UNSEEN ENEMY: THE POTENTIAL LOOMING CRISIS OF THE NEXT DEADLY DISEASE PANDEMIC DEBUTS ON CNN

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In the 21st century, we are all connected. Population growth, mass urbanization, deforestation, climate change and increased travel have dramatically increased the risk that familiar diseases will spread and mutate, and new ones will emerge. As people enter new spheres of biodiversity, they come into closer contact with other species, increasing the risk of viruses jumping from animals to humans, and then spreading more widely.

Unseen Enemy is an essential exploration into the increasing threat of emerging infectious disease outbreaks and their impacts on society. Meet healthcare workers, disease detectives and families who have experienced the horror and devastation of Ebola, Zika and Influenza epidemics and emerged deeply changed.

 

The world’s urgent call to action on pandemics like Zika, Ebola, flu has global premiere April 7.

 

OFFICIAL CNN FILMS PRESS RELEASE:

UNSEEN ENEMY, about the potential looming crisis of disease pandemics, will debut as a CNN Films broadcast for a World Health Day presentation Friday, April 7 at 9:00pm Eastern on CNN/U.S. The film, which is exclusively presented by Johnson & Johnson, will then replay at 12:00am Eastern. All broadcasts will have limited commercial interruptions.

UNSEEN ENEMY is narrated by Emmy® and Golden Globe award-winning actor Jeffrey Wright and is written and directed by award-winning filmmaker Janet Tobias. CNN’s chief medical correspondent Sanjay Gupta, MD, is an executive producer and consultant for the film. Philanthropist Paul G. Allen, known for his catalytic leadership during the 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak, is also an executive producer.

Tobias embedded with some of the world’s top pathogen hunters and medical professionals for more than three years, crisscrossing the globe for UNSEEN ENEMY, to track outbreaks of Zika, Ebola, and influenza. From inside the hot zones in Brazil and Liberia, the film includes doctors who detail their heroic and often hazardous work from the front lines of the outbreak response. Doctors and researchers describe how they encountered the diseases, and how they are fighting the pathogens to save patients.

While the headlines of deadly outbreaks are alarming, Tobias’ film makes the case that successful containment can be achieved with coordinated efforts of medical professionals, researchers, governments, communicators, and the public. Two historic examples support her case. World-renowned epidemiologist Dr. Larry Brilliant, guides viewers through his difficult decisions as he worked on the teams that forcibly vaccinated the last remote villagers against smallpox. Others describe how the global spread of HIV/AIDS could have been stopped if governments and public health bodies had acted more deliberately to warn the public. Dr. Brilliant warns now that there may be 30 emerging human pathogens that have the potential to become epidemics.

“The public plays an essential role in the fight to contain and eradicate diseases like Ebola, Zika, and influenza,” said Dr. Gupta, about his engagement in producing UNSEEN ENEMY. “It’s always been my goal to bring the best scientific and medical information to viewers so they can make informed decisions that improve their health. The situation is urgent, but information can help make us less vulnerable,” he said.

In addition to the premiere broadcasts on World Health Day, UNSEEN ENEMY will encore Saturday, April 15 at 9:00pm and Sunday, April 16 at 2:00am Eastern, with a short, CNN-produced companion special. The special will feature CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta and Anderson Cooper with a discussion on the existing vulnerabilities to disease outbreaks and the tools needed to close the gaps in disease response.

“Because we witnessed epidemics up close during filming, our team came away with hope that we can win the fight against them. Around the world, there are dedicated scientists, innovative technologists, heroic doctors and nurses, as well as survivors, moms, dads, sisters, and brothers, who understand we all have a role to play,” said filmmaker Janet Tobias. “It’s only by each of us doing our part that we will win the battle.”

Profiled in the film to demonstrate the wide range of expertise needed to defeat the next global health crisis are:

**Laurie Garrett, a Pulitzer prize-winning health journalist explains why flu is one of the world’s potentially most serious pandemics and also why public health authorities need to shift current priorities to effectively meet the next crises;
**Soka Moses, MD, a heroic young Liberian physician, left his family to treat Ebola patients at the height of the epidemic that ravaged his nation;
**Peter Piot, PhD, renowned microbiologist and director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, helped identify the Ebola virus in the 1970s and explains why the global spread of HIV/AIDS was not inevitable;
**Peter Sands, a global financier, explains what the next global health crisis could mean to global markets and geopolitical stability;
**Vanessa Van der Linden, MD, is a pediatric neurologist who sounded the initial alarm about a rise in microcephalic infants, following a Zika outbreak. Van der Linden even used a social media app to help gather data about the disease pattern; and,
**Gwen and Terry Zwanziger, parents of a teen who died of flu complications, now urge other parents to become informed about preventive vaccines and advocate for more money for flu research.

Carole Tomko, general manager and creative director of Mr. Allen’s Vulcan Productions, said, “We believe, and we’ve seen proof, that information is aid. In absence of vaccines, human knowledge paired with behavior modification is the most effective way to slow the spread of contagious diseases. UNSEEN ENEMY is a prime example of how Vulcan Productions combines storytelling and technology to ignite audiences to respond to big challenges. It is our hope that this film will inform and prepare individuals, and global society as a whole, for the very real global health crisis we are facing.”

In addition to the telecasts on CNN, Unseen Enemy will also stream live for subscribers via CNNgo on Friday, April 7 (www.CNN.com/go and via CNNgo apps for AppleTV, Roku, Amazon Fire, and iPad). The film will be available the day after the premiere (Saturday, April 8) via CNNgo. For additional information about the film and other ways to watch it, please visit: www.takesallofus.com.

Learn more about the film UNSEEN ENEMY.

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Vegetarian Diets Linked to Genetic Mutation That Causes Cancer

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vegetables wikimediaThe debate between meat eaters and vegetarians has been raging for years. One side has often claimed that the human body never evolved to eat meat. The other side points out that some nutrients are nearly impossible to obtain without a meaty diet. Truth be told there can be health consequences for both diets, especially in the modern world where most meats are processed and loaded with preservatives.

However, the health issues associated with vegetarian diets doesn’t receive nearly enough attention. While it can lower blood pressure, as well as decrease your chances of having diabetes and some forms of cancers, there is definitely a trade-off. Aside from the fact that you’ll be more likely to be deficient in zinc, iron, vitamin D, vitamin B12, calcium, and protein, vegetarians are also known to have lower bone densities, lower sperm counts, and more mental health issues.

On top of that, there is an issue with vegetarian diets that has puzzled scientists for years. Even though past studies have linked excessive meat consumption with colorectal cancer, vegetarians are 40% more likely to have the disease. Recent research may be able to finally explain why this happens.

Researchers from Cornell University in the US compared hundreds of genomes from a primarily vegetarian population in Pune, India to traditional meat-eating people in Kansas and found there was a significant genetic difference.

“Those whose ancestry derives from vegetarians are more likely to carry genetics that more rapidly metabolise plant fatty acids,” said Tom Brenna, Professor of Human Nutrition at Cornell.

“In such individuals, vegetable oils will be converted to the more pro-inflammatory arachidonic acid, increasing the risk for chronic inflammation that is implicated in the development of heart disease, and exacerbates cancer.

“The mutation appeared in the human genome long ago, and has been passed down through the human family.”

Essentially, vegetarian diets have created a mutation in the human genome that becomes more prevalent with each generation of vegetarian eaters. The mutation helps digest plants, but it comes at a cost. Not only does it increase inflammation and cancer risks for vegetarians, but it also stifles the digestion of omega-3 fatty acids. The research points out that this could increase the risk of heart disease, but that’s not all. Omega-3 is responsible for preventing a host of health problems, such as depression, asthma, and Alzheimer’s.

The fact that this genetic mutation developed is very telling. It shows that being vegetarian isn’t the norm for our species. Our bodies had to adapt to it over many generations, and that adaptation is giving us health problems. Without this gene your body will have a harder time on a vegetarian diet, and with it you’ll be at risk for several diseases. This research proves that vegetarianism is not ideal for humans.

That’s not to say that a vegetarian diet is all bad, but it may not be a diet that you want to turn into a lifelong pursuit. Going on a vegetarian diet for a short period of time could probably help you sort out several health problems, but sticking to it is not going to be good for you, regardless of whether or not you carry this mutation.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Be creative, make it yourself!

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Be creative, make it yourself!
Brett Bauma “Makers On Acres

make Aquaponics_with_catfishOn the next episode of the Makers On Acres Tech, Build and Grow show we are going to be talking about getting creative and starting to make our own things for life.

2-13-16 Rankine_cycle_layoutMany of us have hands on talents, either from our past jobs, or just growing up in an era where it used to be taught.  On this episode, I am going to be discussing ways that we can take our creative ideas and start turning them into operable things.

On the last episode I talked about a steam powered generator. The steam powered generator is something I have been wanting to make for some time now and have not pulled the trigger on it yet.

2-13-16 800px-Pellet_Stove_burn_potSo what is the next step? How do I get this design out of my head, on paper, then ultimately running? We will talk about ways to design, and software that can be used to help you get your creations on paper. Once you get it on paper the next step will be getting your hands dirty and making it work.

I  dive into some of the tips and tricks for research, design, product sourcing and more. I also  discuss why it is important for us to hone our skills and learn to create our own things. If we are ever to be truly independent and self-reliant we need to know how to be creative and effective with our knowledge and skills.
Makers On Acres:Website: http://makersonacres.com/
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Listen to this broadcast or download “Be creative, make it yourself” in player below!

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The post Be creative, make it yourself! appeared first on The Prepper Broadcasting Network.

“New Research Suggests [Fluoridating Water] Is Dramatically Misguided”

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Survival World News

human-771601_1920ByWashington’sBlog

To Protect Its Nuclear Weapons Program, Government Hired Top Propagandist to Create the Myth that Fluoride Is “Safe and Effective”

Preface: One of our pet peeves is when erroneous groupthink persists even in the face of contradictory evidence.

As shown below, water fluoridation is based on very shaky science.  And yet – despite the science – the big dental associations in the U.S. and other countries continue to push it as safe and effective.

The Guardian reported last week:

Health experts are calling for a moratorium on water fluoridation, claiming that the benefits of such schemes, as opposed to those of topical fluoride (directly applied to the teeth), are unproved.

***

Stephen Peckham, director and professor of health policy at Kent University’s centre for health service studies, said: “Water fluoridation was implemented before statistics had been compiled on its safety or effectiveness. It was the only…

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Your Grandma Was Right About Early Risers (And Here’s Scientific Proof)

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Your Grandma Was Right About Early Risers (And Here’s Scientific Proof)

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William Blake wrote, “Think in the morning. Act in the noon. Eat in the evening. Sleep in the night.”

Henry David Thoreau wrote, “An early-morning walk is a blessing for the whole day.”

Jonathan Swift wrote. “I never knew a man come to greatness or eminence who lay abed late in the morning.”

Benjamin Franklin wrote “Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.”

For centuries, philosophers have written about the advantages of rising early. However, are early risers really more productive than late risers? Research seems to confirm it, and what’s more, early birds tend to be healthier overall than their night owl compatriots.

First, what is a morning person? The term is informally defined as someone who feels awake and full of energy in the mornings. Morning people also tend to wake up naturally around the same time each day, by 7 a.m. or earlier.

The Hidden Secrets Of Making Herbal Medicines…Right At Your Fingertips!

Research shows that early risers are more productive at work, get better grades and are healthier in mind and body. One theory is that getting up early gives you more time to prepare for the day.

According to a 2014 study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, work supervisors evaluated morning workers as more conscientious than those who start work later. These findings remained constant even after researchers accounted for total work hours and objective job performance reports.

A study conducted in 2013 of students at five German high schools found that late risers had lower grades than morning people, even after researchers accounted for factors such as cognitive abilities and their motivation to do well in school. Another study conducted by the University of North Texas in Denton of more than 800 college students found that early risers had a GPA that was a full point higher – 3.5 as compared with 2.5 — than their night owl peers.

Your Grandma Was Right About Early Risers (And Here’s Scientific Proof)

Image source: Pixabay.com

Study author Daniel J. Taylor theorized that early bird students find it easier get to classes on time and to study before later classes. He added that students who go to bed earlier might be less likely to drink excessively or to participate in other activities that could negatively affect their academic performance.

Whether or not you are an early or late riser can also affect your body weight, according to research by Northwestern University. The study, which found that early risers have a lower body mass index (BMI) than late risers, connected this finding with the body’s dependence on the circadian rhythm. Lead researcher Phyllis C. Zee concluded that if we do not get enough light at the appropriate times of day, our body clock could be affected, leading to an altered metabolism and weight gain.

Early risers also tend to be more consistent in adhering to an exercise regime, according to the American Council on Exercise. Most studies indicate that people who exercise in the morning set and maintain more rigorous workout schedules.

Could This All-Natural ‘Detox’ Capsule Have Extended John Wayne’s Life?

An altered body clock can even affect your driving ability. Spanish researchers found that night owls taking an 8 a.m. driving test performed worse than they did on the same test given at 8 p.m. Early risers, on the other hand, had consistently better scores at both times.

An interesting aspect of these and other studies about early risers is that the findings do not have to do with the amount of sleep we get, but instead with when we sleep. Our bodies are designed to sleep with a natural circadian rhythm that is connected with sunlight and darkness. To put it simply, most people who adjust to this cycle sleep better.

Research by Harvard University suggests that night owls can reset their circadian rhythm by going outside into the daylight early in the morning. If you are a late riser, one way to work your way into an earlier wake-up time is to get up a half-hour earlier for three days and then to repeat the process with another 30 minutes adjustment.

If you need more of an inducement to “get up and at ‘em” earlier, research indicates that early risers are happier than night owls. According to a University of Toronto study of more than 700 adults, morning people reported up to 25 percent higher feelings of cheerfulness, happiness and alertness than their night owl counterparts did. The study linked early exposure to daylight to more energy and a reduced risk of depression.

Convinced? Here are some other tips to move to more of an early bird lifestyle:

  • Sleep in a quiet, dark room for effective sleep. Turn off electronic screens 30 to 60 minutes before you get in bed.
  • Get everything you will need in the morning – such as clothes and lunch — together before you go to bed. Shortening your morning to-do list makes it easier to get out of bed in the morning.
  • Maintain a regular evening routine that will let your mind and body know it is time for sleep.
  • Be consistent by setting your alarm clock for the same time every morning — weekdays and weekends.
  • Move the alarm clock away from the bed so that you must get out of bed to reach it. Set it to play a pleasing tone and skip the snooze button once and for all.
  • Open your curtains and shades to let in as much light as possible.
  • Drink a glass of water soon after rising. Dehydration causes fatigue. If you are groggy when you wake up, you may need water, not more sleep.
  • Eat breakfast for the energy and brain food it provides.

The bottom line is your grandmother was right. Early birds do get the worm. Why not make getting up a half hour earlier or more one of your New Year’s Resolutions?

Do you agree or disagree? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Harness The Power Of Nature’s Most Remarkable Healer: Vinegar

WEATHER PREPAREDNESS: OBSERVE YOUR WORLD

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IMG_3727

There’s a lot to consider when you’re thinking about a really complete preparedness plan, not the least of which is weather. Obviously this means getting prepared to ride out the storms that roll through from time to time for all of us. The occasional severe storm that brings a tornado, hurricane, snow or ice storm, flooding and so on. But have you ever given any thought to how you might deal with weather in a long term survival situation like after a devastating seasonal storm knocks out all communications in your area for an extended period or, if you allow yourself to really consider how bad things could be, after a collapse? Your answer could turn out to be a matter of life and death. That’s why I wanted to share a few ideas on tools and concepts that will help you better understand the weather, and why it’s important to round out your complete preparedness plan.

I’ll touch on a few of the high points here, but I hope you will watch the video to get the full picture of what I’m talking about.

PREPAREDNESS LIBRARY

Being interested in preparedness, we should all have one and no preparedness library is complete without some titles on weather identification and history. Whether you are old school like me and like the feel of a book in your hand or you prefer to download your books, PDFs and other information on jump drives and designated tablets or laptops, I would strongly suggest you include some of these materials in your collection.

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WEATHER TOOLS

A couple of basic tools you will want to include in your DIY weather center are a barometer, thermometer and a rain gauge. With just these three items you will be able to forecast changing weather and establish weather trends. You can get a small and rugged barometer for your BOLT Kit in case you find yourself on the move.

WEATHER HOMEWORK

Now that you’ve got your finger on the pulse of your local weather, the next step is to document what you’re seeing so you can use this information in the future to help you make better decisions based on weather conditions. Here are three simple actions steps you can take immediately to better understand your weather.

1. Create and keep a weather log and an accompanying journal about the weather readings you observing.

2. Get familiar with your local weather history by talking to people that have lived and worked in the area for a long time. There’s nothing better than real, on the ground intel from people that have lived it.

3. Contact your local county level government officials and ask for Hazard Vulnerability (or Risk) Assessment for your area. This is usually not classified material of any type and as a taxpayer you should be able to obtain a copy free of charge.

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PREPAREDNESS APPLICATIONS

When it comes to preparedness, there are many applications for weather information in your particular area. Whether it’s determining when it’s time to put the garden in, whether or not the fish will be biting or if there is a strong storm moving in, the more informed you are the better chance you will have of being successful in your efforts and keeping your group and yourself safe.

WEATHER PREPAREDNESS: OBSERVE YOUR WORLD

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It’s not the fall that gets you….

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jump-off-cliff

 

It’s not the fall that kills you; it’s the sudden change of direction at the bottom.

It’s not necessarily the disaster that kills you.  It’s the severe dislocation of normal societal systems and the chaos and peril associated with it that comes in the two weeks, to a month, to six months following a major disaster that’s really going to determine whether or not you survive.  I say this because as a society, we are completely and totally dependent on our wholly integrated, just in time delivery systems to supply us with the basic necessities required for life.  Our water, our food, the energy we use to power everything that makes this super sized, got to have it right now society of ours whir, it’s all at our fingertips.  The unpalatable truth of our reality is that most people have completely lost touch with all that it takes to procure these basic necessities of life for ourselves.  The really frightening part of this situation is that most in our society do not or will not recognize the fact that by a whole boatload of metrics we are already falling, but because fresh water still flows from the tap, there is food on the shelves when you go to buy and there is still relatively inexpensive gasoline at the pumps when you go to fill up, people are able to turn a blind eye to the nation’s ills because they believe they do not impact them personally.  This of course is a fallacy, but normalcy bias is a powerful thing and the majority chooses to simply not acknowledge the problems they see all around them because it’s just easier.  Never mind looking to the future and where we may end up if we continue on our current trajectories as a nation, most folks only care about next weekend.

The unfortunate truth is that you will stop falling at some point and that’s when things get ugly.  That is when reality demands a cold, hard stop to the continuations of life as we know it and we are forced to make a new way forward.  Or we don’t.

When faced with this new reality, most people will have a very difficult time because they do not have the tools or the skill set necessary to take care of themselves.

So what do I say?

1. Embrace a big picture, long range viewpoint in an effort to see the unhinging before it happens.  This will give you a chance to spot when trouble is ahead and begin to take steps to get better prepared to handle it.  Educate yourself about the most probable threats for your area to start and grow your threat matrix from there.

2. Develop a plan to navigate these disruptions that best fits your circumstance based on your capabilities whatever they are.  Everyone can prepare.  Don’t waste your time worrying about a hurricane if you live in a desert.  Focus your planning and tailor it to suit your needs.  Furthermore, it does not matter what your limitations may be, there are very useful ways for everyone to become better prepared.  Remember, knowledge doesn’t have to cost anything to attain and weighs even less.

3. You can’t know the future for certain, so learn practical skills and don’t just acquire stuff.  There are more than a few folks out there that want to sell you the latest gadget or piece of gear, but if you don’t know how to use all that stuff it will do you no good.  Skills learned, practiced and verified in the back yard or on a family camping trip will most likely be way more valuable in the long run.  Acquiring these skills will make you flexible and adaptable and you will be able to use them any time.

4. Know your tribe.  You may be a verifiable bad ass, but none of us can effect sustainable, long term survival by ourselves in the long run.  Figure out who in your circles is of a like mind now before the storm rolls in and begin to take steps to strengthen those relationships.  You will want to surround yourself with people you know you can trust, that are hard working individuals that understand the importance of team concepts, that most likely share your general world views and who will excel in any area that you may not be as strong.  You will be glad you did.

 5. Enjoy life, but keep your eye on the ball.  Most of us prepare because we want to be able to take care of our family should we ever find ourselves in a bad situation and every one of us should be proud of that fact.  With that said, don’t allow yourself to become so focused on your preparations that you lose sight of why you’re working so hard to get ready in the first place.  Remember to make time to enjoy your family, friends and loved ones now while the world is still rolling along.  There may be dark days in the future, but while the sun is shining get out there and embrace the good times with those you care about.  Take a vacation, play with your children and take your wife or husband out to a nice dinner.  Live your life!  Isn’t that what it’s for?  Preparedness will never fall completely out of focus for people like us because it is a fundamental part of who we are, so don’t worry about that.  While you’re out there doing the hard work of preparedness day after day, just be sure to remember to take a little time to enjoy the good stuff.  Those people you are working so hard for will appreciate and love you for it.

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