell you, I could have appetizers every day of the week and skip dinner. Well, maybe not every night, but several nights each month. Some of these recipes are even better the next day, if there is any left that is! Enjoy! I have the PRINTABLE recipes below.

Quick-Easy Appetizers:

1. Spicy Buffalo Meatball Appetizer

Ingredients:
Instructions:
  1. Combine the Franks Hot Sauce, brown sugar and water in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Stir until the brown sugar dissolves. Place the precooked meatballs in a slow cooker and cover with the sauce. Cook for about 2-3 hours on low, or until warmed through. Serve with toothpicks, buttermilk dressing, and celery sticks if desired.

2. Stacie’s Green Chilies Bean Dip

Ingredients:

  • 1 can bean dip
  • 1-4-ounce can of chopped green chilies
  • 1-16-ounce can refried beans
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/2 cup grated cheese

Instructions:

Layer the ingredients above in the slow cooker and cover. Cook on low for about 2-4 hours or until warmed through. Serve with tortilla chips.

3. Little Smokies (hot dogs) Sweet & Sassy Appetizer

Ingredients:

  • 12 or 18-ounce jar of grape jelly
  • 12-ounce jar of chili sauce
  • Three pounds of Little Smokies

Instructions:

Combine the ingredients in the slow cooker and set on low for 2-4 hours, or until warmed through. Serve with toothpicks.

4. My Favorite Chile Con Queso Dip

Instructions:

  • 40-ounce can chili without beans
  • 2-pounds Velveeta Cheese (cubed)
  • 16-ounce jar Picante sauce (I use mild)

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in the slow cooker and cook on low for 2-4 hours, or until melted and warm. Serve with tortilla chips.

5. Linda’s Cream Cheese Dip

Ingredients:

  • 2-8-ounce packages of cream cheese softened (cubed)
  • 3-16-ounce cans of chili without beans
  • 2 cups grated or shredded mozzarella cheese

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in the slow cooker and cook on low for 2-4 hours, or until melted or warmed through. Serve with tortilla chips.

6. Cream Chipped Beef Dip

Ingredients:

  • 8-ounce package of cream cheese softened (cubed)
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 cup chip beef cut into small pieces
  • 2 tablespoons fresh green onions chopped or 1 tablespoon air-dried green onions
  • 2 tablespoons milk of choice
Instructions:
Combine all of the ingredients in the slow cooker and stir occasionally to combine the softened cream cheese, sour cream, beef, onions and milk until warmed through. Serve with Fritos.

7. My Favorite Nacho Dip

Ingredients:

  • 3 pounds Velveeta cheese
  • 1-10-3/4 ounce can cream of chicken soup
  • 2-4-ounce cans chopped green chilies

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in the slow cooker and cook on low for about 2-4 hours, or until heated through. Serve with tortilla chips.

8. Hot & Spicy Dip

Ingredients:

  • 1-pound cooked ground beef, drained
  • 1-pound Mexican Velveeta cheese (cubed)
  • 8-ounce jar salsa (I use mild)

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in the slow cooker until melted and heated through. Serve with tortilla chips.

9. Hot Spinach & Artichoke Dip

Ingredients:

  • 1-9-ounce frozen spinach, thaw it and squeeze the liquid out of it
  • 1-8-ounce package cream cheese (cubed & softened)
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons dry parsley
  • 1-15-ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts, chopped fine and drained
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • 1 cup Parmesan cheese

Instructions:

Combine all of the ingredients in the slow cooker and cook on low for 2-4 hours, or until heated through. Serve with baguette sliced bread.

PRINTABLE recipes: Quick-Easy Appetizers by Food Storage Moms

Let me know if you have love appetizers as much as I do! Anyone having a party this weekend or a family get-together?

My favorite things:

 

The post Quick-Easy Appetizers For Every Party appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

20 Crock Pot Tips for the Winter

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crock pot tipsThere is nothing better than ending a cool winter day than with a bowl of something cooked in a crock pot. In our home, we adore our crock pots, all four of them. There is always one on the counter top ready to go. The soups and stews are always a big hit, and a really good crock pot recipe book is worth its weight in gold.

Lately, we have been branching out and using our crock pot for more than soup. We’ve learned some tricks and tips than can take your crock pot meals to the next level.

Which size crock pot?

Slow cookers come in a variety of sizes, usually 1 quart to 8 1/2 quarts. Follow the recipe’s recommended size. This is important becasue the correct quart cooker will allow your meal to cook properly, and you won’t have an overflow of mess to clean. Most recipes will work best in a 5 to 6 quart slow cooker.

Don’t peek!

Every time you open the lid, heat escapes and you lengthen the cooking time by 15 – 20 minutes. The best time to check on your dish is about 45 minutes before it should be done. You will be able to tell how much of your cooking time needs to be adjusted.

Do not over-fill

Do not put too much in your crock pot. Most manufactures recommend that you fill your slow cooker no more than two-thirds full. Check what the manufacture recommends for your specific brand and size pot. By following the recommendations, you will avoid any possible food safety hazards and your meal will be finished on time. Don’t be afraid to cook whole chickens and big meaty roasts. These can be very healthy meals. Just check that the lid has a good snug fit.

Avoid the food danger zone

Bacteria love to become an uninvited guest at temperatures between 40° and 140°F degrees. The best way to avoid the danger zone is to put your prepped food in separate containers in the refrigerator ahead of time. Do not cook large chunks of frozen meat in the crock pot. There is no guarantee that large pieces of meat will be cooked all the way through. If you need to double check your food’s temperature, a good quality digital thermometer like this one will give you the information you need without having to lift the crock pot’s lid. Works great when keeping track of food in the oven, too.

Get the most out of the meat

To maximize the flavor of your meal, brown your meat in a skillet before adding it to the crock pot. Then deglaze the pan and with wine or broth. Deglazing gets all of the caramelized pieces of meat from the bottom of the pan. Add the liquid with those yummy bits of meat to your crock pot and you will have a richer flavor in your meal.

Out with the old crock pot!

Check out the new crock pots! There are so many new options available now. If you need your crock pot to do its cooking while you are out of the house, look into the programmable models. On these models, when the food is finished cooking, the slow cooker adjusts its temperature. This keeps your food warm, but at a safe temperature until you are ready to dig in. The latest crock pot in my house has a rubber lined hole in the top of the lid for a meat thermometer. This is a pretty brilliant combination of the crock pot with an indispendable thermometer.The thermometer fits snugly into the lid so none of the heat escapes out. Perfect for larger cuts of meat.

Preheat your crock pot

It is basically a little oven. So give it about 20 minutes to warm up all the way before you start adding your food. Just like you pre-heat your oven, pre-heat while prepping your food. It also cuts down on cooking time.

Food temperature matters

Putting frozen food in the slow cooker can increase your chances of bacteria growth. Remember that danger zone of 40 to 140 degrees F that was mentioned above? Prevent bacteria by avoiding all frozen foods. Fully thaw out all meats and vegetables before adding to the cooker. We have thawed out meat in the fridge or used our microwave to thaw vegetables. The only exception to this rule would be the prepackaged crock pot meals that are sold in the frozen food section in the grocery store. Just follow the directions on the back of the package.

Gingerbread in a crockpot meal?

Toss in some crumbled gingerbread or crushed ginger snap cookies! Ginger adds a depth of flavor and texture to the liquid. Use them in beef type dishes like stew and pot roast.

Use a high quality wine

Look for wines that are dry and have a high alcohol content to add more complex flavor to your dish. The alcohol doesn’t evaporate out much because the cooker lid is sealed. So remember that a little bit goes a long way.

The best vanilla quality possible

Like the wine, use a vanilla of high quality. The alcohol in the vanilla doesn’t burn off as fast and leaves a more intense flavor. Use the same amount your recipe recommends.

Forgotten food

If you rush out the door in the morning with food in an unplugged crock pot, you must toss it. I know, it hurts. But forgetting to plug or turn the crock pot to low or high means that your food could have spent the day in that danger zone. Even having uncooked food on the warm setting needs to go too. The warm setting isn’t warm enough to prevent bacteria. It is hard to throw away food, but it is easier than being sick. Again, you need a good food/meat thermometer!

Layer your food

To get all of your ingredients cooked at the right temperature and finished at the same time, you must layer. Any root vegetables, like potatoes and carrots, need to be placed at the bottom of the pot. These foods take longer to cook and need to be where most of the heat is. Place the meat on top of the root vegetables. If you are going to cut the meat, cut it into uniform pieces for even cooking. Any other smaller or delicate foods, such as mushrooms, can be placed last. They require a shorter cooking time

Pasta and rice

These can both be tricky. When overcooked, they become an inedible blob in your dish. It is best to add rice the last 30 minutes of cooking. Cooking the pasta separately and adding it to your food right before serving is a safer bet. My friend makes this pasta dish and swears by its ease and taste. I feel the ziti is a heavier pasta and that is why it works in this recipe without being cooked on the stove top.

Crock Pot Baked Ziti

Serves 8

1 lb. box of ziti noodles, uncooked

15 ounce container low-fat ricotta cheese

1 egg

3/4 cup Parmesan cheese, fresh is preferred over the green can kind

1½ cup low-fat mozzarella cheese, grated

½ teaspoon salt, or to taste

¼ teaspoon pepper

2 24-ounce jars marinara sauce, any flavor

7-8 fresh, thinly sliced basil leaves or ½ teaspoon dried basil

Instructions

Use cooking spray to spray the inside of the crock pot, and rinse the noodles in a colandar and set them aside.

In a small bowl, combine the ricotta, egg whites, 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, 1/2 cup mozzarella, salt, and pepper. Stir until this is a smooth mixture.

In the crockpot, layer half of the noodles, about 2 1/2 cups. Pour 2 cups of the marinara sauce over the noodles. Use a spoon to smooth the sauce over the noodles so they are all covered and create an even layer.

Drop small spoonfuls of the ricotta mix over the sauce/pasta. Use the back of a spoon or a spatula to carefully spread the cheese mixture over the noodles.

Repeat the 3 layers: noodles, marinara, and cheese. Over the top of everything, pour the remaining marinara sauce.

Cook on low heat for 4-6 hours. By this time, the ziti will be finished. Sprinkle the remaining cheeses over the top, cover with the crock pot lid, and allow about 10 minutes for the cheese to melt.

Garnish with the fresh basil and serve.

Notes: For a heartier dish, you can add a layer of cooked ground beef, sausage or vegetables, such as mushroom and spinach after the sauce layer and before the cheese layer. This recipe freezes well. Source of original recipe is here.

Wait a day

Some foods are better the second day. Many soups increase in flavor when they have had time to sit. About 24 hours should do it. If your dish has any sinewy tissue, like brisket, it will also have an improved flavor after sitting in the refrigerator for a day.

Choosing the right cut of meat for the temperature

For low heat, chose pork shoulders, chuck roasts, short ribs, chicken thighs and drumsticks and any other tough or fatty meat. They tend to become tender and moist. Avoid cooking chicken breasts, pork loin and other leaner cuts of meat on low. They often get dried out. Trim any excess fat before cooking. You don’t want greasy liquid floating on top of your dish.

Dairy last

Milk products, like yogurt, milk and sour cream should be stirred in the last 15 minutes of cooking. If you add them earlier, they tend to break down and you will not have the creamy consistency you are looking for.

Vegetable mush

If you end up with mushy veggies, scoop them out and puree them. Reduce the puree in a sauce pan and make a glaze to pour over the meat or add it to your sauce. To prevent mushy tomatoes, try sun dried tomatoes or use whole canned tomatoes and cut them into large pieces. Diced or crushed tomatoes can disintegrate into your dish.

Consider desserts in your crock pot

The sealed lid allows moisture to stay in the most delicious cakes, breads and brownies. Even cheesecake! Consider using your slow cooker to make party mixes and to roast nuts. Breakfast in a crock pot is an easy way to start the morning. Steel cut oatmeal or a breakfast casserole can be easily prepared the night before. A crock pot also does a great job with oat groats.

Give your crock some TLC

Any sudden change in temperature can cause the ceramic insert to crack. Place a dish cloth in between the insert and cool countertop if needed. Let the insert come to room temperature before you expose it to a hot or cold element. There are plastic liners available that are specifically designed to be used for crock pots. The make clean up easy!

crock pot tips

Baked Honey Barbecue Wings Recipe – A Superbowl Party Hit!

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Baked honey barbecue wings are one of our favorite appetizers when we are feeding a crowd. By seasoning the wings before they bake, they develop an extra depth of flavor before being tossed in the homemade sauce. The wings bake up

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Homesteading Basics: How To Dehydrate Herbs for Long-Term Storage

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dehydrating herbs for storageHerbs are one of the first plants we put in our garden. There is nothing like fresh culinary herbs to intensify the flavors of food. As well, herbs are hardy garden plants that don’t have to be watered as much as vegetables and can serve more than one purpose by being used as natural medicine. For instance, did you know that a sage leaf can be used instead of a band-aid because it has natural healing qualities? Some of these popular culinary herbs are oregano, thymne and sage and can grow year-round in many parts of the country.

To enjoy these herbs year round, many choose to dehydrate them when they are at the peak in freshness and combine them to make their own spices and even homemade tea blends. Can you imagine how much money you could save at the grocery store by implementing this into your pantry?

How To Dehydrate Herbs for Long-Term Storage

Dehydrating herbs and other leafy greens is one of the easiest items to dry for long-term use. All you really need is a constant stream of air. You don’t necessary have to own a dehydrator because herbs can dry naturally from the air, but it does help with even drying.

Here are some steps to get started:

  1.  Prep herbs for drying. Wash and place herbs evenly on a drying rack and ensure that enough space is make for proper air flow.
  2. Set temperature and time according to the directions on your dehydrator.
  3. Ensure that herbs are 95% dehydrated for long-term storage.

Here are some great spice mixes to start adding to your pantry!

Cajun Seasoning

  • 1/3 cup salt
  • 1/4 cup paprika
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon basil
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper

Chili Powder

  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder

French Herb Mix

  • 3 tablespoons marjoram
  • 3 tablespoons dried thyme
  • 3 tablespoons savory
  • 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon sage
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground fennel seed

Chili Powder

  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder

Storing Dehydrated Herbs

Herbs can be dehydrated to store for longer periods, but storage is important for any preserved food, and dehydrated foods are no exception. Store either in heavy duty zippered bags in a metal container, or store in dry, sterile, glass jars. For long term storage, I recommend using Mylar bags.

As I stated previously, before storing, you want to ensure that your food is 95% or more dehydrated because the more moisture your food has the more likely molds and microorganisms can grow. Like all emergency food sources, ensure that you keep your dehydrated food away from natural elements.

“Best Used By” Guidelines for Dehydrated Food 

  • Spices – 1-2 years
  • Vegetables/Fruits – Up to 12 months
  • Meats – Best at 1-2 months, but can be stored for 6 months.

We are all looking for frugal ways to bulk up our preparedness pantries. Using herbs is a great way to do that. Some of our favorite herbs we love to grow in our garden can be utilized to make long-term herbal seasonings to use year round. So, what are you waiting for? It’s time to start dehydrating!

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Steel Cut Oats, The Perfect Breakfast Choice! – Delicious Recipe Included

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Why should you choose steel cut oats for your breakfast? Well before we get into the specifics, first and foremost, they are really, really good! Not all oatmeal is created equal. Just take a stroll down your grocery aisle and

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Savory Solar Oven Sweet Potatoes

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Try this savory solar oven sweet potatos recipe. It's a nice change on a cold winter day | PreparednessMama

I’m lovin’ my new solar oven! This month for our solar oven cooking demo we are making sweet potatoes. You may think that sweet potatoes are only for the holidays and need to be packed with sugar, but you’d be wrong. This recipe for savory solar oven sweet potatoes is a nice change for these cold […]

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Old Fashioned Preserving: Grandpa’s Recipe for Cured Smoked Ham

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Old Fashioned Preserving: Grandpa’s Recipe for Cured Smoked Ham A century ago most of the hog’s meat was cured and smoked to preserve it. This process is still used today by some, but curing hams it’s becoming a lost skill. Nowadays we rely too much on refrigerators. You can buy a hundred pounds of meat, …

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Healthy 5 Ingredient Soups that are Easy to Make when SHTF

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Healthy 5 Ingredient Soups that are Easy to Make when SHTF Cooking hearty, warming meals to get you through the winter months doesn’t have to take hours in the kitchen and a ton of ingredients. Some of the best comfort food is simple and flavorful, like a hot, fragrant soup. Cooking Light has a list …

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Herbal Salve making Basics

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Herbal Salve Recipe Basics

Did you ever wonder why salves are so good for everyday use for example how about a bee pollen salve is so powerful for the skin,  where bee pollen is cold infused into the oils used in your salve recipe. Bee pollen is a powerful skin care aid in cell regeneration because of the flavanoids,antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and amino acids but particularly because of its pure form of b complex vitamins . Domestic Bee pollen due to the bees cross pollination process(s) allow this. providing a new and powerful source of cell regeneration of the skin.

Herbal healing salves are great for everyday use and are very powerful in healing Wounds, Cuts, Sores, Bug Bites with little or no scaring They are also used for sore muscles and actually extracting infections and  poisons from a wound. and a good black salve can over time pull a small splinter out of a wound or hard to get area.
Follow this category to get the recipes for many salves
Below is a simple recipe for a general healing salve to help you understand how salves are made and to be used as a base recipe for other salves you desire.
There are many different types of salve used for different purposes. E.G.  
  • To draw out a poison or infection of some sort one can use a black salve. 
  • For Burns of all degrees one can use a good burn salve.
  • For. Cuts and bruised one can use a general healing salve
  • For Injuries one can use a  sprain salve
  • For poor Circulation, reumatory arthritis, and or joint pain or even to help stimulate blood circulation in specific ares of the body through a topical process one can use a circulation Salve
  • For inflammation one may use an powerful anti-inflammatory salve.
  • For Eczema use a lavender tea tree, oregano,plantain salve
  • and these are just a few salves 

Making The Salve:
What You Will Need:
  • 1 ounce of pure Beeswax
  • 8 ounces of herbal infused oil
  • Lavender essential oil
  • tea tree essential oil
  • vitamin e liquid capsules ( to use as a preserver to get more of a shelf life of the salve)
  • stainless or enamel pot
  • potato ricer or cheese cloth for pressing the oil soaked herb(s)
  • Glass jar for storage ( Small baby food jars work great)
  • 2 cup pyrex measure cup (for transferring liquid salve into containers or tins)
I.  First you will need to make an infused oil:
Cold infused oils: ( better quality salves and longer shelf life)
Take 6 ounces of your herb or her combination (in total) and place in a quart size mason or glass jar.
Add a Good quality olive oil and stir very well.
Let sit for a min. of 4 weeks to achieve a good quality infusion. Some say 2 weeks (I go 4 weeks and try to make extra so I always have some ready to make a batch of salves
after the 4 weeks strain and press herbs back into the stained oil.
Warm infused oils: ( Quicker good for quick needs but has a shorter shelf life)
 In a  stainless steel or enamel pot add 1 1/2 cups of good quality olive oil  and bring to a very low simmer once you reach the simmer point back off the heat
Add  6 ounces of your herb or her combination (in total) .
stay on low or warm for 1 hour.
After one hour take off stove and let oil cool. Once cool stain and press
II. Making the salve liquid to pour into your containers:

  1. Add once ounce of pure beeswax and slowly melt it completely
  2. Once completely melted, add infused oil to the melted beeswax.
  3. You will notice it will solidify at this point just let it all remelt together as one liquid.
  4. Once completely a warm liquid add to pyrex measure cup and quickly pour into your containers.
  5.  While still in liquid form break and add vitamin E liquid of one capsule and then add essential oils 2-3 drops of each per container. 
  6. Let harden and use as needed

Classic Homemade White Bread Recipe – Preservative-Free Freshness!

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Make this classic, homemade white bread recipe and you will never buy store-bought bread again!  The taste of homemade bread is just simply better than store-bought bread! Not to mention it’s preservative-free, inexpensive to make, and doesn’t take a whole

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52 Jar Method – 52 Complete Meal-in-a-Jar Recipes

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52 Jar Method – 52 Complete Meal-in-a-Jar Recipes Creating food stores while prepping and homesteading sure does require some creativity, and luckily there are several different ways to preserve food. Of course, everyone knows about canning and dehydrating, but there is also a method of combining ingredients together so that the only thing that is …

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How to Use Lemon Juice Powder in Cooking

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Lemon juice powder is a kitchen standby for any pantry. It gives you the ability to add a punch of lemon flavor to any recipe you are creating | PreparednessMama

Include this flavorful addition in your pantry. Lemon zest is a kitchen standby for any pantry. It gives you the ability to add a punch of lemon flavor to any recipe you are creating. What happens when you run out of zest? Substitute lemon juice powder instead. You may not be familiar with this little-known […]

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Onion Soup

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For a long time, I didn’t like onions at all. As a kid we hated them but as I have grown older my tastes buds apparently have died off some and I like onions just fine now. I saw a recipe on facebook for onion soup that was very simple and had few ingredients so I thought I would try it. You took 6 large chopped onions (I had some small ones but only did seven because it seemed like an awful lot of onions to begin with), cooked them in butter for a few minutes until they softened, put them in the crock pot and added a teaspoon and a half of Worcestershire sauce and beef broth. I added two 32-oz containers of beef broth. You then just let it cook.
Now, all day this was cooking and I could only think of how disgusting I thought it smelled. It also tasted very bland.

 I read the comments on the facebook video and decided to add salt and pepper as one person on the comments mentioned…it was a bit better…still not good. I really felt that if we were going to have it for a meal….it needed meat. I scrambled up about a pound and a half of hamburger. Then shortly before Phil got home I put a few spoonfuls of hamburger in an oven safe bowl, ladled the soup on it, then put three pieces of sliced French bread on top with a shredded Italian cheese mix on top of the bread. I put it under the broiler until the cheese browned.

I just can’t tell you how incredibly wonderful this was. So GOOD! Definitely going to have to make this again.

Thai Chicken and Zucchini Noodles Recipe, Healthy and Delicious!

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Our Thai Chicken and Zucchini Noodles Recipe is the perfect dish for those who are craving pasta but are searching for a lighter and healthier meal.  We love pasta in our house, but unfortunately, the excess amount of carbs in

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20 Lost Recipes From The Pioneers: What They Cooked On Their Journey Westward

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20 Lost Recipes From The Pioneers: What They Cooked On Their Journey Westward Our ancestors lived more simply than most people today are willing to live. Pioneers were the perfect example of survivalists. They were able to survive in the rough environment for up to six months on the Oregon Trail. Living without power or …

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2-Ingredient Healthy Breakfast Cookies

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I love these 2-ingredient healthy breakfast cookies! I was running errands with my sister, Carol and she mentioned she saw a recipe using only 2-ingredients to make some simple healthy breakfast cookies. I said, “what?” Well, I went to the store and piled the bananas in my shopping cart. Mark and I are trying to eat healthier foods and if the recipe only calls for bananas and oatmeal, I can do that. This recipe is almost magical, I get the giggles thinking that I can have cookies for breakfast. Of course, they are great snacks as well. Here’s the deal, get some bananas and oatmeal. Now I already had regular oats in the pantry because I eat oatmeal every day for breakfast. The reason I say magical is because the 2-ingredient base recipe is stuff we usually have in the house. Most of us store oatmeal, and bananas are a fruit I buy every week. Do you typically have bananas in your kitchen?

When I go to the grocery store I buy about 20-25 pounds of bananas a week. Now, I freeze some bananas for smoothies and Mark cuts some up for his oatmeal each morning. I am slowly weaning him off his cold cereal to a healthier oatmeal breakfast. My sister said to me, “well there are some healthy cereals, you can buy”. I said, “Mark likes Corn Pops, Frosted Flakes, and Sugar Smacks.” He is so healthy and takes zero medications for anything. Enough said. We are starting a new year with healthier food choices. So far, so good, it’s day six of the new year. Bananas are so cheap and they have some great health benefits. For instance, one medium banana is only 105 calories, give or take, and has over 400 mg. of Potassium.

These cookies are moist like a chewy banana bread or an oatmeal cookie, but not as sweet. I kept thinking how is this dough going to “stay” together without falling apart or crumbling. Well, they do and they are so yummy! They are chewy and moist without sugar or eggs. Now, if you want a sweeter cookie you can add some of the things I have listed below. I am sticking to the bananas and oatmeal only. It’s day six of the New Year, I have to keep up the healthy food choices. This is what I came up with for the recipe. If it’s too runn, add more oatmeal, too thin add more bananas. You will love this recipe, I promise.

Healthy Breakfast Cookies

Ingredients:

2 cups peeled ripe medium or large bananas

2 cups regular oats (oatmeal) uncooked

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. I used my KitchenAid mixer to mash the bananas, but a fork would work. Then I started adding the oatmeal. I used the “flat beater” so it would make the banana consistency I wanted. Not runny, not too thick. Then I used my purple 1/8 cup (2 tablespoons) cookie scoop to place the dough on the cookie sheets. I used my fingers to mash the cookies down and molded them into a circle. These cookies do not rise or change shape so how you put them on the cookie sheet is the shape they will be when you bring them out of the oven. Now, I used a Silpat mat to avoid using any vegetable spray. You will need to grease the cookie sheet if you don’t have a Silpat mat. I tried making two cookies using parchment paper. If you use it you will need to quickly remove the cookies after baking. I wouldn’t recommend using the paper because they start to attach to the paper very quickly after removing them from the oven. Just giving you the heads-up, here. They freeze very well, so you can put them in lunch boxes or eat them on the run. Bake for 15 minutes if you use the 1/8 cup cookie scoop.

I got a little carried away with the bananas, obviously, there are more than two bananas in here. I never make a small batch of anything. If I have the mixer going I want to make enough for the freezer. This is truly a no-fail recipe.

Extra Ingredients if you choose to add some:

  1. Nuts
  2. Pitted and chopped dates
  3. Craisins/dried cranberries
  4. Raisins
  5. Coconut flakes
  6. Chocolate chips
  7. Pumpkin seeds
  8. Chia seeds
  9. Vanilla extract
  10. Cinnamon

healthy breakfast cookies

The mixture is moist, but not crumbly at all. It’s really like making oatmeal cookie, but without all the other stuff like eggs, oil, etc.

healthy breakfast cookies

Now however you mold your cookies is how they will look when you bring them out of the oven. They do not rise, puff up or flatten. I used the scoop and then did a quick flattening of the dough with my hand and molded the dough into circles.

healthy breakfast cookies

PRINTABLE recipe: 2-Ingredient Healthy Breakfast Cookies by Food Storage Moms

My favorite things:

Norpro 703 Grip-EZ 2-Tablespoon Stainless Scoop

Nordic Ware Natural Aluminum Commercial Baker’s Half Sheet

Nordic Ware Natural Aluminum Commercial Baker’s Half Sheet

OXO Good Grips Silicone Cookie Spatula

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