Preppers – If You Aren’t Doing This Annually, You Won’t Be Disaster Ready

Click here to view the original post.

Well, it may seem cliché to say that spring is right around the corner, as in most of the U.S. there’s still plenty of snow on the ground.  Winter still seems “deep” to some (especially Yours Truly, as I have almost 3’ of snow on the ground), and the cold weather has not broken.  Nevertheless, everyone out there in ReadyNutrition Land, the early bird gets the worm.  I’m referring to all your gear that you’ll be breaking out soon when the cold weather breaks.

Stay on top of your prepper gear 

Maintenance

Your gear can best be maintained according to a maintenance schedule and you can get a start on it now.  Some preppers do it twice a year when Daylight Savings Time hits. But it’s more than giving it a glance and it doesn’t just mean cleaning it.  It also means inspecting it for serviceability and function.  It means making sure that it’s well organized and that you can pick it up at a moment’s notice to “rock and roll” with it…be out the door and on the moor!  You can’t do that unless it’s ready.  Let’s discuss it, shall we?

How’s that rucksack?  If you’re the way I am, you absolutely hate anything that can detract from your load-carrying capabilities.  Inspect that rucksack!  Has it been sitting out in the garage or in the basement, on the cement floor?  I hope not.  Are your straps in order, and are there any signs of dry-rot, mildew, or water damage?  You need to find that out now, and even more:


Preppers – The time to find out about deficiencies was yesterday, and there should be a “zero defects” policy regarding them.


What does this mean?  If you’re serious about survival and prepping, and you really want to survive a disaster/SHTF scenario when it happens (notice I wrote “when” and not “if”), then you’ll be on top of this…all the time.  The conditions for the rucksack I mentioned should never occur.  They won’t occur if you follow a regular schedule of checking it and correcting anything that surfaces.  For the nylon on your rucksack you can use a shoeshine brush or a medium to stiff bristle brush to clean off any dirt and dust.  Maintain the straps in the same way.

Dirt or mud, clean it off…if it’s not easy with the brush, then take some warm water on a clean towel or rag and “damp scrub” it off.  The nylon of the straps and the pack clean up well, but you don’t want to leave it too damp.  Always place the rucksack off the floor.  Don’t allow it to contact the floor surface.  Inspect the connecting points of the ruck, and inspect every piece that snaps or buckles.  Everything should be clean and working.  Canteens should be emptied and dried to prevent funk from going inside of them, or (as JJ does) if you’re going to store water in them the water needs to be changed periodically (say every month) to keep the “grand Funk railroad” from slipping in.

Familiarization

This may seem an oxymoron, however, unless you have a photographic memory you’re going to have a hard time remembering how you packed your gear…what is where.  One way to solve this (as I mentioned in other articles) is to keep an inventory sheet of everything, listed on an actual diagram of your rucksack.  This enables you to look at the diagram of the ruck and see how it’s made…where the pouches are, etc. …and know exactly what is in it.  Guess what?  It won’t be enough, because when you change seasons (in this case, Winter to Spring) you should have a full layout of all of your equipment you will tote.

Why?  For accountability (know that everything you think you have you actually have), and for serviceability (to know it is all in working order).  Along with that rucksack is that jungle hammock, that one-man tent and all of its accoutrements, flashlights, radios (don’t open that tube and find leaking batteries!), and all of your other gear and gadgets.

If it all comes to a halt, you don’t have the time to do all of this…and it’s on you…nobody else.

Tents have those “friction rods.”  How would you like to find out when you’re in the middle of a torrential downpour and setting up the dome that the friction rods are “ganked,” or broken?  Or you want to open up that poncho and string the bungees at the corners and top…a temporary shelter…and find that the vinyl is all eaten up from some kind of acid or rot, and there’s a giant hole in it?


Ben Franklin: “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”


If you follow a regular schedule of inspection and maintenance, you won’t have a “can of snakes” spring open on you.  This seems overly simplistic, but it is the way of mankind to procrastinate…to move toward the path of least resistance.  It is the way of all of us…and what makes us win?  The ability to be able to fight that part of our natures and discipline ourselves…make ourselves do what it is that is right to do, although we don’t feel like doing it.  Your gear should be clean, serviceable, well-organized, and accounted for…in its place and you know exactly where it is.

I’ll fill you in on one of my techniques.  When I come across someone, I can assess them in an instant if they carry.  If I ask them to look at their weapon and it is rusted or dirty, or it has carbon on it, and is un-lubed?  Then I need know no more.  But if the bluing is worn-down where points of contact meet the holster…and it’s cleaned and oiled…and the holster appears a little worn, but clean and serviceable…I know that one “draws,” cleans the weapon…is one with it.  That individual I remember.

It’s a standard that I hold myself to every day.

In the 82nd Airborne, we had a saying (a mantra, if you prefer): “My weapon, my equipment, and me.”

Sound overly simplistic?  No, it’s ordered…I kept it with me in Special Forces…I keep it with me now.  My weapon’s continuity ensures that I can continue if under fire.  My equipment and gear enables me to live, to be sheltered, to carry food, medicine, and supplies.  These two taken care of, then I must take care of myself…eating, rest, and hygiene, along with physical conditioning.

See how much is in it when you take a really good look?  But I’m not trying to berate you, the Readers in any way.  I’m trying to give you of myself…in lessons paid for with time, experience, and much grief to learn them correctly.

Because iron sharpens iron, and in order to survive, you must be made of steel…you and your family.  Yes, President Trump is in, and we’re “riding the crest” of an upswing.  Remember: all is fleeting, and it can all change in the blink of an eye. Don’t blink for too long, or the moment will have passed.  You must prioritize.  Prep your equipment now, before the Spring hits, and follow a regular program of maintenance and inspection.  Be steel.  You can do it.  Fight that good fight, and fight it to win.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Great Defender: You’ll Want This By Your Side When It Hits the Fan

Click here to view the original post.

45 acp[Editor’sNote: Simply put, things can to hell in a hand basket very quickly following a disaster. The widespread breakdown of the social order leads to looting in disaster prone areas which leads to the importance of being able to defend one’s home, family and their preps during a disaster breakdown. Because home defense is such an important consideration, it is important to familiarize yourself with the best firearms and ammunition choices out there. Jeremiah Johnson has been relentless in writing information on this subject and brings up another well informed article on this ammunition choice.]

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, over the past weeks, we have gone into great detail on firearms, caring and maintaining firearms, and why preppers should diversify their ammunition supplies. This week, we are focusing on the .45 ACP – a worthy cartridge with a long and unique history, and it is also worth your consideration with regard to home defense and survival, for a number of reasons we’ll outline here today.  So, without further adieu, let’s get started!

The History of the .45 ACP Cartridge

I want to discuss the .45 ACP cartridge.  This information is worthwhile and the cartridge itself has a great deal of history behind it.  In 1898 the Spanish-American War (characterized by Teddy Roosevelt and his Rough Riders) came to a close, but the Philippine insurrection did not.  The Moros (Philippine islanders) were able to take a hit from the .38 handguns and the .30 Krag rifle the Army had in service…and keep coming.  They could not, however, “soak up” the .45 Long Colts and the 12-gauge buckshot used from personally-owned Colts and Winchesters.  Yes, back then, many could carry their own choice of weapons.

Two officers were crucial in determining the choice back in 1904.  At the behest of Brigadier General William Crozier (appointed Chief of Army Ordnance in 1901, a new position created by President Theodore Roosevelt), a board was formed comprised of two men.  Colonel John T. Thompson (Ordnance) and Colonel Louis A. LaGarde (Medical Corps) were tasked with finding the optimal sized cartridge for the U.S. Military.  LaGarde’s report contained the following summary:


“The Board was of the opinion that a bullet which will have the shock effect and stopping power at short ranges necessary for a military pistol or revolver should have a caliber not less than .45[caliber].”

                Shotgun News, November 1, 2011, p. 13; article:

                 “High Standard M1911A1,” by Peter G. Kokalis


There we have the first glimmerings of the beginnings of the .45 ACP, and I must mention the author of the article referenced, Peter G. Kokalis was the Senior Editor for Shotgun News with a lifetime of experience in shooting and reloading, as well as being a combat veteran.  Kokalis summarized the .45 ACP cartridge’s capabilities most eloquently.  In essence, he clears up a lot of misconceptions relating to kinetic energy of a round.  Most people equate high velocity with knockdown power.  For long-range shooting, this holds to be true in many cases.

Short-Range Combat

What we’re dealing with here is short-range combat…where you (the homeowner) are protecting your house and family from a break-in at close ranges.  In such ranges, you will need stopping power.  Here are some terms you need to keep in mind:

  1. Wound Track – the path of the bullet through the body, also referred to as the “permanent cavity.” Three factors influence this wound track:
  2. Yaw – the way the bullet tumbles through the body after impact
  3. Expansion – of the bullet itself, also referred to as “mushrooming”
  4. Fragmentation – the way the bullet disintegrates in the body after impact as it moves through the tissue
  5. Temporary cavitation – the path opened up as the bullet travels through the vital organs…a path that “rebounds,” or bounces back into original position, though not without damage to certain organs

Depth of penetration is the most important factor, as Kokalis outlines here, in this excerpted segment of his article:


“Most important of all, is the fact that penetration is without doubt the single most important parameter in the wound ballistics equation.  It has been determined that in law enforcement and self-defense scenarios, a minimum of 12 inches, and up to 18 inches of penetration will produce the most effective results – required to reach the body’s vital organs.  Once we’ve obtained the necessary penetration, the bullet that makes the biggest hole will do the most damage.

 As a result of the above, there is only one possible conclusion.  The .45 ACP cartridge is the most effective handgun round – among those commonly available – that you can use in a gunfight.  Even anecdotal evidence over the last 100 years has proven this to be so countless times.”


Kokalis went on to explain that a 230-grain JHP (Jacketed Hollow Point) expands (on average) from .45 (that is .45 of an inch) to .65 with approximately 15.5 inches of penetration.  I must add his final words in the article, as they should drive the point home:


“This can be summarized in one sentence: use the largest caliber with the heaviest bullet, propelled at moderate velocity.  In other words, deploy with a handgun chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge.”


To clarify what he meant by “moderate velocity” is that other, faster bullets tend to go right through the target at close distances, whereas the .45 ACP (considered a low-velocity round at – on average – 930 feet per second) has both the penetration power and will “open up” for greater internal damage to the target.

To add my own words to Mr. Kokalis’, I have used other calibers, such as 9mm Luger, .38, and .45 Long Colt.  The .45 ACP is an excellent round that is also multipurpose when using different types of ammunition.  The +P rounds (in brands such as Buffalo Bore) turn your cartridge into a super-penetrator that can and will defeat body armor.  It is also a good round to protect against large and ferocious predators.  You can pick up the standard FMJ (Full Metal Jacket) rounds at 230 grains for under $40.00 for a box of 100 at your friendly Wal-Mart for target shooting.

A Frugal Ammunition Choice

They’re easy to reload, and economical: the .45 ACP will not bankrupt your savings while giving you that large caliber round with the stopping power you need.  As to the piece you wish to throw it out of, take your pick.  The 1911 is tried and true (in my humble opinion one of the finest handguns ever made), and has served our military nobly throughout its existence.  So, .45 ACP?  Try it, you’ll like it: the round will serve your needs well, and at a price you can afford.  Keep that powder dry and don’t store it with your primers!  JJ out!

 

 

Don’t forget to join us March 9th 7 p.m. (CST) for a FREE interactive webinar about solar cooking. Click here for more details!

MARCH9G

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Why Preppers Should Focus on Diversifying Firearm Calibers

Click here to view the original post.

Ready Nutrition Readers, as you may have deduced from the title, this piece is a recommendation to acquire firearms of diverse calibers.  Let us discuss some of the calibers and the reasons why it is prudent to prepare in such a manner.  I’m not recommending any particular firearm, per se, except in one instance here that I’ll cover later for a reason that will be self-explanatory.

Firstly, forget about what will happen in the SHTF event.  Whatever it is, the reason for preparing by obtaining diversities among firearms calibers is to ensure you can obtain ammo for it.  This is not detracting from reloading whatsoever.  I guarantee, however, that situations will arise in which you have to load a firearm and don’t have time to sit around with your RCBS “Rock Chucker” press or your Lee Handloader.  You have a need to employ a firearm at the moment, and time is of the essence.

Common calibers ensure that you will usually have ammo for the weapon no matter where you go.  This is one of the reasons it is advantageous to own an AR-15.  Personally, I hate ‘em, because after 200 rounds or so, you have to clean the carbon off of them.  The AR-15 is so finely-tuned with so little leeway between moving parts such as the bolt group and bolt carrier that any severe carbon buildup is almost intolerable to firing the weapon.  That being said, we have had more than 5 decades of dealing with .223/5.56 mm ammo.  The military, law enforcement (state and local) all rely on the AR-15 family; therefore, ammo is obtainable.

The phrase “What if?” however, is your watchword.  If you have either a .308, or a 7.62 x 39 mm (AK), then you’ll also be in pretty good shape.  Law enforcement is switching back to .45 ACP, but there are still plenty of 9mm rounds to go around.  The .45 ACP round is a great round that is widespread.  Your .357 magnum and .40 Smith and Wesson rounds are not as common but are commonplace.  In essence, yeah, you need each of these.

One piece that I’ll finally mention is really unique.  It’s the P-320 Compact by Sig Sauer.  They have a system called the Grip Shell system.  This Grip Shell is the basis for the weapon, that accepts full size magazines and full length slide assemblies.  What’s so big about this?  You can switch out 9 mm, .357 sig., .40 S&W, and .45 ACP on the same frame: the frame will hold all four of those calibers.  Nifty, huh?  Not only that, but it is a “redefinition” of BATFE rules.

The Grip Shell is a modular frame that is a trigger group and receiver with a serial number.  Guess what?  It is this frame that has the serial number, and not each of the individual barrels that you can change out on it.  Ahh, I feel the gleam of many eyes reading these words now.  Isn’t that neat?  You can buy four calibers, but only one receiver is your serialized piece.  You run with the ball from there: imagination is the only limitation.

If you want prices, you’ll have to check with a gun dealer.  The basic piece will run about $700 more or less, and additional barrels will be more.  It’s all up to what you want, but you can pretty much cover the bases with it, as you’ll be sure to find something to fire through it no matter how short ammo may be in supply.  To take that “kit” and pack it up with you…well, that would be prudence and providence prepared by your own hand.  Just make sure to pick up a box of ammo initially for each caliber you decide upon.

For anything you shoot, you should also be able to reload, and I recommend a good stationary press akin to the one I mentioned before, as well as a Lee handloading kit with dies and accessories.  The latter you can pack in your rucksack, as you never know when you might need it.  So hopefully you’ll take some advice to stock up and “plow the field” on different calibers.  If you run across a supply that won’t feed your main piece, it would be good to have a backup piece that can fire what you find until your “lead sled dog” is “fed” and up and running again.  Keep that powder dry, no matter what the caliber, and stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Prepper Training: This is How to Prepare Your Body to Escape the Big City on Foot

Click here to view the original post.

bugging out on footReadyNutrition Readers, this piece covers some of the basic fundamentals on road marching.  Yes, this is a typical military exercise, but it has several applications for you in terms of preparations and in training.  Road marches can be both physically demanding and challenging.  They should not be attempted without proper preparation, and if you have any underlying health conditions, consult with your doctor prior to doing them.

As I have mentioned in previous articles, I prefer the large-frame Alice Pack of the US Army, the one I have been using for many decades, now.  It is both sturdy and affordable, and can meet a person’s needs from a training and a survival perspective.  That mentioned, it is up to you to find one that feels both comfortable and offers you the support you need to be able to move on the road or cross-country with weight on your back.

Don’t road march cold: you need to take the time to do some light calisthenics to warm your muscles up prior to the physical exertion.  The weight you will tote with you will vary according to your abilities and physical condition, as well as the needs of the exercise.  It is a training event: you need to keep it as such and hold it in that regard.  You need proper footgear and comfortable clothing, as well as a water supply.  You need to prepare for it the night before, with a good meal and plenty of rest and fluids prior to your start.

Your stretches can include (but not be limited to) the side-straddle hop (referred to as “jumping jacks,”) as well as half-squats, squats, hamstring and calf stretches, and so forth.  I prefer boots to support my ankles, although I have seen many people using tennis shoes and hiking shoes.  Whatever your preference, as long as it gives your arch the support it needs.

Start out small, with a lighter amount of weight.  That will be on you to gauge.  Start by doing a mile, and then work your way up.  A good conservative plan for a road marching “schedule” can be one per week with lighter weights and shorter distances.  As you “work your way up” you’ll want to make the road marches less frequent.  The reason being is you don’t want to damage yourself with a potential stress fracture or a hairline fracture from continuously pounding the pavement with your feet and heavy weight on the shoulders.  Shin splints are a common occurrence over time, as well.

Medically, they’re referred to as MTSS (medial tibial stress syndrome), and are pains within the connective muscle and tissue surrounding your knee and the outside of your tibia.  It is a chronic “dull” aching feeling that arises in about 15 to 20% of people who run, walk, or (in this case) march long distances.  Ice packs and rest can enable you to recover in a short period of time.  For any question of it, consult with your physician if the problem persists.

The road marches will strengthen your legs and back, and also develop your cardiovascular capabilities.  You should time every one of them, and attempt gains each time you undertake a march.  Gains would take the form of quicker times, or more weight carried.  You have to do it gradually.  Eventually, your end goal is to carry what you normally would in a rucksack if the SHTF and you were out in the woods.  Cross-country is markedly different from doing it on the side of the road due to the uneven terrain as well as other factors, such as water, thick vegetation, an abundance of rocks, etc.

Weather is also a factor, and in the warmer months great care must be taken to ensure you don’t dehydrate yourself.  Remember: thirst is a late sign of dehydration, and means you’re already depleted when you feel thirsty.  It would also be good to undertake these marches with a partner, so that if an emergency arises you have someone with you to rely upon for first aid or to go for help.

Your endurance will improve with time, and it also takes adjustment for your feet to become accustomed to both your pace and the work.  It is an excellent lower-body exercise that still manages to work your upper body.  It requires discipline, determination, and preparation to accomplish.  Eventually you will see results, and can road march 2 to 4 times per month successfully as part of your physical regimen.

Remember to take account of the water you will carry when you initially weigh your rucksack.  You can pick up a good fishing and game scale that will enable you to find out exactly how much you tote.  Try it out.  It is cost effective and will give you some good results.  Happy rucking!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How Big Brother Could Be Spying on You Through Your Prescriptions

Click here to view the original post.

bigbrother 

Prescription meds are a way that the Big Brother state can maintain control over your medical supplies and monitor you as an individual.

In mid-January, an article came out entitled Feds force Doctors and Pharmacists to Spy on 60% of Americans,” and deals with the PMP, the Prescription Monitoring Program, and 48 states have adopted it.  The federal government keeps track of all your sensitive information (birth date, address, etc., and demographics on you) in the “interests of combating drug abuse.”

That reason is nothing more than a front to be able to monitor you and using the prescriptions as a “back door.”  It is the usual government mantra: “For the good of the whole,” “for the public safety,” ad infinitum ad nauseam.  The problem is that they utilize these existent programs to justify more and more control measures that eventually encompass everything you do.  A case in point is the hormone androstenedione.  This is a precursor hormone to testosterone, and the last “gate” before reaching testosterone on the metabolic pathway.

In 1997, it was a completely legal and obtainable as a supplement.  The East German Olympic athletes had a lot of success with it boosting testosterone (thus performance).  Later it was banned by the Olympic committee, and then the torch was taken up by the American sports agencies, then the FDA, and so on.  Now you cannot obtain it.  In many countries (especially in Europe) you cannot even have amino acids without a prescription.  In the last eight years, this country has followed suit in a lot of the practices of Europe.

How to ‘Opt-Out’ of Prescription Monitoring

  1. Stock up on as many nutritional supplements as you can, in the form of herbs, tinctures, and naturopathic aids such as vitamins and anything you can use
  2. Obtain as many long-shelf-life antibiotics for your fish and pets for as long as you can
  3. Learn how to replace medicines that may not be readily available by supplementing with herbal foods and natural food aids (you can’t call any of them “medicine,” by the way)
  4. Get yourself in shape (yes, this is why JJ writes so many articles dealing with physical training and conditioning), as this will prevent you from being ill and/or visiting with these Doctors…. Dr. Doolittle, or Dr. Do-Nothing. YOU ARE YOUR OWN BEST HEALTH CARE PROVIDER THROUGH PREVENTATIVE MEANS
  5. By following these instructions, it’ll keep you out from under the magnifying glass of feds or anyone else “lingering” from the Dark Ages of Obama’s reign.
  6. Practice OPSEC (Operational Security): don’t be a “Chatty Kathy” doll, to paraphrase Steve Martin…tell those worth telling, and only so they can emulate your actions…not to be the center of attention. Don’t let anyone know what you have or what you’re doing!

The last sentence of #6 is very important.  Such is not just to keep the government from prying in on you, but to prevent your nosy neighbors from knowing what you have surrounding a SHTF situation.  Today’s “Madge” from the Palmolive ad is tomorrow’s Marauder with a pickaxe hammering at your front door to get to your supplies.  We have a President who is taking action on behalf of the American people, but we’re not out of the woods yet.  Just because it’s sunlight outside doesn’t mean there are not plenty of vampires snoozing in coffins, just waiting for the opportunity to strike.  If they do, the best “wooden stake” you can use on them is to be prepared beforehand, and not expose yourself to them in the night.  May the sun always warm your back and light a path for your feet!  Keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Importance of Firearms Maintenance in the Wintertime

Click here to view the original post.

winterfirearmMany guys and gals may wonder, “Why do we have to maintain firearms in the wintertime, since we’re not using them as much?” Well, there are different conditions to deal with in the wintertime that may affect your firearms adversely.  Many will just wrap them up in plastic after coating them with Cosmoline or some other lubricant-preservative.  This does not necessarily protect them from changing conditions during the wintertime that may go unnoticed.

First, I stress that you should clean and inspect your weapons at a minimum of once per week.  If it is done less frequently, then you must take several factors into consideration: temperature, change in temperature, humidity, sunlight, and location your firearms are kept/stored.  If you happen to have a temperature/climate-controlled gun storage safe or the equivalent, then you can “whittle” your time down for disassembly and inspection of your firearm.  For the rest of us (myself included), a regular maintenance program is essential.

Depending on where in your house you store your firearm and how you store it (in a gun safe, or a moisture-controlled case, for example) will dictate the challenges you’ll face.  Alternating temperatures cause some problems.  If you have a home that (when you’re inside of it) the temperature is kept at 70 degrees F or such, if the temperature drops to say 50 or 60, you may have problems with moisture.  The weather (and the relative humidity) will also be a factor.


Metal tends to “sweat” with a change in temperature, that is for condensation to build up, especially when the change is drastic or sudden.


You’ve been outside all day hunting that deer with your Winnie ’94 30-30.  You just came into the house, and after kicking off your boots you hung your Winnie ’94 up on the gun rack.  Guess what?  In about ten to fifteen minutes, even if you were as dry as dust coming through the door…the weapon will have condensation all over it from the sudden change in temperature.

Another scenario is that you must vent out the house a bit: your woodstove has been on “overdrive” and you need to air out the place just a tad.  It’s raining outside and humid.  When that cold air and moisture wafts inside, guess where it’ll go?  Yep, right onto the barrel and mechanism of that trusty rifle you have hanging over the mantelpiece.

Another one is that you have a rack in your bedroom, and you opened the drapes to allow a little sunlight into the room…and it just happened to hit your rifle on the rack.  The rifle gains about 20 degrees from the sun, and then when it leaves, the coolness of the room and the weapon’s proximity to the window causes the sweating.

During the wintertime, it isn’t enough just to pack it all up and wait until the springtime.  As far as things are with me, the only time I would ever pack one up is if I’m transporting it somewhere and it needs to be encased and protected for a few days to a week.  Other than that, I stick to my regular maintenance schedule.  First thing you do, is wipe off any excess moisture on the weapon.  Then completely disassemble it and carry out an inspection of all your parts.  You are looking for any debris and any buildup of ferrous oxide (that’s rust!) from excessive moisture.  There shouldn’t be any.

The reason there shouldn’t be is that there will not be…if you carry out a regular program of maintenance.  You haven’t fired it; however, you can still run patches through the bore with a light coating of lube on them.  Clean off any rust and oil all your parts.  It protects from rust or moisture.

Also, want to save a little money?  You don’t have to bankrupt yourself on those stingy little bottles of lube/gun oil…a 3 or 4-ounce bottle…for 7 or 8 dollars.  Go buy yourself a quart of 5W/30 Mobil Synthetic oil.  We used to use it in the service, and I still use it now.  Does the job just as good and (most of the time) better than those cheap, thin, junk oils such as Hoppe’s or Remington’s or the like.  A quart will last you a long time, and then you just refill the small bottles that you normally use with it.

Same for patches.  Take an old t-shirt, sheet, or pillowcase.  Cut out your squares on your own, and also cut yourself some 1’ squares for general purpose weapons cleaning rags.  These can be washed and then reused a couple of times.  Use a bristle brush of some kind and brush the oil vigorously all over your working parts, and then wipe off any carbon and/or rust you have.  Then give it a fresh coat (thin), and reassemble the weapon.  Voila!  Your weapon is good to go.  Make sure that when you reassemble it that you perform a functions check on it, and ensure that it has been reassembled properly without any glitches.

One thing you can also do is to “shroud” your weapons.  This is merely covering them as they are on a rack with a sheet of some kind.  Try to match the surrounding colors of the room.  If you have a white wall, then a white sheet would be a good thing.  This keeps dust from settling on the weapon, and any ash/soot from the woodstove, as well.  It also keeps your weapons out of sight for when some “snoopy” human comes over to the front door, such as the ever-present, never-reliable neighbors, or some door-to-door sales clown, or some other pest.  The less they see the better.

Minimum of once per week per firearm.  An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, as Ben Franklin once said.  Protect them within a case for when you’re traveling, and remember to give them a good wiping down and a thorough lube when you reach your destination.  Maintain that firearm at all times, and it’ll see you through, whether you’re hunting deer or stopping someone from breaking into your home.  Keep that powder dry and stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Green Beret’s Winter Survival Training Guide

Click here to view the original post.

winterprep2Have you ever considered what you will do if you have to bug out in winter? Being exposed to the elements puts you and your family at risk and it is paramount to be ready for that scenario.

It’s time to learn the basics of surviving in harsh environments. These basics will help you to inspire confidence in yourself and your skills.  Winter weather and a cold environment with snow and ice on the ground presents challenges, but they can be overcome and mastered with practice – all that is needed is equipping yourself with the knowledge to do so.

Jeremiah Johnson, our own personal Green Beret, is helping us train to be winter ready. One thing he emphasizes in a lot of his articles is that our preps aren’t the only aspect of prepping that we should focus on.


“None of us are going to be completely prepared when the bottom drops out.  Knowledge and skills should be desirous over materials, because with these you can either acquire what is needed or improvise out of what can be fabricated into something useful.”


He has been writing quite a bit about winter survival lately, and now is the time to put theory into practice. With the right gear, you can blend into your environment and survive in the harshest of environments. Here are some great articles to help you focus on winter survival!

 

Gear

What To Wear in the Harshest Conditions

Take Care of Your Feet and Your Odds of Survival Increase

How to Blend into a Winter Environment

12 Budget-Friendly Survival Essentials for the Cold Outdoors

Don’t Get Caught in the Cold Without this Essential Prep

 

Health and First-Aid

Why Drinking More Water During Winter Is Crucial to Your Survival

7 Fundamental Requirements for Cold Weather Injuries

Frostbite: How To Survive Winter’s Unrelenting Brutality

10 Must-Have First Aid Supplies for Preventing Hypothermia

 

Survival Theory

Procuring Protein Sources in Winter

Critical Training Techniques to Overcome the Elements

When You Lose Power this Winter, Here’s What You’ll Need

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Your Home Security Plan Is At Risk Without This Essential Prep

Click here to view the original post.


ReadyNutrition Readers, this piece is on some of the parameters and importance on keeping things safe…inside of a safe, or a “safe space” where they won’t be compromised.  The compromise that I speak of means from fires, thieves, floods, or mayhem in general.  Every family should consider some kind of safe, as well as a safe/hidden spot to keep the safe in.  You have valuable (either financially or holding value due to their nature) possessions and documents that need safeguarding.

All Could Be Lost Without This Home Security Prep

Let’s start by saying it would behoove you to have 2 types of safe: one for larger items, and another one for portable, smaller items, especially in the way of documents.  Such documents can include (but certainly aren’t limited to) passports, marriage licenses, birth certificates, land deeds, vehicle titles, corporate stock and/or documents, to name a few.  A smaller, more portable type of safe would do in this case, such as those made by Sentry to lock with a key and a recessed handle.


You may want to pick up a fireproof type of safe or box for your ammo, to store in the vicinity of any safe that has firearms, but do not store the ammo in the safe with the firearm.


safe

These small safes can hold your documents and certifications, usually protecting them from fire up to about 1,500 degrees F, as well as being water-tight to protect them from flooding and water damage.  Now, the whole point of having this type of safe is to make your documents portable.  The fire rating may help you if you’re not able to get to them, and must recover them later, or if they suffer “light” exposure to flame and you are able to grab them…and they’ll be protected.

The other type – a larger, heavier kind may have to wait for you to return after a fire or flood.  Sentry makes these guys, too, and I prefer the tumbler kind to the electric.  Firstly, if there’s any kind of solar flare or EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse), you may not be able to get into the safe.  Secondly, the battery is going to run down eventually.  You’re much better off with a “click and tumbler” type of combination lock on the front.  The larger safe will also hold documents, but you can also store things such as jewelry, extra cash, a firearm or two, precious/valuable coins and metals…the list is endless.

safe2

This type of safe will usually be good up to about 2,000 degrees F, and can be bolted to the floor.  This latter detail precludes being able to just lift it up and take it away.  This type of safe should be hidden.  The possibilities include (but aren’t limited to) a piece of furniture either bought (premade specifically to hide it) or specially made for the occasion, a recessed wall or floor, or a hidden room that only you and your family know about.

This last point is especially if you have paperwork or documents in the safe.  You don’t want to “cook off” the ammo with excessive heat inside of the safe and start a fire internally.  Another thing to consider hiding the safe in plain sight by installing it inside of a wall.  This can be done with masonry or with timber and drywall.  The key being you need as much space for the safe as is minimally possible, and it (the space) needs to blend with its surroundings.  It is better to go with the ground floor for such a location, as if you have it on the second floor and the house burns down, it’ll probably end up being in the basement after a considerable fall, and this after being weakened by the fire.

Keep a copy of the combination in a place where it won’t be lost if the house goes down and in a manner that will not allow it to be affected by the elements.  An index card or portion of one with the combination on it and laminated with heavy-gauge laminate is your best bet in this regard.  Make sure your family members (if they’re trustworthy, mind you) know the combination to the safe and where to find it.  In an age where safety deposit boxes in banks are no longer inviolate to the IRS or the Federal Government, the home safes may assure you both of security and privacy.

Always learn the fire-rating beforehand, and buy them new, not used.  You do not know what the previous owners may have either went through or subjected the safe to prior to you owning it.  In this manner, you have quality backed by some type of warranty.  There are plenty of websites available with plans and ideas of where in your house to recess one should you wish to do so.  Consider one or two for your home.  It is a not-so-costly investment that will keep your stuff safe and pay for itself the first time it’s needed.  Keep your things safe, and be safe in all you do.  JJ out!

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Prepared Workplace: Lifesaving Supplies You Need Before the Emergency

Click here to view the original post.

prepared workplace[Editor’s Note: On average, we spend over 50 hours a week away from our homes. Chances are, if a sudden disaster occurs at your workplace and you are forced to shelter in place for a given time, many coworkers (including yourself) could be unprepared. Would you have enough food and water to wait an emergency out at work? A disaster plan is only as good as your Plan A, B and C.]

So, ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, have you made a big batch of pemmican for yourselves yet?  If so, then I commend you.  If not, then get on the stick!  The beef stick, that is, because pemmican is one of the foods that is perfect to carry around.  I know, I know, between bug-out bags, micro-tools, thermoses, and the likes of which I have been writing about recently…you need to be an octopus to be able to carry all of it.  It is better to have, as you well know, than not to have something.  Let’s talk about food in this regard.

The Secret to Survival is Prior Planning

Undoubtedly you have laid up a supply for yourselves and your families in your home and have some packed in your “go” bags.  We’ll now touch on a few other areas: in your workplace and on your person. Some preparedness and emergency items for the entire office are:

Talk to your supervisor about the existing emergency plan and find ways of improving it. You could even create a preparedness month where each coworker donates money to get the office prepped!

Ultimately, It’s About You!

If your workplace shrugs off your attempts to get them prepped, that shouldn’t stop you from getting some extra food and provisions for yourself in your workplace (and also carry a little on you at all times). Keep in mind, this is about giving yourself an “edge” and perhaps buying you some time in a sticky situation.

If you have a workplace locker (the best are those that lock), a basket/cubby space, or a shelf for your things, you can stock up a few cans of food and some essentials.  Why?  Because that is what preparation is all about: the “what-if’s” that may arise.  What if you cannot go outside to your vehicle to get your “go” bag?  There could be any number of reasons: severe flooding, rioting, extreme cold weather, among others.  You may have to make do with what you have on your person or in your workplace.

As well, make sure you have some clean athletic socks and walking shoes stored on you. As well, have some extra change on hand in case you need to get items from the vending machines (items like water, nuts, crackers, etc., will run out quickly in an emergency).

Your Personal Workplace Prepper Pantry

Even if you just have a bag that you stash under a table or in a back room, you can throw extra canned goods in there.  Here’s a sample of what to place in your bag or locker (with a locker, remember, you can probably put some more food in there):

  • (4) cans of food (preferably heat-and-eat prepared dinner-ravioli, soups, etc.)
  • (2) 20-ounce or 32-ounce bottle of water
  • (1) Ziploc sandwich bag of a snack (trail mix, pretzels, dried fruit, etc.)
  • (1) Ziploc bag of hard candies
  • (1) small bag of dried meat (jerky, pemmican, beef sticks, etc.)

That will get you started, but you don’t have to stop there. There are many types of disasters that could occur while you are at work. What happens if there is a fire and you need to escape? Or, in a worst case scenario, hazardous material has leaked into the air. Why not have a gas mask on hand? There are many gas masks that are compact and can fit inside your desk.

Remember, these items are for your personal space/storage space in your workplace.  If you have an office and a desk, all the better.  If the desk has any drawers that lock, then it’s optimal.  Remember this rule:

If it’s a time of trouble or scarcity, whatever you need will also be needed by others.

Sesame Street rules aside, you do not need to advertise that you have a stash of extra food in your office drawer or wall locker.  Keep your supplies in a nondescript gym bag or other non-transparent/non-translucent carrier.

Their need is not a justification for your sharing, nor their shortsightedness for your “help” regarding preparations. 

One way to circumvent this is to get coworkers involved in getting the workplace prepared for these types of emergencies and have them create their own personal workplace pantries.

So, we’ve addressed the workplace, and now how about on your person?  Why?  Because it gives you an edge.  I have written articles in the past on the value of cargo pants with cargo pockets.  Here I am, recommending them again.  I carry a small bag of peanut butter-filled pretzels in my cargo pocket, as well as a bag of jerky, and about half a dozen hard candies (I like those Jolly Rancher ones).  There’s a good reason for it.

What if you’re trapped in an elevator?  Or (as mentioned before) something goes wrong, such as a power outage that leaves you trapped for a while.  What then?  It is a proven fact that the intake of simple sugars helps the human body during times of stress or crisis.  In addition, it is a psychological support you’ll give to yourself to help you deal with all of it.  The protein in the jerky and the peanut butter is important; the necessity to replace protein can never be understated.

The hard candies give you some simple sugar to throw into your bloodstream, and keep the mouth from drying out.  As I’ve mentioned in previous articles, if you can’t drink, then do not eat anything.  You will deplete yourself further; you must drink in order to digest your food.  The difficulty this presents is obvious, because if you don’t tote around a water bottle all the time, you’ll have trouble finding water when the need arises.  So, tote it around!  Everybody walks around all the time with coffee cups and soda bottles, so it won’t look out of place for you to tote around a 20-ounce PowerAde bottle with water in it.

These are akin to “tiers” of response levels: 1st is what you have on you, 2nd in your work area/locker, and 3rd in your vehicle.

One more key point: All the stuff not on you becomes a cache point if you can’t reach it, and you can go for the stuff later on.

You may have to forgo getting food out of your locked desk drawer because 10 other people may see it.  Who’s going to think of going into your desk drawer for food unless you make them aware it’s there.  Practice OPSEC, and re-read the article I wrote on the Nosy Neighbors…the ones who will eat your food and maybe you along with it if their needs call for it.  Keep it to yourself.  It’s better to wait until everybody is out of the area, and then obtain your supplies from your locked and unknown (to your “buddies” at work) location.  Ounce of prevention, pound of cure.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Frugal Prepping: 12 Survival Tools You Need in Your Bug Out Bag

Click here to view the original post.

survival tools for the bug out bagReaders, I’m not so much into gadgets and gizmos as many people, but one of the things that I have done is to amass what I call a “micro” toolbox.  When you’re in a bind, you may have only what is on your belt or in your pockets to rely on.  But what about things you may need in a pinch that may require tools…except you can’t drag around a giant toolbox with you?  This may just foot the bill for you and give you some food for thought.

Although I live an “Uncle Cave-man” type of lifestyle, the fact that I am writing this article to you on a computer and use the internet should prove to you that I still need a certain number of things to carry out tasks besides a bow saw and a stone axe.  Let’s go down a list of some things you can “miniaturize” and take with you in a small tool kit for your needs in a possible 72-hour emergency.  Many of these are low cost and can be picked up in the Dollar Tree/Dollar store.  Remember: You’re not going to stick-build trusses or frame a house – just make a small tool kit you’ll be able to use in a pinch that won’t cost you an arm and a leg.

Learn how to build the ultimate bug out bag

12 Essential Tools You Need For Your Bug Out Bag

  1. Hammer: no, not the 30-oz Estwing, but a small hammer, just enough to tack in some nails and build a small lean-to or shelter [Pack some nails in a variety of sizes in a small container…don’t forget them]
  2. Screwdriver: once again, your dollar stores have the ones that have “bits” for different screwdriver heads, such as standard or Philips.
  3. Drywall saw: yes, the small one with a triangular-thin blade and big teeth…excellent for small branches, and can be used for game you shoot, as well
  4. Exacto/razor knife: the one with break-off, disposable blades
  5. Allen wrench: you never need one until you need one…and when you do, nothing in the world will work except the Allen wrench…also at the Dollar Tree
  6. Star-nose bits for the screwdriver: once again, you’ll never need them until you do…and your life will be horrible if you don’t have one and the need arises…make sure they fit in your multipurpose screwdriver (#2); you can get them at the hardware store for a couple dollars
  7. Pen Torch with Butane: I recommend Benz-o-matic’s ST-200. It is about 6” long, and it can hot-blow, solder, and be used as a torch with a flame more than 2,000 degrees F!  It runs about $23, and the butane (use Benz-o-matic to keep it from gunking up) about $4-5 per can.  If you need to “unfreeze” something in a heartbeat, such as a lock or a moving part, or if you must solder something together to repair it…there’s your racehorse.
  8. Tape measure: get a good one, a 12 foot one for your minimum size, and use the ones by Stanley, not the generic junk…in this case the adage “cheap you buy, cheap you get” applies. Use Stanley’s “Fat Max” brand that is wider with more visible numbers, unlike the others where even an eagle or an owl couldn’t see the numbers and markings.
  9. A small pry bar: the type that is either rounded or hexagonal. You can pick up one of these at the Dollar Tree, but if you’re going to put a lot of force on it, you may want one of the more expensive ones at Home Depot or Lowe’s.  You never know when you need to lever something in a small space.
  10. Eating utensils and accessories: yes, a fork, knife, and spoon, and a small hand-held can opener. [Note: if you’re out in the wintertime, and a can of food has frozen, you can poke a couple of hole in it with the can opener and thaw it out on a fire]
  11. Small power tools: Cordless Dremel with bits, a cordless screwdriver (that can double as a drill if it’s a good one) and bits…these are your “primaries” with your “Uncle Cave-man” manual tools to back them up if needed. The Dremel, especially, has drills, sanders, and cutting wheels that can really help in a bind.
  12. A set of micro/precision screwdrivers: once again, the Dollar Tree is your best bet.

There are many reasons to pack yourself up a small tool kit such as this one.

Firstly, you do not know when or where you are going to run into a situation that you need these tools in a hurry.  Many of you may say that you already have a big Sears craftsman toolbox in the back of your truck or the trunk of your car.  That’s fine, and guess what?  So do I.  But in addition to this full-sized toolbox, I have the smaller one, for the “What if’s” that always arise.

What if you have an accident and you need to get away from the vehicle to seek shelter?  What if you’re compromised, in some way, and must abandon your vehicle completely?  Wouldn’t it be nice to have that small tool kit that can be made to attach to your happy bug-out backpack?  You can potentially grunt it out and lug the full-sized toolbox with you, but if that’s not an option, your backup will be this compact bag or box of tools…micro-tools, if you will…to help you out as you are in motion.

With these tools at your disposal, you can solder, fix, fabricate, and build what you need in a pinch.  Survival is more than living with an entire arsenal of weapons and a warehouse full of tools and supplies. It is also about living “on the cusp” and being able to be “Johnny-on-the-spot,” to either make or fix what you need when the situation calls for it.  Such is adaptability, and along with good coffee, it is the factor that has enabled us to survive as a species.  Invest in that small tool kit and tailor make it for your needs, both immediate and the ones you forecast for the future.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Be Prepared! 20 Must-Read Articles to Get Started Prepping

Click here to view the original post.

 This last year opened my eyes to how quickly our world can turn upside down and how fast people can turn on one another. Towards the year’s end, I sat and reflected on the failures that we all witnessed: our government failures, the poisonous election season, our doomed economy and riots caused by civil unrest.

I asked the Ready Nutrition Facebook community where they felt they were in regards to their prepping endeavors and I was pleasantly surprised to see a new crop of beginners. It seems that many shared in my bleak sentiments. We see a storm on the horizon and know that it is in our best interest to take steps to stay ahead of it. This renewed my passion to get essential prepping information out there and as the saying says, “there is no better time to making changes than the start of a new year.” It’s a new year and we all want to turn over a new leaf.

We are all in the same place – a need to get ready

“This year, I’m finally going to get prepped.” Does that sound familiar? Whether you and a beginner prepper for seasoned, you may not be at the place you had hoped. You aren’t alone. I had prepping plans that I hoped to accomplish by now, but sometimes life gets in way. As well, the more I prep, the more I realize I have so much more to learn. Give yourself a break if you haven’t gotten where you wanted to be. Don’t feel pressured if others surpass you. We are all on our own journey and some may learn faster than others – the point is to stick with it.

This is the single best way to start prepping

Researching and creating a family based emergency plan is the best way to stay organized and on point with your prepping. Have multiple contingency plans too! If Plan A doesn’t work, fall upon Plan B and Plan C, and so on.

You need to understand the disaster you are planning for, how to be mentally and spiritually prepared for it and, ultimately, what supplies and skills you need to thrive. As well, I want to emphasize how important it is to reach out to the prepper community. Learn from each other and don’t be afraid to include your mistakes and failures as part of your education. This is part of the learning curve, and a necessary one at that!

There are some of you who are new to prepping and some that may want a refresher course, so today I thought I would send some links to Ready Nutrition articles that have been the most helpful in getting people on the preparedness track.

20 Must-Read Articles to Get on the Preparedness Path

Below, you’ll find some suggestions for the items you should begin to accumulate. As well, consider these 8 basic preparedness items to compliment your supplies with.

Why You Should Prepare 

5 Ways to Store Water for Short-Term Emergencies

5 Reasons You Should Be Preparing

When the Trucks Stop Delivering, ‘The System’ Will Collapse

The Prepper’s Beginners Guide Part 1 and Part 2

 

Lists of Essential Preparedness Gear and Supplies 

The One-Year Pantry, Layer by Layer

How to Save Food When You’re Off the Grid

Best Practices For Long Term Food Storage

25 Must Have Survival Foods: Put Them In Your Pantry Now

52-Weeks to Preparedness

30 Survival Items You Can Get at the Dollar Store

Short Term Emergency Checklist

Emergency Items: What Will Disappear First

How to Build a 72-Hour Kit

Urban Disasters: Have These 20 Items On You If You Want to Make It Home

What You Have to Do To Prep on the Fly

 

Long-Term Food Storage Solutions

How to Dehydrate Foods for Long Term Storage

Is Freeze-Dried Food Worth the Investment?

Vacuum Sealing for Long-Term Food Storage

Using Your Freezer as a Long Term Food Storage Solution

You can do this!

Now that you have information only a click away, there’s nothing holding you back from getting started! The only thing holding you back from realizing your prepper goals is yourself. You can do this! There is still time to get ready for disasters, but it is important not to waste time. Good luck, preppers! I’m rooting for you and will continue to get more information out to you!

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Is Freeze-Dried Food Worth the Investment?

Click here to view the original post.

 Prepping and freeze-dried food are synonymous with one another. For years, the freeze-dried food industry have profited heavily on families wanting to get their pantries emergency ready. But is it worth all the hype and money?

There are many who wonder if the investment into this long-term food source is the right one for them and have asked questions like: Can you really survive the apocalypse with freeze-dried food? How long is the shelf-life when the #10 can is opened? Are these foods nutritionally complete? What other options are there for long-term food storage?

The Pros

There are many pros to having #10 cans of this long-term food source in your prepper pantry. Freeze-dried food is flash frozen and then put in a vacuum container causing the water vaporize, and leaving the food item with 98% of its water removed.Nutritionally speaking, the food retains all the nutrients that it had in its original form after the freeze-drying process and contains little to no additives. This process keeps a majority of the nutrition in tact. Gary Stoner, Ph.D., and the American Institute for Cancer Research have found that the antioxidant phytochemicals found in fresh fruits is about the same as in their freeze-dried versions. However, some ascorbic acid levels and the amount of polyphenol, a cell-protecting chemical in berries, were measurably reduced by freeze drying. Source

As well, the cook times are drastically reduced which is helpful during emergencies when energy must to be conserved. Moreover, many find that when they are in the midst of an emergencies, stress loads increase because of drastic changes and having these “just add water” meals ready to go cuts down on the stress of food preparation. It is estimated that 98% of moisture from the food is eliminated, thus reducing the weight of the food by 80%. Those who plan on evacuating will appreciate the lighter weight during transport – especially with all the other supplies they will have in their pack. Last but not least, the 25 year storage life makes this ideal for preppers who are looking for long-lasting food options. On a personal note, my family purchased freeze-dried food in 2004 and it’s still just as fresh as when we opened up the first can. Keep in mind, once your freeze-dried food can is opened, the shelf life quickly diminishes and you will need to throw it out in six months, and if you live in a humid area, the shelf life could be cut in half.

The Cons

While, the pros are great, it comes with a hefty price tag. You are paying for all of the specialized equipment and energy it takes to preserve the food for a long shelf life. One case of freeze-dried meals can set you back over a hundred dollars with shipping included. As well, having this type of food source for your long-term food needs will require extra space to store the food. An entire years supply fits into a 2 ft x 3 ft area, stacked 5 ft high. As well, food cans could be strategically hidden in the home, underneath beds, above kitchen cabinets and in the closet.

If you are going back and forth about whether or not to invest in freeze-dried food or dehydrated food, here’s a good answer. Because 98% of the water is removed from freeze-dried foods, it will take more water to reconstitute it for meals as opposed to dehydrated foods needing a fraction of the water. An article on Modern Survival Blog gives a great explanation:

“It does take more water to reconstitute freeze-dried food than dehydrated food. I randomly pulled out a few freeze-dried food packets that I have on hand here, so that I could read the directions. The average amount of water required is a bit more than 1 cup of water per serving (which you would heat up first). On the other hand, some dehydrated food can be consumed without re-constituting with water (particularly fruits or meats). My experience with re-hydrating foods that I have previously dehydrated, are that I tend to use less than 1 cup of water per equivalent serving of vegetables than a freeze-dried food.”

Also, keep in mind that many of the freeze-dried meals are high in sodium. Many outdoor enthusiasts and hikers complain that you have to drink so much water to overcome the thirst the meals create. Make sure you have extra water on hand if you plan on using this as your main food source. As well, the high sodium can cause your bowels to become sluggish. To remedy this, purchase some over the counter meds for constipation or look for low-sodium freeze-dried options. One website states that the real key is balance.

“If you are concerned about sodium content in your food storage items, keep in mind that you can balance out the higher sodium foods you consume in a day with lower sodium foods. For example, many freeze-dried vegetables contain low or no sodium. There are also many breakfast items, like granola or oatmeal, that have very little sodium, if any.

Just like with a fresh food diet, the key is balance. If the only thing you ate every day was chicken, you’d quickly find that your diet is not providing what your body needs. But when you add lots of fruits and vegetables to that chicken and you will begin to achieve a more balanced diet.”

In that same vein, I highly recommend you also investing in sprouting seeds to ensure you are getting some fresh vitamins into your daily diet.

How Much Freeze-Dried Food Do You Need?

In an emergency situation, your caloric intake will increase due to higher activity levels, thus you will be consuming more. Keep this in mind when determining what your caloric needs will be. Once you know that magic caloric number, you can begin to find out how many freeze-dried meals you need. The Ready Store has a good calculator to get an idea how the number of cans of freeze-dried food you would need to survive.

Can You Survive Solely on Freeze-Dried Food?

So, the question is can you survive an apocalypse with freeze-dried food? Yes, you can, but the real question is do you want to?

While there are pros and cons to investing in this long-term food source, above all, you are investing in food freedom and the livelihood of your family or group. My preference is to have a little bit of everything and believe in having a layered approach to emergency food sources. You can read more about it here. We plan on using our supply of freeze-dried food after we finish our perishable foods. During the time we are using up this portion of our emergency food, we plan on getting fresh food sources established.

Ultimately, when people set out on the path to preparedness they turn to freeze-dried foods for a fast approach. After all, it is the healthiest and longest lasting emergency food source. Based on the price alone, it is difficult for many of us to use this as a sole emergency food source. There are less costly food storage options such as using a dehydrator to dry out food and is completely customizable to your dietary needs. As well, the further a person journeys into preparedness, they want to attain total self-sufficiency and look for ways to growing their own food sources through gardening and livestock.

My advice to all of you is to keep your budgets in mind before you decide to purchase bulk emergency food. You don’t want to go broke getting a food pantry set up. Prep for emergencies with the layered approach mentioned above, keep your options open and keep researching better ways to get your family ready for life’s uncertainties.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

What You Need to Know About Nuclear Attacks

Click here to view the original post.

nuclearReadyNutrition Readers, as you have exciting fun during this holiday season – meals, Christmas presents, family dinners, and such – let’s not lose focus on the volatility of the world situation.  Just because Donald Trump won does not mean that the battle to restore the United States to a constitutional republic is over.  There are still enemies outside of the country and enemies within; do not lose sight of these facts.

The Nonsense Begins Around This Time

Usually, this time of the year is “great” timing for either an attack or some kind of military action.  Operation Just Cause in Panama (1989) was kicked off right around Christmastime.  Same for both Desert Shield and Desert Storm (’90 and ’91).  The nonsense always starts around this time of the year.  There are reasons for it.  The harvests are in, and there’s not a lot a civilian population can do during the winter to counter an invasion without great cost or discomfort.

Complacency is also a big reason.  While the U.S. invaded Panama in 1989, most people were out doing their shopping, eating in different restaurants in between shopping, and settling down in the house to watch football, eat, and relax.  While we in the U.S. (and most of Europe) are relaxing, the Chinese and North Koreans are not.  The Russians (while celebrating the season) do not relax.  I repeat my caveat from articles past:

The next world war will be initiated by an EMP device/weapon detonated over the continental U.S., followed by a limited nuclear exchange and war with conventional forces.

I stand by it because it is better to be either “wrong” or “late” in a prognostication 1,000 times than to be right (and unprepared) just 1 time.

In this regard, here are the basics for preppers and survivors out there who understand that vigilance is not paranoia.  Here are the basics concerning a nuclear attack.

The Three Effects of a Nuclear Bomb

  1. Heat (Thermal Effects) – The severity of the thermal effects will depend on your location. If you are at ground zero of the blast or within a mile of it?  It was nice knowing you.  2-5 miles of it, and you’ll probably be subjected to an intense fire wave and not survive it.  5-10 miles out, a lot of buildings and trees will be on fire, and you can receive burns on exposed skin, as well as retinal damage from the initial explosion’s excessive flash (flash burns can be either temporary or permanent).
  2. The Blast – Once again, proximity will be the factor that determines whether you survive. The blast has two parts:
  3. Overpressure – a large increase in air pressure far above what is considered normal.
  4. Dynamic pressure – akin to an extremely powerful blast of wind, outward from the center of the explosion

Within six to seven miles of the explosion, the “wind” speed can be between 90 to 120 miles per hour when the dynamic pressure component of the blast wave hits.  It would not be good to be out in the open, and you would also be exposed to things picked up by this wind and hurled at you.  Light damage would be sustained by buildings and structures about 15 to 20 miles from the blast.

5. Radiation – all the radiation is produced within the first minute of the explosion. An unprotected person within a couple of miles would be exposed to radiation in amounts that he or she could not live for long if initially surviving the heat and blast effects.  Then it takes about 24 hours for the remaining fallout to come back down to the earth.  Fallout is particulate matter (such as dust and dirt particles) sucked up into the fireball that “fall” back down to earth.  This applies in a ground-burst weapon, as airburst explosions detonate above a city and are the most “efficient” method to take it out, leaving a minimal amount of fallout.  With radiation, other factors such as weather and wind patterns must be taken into account to find the pattern of drift.  Usually, 3 weeks to a month in a shelter will enable the majority of the particles to deteriorate to livable levels.

Radiation comes in several different types.  Alpha particles are larger and attach themselves to debris.  They can be shielded against by clothing and brushed off, posing a danger only if they are inhaled, ingested, or enter through the skin such as in a cut or a burn.  Beta particles are also able to be kept off with thick clothing.  If Beta particles touch the skin, they will burn you, and can penetrate the skin.  Beta particles also can pose a problem if inhaled, ingested, or with entry through a wound or burn.  Gamma rays are very dangerous.  They go right through you and into you without protection from shielding.

Signs and symptoms of radiation poisoning are as follows: nausea and vomiting, malaise (overall weakness and sickness), blisters/ulcers of the skin, excessive visual disturbances, dizziness and vertigo, and excessive bleeding from minor and major wounds.  Also, keep in mind that radiation received is cumulative: a fatal dosage usually runs about 300 rads/roentgens or higher, but if you receive 200 at one exposure, you’re not safe with another exposure of 200, as it adds up to 400.  You need a survey meter (Geiger Counter) and a dosimeter to keep track of such exposures and the radiation received with them.

There are numerous sites and resources available to you on the Internet that will provide tables of thicknesses and degrees of protection for the various components of your shelter, whether field-expedient or planned.  The general rule is that the denser the material (such as steel and concrete, as opposed to soil, or wood) the better a protective factor it will render.  Mass and density are the two factors that will help to shield you from radiation.  The third is time, as radiation does decay rapidly with the exception of isotopes such as Strontium-90 or Uranium-238.

Your best protection is (of course) distance from the bomb…as much as possible, as well as shielding in a shelter with supplies and necessities gathered within that shelter beforehand.  To cover all the information you will need is beyond the scope of this article, the intent of which is to give you “food for thought” if you haven’t already taken such a thing into consideration.

To summarize, a nuclear attack can ruin your day if you haven’t prepared for it in advance.  When you look outside your living room window and find that the snowman has melted, the wicker furniture on the porch is on fire, and the chestnuts on the tree are roasted, along with the tree itself…that is a little too late.  As with any disaster natural or man-made, the time to prepare is before it happens and keeping in mind that complacency can kill you.  The disasters strike just when you think they will not, or at a time when everyone is at the dinner table having a grand time.  Be prepared with your supplies and in your mind and heart.  Keep fighting that good fight, and take care of one another.  JJ out!

 

More Reading:

An Urban Guide to Surviving a Nuclear Attack

How to Survive When a Nuke is Dropped

The One Nuclear Threat That Most People Aren’t Aware Of

7 Natural Supplements You Should Have in Case of Nuclear Fallout

What Happens to Nuclear Power Plants Following an EMP?

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

A Storm Coming: Preppers Must Stay Vigilant in 2017

Click here to view the original post.

 [Editor’s Note: While many believe the shift in government leaders in 2017 will bring us back to better times, one can never be too sure. As my father always said, “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.” These are still uncertain times, and as Jeremiah Johnson emphasizes in this article – with that uncertainty, we must continue to be ever vigilant in our preparedness endeavors.]

ReadyNutrition Fans, this piece is an important exhortation to you – a sort of plea, if you will – to not lose your focus in preparations and your readiness-stance during these times.  With the Dow-Jones Industrial skyrocketing, the Christmas Holidays in full gear, Donald J. Trump about to be inaugurated, and the glow of a new patriotic dawn, everything seems OK, right?  Wrong.  This is not alarmist, but pragmatic.  We cannot allow a burst of patriotic positive fervor to dull the perception of the last 8 years.

Losing our focus is what allowed those 8 years in the first place.

The Unemployment Rate

The welcoming of a new President brings renewed hope in our government system; however, there is a lot of road to travel before the country is fixed. While many preppers feel relieved and are slowing their preparedness endeavors down, many preparedness experts are stressing the importance of not giving up. As preppers, we must keep an eye on indicators like the economy and unemployment. Bear in mind that unemployment is deliberately under-reported.  The economy is in bad shape.  Everyone is focusing on the happy times of Christmas cheer and family festivities.  I adjure to your intellects: do not relent in your focus or your activities to prepare for what is still around the corner.

They’re not celebrating festive, happy shopper days in Venezuela, where women are cutting off their own hair and selling it just to buy loaves of bread, or where a whole shopping bag full of Venezuelan Bolivars will not even buy a few days’ worth of essential supplies.

These 7 Indicators Can Help You Forecast an Economic Collapse

The Economy

The economy of the United States will take quite some time to recover.  You can continue in the true economy that you have started: the acquisition of supplies, materials, and resources that always hold their worth and have an intrinsic value.  Gold, silver, and precious metals…in physical form…these have worth and lasting, intrinsic value.  For an excellent analysis of just where the United States is economically, I highly recommend an article written by Shaun Bradley on December 8, 2016 entitled Cash is No Longer King: The Phasing Out of Physical Money Has Begun,” and downloadable for your files.

Another article worth mentioning was written by Susan Duclos of All News Pipeline, entitled We are Facing the Most Important Battle of All at the Most Dangerous Moment in History,” released on December 10, 2016.  Here is an excerpt from that article:

We at ANP are noting a lot of optimism from investors with stocks soaring,  to economic confidence reaching new highs, to small business owners, to household spending and even prepping has hit a “multi-year low,” all the articles I am reading are crediting the election of Donald Trump as reason for all this optimism, but as much as I hate to rain on everyone’s parade… now is the most dangerous time in history, not a time to assume just because one man was elected, all the wrongs will be made right, the failing economy will automatically just magically fix itself.”

These timely and sagacious words show that the battle is not over yet.  In this vein, do not lose focus!  Don’t allow the holiday cheer and festive atmosphere to leave you blindsided and thinking that the battle is over!  Other blogsites have reported that sales of emergency equipment and supplies have been drastically on the decline since the election was finished.  Remember: North Korea, Russia, and China still pose a viable threat in several areas of the world, the world economy is quite bad, and the U.S. has by no means recovered from the nightmare of two consecutive Obama terms.

Stay the Course for 2017!

Stay focused.  Gear your shopping and holiday activities to always take a back seat to awareness of the overall situation.  Stock up on your precious metals and long-term food supplies and water procurement capabilities.  Continue to locate and obtain the tools, medicines, and equipment you and your family will need.  Just because the “Captains” are about to change does not mean that the ship will change its course…the one taking it toward a wreck on the reefs.  Don’t let that reef loom up and blindside you to take you unawares.  Enjoy your holidays, but do so with one eye on the festivities and another one on the horizon…aware of what is going on around you.  Do not stop the preparations for even one minute.  Happy holidays, and keep up that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Why Drinking More Water During Winter Is Crucial to Your Survival

Click here to view the original post.

winter-water
“Water, water, everywhere,” wrote Coleridge, in application to the ancient mariner of his prose.  The big difference, though, is his water was not potable, as it was the ocean.  The water I’m referring to in this piece is the water that is all around you in the winter, and the importance of consuming the proper amount of water to prevent dehydration.  Be advised: your needs for water do not decrease; rather, they increase due to stressors that are different on the human body.

The tendency is to not drink as much when the weather is cold.  This is a natural thing, as people usually (even when thirsty during the winter) do not wish to drink cold beverages.  Conversely, they prefer warm beverages that are (usually) caffeinated, such as coffee or tea.  As a die-hard coffee drinker, I know from experience that you must offset the caffeine consumption (to a degree) with an increased intake of water.  At the end of this article, I’ll mention more on this.

How the Body Loses Water During Winter Months

With increased activity, there are many ways that a person loses water.  Diaphoresis (sweating/perspiration) is one way, and insensible water loss is also increased, examples being water lost from the eyeballs and from respiration.  People breathe out 1-2 glasses of water per day.  Urination is another way that water is lost, the composition of urine being about 95% water and 5% miscellaneous solids.  The needs (on average) of water consumption in humans is about a gallon per day, with kids needing a little less except when they’re extremely active.

Water is Fuel

During the winter, you’ll need about a quarter to a half extra water than your body normally requires, and this increases further if you are working hard physically or exerting yourself.  Remember what is happening in the cold weather.  Your body is burning up calories and extra sugar and carbohydrates to heat your muscle tissue.  This requires a tremendous amount of metabolic energy, down to the cellular level.  Water is fuel: never forget that.  With the increased cold temperatures, your metabolism works harder to stay warm.  Food intake is critical, and so is water.

As mentioned earlier, you may (due to the cold and a desire to not drink that accompanies it) take in more food than water.  This, too, is not good for you.  I don’t want to get into proponents of eating your food and drinking sparingly to allow hydrochloric acid in your stomach to digest more efficiently.  That may be, but more importantly, you need liquid to consume your food.  Remember, if you do not drink, your body will rob what water is in and between the cells (that is, inter, and intracellular fluid, respectively) to digest the food.  We learned it thoroughly in SERE school: Thou shalt not eat until thou canst drink.  You must be able to drink in for your body not to take from itself to digest the food.  If you do not drink, then you’re dehydrating yourself when you eat.

The appearance of your urine is a good indicator of your level of hydration.  Dark yellow urine means you need water.  Your body excretes the waste it must excrete on a regular basis; nevertheless, the body will reabsorb as much water as possible to conserve it.  The urine will be thicker with more solutes (dissolved substances, such as sodium) in it.  This brings us to the secondary problem: your body needs to excrete wastes but you’ll be losing electrolytes.  Your food replaces the electrolytes, but if you have no food readily available, you want to supplement and not just drink excessive quantities of water.  Too much water can flush out your electrolytes.

Remember: thirst is a late sign of dehydration.  In a survival situation, do not eat snow.  The eating of snow robs your body of calories (as explained earlier) to enable itself to melt the snow into water, and in addition, lowers your body temperature.  You can melt it over a fire, in which case it is worth it.  I highly recommend a small folding stove with hexamine tablets.  Each tablet burns for about 9 minutes…plenty of time to melt some snow, ice, or icicles for your water.  As mentioned in times past, the U.S. Army issue canteen cup is a great thing to have, made of steel.  It can take a beating and be set on a campfire or on a little portable stove with good results.

It is very difficult to keep water on hand when you’re dealing with subzero temperatures.  Most urban and suburban residents are always able to duck into a store and purchase whatever they want…for now.  People in more remote or less dense areas may have a bit of a problem.  Living where I do, I have a real problem. What I do is pack two thermoses (Aladdin’s) with hot water, and then wrap the outside with towels to further insulate them.  This ensures that I have a supply of drinkable water when I leave the house for up to 24 hours without freezing.

I also tote electrolyte packets and bouillon cubes with me, as well as my ever-present jar of instant coffee.  Returning to my earlier note, whatever you drink as far as coffee and tea are concerned?  Don’t deviate from that, and your body will compensate for the caffeine consumption so that it will not affect you in the same manner as if you were drinking that amount for the first time.  I usually have five cups a day, and my coffee is very strong.  Most people would shake akin to a leaf and be hitting the restroom all day long.

But perhaps you get the gist of the article: you need to maintain your consumption of water, even during the wintertime.  You should also have access to fire-starting materials and things such as hand warmers/chemical heat producers.  You don’t know when the need will arise for you to melt some water.  If you can keep a Camelback handy and keep the water pouch near your body heat to keep it from freezing, all the better.  Just have a source of water, and a means to replenish that source when it runs out.  During the winter, you don’t want to be dehydrated.  And if the SHTF, or if there’s a winter emergency?  These measures can mean the difference between life and death.  Stay hydrated, stay safe, and bundle up…the winter’s just starting!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

27 Last Minute Christmas Gifts For Your Favorite Prepper

Click here to view the original post.

last minute prepper giftsIt seemed like yesterday we were wishing each other a Happy Thanksgiving, and now half of December is gone. If you are stumped on what to get your favorite prepper or are shopping at the last minute, these gift ideas could be what you’ve been looking for.

I like to focus prepper gifts on striving to enhance a prepper’s skillsets or helping one acquire the equipment they need to live in a long-term off-grid environment.

10 Stocking Stuffers

  1. Crocheting Kit
  2. Mountain House Meal Assortments (Great for 72 Hour Bags)
  3. Collapsible Walking Stick
  4. Duct Tape
  5. Cyalume SnapLight Green Glow Sticks
  6. Biolite Camping Stove
  7. Gun Cleaning Coil
  8. Balaclava
  9. Quikclot
  10. SOG Key Knife

Bonus! Titanium Escape Ring

Gifts For the Ladies

  1. Leather Purse with Concealed Holster
  2. Fermenting Starter Kit
  3. Foldable Bicycle
  4. Lodge Cookware Set
  5. Excalibur Food Dehydrator

Gifts For the Guys

  1. Tactical Hammer
  2. Cross Bow (Read more about it here)
  3. Whiskey Making Kit
  4. Goal Zero 22004 Yeti 150 Solar Generator
  5. Customized CBRN Tactical Gas Mask

If none of these gift ideas strike your fancy, check out Lehman’s or Real Goods. Both of these stores cater to off-grid living and have a huge amount of products to choose from. Check out Real Goods preparedness section – you’ll love it!

As well, don’t forget about the importance of reference manuals for the prepper library! Here are some of the top books (Warning: a shameless plug is ahead).

All of these gifts are guaranteed to delivery before Christmas, but you have to order them soon.

Merry Christmas and Happy Shopping to all of you!

Tess and the Ready Nutrition Writers

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

What’s the Best Survival Knife?

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, we’re going to give some info and recommendations on knives.  There are about as many uses for knives as you can imagine: knives for skinning, filleting, fighting, and all-around survival.  There are a ton of different companies that manufacture knives, and not as many of them in the United States as there used to be.  There is a resurgence in small forges and private knifemakers currently throughout the U.S., and in a future article, I will cover this subject in more detail.  For now, we’re going to stick with the well-known firms, of which I have both preference and experience with for different reasons.

Carry Blade

My “carry” blade for defense is a Spyderco H-1 Jumpmaster model, made in Seki City, Japan.  I’ve been “into” Spyderco for a good while; when I was in the service I carried a Spyderco Police model stainless steel folder.  This Jumpmaster model is actually designed by jumpmasters of the U.S. Army.  The blade is sharp – beyond belief and can be sharpened on a Tri-Angle Sharpmaker, also made by Spyderco.

The jumpmaster’s blade is straight, serrated, non-rust steel with a single piece running continuously from blade to handle, a fixed blade with a plastic handle.  The blade measures approximately 4-1/4 inches of special steel that does not corrode.  I mention again, it is for defensive purposes and I know how to use it, although ideally, a fighting knife should have a blade of approximately 8 inches or greater to be most effective.

I also carry a Buck 181 folder for all-purpose and utility that is about 3 inches long.  This model has an oval-shaped “pinch” ring within the blade, and a clip that enables you to pinch the ring, draw out the blade, and flick it open in the locked position.  The Spyderco Police model I mentioned earlier is the same configuration as this Buck folder.  It can be used for cutting, slicing, and (if necessary) small skinning jobs if the need arose.

General Purpose Knife

As far as a good general purpose survival knife is concerned, I really love what Gerber puts out (or rather, the older models), with the Gerber BMF series being really great.  As far as newer models run, I have a Gerber Mark 11, a two-edged blade similar to the Fairbairn-Sykes Commando model used by the OSS in World War II.  The knife was made in the U.S., and the sheath was made in China.  Guess we can’t win ‘em all.  The blade is approximately 7 inches in length with 2 inches of the blade on both sides being serrated before the final 1 inch connects with the handle/hilt.

Throwing Knives

Hibben (in my assessment) makes the best throwing knives.  When you pick up throwing knives, you should pick up 2 sets of the same model: one to practice with, and the other for use when needed.  In this manner, you’ll be able to sink that knife into a target from 15-20 feet away with no problem, and the quality/sharpness will not be a factor when you face a real-world situation.

If you wish to watch an excellent movie that will give you pointers as an introduction to combat with knives, pick up Hunted,” starring Benicio Del Toro and Tommy Lee Jones.  They go “deep,” but the depiction of the U.S. military’s courses on knives, knifemaking, and actual combat techniques is very accurate.

Your folder you want for a good all-around utility knife.  For small cutting, just invest in a little folding pocketknife so as not to dull your blades continuously.  Although 8” is the preferred minimum length for combat, do not underestimate what you can do with a smaller blade when the need arises.  You want your knives to be maintained and as sharp as possible at all times.  I don’t really wish to cover skinning and filleting knives, simply because there are so many on the market that you can use.  I covered these because when push comes to shove, your combat blade can be used to skin game if need be.  Just as all cooks in the Army can become infantry when needed.

My preference is for the blade to be either black (subdued), or non-reflective/non-high sheen.  My personal preference (although for some specialty blades such as my jumpmaster model you need a specialty sharpener) is the old-fashioned stone and oil method.  It takes time, but it’s worth it.  Other methods (non-specialty) put a “quick” edge on it that doesn’t last too long, but the honing stones take a longer amount of time and deliver in the end.

Regarding a blade, do not sacrifice quality for price.  For fixed knives, they should be a continuous piece.  Buying from a reputable firm gives you a worthy blade.  Remember: you may depend on this blade to survive, be that to cut yourself out of a seatbelt if your car takes a dive, or to skin wild game in the dead of winter.  Cheap you buy, cheap you receive.  There’s a guy who is a builder who cruises around in his little pickup truck in town.  He has a saying on his truck that runs [I paraphrase], “Those who buy a lower quality at a cheaper price will later find the money they saved doesn’t make up for the inferior product, and they will come to regret both decisions.”

Yeah, it’s a long statement, but it’s the truth.  Knives can be very crucial tools when the need arises, sometimes being critical to stay alive.  Look up those models that I recommend, and you’ll find without exception that they’re expensive.  The thing is, they work, and when the chips are down, I can depend on them far better than some cheap piece of junk from China or Pakistan made of pot-metal and Elmer’s glue.  Take your time to find which model works the best for your needs, but never sacrifice quality for price.  Keep your powder dry and your knife oiled and sharp!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

50 Awesome Stocking Stuffers Every Prepper Will Love

Click here to view the original post.

prepper-stocking-stuffersSometimes the best gifts are the ones hanging in the stocking on Christmas morning. Adding a few stocking stuffers that are preparedness centered is a great way to help the family get more prepared.

While there are a lot of prepper-inspired products out there, this modest list of prepper-inspired products are the ones that really caught my eye. These tiny treasures have the gift of practicality and deserve a place on your preparedness shelves.

50 Awesome Stocking Stuffers Every Prepper Will Love

  1. Pocket Chainsaw
  2. River Knife Eat n’ Tool
  3. Tactical Holster Shirt
  4. Tea Variety Pack
  5. QuikClot
  6. Iosat Potassium Iodide Radiation Protection
  7. Paracord Survival Kit
  8. Tanto Knife with Fire Starter
  9. Inflatable Solar Lantern
  10. Outdoor Dry Sack
  11. Tactical Flashlight
  12. Encrypted Thumb Drive
  13. Platypus Platy Bottle
  14. Doom and Bloom SURVIVAL! Board Game
  15. RFID Blocking Wallet
  16. Human Energy Concealment Facemask
  17. Windowsill Herb Kit
  18. Portable Camping Chair
  19. Essential Oils
  20. Emergency Sleeping Bag
  21. Tactical Kuba Kickz
  22. Camping Hammock
  23. High-Intensity Glow Sticks
  24. Tactical War Hammer
  25. Keychain Carabiners 
  26. Gardening Tool Set
  27. Credit Card Survival Tool
  28. Sawyer Mini Filtration System
  29. SOG Entrenching Tool
  30. Kevlar Tactical Gloves
  31. Folding Key Knife
  32. The Prepper’s Cookbook
  33. SAM Splint Fold
  34. Green Coffee Beans
  35. Wound Seal Kit
  36. Conflicted Card Game
  37. RFID Blocking Faraday Cage
  38. 10 in 1 Wild Survival Kit Briefcase
  39. Bread Dough Hand Whisk
  40. ESEE Fixed Blade Survival Knife
  41. Wild Flower Seed Kit
  42. Maple Syrup Tree Tapping Kit
  43. LED Nightlight/Flashlight
  44. Waterproof Matches with Case
  45. Pocket Blanket
  46. Firearm Protective Eyewear
  47. SOG Snarl Fixed Blade
  48. Survival Grenade Keychain
  49. Whetstone Knife Sharpener
  50. Cell Phone/Credit Card Wallet with RFID Blocking

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Get Free Maps For Your Prepping Supplies

Click here to view the original post.

maps-for-preppingReadyNutrition Readers, undoubtedly most of you are working on whittling down that turkey, and preparing for the extremely scary times of the Christmas holidays.  Let us digress a bit from all the festive cheer and commercial drudgery to return to the business at hand.  This article is going to cover some information about maps, indispensable tools for you to thrive in a post-collapse environment.  There are several different sources for these maps on the free or on the cheap, and it’s good for you to be aware of them to prepare your supply of them for the times to come.

Firstly, let us not discount your telephone book.  Yes, the telephone directory holds quite a bit in local maps that you might want to take advantage of.  Usually in the front of the phone book are (for whatever your metropolitan area) maps of small towns and suburbs.  These maps are accurate and give the streets, place names, and points of interest.  Here’s what you do.

Take a hobby knife and cut out the map and the key for your immediate area, and another page that covers your local vicinity.  Trim them off with scissors and then lightly apply a glue stick to the back of each.  You want the two different maps to be back-to-back.  When the glue dries, you can mount them.  There are laminating sheets you can pick up at your local, friendly Wal-Mart that run about $10 for ten sheets.  They peel back for you to insert the maps and line them up, and then just close the top sheet after you remove the non-stick backing paper.  Press them firmly and evenly together, and there you are.

You now have an accurate map for local use on the cheap.  Dry erase comes off too easily, but pick up a grease pencil and you can mark things on the front of it when you’re in the middle of a leg of traveling.  It would behoove you to make several of them: phone books are either free or a dime a dozen.  In this manner, your family members can have a map for themselves in their vehicle.  Store these in some kind of binder or folder with pockets to give you easy access.

You need the maps because your electronic devices such as your Garmin GPS or your MapQuest attachment on the dashboard might just suddenly go “defunct,” courtesy of an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) or other similar, natural anomaly such as a solar flare.

            Keep your high-tech, but always have your low-tech aids for backup.

Next is your chamber of commerce.  These guys have about a thousand brochures and maps for your use.  Some of them are pretty good and fairly detailed.  Of particular note are the brochures on parks, forests, and happy-family recreational sites.  Guess what?  That state park may be a fallback area for you if you are on the run.  Wouldn’t it be nice to have a map entailing all of the terrain features and manmade features of such a place?

Don’t forget the rest stops usually found in the welcome centers as you cross from one state to another.  These places have the same brochures and maps as the chambers of commerce, and a free state map for you to grab.  Remember: good intel is not merely found, it’s made.  Talk to the people who work at these welcome centers and chambers of commerce.  They can point you in other directions or give you information that may not be immediately visible.  Your “cover” is tourism, vacation, etc.  As “facilitators of information” the state governments pay them with your tax dollars to lure you into their beautiful state and generate more taxable income for all of them.  Make these guys earn their money.

You can often find that many of these parks and tourist sites have maps that also include a little bit of the surrounding area.  Use your judgement, and many of these maps can also be laminated in the manner outlined above.  Do not forget about the Forestry Service in your area.  Here in Montana, they release every year or every two years updates to the national forest trails in the form of maps and guides for free.  Other states have the same.  Don’t forget your county extension office for a plethora of different documents and maps.  Once again, they’ll be happy to help if you just speak to them in a friendly manner.

Don’t discount older or out-of-print maps that you may find in your travels and searches.  They may not be updated, but they may have information on them that is accurate but for whatever reason was not included in the more recent revisions.  Old abandoned tunnels and mine operations are prime examples of things found in older maps and not included in the new maps.  Same for abandoned buildings or abandoned construction projects.  All of these things you may find useful to know…especially when the majority of people have forgotten about them.

Thrift stores and used book stores usually have maps and atlases floating around.  With older maps, what you do (besides the “special” locations just mentioned) is find the main highways and byways that are similar and accurate and cut out these pages to use for an overlay for yourself or an adjunct to a local map you may have laminated.

Do your homework.  On your maps, you want to include as much relevant information as you may need.  Addresses, phone numbers, locations of utilities such as water and power facilities, and places usable for a refuge if you’re out and about and the SHTF.  Place index cards with these extra notes in with the map before you laminate them.  Also, ensure that you mark a compass rose on your map with North and the other three cardinal directions.  Ensure that it is oriented in the correct direction: North needs to actually point north, not just be affixed to the map.

Naturally there are more sources than these.  Your good sporting goods stores usually have a supply of maps either from the Forestry Service or even military maps from the Defense Mapping Agency, the latter of which are golden.  They’re not nearly as expensive as if you order them online.  Want a good idea?  Get yourself a piece of 3-4″ diameter PVC pipe, and cut down two pieces of this that are about 3′ long.  Pick up some end caps that fit snugly, and you have yourself a map case…you can roll up your maps and stow them in there to protect them.

One final word, for your local maps you want to drive around and check them out yourself.  You want to perform a thorough reconnaissance of different routes and ensure they are viable prior to your utilization of said routes.  You don’t want to find out that a bridge that is on your map is actually “out” and unable to be crossed when you’re on the move.  In this light, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.  Garner your maps before your Garmin goes out as a part of your preps that truly will help you move in the right direction.  Keep fighting that good fight, finish off that turkey, and take care of each other!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How Cycling Helps Save the World (and Save Your A*@ when the SHTF)

Click here to view the original post.

shtf bikeWe recently moved from NYC to Portland, Oregon, and I have to say the biggest change (besides all of the trees and so much more living space!) is the cycling culture. Portland is one of the most bike-friendly cities in the country. There are bikes everywhere you look (I just bought this one and I love it). Not only are there safe bike lanes leading everywhere—including all the way to the airport—there’s also a bike shop on every corner and even a bike assembly area within the airport terminal itself. The bike culture also flourishes in Portland because cyclists and drivers both follow the rules (and, let me tell you, that’s a HUGE change from NYC as well).

Cycling is great for your body and great for the environment. People who ride their bicycles regularly have better cardiovascular fitness, less body fat, increased energy, and they experience less depression. These are all ideal characteristics for being conditioned in a SHTF situation. Cycling to work instead of driving saves close to 10% of your household emissions and biking combats noise pollution, traffic, and uses far less rubber than what is needed for car tires. It makes sense that anyone who is interested in having a sustainable lifestyle would also be interested in traveling by bicycle as much as they can.

Why Cycling Matters in a SHTF Situation

In addition to health benefits, knowing how to cycle and having the necessary gear can come in handy in a dire SHTF situation. I recently read an article about how traveling by bike is your best bet for surviving the zombie apocalypse—the article was a bit of a joke, but it got me thinking seriously about bugging out and how to travel safely in a potentially dangerous situation.

Riding a Bicycle Lets You Avoid Traffic: First of all, anytime there is an emergency, from a severe weather event to a terrorist threat to a fire, traffic becomes an immense and literal roadblock. You won’t be limited to roads at all if you have a bicycle. Being able to take alternate routes means getting the heck out of Dodge faster—of course, you’ll have issues with covering long distances, but people stuck in hours of traffic will too.

Riding a Bicycle Does Not Require Fuel: There’s also the issue of getting gas and maintaining your energy source for your car. Sure, if you’re prepared, you’ll have a few extra tanks on hand, but what happens when that dries up? In a national or worldwide SHTF situation, gasoline will be among the first resources to go scarce. When the gas is gone, even if drivers are able to power through traffic and use their preps, it’s only a matter of time before they have to abandon their cars and continue their travels on foot.

Bikes are Easy to Repair: A bicycle is a straightforward machine that requires only a slight bit of research to repair. You don’t want to be worrying about your engine or oil changes when you’re on the run.

You Can Still Carry Cargo: If you’ve traveled to Indonesian countries you’ve seen how much gear (or how many people!) can be packed onto a single bicycle. Having a basket or rack is an easy and affordable way to make your bike more emergency friendly. Even just having a simple set up for your bug-out bag and some of your preps will make a huge difference.

You Can Accommodate Children on a Bicycle: If forced to abandon your car, having smaller children means that they slow you down, and if they aren’t willing to walk you will find yourself in a terrible situation indeed. Carriers or trailers like this one mean your child can be sleeping soundly while you travel.

Riding a Bike is Better for Your OPSEC Situation: Bicycles are stealth and silent when you are riding them and are reliable in an off-grid situation. They are small and easy to camouflage–they can even be pulled up into a tree or stashed behind some bushes at a moment’s notice.

At the very least, understand that you cannot rely on your vehicle in a true SHTF situation if you have to flee your home. Loading up your trunk with preps could potentially be a waste of time—instead, you might do well to learn how to ride a bike and be sure one is packed in that trunk of yours.

 

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

One of the Most Undervalued Storable Survival Foods

Click here to view the original post.

 23Preparedness is more than a method of planning, it is a lifestyle. Long-term survival strategies are most effective when they are incorporated into one’s daily life. Anybody who seeks to be prepared for the future should be prepared to live out their plans in the present, even if the only purpose is to understand the efficacy of their plans. Food preparedness stands paramount as the most fundamental element of any long-term survival plan, and it is important that your preparations for long-term food storage are efficacious and simple.

Food Preparedness

As impending socioeconomic collapse fast approaches, many of the commercially available storable foods have risen in popularity, and for good reason, but many of these so-called foods are pre-packaged freeze-dried meals, powders or just plain mush that are intended to sit in storage for up to 2 years. Consequently, these foods contain a high amount of sodium and/or preservatives to maintain their shelf life; they are designed only “for emergency” and not as a nutritional food that could be eaten in one’s daily regimen today. Over time, many of the storable foods that people rely on, especially canned foods, contain meat which will putrefy and cause all other food in the package to spoil. How likely is it that these foods will sustain your survival and nutritional needs when the time comes?

The food you choose to store should be something that you are comfortable eating today, and it should be providing what you need to stay healthy.

What You Need

These are the basic requirements that a food should have for long-term survival:

  1. It must be inexpensive.
  2. It must have the capacity for long-term storage (Check out these 25 must-have survival foods)
  3. It must be a calorie-dense food that yields significant nutritional benefits.
  4. It must have a number of uses so that it can be incorporated into your diet today.

When searching for the best long-term survival food, the one food that seems to match every basic quality mentioned above is seeds. There are various seeds which are substantially inexpensive as compared with many of the other commercially available long-term food storage products on the market, and they are perfect for long-term storage if they are stored correctly. Here we will discuss two highly nutritious and widely available seeds and give you a number of ideas as to how you can use them in your diet now.

Chia Seeds

Salvia hispanica, also known as chia, is a member of the mint family and is native to Southern Mexico and Guatemala. The seed of this plant was once a staple food for Inca, Maya and Aztec civilizations. Chia seeds are considered a complete protein because they contain all 9 essential amino acids: isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, valine, and histadine. They are also a great source of  omega-3 ALA fatty acids, which have been shown to prevent cardiovascular disease when converted to omega-3 EPA and DHA in the body. One tablespoon of chia seeds provides approximately 2.5 grams of omega-3 fatty acids. They are also a good source of cholesterol-lowering soluble fiber and lignans which have shown a potential role in cancer prevention. These seeds provide 80 calories per tablespoon, and they would serve as a highly efficacious way to obtain sufficient calories if there is ever a food supply shortage as a result of a natural or unnatural disaster.

Chia seeds are highly absorbent; they will absorb up to 12 times their weight in water. They are best eaten after being soaked in a liquid of some kind, where they will soak up moisture and form a gel-like consistency. Once soaked, they could be added to a number of beverages or foods. They are commonly added to fruit drinks. Another easy way to consume eat chia seeds is to add them to cereal or to add them to a fruit jam and spread them on toast. They do not have a very strong taste, so they will tend to taste like whatever you mix them with.

Hemp Seeds

The hemp plant, also known as cannabis sativa, has been used by humans for over 10,000 years for industrial and commercial uses, such as the creation of clothing, rope, paper, fabric, biofuel, biodegradable plastic, paint, and food. The seed of the hemp plant is full of nutrition, and it could possibly be the ultimate survival food. In addition, to be a complete protein source, hemp seeds are a particularly good source of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, but hemp seeds actually have almost twice the omega-3 content as chia. Hemp provides 4.5 grams of omega-3 fatty acids and 90 calories per tablespoon.

Hemp seeds have a subtle, nutty flavor, and they taste great when added to a shake. Similarly to chia, they can be added to a cereal or spread on toast with jam. They also taste great when added to a salad.

Storage

Both chia and hemp seeds can last up to two years if stored properly. Preparing a cool, dry place will be necessary for any long-term storage strategy. A cellar would make an ideal location, because it is underground and undisturbed by household heating systems, however, for those who do not have underground storage available, a refrigerator will do just fine. The amount you need to store will be dependent on how many people are in your home and how much space you have. The best idea is to store at least two-weeks-worth of seeds at any given time to ensure long-term survival.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Prepping for a Full On Breakdown? Stockpile These Foods

Click here to view the original post.

full-on-breakdownReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, as you know we’re down to the wire just before the U.S. presidential election: an election that will shape the face of the country for a long time.  But will we make it there?  And if so, will we make it through it, and the transition period?  With the contrived “Russian Cyber threat,” along with the very real threat of nuclear war, an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) attack, a true Cyberattack, an economic and societal collapse, or a grid down scenario, we have enough things to look out for.  When things of this nature make the mainstream news media, it may be time to start preparing if you have not done so.

It’s time to prepare for the worst-case scenario with this best-selling preparedness manual

People are Planning for Unrest Following the Election

Emergency food sales and preparedness related supplies have soared due to the upcoming election. Here are excerpts from this article:

“What’s feeding this new urgency?  Survivalist consumers say they’re preparing for post-election unrest that could involve everything from massive riots, to power grid outages, to the total collapse of the financial system where a can of food becomes currency.

Nor is it limited to just rural areas.  Frederick Reddie, a 41-year-old ‘urban prepper’ from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is stocking upon staples like rice and peanut butter and working on expanding his 6-month supply of emergency food to two years.  He has to use a pseudonym to protect his supply from any future hungry neighbors, he told NBC News.”

Well, it seems as if “Freddie Reddie” may have read my article about neighbors and “The Shelter” episode of the Twilight Zone.  In any event, he has the right idea.  Certainly, if you can afford it and wish to invest, then by all means (and by your choice), indulge as best fits into your budget and storage plans.  The aforementioned article reported that several companies that sell freeze-dried and dehydrated foods in Mylar that are packed in buckets are being bought akin to a wildfire.  Telephone orders are through the roof, and the companies reported they have needed extra staff to take care of the purchases.

Why Canned Goods are a Good SHTF Investment

I personally like the canned goods.  They’re within my budget (no, JJ is not a millionaire or even close), and they are the basis for my logistical needs.  I don’t normally eat a lot of canned goods, and for a survival situation, I’m not overly concerned with the food being organic, or any “leaching” that may occur out of the can liners.  My focus is on complete nutrition: protein, carbohydrates, fats, and vitamins.  Canned foods have been time-tested with me: I have had cans of vegetables and meats that I had in New Orleans during Katrina that (after ten years) were still just fine when tested.

Indeed, they found canned meat from Arctic and Antarctic missions such as Scott’s and Amundsen’s that had been almost a hundred years old with the contents still edible.  Canned goods can take tremendous changes in temperature and still be perfectly edible.  Canned goods are also pretty affordable and can even be found at dollar stores.  Everyone has undoubtedly concentrated on the basics, as follows:

Soups, prepared dinners (pasta dishes, chili), stews, canned meat (chicken and fish), canned beans and vegetables.

Be Careful of Tricky Manufacturers

You have to watch out: they’re starting to shrink not only portion size but portion content.  I just picked up the last case of ready-made mini beef ravioli with meatballs.  My sneaky grocers kept the same label on the cans but removed the “with meatballs” from the label…and (as you may have guessed) the meatballs, as well.  The can with the meatballs has a protein content of 22 grams (g), or 11 g per serving.  The one without the meatballs only has 16 g per can (8 g per serving), and they “phased” out the ones with the meatballs, but left the same price…79 cents per can.

Doesn’t sound as if it’s much, but when you buy 20 cans, that’s 120 grams of protein less in the variety sans meatballs.  Same for peanut butter, where they conveniently shrank the portion size but kept the same sized jar.  In addition to the canned goods, you can still find some case lot sales on dry goods, such as pasta, rice, peanut butter, crackers, and so forth.  With canned goods, don’t write off canned mackerel or sardines from your preps.  They’re high in protein and Omega-3 fatty acids.

We’re getting close to “crunch time” with all of these things happening.  Now is the time for you to stretch your dollars and prepare according to the many tips and articles you’ve read and researched here on ReadyNutrition.  Use those Gatorade and 2-liter soda bottles to build up as much of a bottled water supply as you can.  For your canned goods, if you can put them in bins, all the better.  If not, try out some cardboard boxes, and be sure to label them or mark them on the outside with a magic marker for what the general contents are.

Staying Organized

Inventory sheets (as I’ve mentioned in articles past) go a long way in rotating your supplies and also for keeping track of their contents.  For canned vegetables, concentrate on the ones you can get the most for your money with.  Examples would be canned, whole potatoes, spinach, kale, beans (such as baked or black…not the green beans that are almost devoid of nutrition), sauerkraut (excellent vitamin C source), canned fruit high in vitamin C (grapefruit, mandarin oranges, etc.).  Other prepared foods in cans are macaroni and cheese that you can add meat to if you wish.

They last a long time, come precooked (therefore can be eaten right out of the can), and they can take a beating.  Let’s not also forget canned juices, such as fruit juices and vegetable juices (tomato, V-8, etc.)  Stick with the non-carbonated stuff, as it’s better for you and will be less prone to burst on a fall or impact. Here is a good list to follow.

In a nutshell, these canned goods and dry goods can help you boost up your supplies, or provide you with a base if you have not been preparing.  All of the advice in the world will not help you unless you put it to use with actions.  As things occur both in the U.S. and the world, now is the time to take advantage and do all that you can, and the canned goods can be found within your budget that fulfills your basic needs.  Keep in that good fight, and fight it all the way!  JJ out!

 

 

Related Material:

11 Emergency Foods That Last Forever

The Prepper’s Cookbook

How to Stock a Prepper’s Pantry

Five Family Friendly Food Pantry Organizing Tips Anyone Can Do

Prepping With Wheat Allergies

5 Ways to Stretch Your Meals SHTF Style

Food Pantry: Take Care of Your Basic Needs

72 Hours Without This Will Kill You: Survival Water Fundamentals

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Emergency Survival Food Sales Soar as We Get Closer to Election Day

Click here to view the original post.

prepper-candidateSales of emergency survival food are increasing as we approach election day, and rightfully so. With Hillary Clinton and other democrats hellbent on resuscitating a non-existent Cold War and the violent riots we’ve seen by so-called protesters at Donald trump rallies, many preppers are seeing the signs and preparing for post-election unrest by storing large amounts of non-perishable food.

Although it is quite normal to see long-term storable foods rise in sales around election time, but survival food companies are seeing a particularly large spike in business this year as we approach election day.

“This is more intense than what we saw in 2012,” Keith Bansemer, marketing VP for My Patriot Supply, a survival food company, told NBC news. He says that last election season doubled their sales, and this time around they have seen their sales triple.

“We have everyone we can on the phones. We are overwhelmed,” said Bensemer.

Those who expect Trump to win fear a revolt from violent anti-Trump protesters, such as the riot seen in San Jose, California outside of a Trump rally. Others who expect Hillary Clinton’s coronation to the presidency are preparing for a possible World War 3 scenario, which may be a very well-founded concern considering Clinton’s war-driven rhetoric about Russia’s involvement in Syria and the establishment of no-fly zones in air space around Aleppo.

However, not everyone is preparing for war with another country. Many are preparing for government-related threats to their life and liberty. One of the major threats we face is the ever-increasing desire of politicians to take away our guns and the resulting chaos that would ensue. Hillary Clinton completely disregards the second amendment, and the possibility that she would enact gun confiscation across the country should not be discounted. This would mean a declaration of war on the people, or at least those who cherish freedom.

Bansemer does not think his customer base is fearing for any specific election outcome. He thinks that many just want to be prepared for whatever may come as a result of either of these candidates’ policies.

“You hear them saying, no matter who wins, I know I could take a positive step myself and secure what’s important,” he explained. “They’re securing their food supply.”

A number of other long-term food suppliers are seeing an increase as well.

Legacy Foods is predicting that sales will jump in the weeks following the election, said owner Phil Cox. Legacy sells a $2,000 package of a year’s worth of storable food, containing nearly 1,100 meals and sealed in military-grade Mylar packs.

Retailers are noticing the increase of sales of long-term food and they are serving the market. Costco is also getting into the emergency food market with a 390-serving bucket, or one month’s supply of food, for $115. Store owner Larry Friedman is unsure what to make of the increased presence of preppers at his military surplus supply store, M&G. “Some are regulars in here,” said Friedman. “They come in, seem perfectly normal, and then suddenly, they’re talking about the apocalypse. You do a double-take.”

Friedman recalled seeing an increase of sales like this nearly two decades ago, after the original invasion of Iraq:

“It really started in ’91 with Desert Storm. People were worried about Scud missiles and chemical weapons from Iraq. We had so many people waiting we almost couldn’t close the doors. We sold every gas mask we could get our hands on. That was off the hook.”

Whatever reason one may have for preparing, there is no question that if disaster strikes and food becomes scarce, food will become a primary currency, and storable food will become highly valuable. There’s no good reason to pass up the opportunity to prepare.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Build a Prepper’s Medical Emergency Kit on a Budget

Click here to view the original post.

first-aid-dollar-photo-clubWhen disaster strikes, you want to know that you have done what you can to prepare for the worst. If an event such as a hurricane or nuclear disaster forces you and your family to leave your home without warning, you could easily find yourself in a serious situation where you will need first-aid medical attention. However, during natural or unnatural disasters, emergency medical attention might not be able to come to your location, so having the resources and knowledge to help yourself and your family members at a time like this can be the difference between life and death.

In the midst of a catastrophe, having a functional medical emergency kit is essential for survival, and sometimes you have to plan for it on a limited budget. In this case, the best approach is to build your own, while utilizing only the most critical items you need for your survival.

Prepare for any disaster step-by-step

Build Your Own: Four Essential Medical Categories to Concentrate On

The four general categories you will want to take into consideration for your medical kit preparations are: ointment, bandages, tools and medicine. Knowing the necessary components for each category will help you to form the most cost-effective kit.

Ointment

The first and most important in this category is antiseptic wipes, like iodine wipes or alcohol-based wipes. In addition to wipes, you may also want to include an antibacterial ointment, like bacitracin.  These are other ointments you may also find valuable:

  • Hand-sanitizing gel
  • Insect repellent
  • Insect sting relief treatment
  • Iodine liquid
  • Sunscreen
  • Lip balm
  • Biodegradable soap
  • Collapsible water sink or basin
  • Water-treatment chemicals

Bandages

You want to have bandages that can address any possible injury that may arise. Keep in mind that a person can die after just 10-15 minutes if they are bleeding from a major artery; you will want to have sufficient bandages to stop blood flow and close the wound. Remember, the best thing you can do for an actively bleeding wound is to apply pressure until you are able to apply ointment or bandages. The Israeli Battle Bandage is a first-aid device commonly used for major wounds, and it’s only $9. You will also want to include the following bandages in your medical kit:

  • Blood-stopping (hemostatic) gauze
  • Triangular cravat bandages
  • SAM splint and finger splint
  • Stretch-to-form bandages
  • Liquid bandages
  • Medical adhesive tape
  • Band-aids (various sizes)

Tools

You are definitely going to want a suture kit as well as scissors and fine-point forceps to deal with critical injuries. You may want to consider buying paramedic shears in order to cut through clothing for injuries that require fast response time. Cotton-tipped swabs will be helpful for applying iodine liquid to wounds. In addition to these items, here are a few other tools that will likely be useful:

  • Multi-tool (or pocket knife)
  • CPR mask
  • Emergency heat-reflecting blanket
  • Headlamp (or flashlight) with extra batteries
  • Safety pins
  • Industrial gloves (preferably non-latex)
  • Needle-nose pliers

Medicine

There are a number of medications and treatments that you will want to consider packing in your medical emergency kit. Aloe Vera can be helpful as both as sun screen and a treatment for sunburns. You may also want injectable epinephrine, commonly known as an “Epipen” (only $7), to treat allergic reactions. Here are a number of other medications or treatments that one may require:

  • Antihistamines for allergic reactions
  • Prescription medications
  • Glucose to treat hypoglycemia
  • Eye drops
  • Aspirin
  • Iodine tablets for water purification
  • Multivitamins

Take into account the above mentioned items and each of the general categories as you compare prices on medical emergency kits that are prepackaged versus individual items. Many of the prepackaged kits have a great variation of items, but they may be lacking on some of the critical components previously mentioned, and this is why it often the most cost-effective strategy to build your own.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Why This Winter Could be the Perfect Storm for a SHTF Emergency + 10 Must-Have Preps

Click here to view the original post.

winterReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, “Old Man Winter” is starting to rear his ugly head.  Yeah, so what?  So there is a difference this year on three fronts.  The first has to do with the weather itself, and the second is the situation in the U.S. and the world.  Throughout history winter has been (at times) so severe as to cause large numbers of deaths and great hardships.  Throughout history warfare has been conducted during the winter months after the harvest has been taken in.  Between you and I, the harvest is being taken in, and the whole world has been on the brink of war for quite some time.  The third front: in the U.S., with the election.

Weather, War and Domestic Issues Could be a Recipe for Disaster

Let’s address the weather portion first. Think Progress posted an article on the polar vortex shift that will affect our winter considerably.  The polar vortex is usually “confined” to an area around the North Pole.  It is a gigantic, constantly-moving system of air that is circulating and swirling.  As the site mentioned, the last polar vortex shift affected more than 200 million people in 2014.  I can attest to the fact that I was one of them: in January of 2014, it was -26 Fahrenheit outside of my cabin, and never rose above -10 Fahrenheit for almost the entire month.

From the perspective of a global war, the Ukrainian-Russian situation is intensifying with the Ukrainian Army moving troops and equipment into Eastern Ukraine for operations against the separatists.  As we speak, a Russian fleet is sailing toward Syria.  The fighting in Syria between Assad’s forces and the Russian army and the Islamic terrorists is burning fiercely.  The U.S. and Russia are facing off toward a nuclear war.  North Korea continues to test missiles and threatens an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) and/or nuclear attack on the U.S. about once a week.

That “third front” of the domestic situation in the U.S…. believe it or not, here is the highest potential for something bad to occur.  Such is because Obama will think nothing of enacting Martial Law with either the advent of civil unrest and rioting, and/or a nuclear war.  The volatility and unpredictability of the situation can be the undoing of the entire country.

How to Prepare for Winter-Related Emergencies

So what does this have to do with winter?  Everything.  Everything you can imagine.  All the supplies in the world won’t do you any good if you have no way to heat your home, cook your food, and stay warm at night.  Hope all of your home-canning supplies and provisions are in wide-mouth Mason jars.  Hope you have a plan in effect, ready to go.  And if not?  Here’s a few suggestions.

  1. You can pick up a small, portable woodstove that will burn between 50-100,000 BTU’s that will fit right inside of your fireplace.  It might be a good idea to get one of them.
  2. A good wood supply (in past articles I’ve been telling everyone how important it is to build up their wood supply in the summer and early fall) that is kept dry and is well-seasoned. As well, having some fatwood or quick ways to start a fire will help you expedite the process to warm the home.
  3. Plastic, weather stripping, aerosol foam insulation, and aerosol rubber weatherizing spray: these should be in your arsenal to patch holes and close up any gaps in your house to completely weatherize it.
  4. Tools: hammers, chainsaws, bowsaws, axes, hatchets, and mauls: to split and cut wood if necessary. The primitive saws are good, especially if you want to save the gas.
  5. Generators: I recommend the Honda 2000 EU i that is as quiet as a mouse.  If you buy two of them, you can couple them and double the power output.  They also run on eco drive to conserve fuel, and can be fitted.
  6. On bottled water: I have a well, and I use old Gatorade and Powerade bottles to store my water, and rotate it frequently.  If you have bottled water in the manner that I do, then make sure you are about ¾ full on the bottles, to leave room for expansion if the bottle freezes.  Then you’re still sure about the water, and it won’t burst through the bottle.
  7. If your refrigerator goes out (lack of power): have coolers so that you can store your food outside. Better frozen than rotten, and except for eggs, most everything can be frozen and then thawed out and used again.
  8. Warm clothing and blankets: especially sleeping bags. I prefer extreme cold weather Army issue (the newer stuff with Thinsulate) and Gore-Tex cover.
  9. Small stoves: I recommend the ones running on dual fuel (such as the Coleman Peak series for single burner stoves), as well as the two and three burner Colemans with the green exterior.
  10. Port-a-potty with plenty of extra bag-liners: subjected to a polar vortex and then getting hit with an EMP is the combination for problems with the toilet, whether on a municipal system or a septic system. Use the port-a-potty that is in the shape of a chair with a bucket, lid, and seat incorporated.  You can always burn the waste later, and you’ll conserve on water as well as prevent any plumbing problems from looming up.

It would also behoove you to stock up on matches, lighters, and fire-starting equipment.  The more you prepare now, the better it will be for you when you face all of these and similar challenges.  It is part of your daily planning that you have, so that you’re planning ahead instead of playing catch-up from working behind.  Keep fighting that good fight, and stay warm!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

4 Critical Components to Getting Prepped for a Blackout

Click here to view the original post.

Blackout Hurricane SandyPower outages can happen at any time. Just this summer, there was up to 14 days of blackouts across California, and while they were not necessarily consecutive days, these power outages can be devastating for those who may be without a plan – especially in the peak of summer. As well, those living in northern climates have seen their fair share of “lights out scenarios” when the cold weather affects the grid. And let’s not forget the massive blackout that occurred from Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

From refrigerators to cell phones, people have almost become completely reliant on electrical devices for their survival, and for this reason a blackout can have disastrous implications for the ill-prepared. You never know when a blackout could occur or for what reason, but it is important to know that it could happen at any time. It is important that you have what you need to survive in the wake of a catastrophe.

Read more about rolling blackouts and the electrical grid

In addition to blackouts, there are a number of other threats to the power grid, both natural and man-made, that should be taken into account when making preparations for such an event. For instance, hurricanes and tornadoes have been known to damage power lines and render them completely unusable. An electromagnetic pulse (EMP) is another threat to the power grid, and it could originate from a natural source, such as lightning or coronal mass ejections, or from an artificial source, such as a nuclear and non-nuclear EMP weapon. An EMP could affect the power grid by causing transformers to fail, and it could possibly cause irreparable damage to electronic equipment that does not have sufficient protection, which could mean just about any modern car with a computer, would likely experience disruption or failure. When preparing for a blackout, it is important to keep these other possible threats in mind.

Energy Conservation Measures

Energy conservation at home or at work is critical for minimizing blackouts, especially when high temperatures cause immense stress on electrical equipment during the summer months. It is important to turn off all unnecessary appliances or equipment and shut off all unused lights where possible. If practical, using an electric fan instead of air conditioning units can save quite a bit of power. Closing blinds or drapes to keep out sunlight during hot periods of the day can decrease the need for air conditioning as well. Excessive opening and reopening of refrigerators can cause unnecessary power usage for the refrigerator to maintain a lower temperature. Here are some other tips to stay cool when the air conditioner is off and how to stay warm if the heater does turn on.

Store and Prepare Food Off-Grid

Water is fundamental to staying alive, so make sure to have at least 1 gallon per person per day stored for each person in your household. A blackout can last multiple days, so it would be best to plan to store enough water for each individual in your household for at least a week. Perishable food will go bad without refrigeration, so it will be important to keep food that does not require refrigeration, like peanut butter, flax seeds, chia seeds or hemp seeds. Canned foods may be made to last long, which is why they are so often suggested as long-term survival foods, but they are generally lacking in nutrition and high in sodium, so nuts or seeds will make for a better option for meeting your nutritional needs when it really counts. As a side note, most medication that requires refrigeration during a power outage can be kept in a closed refrigerator for several hours without damaging the medication. Of course, if you are unsure, it would be best to check with your physician or pharmacist.

Alternative Power Sources

It is important to have at least 2 alternative power sources at your house in the case of a blackout. Luckily, you probably already own one: your car. If you connect an inverter to the positive and negative terminals on a car’s battery, you can use the battery to run most household appliances for a limited period of time, and you can run the car periodically to charge the battery. The primary difficulty in sustaining your car as a power source is knowing the wattage rating of the devices you intend to use. An inverter that is rated for 500 watts should be enough for a small family to power most vital appliances. If there are any high wattage devices plugged in, you will likely need the car to be running for the duration of the device’s use because the battery will run out quickly. You can also keep a store of charged batteries so that you can continue to use the inverter in the case that you run out of fuel.

Another device that you may want to consider purchasing as an alternative power source is a gas-powered generator. Gas-powered generators take about a quarter gallon of gasoline for each hour of use. This will require that you keep a store of plenty of extra fuel. For a blackout period lasting 3 days, it would be wise to keep at least 15 gallons stored in your house for use in your generator or car.

Survival Gear

This type of emergency is one of the many reasons to have emergency supplies set aside and a well thought out plan. Access to fire will be critical in a blackout. Make sure to have at least three different ways to make fire, such as a magnesium and steel fire-starter, matches and butane lighters. Lanterns will be effective alternative light sources as long as you make sure to keep kerosene in storage. Keeping in mind fuel that will be helpful, you may also want to have propane in storage for use on a barbecue or other propane-powered appliance. Having extra flashlights will make a fundamental difference in a power outage. Keep one extra set of batteries for each flashlight that you set aside. Of course, you want to have a first-aid kit with sanitizing gel. A radio with a crank generator will enable you to hear emergency alerts without having to use back-up power. Have at least 3 days of clean clothes prepared.

Preparedness is a lifestyle. Having the items you need when the worst happens can mean the difference between struggle and survival. More than anything, the knowledge that you know how to face disaster whenever it may strike is empowering. Build confidence in yourself and your family members by making sure that you have what it takes to face the next power outage today.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Winter Survival: How to Blend into a Winter Environment

Click here to view the original post.

winter-camoSo why camo?  To blend in, naturally!  And what to do about the winter?  Well, one can always throw a bedsheet overtop of their head and squat, pretending to be a snowdrift!  Seriously, ReadyNutrition Readers, let’s talk about winter camo and cover a few tips and fine points to help you in your preparations.

The circumstances are yours to tailor-make, as everyone lives in different geographical regions and different population amounts.  That being said, it may not behoove you to walk down Main Street in Chicago dressed up with so much Real Tree camouflage that you bring to mind the “mean trees” on the Wizard of Oz!  Generally speaking, (except either for Chernobyl or Fukushima), trees don’t usually walk all around the neighborhood. You must match up your environment with how you intend to camouflage yourself.

Blend Into Your Winter Environment

We are going to go on a basis of the camo needs you will face if the EMP detonates, the missiles are on the way, and the “S is definitely Hitting TF,” so to speak.  The key word for you to remember: synthetics.  Synthetics, such as nylon and polyester are going to provide you with what is needed.  Cotton is not for exterior wear: it turns to sludge and wears out fast.  Synthetics are more durable for your outer camo wear: they clean more easily and do not rip.

Camo for Urban Environments

In an urban environment, you want to concentrate on your greys and off-whites and some striping or spotting of black…intermittently, of course.  You don’t want to appear to be a walking “parking lot” or a “driveway with legs.”  Adjust with where you are living, naturally, for example if you are surrounded by brick buildings or brownstones, you need to not stick out akin to a sore thumb.  Utilize the appropriate color for where you are going to hide, whether it is temporary or permanent.

Your top is the defining portion of your camouflage, since your head is (should be) facing in the direction of potential threat/enemy contact.  You’ll need a top for yourself, and a “shroud” for your backpack/rucksack.  Make sure your top has a hood and that it is not too tightly-fitting.  The top should be 1-2 sizes larger than what you normally wear.

The photo is of a military-issue top, ranging in price from $20-30, depending on the outlet.  Make sure the NSN is 8415002237627, made completely of nylon with a corded drawstring for the hood.  The good thing about it is it has a self-contained bag attached at the neck that the whole thing scrunches up and fits inside.  As it is nylon, it will not be all messed up from the elements.

You can pick up a nylon or polyester bed sheet for a child’s bed for use as a shroud to throw over either you or your rucksack or both, if you are lying in the prone.  Remember, both the top and bottom is for if there’s snow covering the ground…you’ll have to make an adjustment for urban or suburban conditions.

You’ll want to wear face masks that both keep you warm and break up the reflection of your face.  Sunglasses are also very important to use during the winter months to protect from snow-glare and prevent snow-blindness.  JJ prefers a baseball cap for its visor…this helps to shield the sunglasses as well as provide a little bit of shade for the eyes.  If you have the top pictured, you can cover the cap with the hood, no problem.

Also, do not neglect your protection from windburn and the cold elements.  JJ’s preference for the lips is Carmex lip balm, as it has menthol that helps heal the chapping, or make your own.  Don’t forget your gloves! This will help maintain body heat when you are exposed.  While you’re camouflaging yourself, remember to make sure your gloves are not anything other than snow tones or earth tones.  Finally, subdue all things that glitter…let them not give your position away.  For scoped rifles, you can place pantyhose over the forward objective lens…you can still see through it and it cuts down on the glare that would reflect off and give you away.

Just a few pointers to give you some food for thought.  Make sure you blend with your surroundings, whatever they may be.  Also remember that camouflage is not the same as cover…it does not make you “bulletproof,” per se.  Use your synthetic materials wisely, and shop around.  We’d love to hear from you and your ideas that you have experimented with, and welcome all comments.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Best Advice in Preparing for Hurricanes and Tropical Storms

Click here to view the original post.

While forecasting methods and emergency procedures for tropical storm systems and hurricanes are constantly improving, there is substantial risk that still remains for those who continue to build structures along the coastline. With Hurricane Matthew causing immense destruction and loss of life across Haiti, the Bahamas and much of the eastern U.S. Coastline, reaching as far as North Carolina, it is of great importance to learn when and how to be prepared for this kind of disaster. Matthew claimed 44 lives in the US, according to ABC News, and vast amounts of flooding was seen across 4 states, with over a thousand houses submerged in water in the days following the Hurricane’s end on October 9. Having a plan for the next hurricane or tropical storm can be the difference between life and death.

Pre-Season Preparations are Ideal

There are a number of pre-season preparations that you will want to take into account long before any storm arises. It is imperative that you know all available evacuation routes in your area. The main roads and highways will likely suffer delays due to heavy traffic flow, so you will want to plan multiple alternative routes in order to ensure that you are not trapped in a flood while attempting to flee the storm. Prepare multiple first aid kits in your house and vehicle. You will want to keep at least a 3 day supply of water, amounting to 1 gallon per person per day and a 3 day supply of non-perishable food that does not require cooking. Seeds, such as flax seeds or hemp seeds, can provide worthwhile nutrition and are easy to store. Of course, you should pack at least a 3 day supply of any medication that may be required for those in your household. Also, make sure to have a NOAA-enabled radio to receive emergency broadcasts and multiple flashlights with extra batteries for each device. You will likely want to fit storm shutters to your house to mitigate damage as the storm passes.

When a warning is issued, it is important to keep in mind the nuances of the region in which you live. Low lying areas nearest the coast are particularly susceptible to flooding. For instance, New Orleans sits 8 feet below sea level and was almost completely flooded in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina struck. The nearly 1,500 lives claimed by Hurricane Katrina could have possibly been saved by immediate evacuation.

Make sure to secure outside objects and cover windows with plywood, if they are not already covered by storm shutters, in order to  protect those inside from broken glass and other objects that may be thrust toward the house. Evacuation may not always be necessary, but make sure to listen for a call for evacuation on the radio or otherwise, and be prepared to take your supplies with you.

It is important to establish a secure room in your house to which you will retreat when there is no time for evacuation. A basement room or a room with few windows, nearest the center of your home, would be the best option for a secure space. This room would be the best place to keep your supplies should you be trapped for any extended period of time. If you have a need for light, flashlights should be used instead of candles, because a lit flame could possibly cause a fire if a gas leak is caused in the destruction left by the storm. While you wait for the storm to clear, monitor your radio for updates on the storm’s location. When the warnings stop and the storm appears to have gone, proceed with caution. Make sure that the storm has completely passed before leaving your house.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Could the Next World War be Initiated with an EMP Weapon Over Continental U.S.?

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Readers, undoubtedly you have read many of my articles that deal with an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) attack and nuclear war.  The reason these articles must be referred to and that I must keep writing them is to concentrate on the seriousness of the situation worldwide.

As of this writing, Kim Jong-Un has once again threatened the U.S. and South Korea with a nuclear war in response to the sanctions placed against North Korea after the G-7 summit and the G-20 meeting in Beijing, China.

The threats are not idle

Research any of the writings of Dr. Peter V. Pry, the foremost expert on EMP threat who regularly briefs the Congressional Commission to Assess EMP Threats against the United States.  Dr. Pry’s testimony and research conclude that both North Korea and Iran hold current military doctrines of an EMP first strike against the U.S., and North Korea (as affirmed by Dr. Pry) does indeed possess such a capability to hit the U.S. with an EMP.

Should a nuclear exchange occur, it will in all probability be limited (regarding U.S. targets) to key command, control, and economic locales.  Examples would be the following cities as primary potential targets: Washington, D.C., New York City, Norfolk, VA, Miami, FL, Seattle, WA, San Francisco, CA, and San Diego, CA, to name a few.  Limited nuclear war would be the focus, as foreign nations would wish to take the U.S. for her resources as much in one piece as possible.  I now give you my caveat that I have mentioned before:

The next world war will be initiated with an EMP weapon over the continental U.S., followed by a limited nuclear war and conventional warfare

The major problem resulting from an EMP knocking out all of our power will be the nuclear power facilities in the U.S.  Recently Dave Hodges of the Common Sense Show released warnings in an article entitled Trump Told EMP Attack to be Used to Stop the Election,” and you can go to this article to see what the short and long-term effects of an EMP attack would be on nuclear power stations and our electrical grid. Dave Hodges also received letters from some of these individuals – professionals in the nuclear power industry – who warned of testing being done both by DHS and FEMA to assess the effects of a power shutdown on nuclear power facilities.  The article is an excellently-written, very informative read that I highly recommend you to visit to pick up some good information on the fundamentals of how nuclear power plants are cooled and sustained.

After reading the article I conducted some research on my own.  You can visit the website www.nrc.gov/reactors that gives maps of nuclear power stations, courtesy of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.  The map (interactive) shows the number of reactors in each power station, and tells whether they are in operation or not.  You can also highlight any particular reactor you wish to learn more about, with detailed information such as location, age, and points of contact.  You can scroll even further on this page to find out about any safety violations or accidents in the plant.  There’s also a page with all of the reactors listed alphabetically by name.

There is also another resource for you that can be found when entering in “5 million tons of smoke created by 100 Hiroshima-size nuclear weapons,” in which you can learn information on the consequences of a regional (limited) nuclear war, and other studies that include an all-out nuclear war scenario.  The study was conducted at Rutgers University, the University of Colorado-Boulder, and UCLA.  The results list effects such as estimated casualties, the dropping of the temperature worldwide, climactic changes, and other noteworthy considerations.

The other site is the Cresson Kearney site that details a ton of information on Nuclear War Survival Skills, with a downloadable book that bears that same title.  Kearney’s site also tells you how to build a Kearney Fallout Meter out of simple materials, such as dried gypsum wallboard and aluminum foil, among others.  Now is the time to read up on, print off, and store as much of this material as possible.

Let us not forget: The Internet was “handed off” to ICANN by Obama on October 1, 2016, and we do not know what the effects of this will be.

Prepping essentials

Your preps: Bullets, Beans, and Band-Aids.  Stock up on as much fresh water as you can…enough for your family to have (optimally) at least a two-week supply per family member.  Survey meters (Geiger Counters) are hard to come by these days, but if you can get ahold of one for your family, along with a good Nuk-Alert radiation detector, and a dosimeter for each family member…then by all means, it is worth the cost.  It’s better to have and not need than to need and have not.  Prepare as much as you can while you still have the time.  Keep on rolling and fighting that good fight!

 

JJ

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

This is What Panic Looks Like: Thousands Stuck in Gridlock After Failing to Prepare

Click here to view the original post.

Traffic as far as the eye can see: Thousands of families have been caught in gridlock across the state and up the East Coast into the Carolinas and Georgia, as they flee their homes ahead of the storm - while the National Guard trucks drive towards the evacuation zones to assist Courtesy of http://www.dailymail.co.uk/ 

  • Hurricane Matthew is expected to hit southern Florida late this evening and move up the East Coast 
  • Powerful storm claimed at least 140 lives after it ripped through the Dominican Republic and Haiti Tuesday causing mudslides and flooding in the latter yesterday 
  • President Barack Obama has declared a federal state of emergency in Florida as the hurricane approaches
  • The storm intensified to a ‘catastrophic’ Category Four this morning with sustained winds of 140mph 
  • There are fears Matthew could combine with Tropical Storm Nicole, forming further east over the Atlantic  
  • National Weather Service has advised ‘loss of life’ and ‘immense human suffering’ is possible 
  • Seven million people could be left without power and some areas left ‘uninhabitable’ for months
  • Two million people in the US have been urged to evacuate their homes in preparation for a ‘direct hit’
  • Gov. Scott warned Florida warns that the storm ‘is going to kill people’ after declaring a state emergency 
  • South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley said only 175,000 have evacuated so far, warning ‘that’s not enough’ 
  • Disney has now confirmed that all theme parks will be closed at 5pm and won’t reopen until Saturday

By late morning, Hurricane Matthew had grown from a possibly devastating Category 3 storm to a potentially catastrophic Category 4. The eye of the storm is already more organized since it hit Haiti, thus becoming stronger. Forecasters are suggesting that West Palm Beach and Cape Canaveral areas farther north could get the brunt of the storm.

094542w5 nl sm FIRST WARNING WX: Hurricane Matthew Gains New Fury As It Hurtles to Florida, But Some Residents Staying Put

This is the latest report for the fast-moving hurricane.

Some Residents are Not Taking Hurricane Matthew Seriously

Florida Governor Rick Scott has urged all Florida residents to take the storm seriously and earnestly prepare and/or evacuate to a safer area, but for some, his pleas have fallen on deaf ears. With 200 million evacuating the roads are gridlocked because many waited too long to leave the area.

One way traffic: Cars can be seen on just one side of the road stretching back for miles along the Florida highway on Thursday

Courtesy of http://www.dailymail.co.uk/

While many are taking the hurricane warning seriously and preparing or evacuating, some are not taking the fury of this storm seriously. In fact, one Florida resident shrugged it off and said, “The hype is going to be worse than the actual storm. I feel I can do quite well,” said Long, who owns a bike shop and plans to ride out the storm with his cat in his 32-foot recreational vehicle a half-mile from the ocean. He has lived in the Space Coast area for three decades. “There’s always tremendous buildup and then it’s no stronger than an afternoon thunderstorm. I’m not anticipating that much damage,” he said Wednesday. Source

Overconfidence Can Kill

One of most common mistakes in disaster preparedness is overconfidence. You cannot put a gauge on Mother Nature. Storms like Matthew can quickly get out of hand, especially due to storm surges that forecasters are estimating to be between 3-6 feet and some residents believe this hurricane could give some residents a wake up call.

Those left in the wake of disasters and have not prepared adequately tend to take matters in their own hands if they feel desperate enough. This is the perfect storm for a breakdown if the state of Florida is not prepared. Residents who have stayed behind will face gas shortages, supply delivery stalls , looting, lack of water and essentially, will be left to fend for themselves until help can arrive.

One can only surmise how far-reaching this storm will be, but rest assured, there will be massive amounts of damage and not preparing for this storm could get you killed. These are essentials you need to prepare for and understand how devastating these types of disasters are.

Preparation

Supplies

Medical Needs

Communication

Sanitation

Evacuation

Don’t Be Another Statistic

Now that you understand what we’re dealing with, there are ways you can use this information to prepare for the next event so that you will be a part of the population that is ready for what may come.

Ultimately, you are the only one who can best care for your family. Having a stash of your family’s favorite canned or dry goods, a supply of water and a simple medical kit can maintain your basic needs for a short-lived disaster. This simple preparedness supply could set you apart from the unprepared.

If you live in a highly populated area, understand that resources will diminish quickly, so preparing beforehand can circumvent this. You can always start out with these basic preparedness items to get through a disaster:

  1. Food and alternative ways to cook food
  2. Water – 1 gallon per person/per day for consuming only. Plan more for sanitary needs.
  3. Fuel for generators. Also consider charcoal for outdoor grills
  4. Batteries and battery charger
  5. Flashlights and lanterns
  6. Generator
  7. Emergency lighting
  8. Ice
  9. Medical supply
  10. Items for baby needs
  11. Sanitation supplies

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Protect Your Vehicle From an EMP with this Simple Strategy

Click here to view the original post.

roll of wireReadyNutrition Readers, there have been a tremendous number of world happenings that has placed all of us in a precarious situation.  The past several months have seen successive tests of missiles, with a nuclear test as well (Friday 9/9/16) by North Korea.  Iran and North Korea have been exchanging missile technology, supplemented by the Russians with technical advisors and materials.  China, too, has been developing their SLBM (Submarine Launched Ballistic Missile) weaponry at a breakneck pace.

The military doctrine of both North Korea and Iran call for a first-strike against the continental United States using an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) generating warhead.  I wish to pen the caveat that I have been stating in my articles repeatedly for quite some time, now, hoping they will be taken into consideration:

A war would be kicked off with an EMP weapon detonated over the Continental United States, then a nuclear exchange, resulting in a World War.

That being said, there are numerous sites available for study of EMP effects as well as the nuclear threat capabilities of the countries previously mentioned.  Read the briefings of Dr. Peter V. Pry who heads the committee to assess the threat of EMP against the United States.  His writings and testimony before sessions of Congress between 2006 to 2009 are readily available and downloadable from the internet.  He also expounds on the fact that he is certain that North Korea has the capabilities of miniaturizing a warhead to deliver an EMP, and they have already done so.

I recently submitted a piece to SHTFplan.com that details the effects of an EMP on vehicles, as well as some sites to research.  In the interim, what can we do to reduce those effects?  One of the things is a grounding wire, a simple term that we can “complicate” further by expounding on measures (shoebox, field-expedient measures) that you can do…and that I have already done for myself…to give your vehicle a better chance against an EMP.

Micro Circuitry and Computer Chips in Vehicles Will be Problematic in an EMP

Firstly, the majority of the testing done by the government and private companies conclude that most vehicles will be unaffected by the EMP.  I wrote “most,” and the thing that it doesn’t take into consideration is the amount of complex micro circuitry and computer chips that exist in most cars after 1990.  The engine of the vehicle may remain intact; however, computer ignition systems and sensitive microcircuits that control a great deal of a vehicle’s internal functions could be fried instantaneously.  If the engine is fine, but it won’t start because the chip in the ignition is fried, well, the result would answer the question.

One of the possible solutions would be the grounding wire.  For decades all the way up to the present day, 18-wheelers have all utilized grounding wires attached to their frames both to protect from lightning strike and from static electrical discharge when they are delivering flammable cargoes such as fuel to filling stations or heating oil to homes.  It is this principle that you too can follow after, along with a grounding chain, to help protect your vehicle from the EMP.

How to Attach Grounding Wire to Your Vehicle

The grounding wire can be a 9’ -12’ piece of stranded steel cable attached to your rear axle to permit the cable to drag upon the ground when the vehicle is in motion.  This would permit electricity (that always tries to “find its way” to a grounded source, i.e., go into the earth) to pass along the frame and into the cable, that then passes it along to the ground.  Such a steel cable would have to be replaced periodically, as it would tend to fray and wear down.

For when the vehicle is not moving, you could double your chances and affix a grounding chain around the rear axle of your vehicle.  This chain (1/8” thick links, approximately) you would not drag.  By affixing eyehooks (yes, JJ “ruined” the bumper of his vehicle in this manner) to your rear bumper, you can use D-rings (small carabineers) to attach the chain to the bumper when the car is in motion, effectively lifting it off of the ground.  Then when you park your vehicle, unclasp the D-rings, and coil the chain up, and set it on the ground.  Bare earth is preferable, but macadam will work as well.  Do it at night before you go to bed, and during the workday, to give that added protection in the manner that electricity will pass along the grounding wire.

For the point of attachment around the axle, you can use a link that is “broken” and you can close by a screw-thread that is used to close the gap, or place that on the end of the chain and use the quick-release type clasp that is found on the end of a dog’s leash…the part that affixes to the dog’s collar or choker chain-link.  When you’re in motion you’ll have (hopefully) the grounding wire to assure contact between vehicle and road, and when you’re stationary an even better ground.

Is it perfect?  Possibly not, but the point is to give you a fighting chance.  When you buy Drano, it isn’t necessarily because your tub or sink is clogged…yet.  When it does clog, however, the Drano will be there.  Same principle as the one that you Guys and Gals already know, and it’s this one:

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Very true, and it’s better to take a swing and not get a hit than to just stand there and let the ball go into the catcher’s mitt.  This is a low-budget method that may just save your car’s electronics and enable you to drive home when the SHTF.  We welcome your questions and comments and look forward to hearing about your experiences in these matters.  Keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Did You Know That You Can Reload Primers? Here’s How

Click here to view the original post.

shell-casingSeveral months ago I wrote about some of the ways that you can make gunpowder from scratch if society collapses. Those methods were crude and could be used to create a product that doesn’t have as much punch as modern gunpowder, but is effective nonetheless. It’s nice to now that it is possible to create gunpowder in the absence of a modern civilization.

However, there is another component to ammunition that would be far more difficult to create if society fell apart for a long period of time. You can reuse brass and you can make your own gunpowder. A lot of lead can be found in ordinary places in our society, so depending on the firearm, you could cast your own bullets. But you’re going to have a very hard time making your own primers.

That’s because primers contain chemicals that for the vast majority of the population, cannot be sourced locally. Without a functional global economy, or at least a functional national economy, they won’t be made. Until society recovers, you’re stuck with whatever supplies you bought ahead of time. So if you like reloading, make sure you stock up on plenty of primers. It would be wise to have more primers than you think you would need. Even if you don’t get around to using them, primers would no doubt become a hot barter item.

With that said, a backup plan wouldn’t hurt. Though making a primer from scratch would be an incredibly difficult feat for most people, it is possible to reuse and refill primers. Again, the substances you need can’t be sourced from your local environment and won’t be produced anywhere immediately after a societal collapse, but there will be plenty of leftovers lying around in the form of matches.

For instance, the head of a strike anywhere match can be ground up and used to refill a primer (you might be able to do it with ordinary matches as well). Here’s how it’s done:

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The One Thing You Need To Do Right Now To Prepare For Collapse and Chaos

Click here to view the original post.

collapse(This article is dedicated to my wife, Brenda, who never gives up in a situation or with me)

ReadyNutrition Readers, there have been numerous articles that I have penned regarding home defense and also what to do when you’re either in a rural/suburban or an urban setting pertaining to hunkering down and defending your home and family.  There have been quite a few comments posted and e-mails received that naysay some of the actions suggested, and I will further clarify those suggestions.  Most of the naysayers have said that such actions in an urban setting (such as escaping an apartment building and heading to a predetermined location, such as an abandoned building) are either “unrealistic” or “impossible.”

Food for thought

The reason for such suggestions is this: they are last-ditch attempts, to be made only when there is not another option available.

The purpose for articles such as these posted on this venue is to provide you with ideas to be used as tools and food for thought that may make what most consider impossible to become a real possibility.

How you may either stay in place or, conversely, run for your lives is going to depend on a lot of variables that do not pertain to each and every reader.  Such is because everyone has their own unique situation, family structure, and problems associated with those two factors and the locale in which they reside.  I recently received an e-mail from a reader who will remain anonymous asking specifically what to do in a running situation, that is a situation when running from the home is the only option.

Combat the uncertainties with organization and planning

As you can see and perhaps either understand partially or relate to entirely, there are many who, when faced with the only option (for whatever reason) of having to leave their home, still do not know what to do, where to go, and how to arrive there.  My first piece of advice is this:

Combat the uncertainties by being well-organized and formulating tentative plans as far in advance as you can.

There is another piece of advice I wish to share.  My wife and I have the sixth season of the “Walking Dead” on DVD and we just finished watching it.  She and I like watching it not for the zombies, but for the situations that arise that are very realistic and true to form involving human behavior.  One of the dislikes that she mentioned to me was that there seems to be no end to the amount of mistakes the characters make over and over again, and she becomes tired of these situations arising so many times.  I told her that I understood, and I gave her the same words I’m giving to you, now:

When a SHTF event comes to pass it will take years…perhaps even decades…for society to return to “normal,” if it does so at all.

Consider the fall of the Roman Empire.  The succeeding centuries were not termed the “Dark Ages” for nothing.  It was a time of lawlessness, a time when great kingdoms and small petty ones arose and fell…a time of alliances and broken alliances, a time when robbery, rapine, and slaughter were the norm rather than the exception.  I wrote a book review of a work entitled The Coming Dark Age by Roberto Vacca that emphasizes such a return to lawless times and neo-feudalism, where communities form around a central leader, and where either civilization or barbarity, one or the other are upheld and protected by these communities by force of might, not simply by legislative dictate or philosophical mindset.

An excellent example of such neo-feudal communities can be found in the movie “The Postman,” a post-apocalyptic movie starring Kevin Costner (from the novel by David Brin) in which he encounters many different communities, some organized along lines of a free and voting democracy, and one group in particular run by a warlord whose dictates were enforced quite brutally by his band of fighters.

Eventually, no matter how well-ensconced or remote we are, we may all have to become “nomads” and refugees, living each day as it comes, until we can meet up with like-minded others to form some kind of societal organization.  This is why I continuously recommend “pop-culture” disaster and collapse movies and series for observation…to understand the realities of what we will be facing when the SHTF.

By seeing these situations that are similar to what we will face, we have a better understanding of the way societal collapses occur.  I highly recommend the nonfiction works of Jared Diamond, such as Guns, Germs, and Steel,” The Third Chimpanzee,” and Collapse,” for in-depth studies and analyses that delve into things deeply from a social and anthropological perspective.  The first work characterizes driving forces of disease and warfare, the second is an anthropological treatise on man and his history and nature, and the third takes models of societies that have collapsed and explores the underlying reasons for their downfall.

My final piece of advice regarding these studies: Do not discount what is possible merely because it is improbable.

Has it happened before?  It is written that nothing new is under the sun, and what has happened will happen again, just not remembered from when it happened before, in a nutshell.  How close is it to happening?  What plans do you have in place if you are going to defend where you live, or if you have to run?  Have you examined the types of situations you may face at home or on the run, factors such as marauders, a hostile government, a plague, or an area that has been rendered radioactive?

Study nonfiction to learn what situations have arisen, and study the fiction to see what will arise in the future.  You can best prepare by immersing yourself in study, familiarizing yourself with the situations that can arise, and either as an individual or as a family unit coming up with plans to follow that can smooth things out and enable you to arrive upon a solution.  Prepping needs material and training to work, but also a discipline of the mind, and the realization that our minds need constant study and reinforcement in order to be at our best.  So, do the best you can in the fight, and study what has happened and the possibilities of what is to come in order to better prepare yourself.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Some Basics on Living a Self-Reliant Lifestyle, Part 2

Click here to view the original post.

 ReadyNutrition Readers, we explored some precepts in the first part of this Self-Reliant Lifestyle Series a few weeks ago.  Part 1 covered a major component of such a lifestyle: identifying the needs of your family before you “jump into the water” and begin the lifestyle. This rule holds true in Part 2, as well, and I’ll repeat these major points I wrote in Part 1 that need to be kept in mind:

  1. Self-reliant lifestyles are going to have a different definition for different people.
  1. Self-reliance means you must provide for and take care of each family member’s needs, especially from a medical/caregiver standpoint.
  1. You must correctly assess what your needs are and realistically pursue a course of action to fulfill those needs in order to be self-reliant.
  1. Self-reliance is still going to leave you reliant on someone.
  1. We can return to the basics of living, and do it in a manner that does not inflict severe pain upon ourselves or our family members in the process of doing it.

These things having been mentioned, we can keep them in mind with this piece.  Now comes a time of some important decisions to be made.  There are too many resources on this site alone to tell you how to develop the most self-sufficient cabin and storehouse for all of your supplies.  Miss Tess Pennington has provided a plethora of resources for you to use in the information you will need to make a plan of action for home canning, gardening, and the like.  I have done pieces on survival medicine and for water procurement that you can research on ReadyNutrition’s archives.

Your Homestead/Retreat Should Provide These 9 Essentials

So really, what you need is an outline to go about planning in accordance with your geographical location, family’s special needs, seasons and times of the year, and the developing situation in your immediate location as well as nationally.  This last part, the situation, you can use this phrase to guide you:

            In order to prepare, you must first be aware.

The economy, and federal, state, and local laws are going to affect a great deal of what you do.  In order to camouflage your activities, you must not so much conform, but you must blend in so that your activities are unnoticed.  In this manner your preps are undiscovered by potentially hostile neighbors and you maintain a proper level of OPSEC, or Operational Security.  We’ll go into this more, as we begin our list.

  1. What kind of home/retreat do you have or are planning to have?  How are you going to provide for heat and fuel to do things such as boil water, cook food and can or preserve your foods?  You must take into account how long your growing season lasts, as well as how long the winter is in your locale.
  2. Each person requires about one acre of land to produce food for one year, times two. The “times two” factor involves rotation, because after one year of growing and harvesting, you must have a year that the land lies fallow and can be conditioned (with composting and other methods of fertilization) to be able to produce again the following year.  Micro gardening and terraced gardening along with greenhouses are your solution to this.
  3. Protein. Are you going to raise a whole lot of cattle, sheep, pigs, chickens, and other livestock?  Do you have enough forage and arable grazing land to sustain them?  Do you have the capabilities of slaughtering, preserving the meat, and replenishing your stock?  What are your family’s food needs in terms of protein?
  4. Hunting for your protein. Hunting and fishing may play a major part in your family’s sustainment if you are not going to raise livestock, and if you are going to raise it and cannot sustain it with arable land after the SHTF.  Are fish and game abundant in your area, and do you know their seasons and migratory patterns?  All of these questions are “food for thought” in order to help you plan for your family’s food needs.
  5. Solar/Geothermal/Wind/Water. What will be your heat and power sources?  Have you assessed what is within your budget, and how long you will be able to use your system?  Montana is a good example, because solar power goes out the window (literally) at times when there is little sun and a ton of snow and ice that need to be cleared from your panels during the winter months.  Geographical location and severity of the winter are factors that are crucial to determine your plan of action in this regard.
  6. Herb Garden. Do you have an herb garden that is not just for a savory meal, but for medicinal herbs?  This must be grown especially with the needs of any medically-dependent family members with special needs.  Do you have mugwort, Jerusalem artichoke, and juniper that is growing that can be used to make homeopathic solutions for a diabetic in the family?  Do you have Echinacea, oregano, lomatium, garlic, and other herbs for viral and bacterial infections growing in a controlled environment?
  7. Water. This is a biggie, because I outlined a rain catchment system for your use in previous articles.  This is where you have to know all of your existing laws in your locale.  Is it illegal to take the rain?  Well, guess what?  The way around this is to have the system in place and operational but not operating.  When it hits the fan, you probably won’t need to consult with a lawyer, and you can begin to harvest the water.  There needs to be a plan for obtaining water during the summer months and during the winter, because temperature doesn’t change the fact that each person needs 1-2 gallons per day, and don’t forget about any animals that you have, either as pets or as livestock.
  8. Waste. Human and animal waste (with the exception of the latter being cats, as they carry Toxoplasmosis in their stool) can be composted.  Once again, if you live in an area that prohibits such activity, you have to take this into account…and perhaps have a system ready to go at a moment’s notice after the SHTF.  The same for garbage.  It needs to be either recycled (such as aluminum foil, plastic bags, plastic bottles, steel cans) or used as fuel in a woodstove, or if it’s biodegradable then into the compost bin it must go.  The legal consideration exists until the SHTF, so know your local laws.
  9. With whom?  Who can you trust?  This is part of self-sufficiency, because the tenet “No man is an island” holds.  You will be self-sufficient to a point: we are a social creature with needs of interaction with others.  It would behoove you to develop your network of those who are trustworthy now.  I stress one point that may sound mean, but it serves a purpose, that being your survival:  Don’t just link up with people because they’re “nice” people: they have to have either some skill or something they produce that can contribute or be exchanged for your skills or products…or else they’re just a liability…or worse.

Regarding this last statement, I highly recommend watching “The Shelter,” an episode of the old “Twilight Zone” series, where a family builds a bomb shelter, and an air-raid comes about.  Watch the reaction of the neighbors and how things “morph” into a very bad situation indeed.  Having served in some very nasty areas of the world with the military, I have seen firsthand how these situations develop in the blink of an eye, so be forewarned that they can and will occur!

Skills, skills, skills.  You need skills…to develop the ones that already exist, and learn new ones that you don’t yet have.  Gunsmithing.  Can you reload?  Can you fix the firearms that are in need of repair?  Basic Mechanics.  Can you change the brakes on your vehicle?  Change your tires?  Put in a new battery?  Change the fluids?  Put in a new alternator or distributor?

Medicine.  Do you know how to give an IV?  Can you diagnose a life-threatening condition such as ectopic pregnancy?  Can you give CPR?  Do you know how to treat a patient for shock, as well as the injury he or she has sustained.  Herbalism.  Do you know how to dry and tincture herbs?  Do you know how to find herbs (wild-craft) that are medicinal in nature in your own backyard?  Do you know what herbs are nutritious and edible?

I could go on, but the point I’m trying to impress is that in order to live a self-sustained lifestyle, you have to be the butcher, the baker, and the candlestick maker.  You must be a jack of all trades and a master of all.  You must wear many hats, and assume the role in each hat, and take up another hat when another role comes along that you must fulfill.  In order to be self-sufficient you must prepare.  We had a very good saying that a First Sergeant in the 82nd Airborne Division used to say all the time that holds true, and it can serve you well here:

            How you train in peace is how you’ll fight in war.

Very true, and I know I’ve mentioned it before.  It is true, and it is important for us as preppers and survivalists.  In order to live a self-sustained existence, you must prepare, and practice what it is that needs to be done…so that you can actually do it and not just have it stored away in a book or in your files.  Hope this piece helps you to organize, and we welcome any comments or suggestions you may have.  Keep up the good work, and have a great day!

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Negotiate Like a Pro With These 5 Powerful Tips

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, we’re going to cover some of the finer points on the art of Negotiation in this article.  Negotiation does not necessarily mean between yourself and an enemy.  Negotiation is a very valuable skill that is crucial to develop and employ in the various situations you will encounter, both pre and post-SHTF.  You can use it and develop it on a daily basis until it becomes natural.

When you are doing things within your family you negotiate: how to get the kids to do their chores, what responsibilities you will split with your spouse on numerous domestic issues, and what you will all do either when working together or on your free time, such as a vacation.  You negotiate with your bosses and co-workers.  You negotiate when you deal with a salesperson who wishes to sell you a car or a household appliance.

Fine Tune This Essential Skill

In an emergency, you may need to negotiate with a gang that is holding one of your family hostage, or another family that has resources that you need or want.  You may need to negotiate with a professional, such as a doctor or veterinarian to provide services for you in exchange for bartering.

The best resource that I have to recommend on this subject is the book, “You Can Negotiate Anything,” by Herb Cohen.  This guy actually worked for the police department as well as other law-enforcement agencies such as the FBI to negotiate with kidnappers and terrorists.  He was also a consultant for many years in the private sector.  The book is simple and straightforward, and Cohen breaks down the factors needed for a successful negotiation into three areas:

  1. Power: this means power of information, special skills, and confidence that you have what it takes to conduct the negotiation
  2. Time: the limitations needed to obtain the negotiation (deadline)
  3. Information: the information you have about the other party’s needs and desires.

 Cohen was very specific in terms of being “above board” and not trying to intimidate or manipulate people into doing something immoral, illegal, or harmful.  He did add a caveat to this concept and said in a life-threatening situation, it is a different story; however, he believed in finding honest and peaceful solutions to problems.

One of the main points is to empower yourself: with knowledge and skills.  This article can be very complementary to the articles I wrote on bartering for pre and post-societal collapse.  We need to ask ourselves questions in this regard, such as what does the other person need?  What skills and/or materials can I provide that will fill this need?  What does the other person or group have that I need and desire?

Negotiation means (as we used to term is in Special Forces) the need to pursue cross-cultural communication; that is, you’re dealing with a different “tribe” than your own.  Perhaps there are significant religious and political differences that may make negotiating a more difficult endeavor.  It is up to you to find common grounds to allay the fears and tensions and enable you to come to the bargaining table.

This does not mean dragging out all of the goods you have with a big smile and jumping up and down, saying “I’m ready to negotiate!”  Getting back to the “knowledge” factor, you had better know who you’re dealing with and figure out what they want…and what they are willing to do to obtain what they want.  Keep Ronald Reagan’s saying in mind: “Peace through superior firepower.”

Negotiate Like a Pro

This can be expanded upon to mean greater “firepower” in the thinking department, and greater adaptability and flexibility.  You have to wear many hats in a post-SHTF bargaining session.  There are a few pointers you can follow that will get you started.  It means coming across as cool, confident, and capable, not a hothead who loses their composure the first time the other party states something annoying or vexatious to you.

  1.  Speak clearly, audibly, and with calm in your voice.  This promotes a good follow-through.  Remember, you want something and they do, too.  It’s up to you to promote confidence in you with them…that they feel comfortable with you and that you’ll live up to your end of the bargain.
  2. When you’re speaking or listening, meet the other person’s eyes with your own, and blink regularly.  Not blinking can be a sign to them of either a challenge or that you’re nuts.  When you meet a person’s eyes with your own, it denotes sincerity and truth, as well as showing them you’re not afraid to speak to them face-to-face
  3. Avoid directly contradicting what they say.  If something is too “heinous” for you to deal with, it is best to break off the negotiation and say, “I need some time to consider this,” or “It may be better for us to speak about this later.”
  4. When the negotiation is concluded or still on the table and it’s time to break off the conversation?  Thank the other party for taking the time.  Politeness always pays off, even if the other person does not respond in kind.  I’ve had numerous negotiations with third-world guerillas who were more taciturn than the face of the moon.  Later on they returned to table and wanted to do what we asked because my men and I were courteous and polite.  It goes a long way.
  5. End on a positive note.  This ties into number 4, but pay them a deserved compliment if you can, and tell them you’re looking forward to dealing with them in the future.  Good feelings are not just “walked upon”: they can be developed, and this is all part of negotiation.

The skill of negotiation is a valuable one.  Life is lived with people unless you’re a hermit in a cave or the Unabomber.  Negotiation skills can help you land a better job or save some money on a new or used car.  It can be used in all areas of life, in our happy consumer society or when the “Mad Max” scenario unfolds.  Tailor make it to fit your needs and best suit your personality and skills, and you’ll find it is worth the effort to develop.  Have a great day, and take care of one another.

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Save Perishable Food In An Off-Grid Emergency

Click here to view the original post.

canned tomatoes“That morning, when Helen apprehensively opened the freezer, she found several hundred pounds of choice and carefully wrapped meat floating in a noxious sea…As any housewife would do under the circumstances, she wept.  This disaster was perfectly predictable, Randy realized.  He had been a fool.  Instead of buying fresh meat he should have bought canned meats by the case.  If there was one thing he certainly should have foreseen, it was the loss of electricity.”   – “Alas, Babylon,” by Pat Frank, page 151

Readers, there’s your standard…what to read and what we may very well face.  The cited work, if you’re into disaster fiction/apocalyptic reading is the end-all be-all of survival stories of how a community organizes and makes it through a nuclear war.  It is not so much a how-to as a story with real-life situations that average people face.

What we are focusing upon is the initial problem: refrigerated food, and an emergency just hit and took out all of the electricity.  In this day and age, most of the family is working and out of the home.  Still, someone will return home eventually and the actions that are taken could very well save your family some of the foodstuffs they have.  If you read the articles I wrote on my personal experience during Hurricane Katrina, I detailed how I prepared all of the food that was in the refrigerator prior to the power going out.

To be sure, you’re going to lose some food.  There are generators, yes, but you’re going to have to weigh the use of it with silence around the house.  Picture the scenario of three days or so after an EMP and you are the only house on the block with a generator running.  There’s a formula for disaster via the marauders who used to be the friendly neighbors chatting about the football games.  So what can be done?

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

One thing the can be done is to start stocking a prepper’s pantry in your home. Foods that are shelf stable and nutritious are the best to stock. Here is a list of 25 must-have emergency foods and how to get them organized. Along those lines, you want to ensure you have canning supplies, Mylar storage bags and plastic bags on standby to store all the food you are about to preserve.

Another method that is done in the JJ home is when the groceries are brought home, all meats are cooked immediately, placed into Ziploc bags, and then into the freezer they go.  Remember, after a power outage your fridge will still keep things cool for about 24 hours.  The frozen meat adds about another 24 hours to its “frozenness” until it needs to be consumed.  You can do this with other portions of food as well, such as soups, pasta, vegetables, and so forth.  It’s better to have it a few days longer than to lose it in the first 24 hours.

Now what do we do?  Here’s a possible solution.  That frozen meat?  It’s cooked, so if you have the generator, why not stack up those dehydrator machines with already-cooked meat and dry it out?  It would be a one-day risk, and you could dehydrate a certain amount of it and have it last a little longer.  There’s also another method.  Break out your canning manuals, and prepare to can.  For this you’ll need something a little special.  Here’s what I have: The Coleman two-burner dual fuel stove.

Yes, that green camping stove…runs on white gas/Coleman fuel or gasoline.  The reason this is a “goodie” is that you can steadily regulate your temperature and pressure with this little gas-burner stove as you are monitoring your work.  Such regularity is important when it comes to canning.  Can away!  You’ll need to know your stuff: your elevation and the proper recipes that you have in your canning manual for your ratios of seasonings and salt.  Can the meat, can the veggies, can whatever you can!  Better to save most of your food than eat akin to the proverbial last meal and lose most of it.

Meat can also be salted; therefore, it would behoove you to pick up some 25 – 50 lb. bags of salt, and whatever can’t be canned can be preserved in this manner.  Then there’s the Brinkman, the smoker.  Yes, time to break out the charcoal and mesquite chips and smoke the daylights out of that meat.  Smoke some veggies, and dehydrate them as well.  It’ll be a race of the likes of which you’ve never run.  Have a woodstove?  Well, you can scramble all of your eggs on the top of the stove on a baking pan (hopefully yours has a lip).  Scrambled hard…and then you can dry them out after cooking them.

Seafood is tricky.  I’d throw that in the Brinkman and smoke the daylights out of it, being careful to season it, as dried fish on its own tastes pretty crappy.  Just try and avoid the use of butter or dairy sauces or any cheese.  That’ll make the meat go rancid as it goes south.

Speaking of which, if you’re going to have any kind of a “gorge” then make it a breakfast special.  Break out the pancake mix, and eat up all of the dairy products that you can for the next couple of meals, while the electricity is out and the fridge is still within that 24-hour window.  Load up on the powdered sports shakes, the grilled cheese sandwiches on the woodstove, the pancakes and cereal, because fresh milk will be a thing of the past, barring Bessie the cow being tied up outside in the backyard.

You can use the sun to dry out your fare if you have the time, and that is a big if.  You need to get everything cooked and/or canned, and get it out of sight.  The day started out as “Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm,” but after an off-grid disaster, you can bank on the day ending as “The Planet of the Apes.”  Out of sight and out of mind.  Get it cooked, dried, smoked, and canned, and get it in your vehicle if you’re getting out of Dodge, or get it out of sight.

Yes, there’s always room for improvement in this case, and any tips or suggestions you wish to add will be great to glean some of your experience that you have tested on your own.  The most important thing: go into action on this immediately.  You don’t have time to waste, and it’s best to get it all done before the “Drama in Real Life” becomes more real, and more dangerous.  Save the food, get it out of sight, and then be ready to defend it.  Hopefully it won’t come to that, but then again, it’s better safe than sorry.  Hope this piece gave you some “food for thought,” and we look forward to hearing from you.  Keep up that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

News: Solar Activity Higher as NASA Claims No Danger

Click here to view the original post.

cmeWe have a major event happening on the sun at the moment.  NASA does not believe there will be a problem…but there may be one, and that is all the clue that one needs at times.

The Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft run and maintained by NASA found a coronal hole, an enormous dark region that is pervasive on the sun’s surface.  A coronal hole is an area of the sun’s “atmosphere” that is characterized by extremely low density, in a nutshell.  They have lowered temperatures in comparison to the rest of the sun, and they present an appearance that is darker than the sun’s surface.

These areas are caused by gaps in the magnetic field of the sun.  NASA has been downplaying this, but this is the statement that is almost a caveat, a complete 180-degree turnaround from their “don’t worry” posture and their lack of any substantial warnings on the matter:

“Coronal holes are the source of a high-speed wind of solar particles the streams off the sun.”    – NASA, July 18, 2016

Doesn’t that remind you of the friendly “Heat Miser/Mister Sun” from “The Year Without a Santa Claus?”  Akin to a “friendly, smiling sun” just blowing some solar particles our way?  I assure you, what NASA described in the highlighted sentence is a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), and it is not some friendly space-dust traveling to earth as a glowing kiss.

On September 1, 1859, scientists and observers noted a discharge from the Sun, and on September 2 that discharge actually hit the earth.  This solar discharge was known as the Carrington Event, and it had worldwide effects: telegraph lines and basic electrical circuits were fried.  If the event had happened today, it would have knocked out all of the electrical and computer systems on the Earth and thrown us back to 1859, literally.

Huge amounts of electrical and magnetic particles are thrown into space, and when this occurs in force it can have devastating effects on the power grid systems and not leave us adequate time to prepare.  One occurred as recently as 2003 with almost catastrophic effects in Canada and Upstate New York as the power there was knocked out for several days.  That CME was nowhere near the size of the one that occurred during the Carrington Event.

There are those who have gone as far as to predict a CME may occur on or before July 29; however, the important thing is not so much to prepare for it (we are already preparing) but to be aware that something may occur.  Faraday cages will shield your electronic equipment if something should happen.  It also wouldn’t hurt to monitor NASA’s website as well as others that report on solar activities and anomalies.

The bottom line: Just because the “experts” claim there is no danger does not require you to follow their claims!  The point is to be aware and be alert.  A professional, licensed captain piloted the Titanic; an amateur (Noah) piloted the Ark.  The pros don’t always know, so it’s up to you to be the pro in this department.  A master of all trades, wearing many hats; time to put on the astronomer’s cap.  In any event, keep fighting that good fight and don’t ever let your guard down, even when the experts say it’s safe to do so.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Finding Your Way: Land Navigation Series, Part 1 – The Pace Count

Click here to view the original post.

“A soldier is never lost, he’s just temporarily disoriented.”

– An old Army saying

Well, ReadyNutrition Readers, you’re not lost, as you have found this site!  Today we’re going to cover some of the finer points of land navigation.  “Map reading” is an oversimplified term that does not cover the broader, more comprehensive category of land navigation, or “land nav,” as we referred to it in the service.  It is very important skill to learn and takes time and practice to develop effectively.  Let’s get started.

I recommend the older Army publication for a reference guide, the one I’m familiar with that I can recommend to you by experience: FM 21-26 Map Reading and Land Navigation.  It gives you everything you need.  The newer manual is FM 3-25.26 (entitled the same), and although I’m sure it is worthwhile, I don’t know it.  I have to give you what I know, and what I know that works as your basis for land nav.

Learn to Pace Count

If you’re hiking across unimproved terrain, you need a pace count for yourself.  I have been “brought up” with Uncle Sugar…the Army’s method…that is in meters, as all military maps are in kilometers and meters.  Don’t worry: if you have one of the Army’s maps, it has a conversion scale to feet and miles.  If you feel the need, stick with English units, but the meters are easier to add and adjust while you’re backpacking along.  Now we’re going to show you how to figure out your pace count.

Start off by using a tape measure (the longer the better) to measure from a fixed point (point A), and measure off 100 meters, and mark that point (point B).  Trees are excellent for this, and you can tie off a ribbon or string to A and B to always be able to use them.  Start from point A, and take a comfortable walking step, and then another.  These two steps constitute a pace. Left, right is one.  Step with the left and count on the right, all the way up until you’ve reached point B.  The number is your pace without any equipment.  Mine happens to be 65.

How To Mark Meters

When you’re wearing a backpack, your pace count changes and is increased, because you have more weight to bear and you end up taking shorter steps.  When I have my rucksack on, my count is 70.  These numbers (unencumbered and encumbered) constitute your pace counts for each, respectively: you must memorize them!

Now what?  Well, once you have that, you then need to figure out a way to mark off your groups of 100 meters.  Pace count beads are what I used in the service.  It is nothing more than a string of 550 parachute cord with 9 sliding discs or beads, a knot, and another 4 sliding discs that terminate in a knot and the whole thing is tied off on your equipment (camelback, pocket, etc.).  As you travel 100 meters, slip a disc down, and so on.  When you’ve slid all of them down, then with your 10th hundred meters, slide one of the top four down and reset the bottom 9 back to their original position.  The top measures kilometers, or “klicks” that constitute 1000 meters per “klick.”  This distance equals 6/10 of a mile, for your conversion.

Therefore, if you travel 8 klicks, you have covered 4.8 miles.  Simple enough, right?  But it takes practice.  Other adjustments you must make are with regard to terrain.  The rougher the terrain, the more objects (stumps, large holes, rocks, etc.) you will have to bypass, and this will force you to adjust your pace count accordingly.  Night, inclement weather, water features, and thick vegetation will take both considerable practice and additional adjustments to gauge the distance you have traveled.  Bad guys add even more!

nav picI have enclosed this photo from Amazon.com where you can order them listed as “Army Ranger Pace Count Beads,” for $4.00 a set.  If you are the way I am, you can also make your own.  You’ll be able to figure out your distances up to 5 klicks (3 miles) using the beads, and then you’ll have to reset them and keep a count of the 5 klick increments.  Jot them down on paper, or put a pebble in your pocket for each increment.  The latter method works best in inclement weather.

If you don’t prefer to use the military method, you can take that tape measure and figure out a pace count in feet.  You can accomplish it by doing it in 100 foot increments, as it is then easier to add, but it will be time-consuming this way.  I strongly recommend using the metric system for your pace count.  You can easily convert to feet and after a while it becomes second nature where you won’t even have to write anything down and can do it mentally.  Also, you can always use a civilian map and convert the miles easily to kilometers (divide miles by 2.2), and if you come across a military map?  Oh, you’ll be doing good, because you’ll have the unit down…and military maps are very detailed.  We’ll discuss them later.

Your pace count is your key to movement and land navigation on your feet.  It is the basis for your two components of land navigation when traveling from one location to another: distance and direction.  In the next part of the series we’re going to cover the direction component.  Until then, happy pace-counting, and remember: practice makes perfect!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Preparedness Advantages of Holding on to Your Older Vehicle

Click here to view the original post.

pickupReadyNutrition Readers, I’m the last person on earth who would ever advocate going out and buying a brand-new vehicle from a showroom floor.  For any of you who may be selling automobiles, this is no insult to you or your products.  This article is meant to point out the advantages to “recycling” that older vehicle you have, and making an old thing into something new.  This has to do with a preparatory and survival mentality, not about saving dollars.  It has to do with things that may help you when you need them after the SHTF.

We have already seen and read a myriad of articles on the Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP), and the susceptibility of newer-model cars and trucks to the pulse, due to the reliance of the vehicles on complex circuitry and integrated computer systems.  OK, so you have an old 1973 Ford pickup truck, and it’s on it’s last legs.  It is a five speed and doesn’t utilize any of the ultramodern component parts just mentioned; however, the engine is not what it used to be.

Before you scrap it, I want to bring before you the possibility of doing a complete engine overhaul on the vehicle.  Understand if this avenue is pursued, you need the services of a competent mechanic…one who you can totally trust and rely on.  What an engine overhaul entails is detailed, but not complicated.  You will put out some money on this one, however, it may turn out to be a goldmine for you.  The pragmatic, non-preparatory reason is that if the engine is completely fixed and placed into reliable working order, the money you would have sunk into a new vehicle is completely eliminated.

The engine overhaul is just as it sounds: taking your vehicle’s engine completely apart, cleaning the parts that are serviceable, and replacing any parts with new ones as needed.  You can spend several thousand dollars on this, and once again, this will vary with your factors of the vehicle’s condition, availability of parts, and what not.  A good mechanic will do this and certify your vehicle after completion for an additional hundred thousand miles.  Then what?

Well, you’ve eliminated a car payment, as we mentioned.  Your older model should be well within the limits of being protected from an EMP, as mentioned, as it does not hold all of the modern hardware.  There are some other factors worth considering as well.  Remember those “black boxes” installed in the vehicles after 2012/2013 and (some firms) even earlier?  Well, that “secret agent” inside of your engine that tracks your every move with the vehicle is then eliminated.

In some states (Montana is one of them) if your vehicle is a certain age, you can apply for a “permanent” tag that will eliminate the yearly fee of their sticker on your license plate.  In addition, an older model may not be subject to the same emissions requirements as a new one, eliminating the needs for inspection, compliance, and funds expended.  Also, your insurance may even be reduced if you present paperwork showing that your vehicle has been improved in this manner.

Camouflage is another issue.  Your “beater” of a pickup truck doesn’t attract as much attention, both pre and post-SHTF.  It is less likely to be stolen or interfered with (interior looted, etc.)  Another thing is its simplicity.  The good mechanic will be able to advise you on what extra parts to obtain, pertaining to those that frequently wear out.  If the engine is simple, it is usually simple to repair it.  Of course there are other factors to weigh in, such as if it’s a gas guzzler, but here again, the mechanic can help you out in the initial assessment and can tell you whether or not the engine overhaul will significantly improve the gas mileage you’ve been getting.

Also worth mentioning is the fact that you may have “tailor made” this vehicle to serve your needs, such as weapons racks or tool brackets and boxes.  You are familiar with it, and know its limitations when you’re driving it…what it can and cannot do.  Think of how it was when you picked up the vehicle new.  You’ll be taking it back in the direction of that capability.  You won’t have to start out on a brand-new slate; it’s almost akin to having a surgery that will extend your life, and in this case it is the life of your vehicle.

Consider the engine overhaul on that early-model vehicle, and you’ll save money in the long run, and keep that anonymity that you so desperately desire as a prepper and survivalist.  The key is the good mechanic.  When all is finished, you’ll have something that will not look pretty on the outside as a new vehicle but you’ll have restored an asset that you need.  You will have invested in something that you know inside and out…capabilities and limits.  Then you can capitalize on this, and rely upon it again to suit your needs.  Happy motoring, and find that good mechanic!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Finding Your Off-Grid Survival Retreat in Montana

Click here to view the original post.

montanaReadyNutrition Readers, Survivalists, Preppers, and Homesteaders, lend me your ears!  I come to give you some pointers Montana land for a survival retreat, and a plug for myself in the bargain.  Why not?  And what would that plug be?  I have a piece of property for sale that would suit the interests of any off-grid, homesteading prepper who really wants to settle in the “American Redoubt” out of the way of the coming maelstrom.  Here are the basics on my property for sale:

20 Acres, private, off-grid, water rights, two-story cabin with woodstove, barn, shed, goat pen, tool room with workbenches, two-story chicken coop, gigantic root cellar, and two more storage buildings on site.  Low property taxes, as all structures are above-ground with no foundation and aren’t assessed.  $100K worth of timber on the site.  4,300 feet elevation, the mountains of the North Fork of Montana.  Other “perks,” we can discuss.  Serious inquiries only.  E-mail Jeremiah Johnson here, bigfanofultraman@yahoo.com for more, and “let’s make a deal!” I would be delighted to meet you and show you everything if you come out here.” Also: I’m not moving out of Montana; I have another place close by.

 There.  Someone once wrote that I just offer advice.  Well, here’s more.  I invite you to “play ball” in my neck of the woods.  Montana is excellent as a retreat location, seriously.  The property taxes outside of the small cities and towns are not excessive, and the land is not as expensive as many of the other states that are in the “Great American Redoubt.”  Let’s give you some more reasons to move to Montana as a retreat location.  Open carry is permitted, and concealed carry without a permit is legal and allowed everywhere except in an established town, and even there it is permitted when you’re in your vehicle and traveling with it as such from one place to another.

In Montana, if you have a Montana driver’s license, you can purchase a firearm and walk out the door with no waiting period.  In addition, private sales are legal and require no call-ins or background checks.  Just a handshake and exchange of the money and the firearm.  You go your way and the seller goes his.  Big Daddy Government has nothing to do with it.

In Montana if you build a house that is not on a foundation, you pay no property taxes on it…only for the land (as such is the case with my property for sale).  In Montana, if you want to live outside of a town (a must!) you don’t have any building codes or restrictions on what you put up.  You can live in a tent, a tarpaper shack, or a stone villa…you aren’t interfered with in any way.  Home improvements do not require any permits, licenses or any other garbage.  No zoning requirements, no restrictions.  None.

The population density is low (except during the tourist season), and believe you me, if you live anywhere in Western Montana (especially the Northwest, where I live), you are there in the “outback” and the wilderness of the Rocky Mountains.  Let me tell you more.  The area in and surrounding the Flathead Valley is extremely safe: there are no big target cities anywhere near.  The closest being Seattle, with four major mountain ranges to the west between them and Montana.  To the east are the missile silos, but it is to the east of the Continental Divide, with hundreds of miles and four major mountain ranges in between, plus the prevailing westerlies, meaning fallout would drift away from us, not toward us.

The area from a target perspective is completely safe.  There are no military industries or key industrial targets in the region.  The railroad line runs straight (east to west) through Glacier National Park, and also has a branch that runs North and South to Kalispell with a rail line that runs west as well.  The strategic necessity would be to preserve this rail line (from a domestic or foreign invader’s perspective) as it enables transport across the Divide, just a word maybe to most…but rugged and impassible in any way to transport equipment, materials, and supplies in a manner that saves hundreds of miles out of the way.

The towns provide the basic necessities if one needs supplies, and medical help is less than an hour’s drive if you set your homestead up right.  Kalispell and Whitefish have hospitals, and there are small doctor’s offices and care clinics in some of the larger of the small towns.  Everything is spread out, but not painfully so.  Four-wheel drive here is a must: refer to some of my other articles on emergency preparations and procedures when you or the family are driving anywhere in inclement weather.

My property is very close to the National Forest, but it is not able to be annexed in any way, by either the government or the timber companies.  There are many properties that border national forests or are nearby, and these are excellent properties that allow you to actually run to a safe place in the forests if marauders, foreign armies, or any others drive you out in a grid-down, SHTF scenario.  There is plenty of water, even during the drought seasons and the winter.

Be advised: the winters are rough, but then again, you want to rough it, don’t you?  All of your skills that you have been developing in theory will come to play here: from woodcutting to canning, log-splitting to snow and ice removal.  Montana has abundant game and is a hunter’s paradise, and as I have done, you can fill your freezer for more than a year with one elk.  So here it is!  Montana is more than worth considering, it is worth acting upon.  All the skills in the world cannot be employed in a state such as California or New Jersey, but you can ply your craft in Montana and be safe doing it.  Hope to hear from you all soon, and all comments and inquiries about the state that I haven’t covered are more than welcome.  Keep your powder dry, and keep fighting that good fight!

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Get Prepped: The Hurricane Primer + Giveaway

Click here to view the original post.

 Over 80% of people on this planet live within 100 miles of a coastline. Despite attempts at getting the population better prepared, according to FEMA, only 40% of the U.S. population actively prepares. It only takes one hurricane for victims to see how quickly their lives can change.

Hurricanes are nightmarish in terms of the damage they cause and have the capacity to level homes, flood neighborhoods and cause massive amounts of damage to communities. Those that choose the unpreparedness route gamble with the chance of going head to head with severe flooding, tornadoes, wind and storm damage and gamble with their families lives. This may sound alarmist, but it’s a fact. On a personal note, I have witnessed first hand how unprepared families flock to the stores for last-minute preparations and how grocery markets, super stores and home depots are quickly overwhelmed and supplies exhausted within hours of restocking. Inevitably, there will be people who walk away from these storms unprepared. Do you want to be a part of this statistic?

Everything You Ever Needed to Know to Prepare for Hurricanes

The time to prepare for this natural disaster is now before any storms are on the horizon. Using this approach is also easier on the pocket-book and will help you prepare with a clear head rather than a panicked one. The best place to start is to find resources, checklists and advice from experienced professionals. Even asking friends and family what their personal stories of surviving hurricanes are can better prepare you. One of Ready Nutrition’s writers, Jeremiah Johnson wrote about his personal survival story about going through Hurricane Katrina. You can read his words here.

hurricane preparedness

Make sure you sign up for the Hurricane Preparedness Giveaway below!

These are essentials you need to prepare for and understand how devastating these types of disasters are.

Preparation

Supplies

Medical Needs

Communication

Sanitation

Evacuation

Don’t Be Another Statistic

Now that you understand what we’re dealing with, there are ways you can use this information to prepare for the next event so that you will be a part of the population that is ready for what may come.

Ultimately, you are the only one who can best care for your family. Having a stash of your family’s favorite canned or dry goods, a supply of water and a simple medical kit can maintain your basic needs for a short-lived disaster. This simple preparedness supply could set you apart from the unprepared.

If you live in a highly populated area, understand that resources will diminish quickly, so preparing beforehand can circumvent this. You can always start out with these basic preparedness items to get through a disaster:

  1. Food and alternative ways to cook food
  2. Water – 1 gallon per person/per day for consuming only. Plan more for sanitary needs.
  3. Fuel for generators. Also consider charcoal for outdoor grills
  4. Batteries and battery charger
  5. Flashlights and lanterns
  6. Generator
  7. Emergency lighting
  8. Ice
  9. Medical supply
  10. Items for baby needs
  11. Sanitation supplies

Sign-Up For Our Giveaway!

To encourage you further, we are offering a giveaway to help get you ready for the upcoming hurricane season. All you have to do is sign up for our newsletter and you will be entered to win this hurricane preparedness kit worth $130!

You guys are going to love the prizes!

backpack72-hour Kit for a Family of 4 – This is a great compact kit from ReadyAmerica that has everything you need for 72 hours time. This is great for a grab and go evac pack or is a great addition to your vehicle.

250x250-PreppersBluePrintThe Prepper’s Blueprint – We can all agree that the subject of preparedness is a lot to digest. The Prepper’s Blueprint is a best-selling resource that will help readers see the value in adding preps slowly and steadily to fully insulate themselves from the worst-case scenario.

lifestrawLifeStraw – This handy, lightweight water filtration system removes minimum 99.9% of waterborne bacteria (>LOG 6 reduction) and surpasses EPA standards for water filters, removes a minimum 99.9% of waterborne protozoan parasites (>LOG 3 reduction) and filters to an amazing 0.2 microns. Lifestraw will ensure you have drinking water in the harshest of conditions.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Hurricane Preparation: How to Board Up Your Windows Like a Pro

Click here to view the original post.

boarding homesAs we turn the corner into hurricane season, many parts of the country are starting to make preparations for this type of natural disaster.

Broken windows are common occurrences with this type of storm and knowing how to protect your home is important for these preparations. Lumber is one of the many supplies to quickly disappear in preparation for disasters; therefore, having items ahead of time to be able to board up windows in a hurry will be very advantageous if you are short on preparation time.

Make sure you have everything to prepare for disasters. Here’s a checklist for supplies for short-term disasters.

 Pre-cut and Prepare your Supplies Before the Storm is a Reality

Here’s where your preps come in.  Do it now, and not later.  Think Aesop’s “Grasshopper and Ant” fable on all things…and be prepared.  You have to keep the cold and the elements out of the house.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • plastic sheeting 6 mil thickness measuring 25’ x 10’
  • staple gun 
  • pre-cut fir strips
  • galvanized nails or screws
  • plywood

Plastic Sheeting – The first key is to seal, and this is with plastic.  Wal-Mart has pretty thick gauge rolls of plastic sheeting, and I have found there are rolls of 6 mil thickness measuring 25’ x 10’ for sale there for about $20 per roll.  You can measure all of the windows and precut pieces of this plastic for them.  A good staple gun is essential for this task.  Attach the staples to the outside of the window, not the inside: this will help seal out water and wind better.

Pre-cut fir strips – You can measure and pre-cut fir strips/ 1” x 3” pieces to border the outside edges of the windows overtop of the edges of the plastic.  Either nail ‘em in or screw ‘em in with drywall screws or galvanized screws…1 to 1 ½ inchers should do the trick.  This will further keep the plastic intact from wind and the elements.  Next comes the plywood.  Much of this is going to depend on the size and height of your home.  We’re addressing standard sized windows and sliding glass doors here.  No doubt that some of you have some big picture windows that will take more planning and use more material, so with them you’ll have to make adjustments.

Plywood – Returning to the plywood, for the bottom floors/ground level, I recommend at least ½” pressure treated plywood.  from wind and the elements.  Next comes the plywood.  Much of this is going to depend on the size and height of your home.  We’re addressing standard sized windows and sliding glass doors here.  Some of you Readers no doubt have some big picture windows that will take more planning and use more material, so with them you’ll have to make adjustments.

For the bottom floors/ground level, I recommend at least ½” pressure treated plywood.  You’ll have to make braces or brackets to hold them.  Either do this with pieces of 2” x 4” boards, or invest in some “L” angle irons with screw holes to help support that bottom edge.  Measure the window, and cut the plywood to overlap at least 6” to 1’ on all of the sides.  Sink them in with galvanized deck screws through predrilled holes in the corners and sides.  You want hexagon (hex) heads on them to secure in place.  All of this will take some planning on your part.  It’s best to mount them on the outside, overlapping the plastic and the fir strip borders.

The reason for this is it allows for some “give” between the plywood and the newly plastic covered window.  It also is better on the outside, as it is easier to smash through plywood affixed to the inside of a window/door opening than to smash through it if it’s attached to the outside of the house.  Draw a diagram of your house and the location of the windows.  The reasons for pre-drilling holes are that you may not have power for a corded or cordless electric drill after an EMP, or such, but you can still use your ratchet set to set in the deck bolts and secure the plywood.  It also cuts down on the work you do post-window loss.

Label the diagram’s windows and doors A, B, C, etc., and then make sure that you spray paint this letter onto the corresponding piece of plywood.  That way you’re all set.  Don’t forget an arrow to show the side that goes upward.  Store your plywood pieces either inside close to the windows they’re cut for, or pool them in a central location, stacked or lean-stacked in alphabetical order for ease of finding your pieces and matching them after the windows go.

It’s simple enough, and can run you some money, but the alternatives are elements, debris, and bugs (six and two-legged) entering through those holes.  An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and this is certainly a prep that holds with that rule.  Set it up now when you have the time.  You can probably find some scrap plywood in good condition that you may be able to either bargain for, or that your local lumber yard will be happy to sell you at a discount as it is not a full sheet.  Use your imagination, plan your work and work your plan.  In all of this protect your windows in this manner, before they break…and avoid those gaping holes after they’re gone.  Happy hammering!

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Get a Year Supply of Firewood for $20!

Click here to view the original post.

Buches_MG-47 (1)ReadyNutrition Readers, one of the things that always amazes me is the way people always wait until autumn sets in to begin cutting and storing up a supply of firewood.  I wanted to tell you guys and gals the way I do things here, and perhaps (quantity and geographic variances aside) you can see my overall intent.  As you well know, I live in Montana where it is usually bitterly cold with snow on the ground for anywhere from 7 to 9 months of the year.  I’m aware this is not the case in most of the U.S., however, there are some good reasons for laying in a firewood supply right now.

Get a permit

Firstly, one of the really good things we have here in Montana is that the U.S. Forestry Service allows residents to pick up a permit (every April) to cut fallen dead and standing dead timber.  The permit runs $20 for four cords, and you can pay $60 and take up to twelve cords.  That’s a heck of a lot of wood, and dirt-cheap!  I’m not sure what it is in other states, however, I am certain that many of them have the same policy.

On this note, I’d love to hear from you and find out what the policy is in your home state: prices and amounts, and such.

The only regulations governing it are you must have a serviceable and up-to-date/inspected fire extinguisher with you if you use a chain saw.  In addition, there are certain times (and the USFS posts it) when the fire danger is high or greater.  In these periods, it is not permitted to run a chainsaw and harvest that dead timber.

This is the best time to prep for next year’s cold weather

But now is a great time for it!  All of the undergrowth has not yet emerged from its winter hibernation, so it is relatively clear to work.  I have much of it that I take where it is not permissible to take a vehicle and load up in the forest itself.  My way around that is to cut my wood, stack it up, and haul it out with a garden cart.  Sears make a pretty sturdy one that holds about 600 lbs, and it’ll run you just under $100 dollars.  It has some thick, tough-treaded wheels that can easily run the trails, and not have too much of a problem going over even fields.

Cord_Wood The reason for the wood gathering is twofold.  Firstly (from a “normal” thought perspective) you’re laying in your supply for next winter.  The early bird gets the worm.  You’ll be able to pick up the best wood for yourself when most others are not even thinking about anything except their weekend trip to the beach.  Secondly (and also very important) from a prepper’s perspective, is the “What If?” reason.

What if that EMP attack comes from North Korea or China?  What if the economy collapses?  What should happen if there is civil war, or a war/invasion here in the U.S.?  Yes, your home will be warm already, but what about cooking?  What about hot water for laundry or personal hygiene.  How about some light when there’s no electricity?  And what about emergency medical care that pertains to sterilizing instruments, boiling bandages, and running a home/field dispensary?

All of these, I hope you realize are good reasons to prepare and plan now, so that when the tough times arrive, it is not so great a hurt to deal with.  You have seen the news reports, and we’re just a step away from either a war or an EMP attack.  As with Aesop’s fable “The Grasshopper and the Ant,” although we in the survival community are hardly grasshoppers, if we’re ants it is best to be wise ants…covering all of the bases before the ball is hit to center field.

Now is the time to set up your wood-fueled “kitchen,” by investing in a good wood stove for heat and for cooking.  The wood stove also cuts down on the light signature at night…much better than a fireplace.  Along with the stove, start investing in cast iron cookware and utensils for cooking that can withstand rougher treatment than your standard dinner fare.

How to estimate how much wood you will need

If you have not done so already, now is a good time to estimate how much wood you will go through in the wintertime, and then estimate how much you would need to have a fire/woodstove burning 24 hours a day.  In the summertime it is significantly less, but take your winter consumption and double it, just to be on the safe side. Typically, a cord of wood is 4 feet wide x 4 feet high x 8 feet long stacked and adds up to 128 cubic feet. As well, the cords may consist of whole logs or split logs. Here is some great information on how to estimate cords of wood from a standing tree.

Invest in a good gas-powered chain saw, like an Echo with at least 5 extra chains, and plenty of rattail files to sharpen them when you need to.  Remember, you don’t want to buy cheap tools. Always look at these as a necessary investment, because they will be a lifesaver in an off grid situation. Also in that equation, you’ll need a good bench vise to help you to sharpen them.  Stock up on oil and fuel for the saws.  Back all of it up with several good axes, and as many bow saws as you can find.  Remember: if you run out of fuel, you’ll have to do it the old-fashioned way.

So take some time to figure out your fuel needs to heat your home with wood and to fulfill the other functions I have just mentioned.  Now is the time to do it, and it can be a good team experience for the whole family.  Make sure you always pack a first aid kit in your excursions and thoroughly familiarize yourself with the operation of all your cutting and safety equipment.  Happy woodcutting!  We encourage your input and thoughts in these matters and hope to hear from you soon!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Why Aspirin Should Be In Every SHTF Medicine Cabinet

Click here to view the original post.

Hey there, ReadyNutrition Readers!  We’re going to sing a little ditty about Aspirin, and it’s many uses.  Why?  Because it is an inexpensive treasure-trove available just about anywhere that can be added to your supplies.  It is safe and effective, and has a heck of a long shelf life if you protect it from moisture and the elements.  A good supply of it is not hard to build up, and you can always FIFO your supply to utilize it as needed. This simple little prep is highly recommended for your preparedness supplies and can be found at the Dollar Store and most drug stores. For those of you who may not know, FIFO means “first in, first out,” in accordance with inventory: use your oldest bottles first, and rotate your newest replacements to the back of the stack.

The origin of aspirin

Willow, Poplar, and Myrtle trees have a component known as salicin in them.  This chemical (a derivative of salicylic acid) has the ability to reduce pain, fever, and relieve small-scale maladies (such as headache and fever).  A German chemist (the Germans have always been great chemists and are world-leaders, FYI, in the field of Herbalism) named Felix Hoffman in 1895 first successfully employed salicylic acid to help his father.  Felix did this at the ripe old age of 29.

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was a synthetic version of this salicylic acid, and that had been discovered by a French chemist in 1853 by the name of Charles von Gerhardt (OK, he was a French citizen, but he was of German descent!).  Not much was done with this synthesized version of the natural acid taken from the trees.

But Hoffman learned about it.  One of the problems with the salicylic acid he gave to his dad was that it upset the elder man’s stomach.  When Hoffman expounded on von Gerhardt’s discovery, however, he found that ASA (yes, aspirin) was a lot less harsh on the stomach, and Hoffman is credited with giving Aspirin its name.  But that company Felix worked for (a dye and pharmaceutical firm) took the young man’s discovery a step further.  They patented it and developed a process for manufacturing it in 1899.

That company was Farbenfabriken vorm. Friedr. Bayer & Co.  Yep, you guessed it: Bayer, as in Bayer Aspirin!

Here is how aspirin can help

In your body are prostaglandins, a twenty-dollar word for substances that work in your body to do all sorts of functions, from regulating your body temperature to helping your blood clot.  Aspirin works by reducing these prostaglandins.  This has the effect of reducing pain and inflammation, and also thins the blood to reduce clotting.  It does this by disabling an enzyme called COX (cyclooxygenase) that turns acids found in your cells into prostaglandins.  Pretty intricate, huh?  The primary effect is to lower inflammation, and thereby pain is lowered.

Regarding the circulation, aspirin also helps fight against coronary artery disease and does it by lowering the amount of platelets that can attach themselves to the arterial walls and preventing clotting.  In the event of a heart attack, the Mayo Clinic advises taking 162 mg of aspirin and chewing it up, enabling it to be broken down and more readily absorbed and transferred by the bloodstream, after calling 911.  It also helps with angina pectoris.

Aspirin has been found useful in the prevention and treatment of breast and colon cancers, osteoporosis, dementia and other forms of Alzheimer’s disease, prostate cancer, and to neutralize viruses.

Looking for a more natural approach?

From an herbal perspective and naturopathic viewpoint, white willow bark is a healthy and natural alternative to synthesized ASA.  White Willow (Salix spp.) is also interchangeable with the American Willow (Salix nigra).  The only ones contraindicated for its use are pregnant or nursing mothers, very young children, or people with allergies to salicylates.  It comes in a liquid or powder in your better health food stores.  Follow the directions on the package, as the manufacturer, hence formulating the correct dosage, knows the exact salicin content.

The standard for powder is 1-2 grams several times a day as needed.  This is not denigrating the manufactured aspirin by any means.  As I wrote earlier, aspirin is a safe and cost-effective supply for you to have in your preps.  In addition, if you stock up on some extra?  Post SHTF, it can be more valuable than gold for barter and trade.

Another thing: if you have a battery that you suspect of being dead (maybe you left your lights on) pop a couple of aspirin into the battery, and wait a few minutes.  The aspirin will react with the nitric acid in the battery and produce a weak charge, enough to start up the engine with.  And if it doesn’t work, you can take two more yourself for any headaches you may suffer while you’re awaiting triple-A and a tow truck.

To summarize, aspirin does many wonderful things.  It is an affordable asset that you can store up in large quantities in your preps and not come anywhere near to hurting your billfold.  It has a high degree of safety, and helps with many different ailments.  Because of all of these things, it will be highly valuable, both for your family and as a bartering commodity when the bottom drops out and our society comes crashing down.  On that happy note, hope I didn’t give you a headache, and you have a great day!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Gardening During Troubled Times: How to Start a Victory Garden

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, we’re going to touch on a subject that bears keeping in mind: the Victory gardens kept by citizens of the United States during World War II.  The reason this subject is good to mention is because now that spring has arrived, you should know about shortages and pitfalls people faced before.  As it is aptly written, there is nothing new under the sun; therefore, the same dilemmas faced by people before will be faced again.  A survival garden may be just the thing your family needs, as it will passively produce food for your future.

Victory-Garden-2Wartime brings real shortages in virtually every area of the economy, especially in the area of foodstuffs.  Rationing becomes the norm rather than the exception, and it is difficult for people to scrape out a bare subsistence.  During WWII, the Victory garden was recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in a pamphlet published in 1943.  The gardens were recommended to have the following vegetables planted:

Spinach, Chard or Kale for greens; Cabbage; Lettuce; Tomatoes; Soy Beans; Snap Beans; Lima Beans; Peas; Asparagus; Carrots; Beets; Turnips; Parsnips; Onions; Strawberries; Raspberries; Radishes; Peppers; Onions; Pole Beans.

That’s quite a list, but it is not comprehensive and many preppers suggest these 25 seeds to start their survival gardens for added nutrition.  The point to be made is that if you are able to grow food, then do it during the warm months.  Potatoes can be grown inside of old tires, and there are plenty of books and resources out there that will tell you how to perform micro gardening.  This is a type of gardening that allows you to maximize the minimal space and arable land that you may have.

The main thing is planning and knowing where to start.  On this site Miss Tess Pennington offers many different resources to pursue concerning gardening and cultivation.  You must find out the available square footage that is on your property and utilize it to the maximum potential to grow.  Make use of every possible growing space and do not neglect window boxes and plants that can be grown on the windowsill.  Do not neglect a deck if you live in a high-rise or an apartment building.  Be creative.  Try to plan for what you believe you will need.

Even if you do not have the acreage to be able to sustain you and your entire family, at the bare minimum you can supplement your food supply.  Let’s not forget that food in the immediacy is not the only consideration.  You want to save your seeds.  Seed-saving will be very important in the times to come, as you want to be assured of crops for future growing seasons.  The Survival Seed Vaults are good investments, especially if you have to pick up and run to another location or want to secure it in a cache.  Along those lines, consider adding the easiest seeds to grow in any of your caches, that way you can have a reliable food source when you need it the most. It’s kind of hard to take everything that is growing with you, and to have these seeds that you can take off with will help assuage the loss of your crops if you must flee.

Your survival garden should also include whatever you can pick up with wild crafting.  Remember that article I wrote last year on the book, “Eat the Weeds,” that details common wild plants and herbs that are edible?  Man forages as well as produces.  Never limit yourself to one activity.  Remember, when you find dandelions or shepherd’s purse…you can transplant them (here are some other edible weeds to consider)!  Bring them back to your survival garden and maintain them!  The only limits on your survival garden are the limits you place on it.

Other excellent resources for you are your county extension office and your local community college.  These institutions are replete with free information, tips, literature, and sometimes even free supplies for things such as gardening, horticulture, and composting.  Take advantage of these resources, as your tax dollars are paying for them.  Make inroads with the people who work there and they can point you toward a plethora of information and materials that you can use for your home.

To summarize, now is the time to get your garden in gear.  Whether you have 20 acres up in the mountains or just a small balcony in a high rise, you can make the most out of your space and resources with the proper planning and desire to grow some foods.  Plan your work and work your plan.  We look forward to hearing any ideas or suggestions you may have for your fellow readers and us.  Have a great day, and happy gardening!

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Trash to Treasure: 6 Everyday Items Will Be Worth Their Weight in Gold in an Emergency

Click here to view the original post.

waterReadyNutrition Readers, we kicked off an article about metal bins and how to segregate different types of metals for future use.  Emphasis was placed on keeping the metals saved in their original forms, so as to be used in the original manner after forges/metal fabricators were down, post SHTF.  In light of this article, I wanted to touch on a few other avenues of recycling for the times following a collapse.  It is very important to improvise and just as important to learn how to “scrounge,” or gather supplies, so to speak.

Some Trash Will Be More Useful in a Long-Term Emergency

1. Plastic bottles and containers will be worth their weight in gold after an ELE/SHTF event.  For water, you can’t beat Gatorade or Powerade bottles in the 32-ounce size, the latter being my favorite for ergonomic reasons.  The bottles are extremely durable, and at a one-quart size, they are readily set up to decontaminate water.  Remember, with bleach it is 8 drops per gallon; therefore, 2 drops in a one-quart bottle.  They take a freeze really well, too.  Make sure you clean them up really well to remove the sugar from their former beverages.

Can you store water in them?  You bet you can.  Also, keep in mind that water weighs 7.6 lbs. per gallon.  That 5-gallon water can weighs just under 40 lbs., and it can be less cumbersome to move it around even in an equal amount if you have that 5 gallons broken down into 20 Gatorade bottles.  Clean up a bunch of ‘em and store them in a cardboard box; they’ll be good for barter as well.

2. Ziploc bags can be scrubbed out and used again and again.  Remember: what you do now is good practice and training for later.  When electricity is gone, you’re going to need to find new and ingenious methods for preserving and storing your food and protecting it from pests.  Many people like to save their condiment packets from fast food restaurants and the grocery store.  This is good to stock up on as well.  If there’s no refrigeration, how long is a 32 (sorry, they’re 30 ounces now) ounce mayonnaise jar going to last in the summer?  But you can take one of those big plastic “barrels” with snap-on lid and fill them up with condiment packets that can be used as one serving.

3. Paper plates and plasticware – It may not seem important, but the small comfort items will help you get through the tough times.  Save your plastic flatware: forks, knives, and spoons.  What harm is it to place them in a cardboard box and forget about them?  You’ll get use out of them.  Paper plates are not so easy to recycle, but it is good to have a good supply of them on hand.  Same with napkins from those restaurants and grocery stores.  Throw them in gallon Ziploc bags and save them up: for napkins, for backup toilet paper, for fire starter, and plenty of other uses.

4. Soda bottles – Two-liter soda bottles are excellent for storing water, as well.  Clean them up really thoroughly to remove all of the sugared soda before putting your water into them.  Plastic grocery bags are worth saving.  If you followed earlier articles that I wrote on how to set up a home “aid station/hospital,” and how to disinfect water, you’ll remember that a portable toilet is priceless for your preps.  The bucket/pail can be lined with these plastic grocery bags, and the waste taken and burned later.  [Remember, this is post- SHTF].

5. Food containers that come from the grocery store for things such as macaroni salad or potato salad are (on many occasions) just as reliable and sturdy as Tupperware.  After you’re done with the contents, scrub and sanitize them.  Even if you don’t need them now, don’t worry, you’ll need them later, either for yourself or to barter with.  The same holds true with plastic and glass food jars.  You’ll have to gauge them according to your needs and what you think will be practicable later on.

6. Newspaper and telephone books are always useful as fire starting material, and also for insulating material (vs. cold, or heat) in many projects.  Glass is worth saving, as well, especially anything by Pyrex or Corning that can be heated to a high temperature.  Use your imagination.

Read more about 50 ways to re-use your trash

While none of us at ReadyNutrition are advocating or advising “dumpster diving” (you have to check with your local laws and codes first before pursuing such activities), you can often find many valuable materials for construction: wire mesh, lumber, plywood, siding, nails, screws, and other hardware.  It is a mindset that needs to be developed.  It is a form of recycling, and you’re saving money and obtaining something useful for your supplies.

Recycling and scrounging are two skills it would behoove you to develop prior to a collapse.  It is part of our legacy as hunter-gatherers to be able to seek things we need in an opportunistic manner.  We welcome any and all comments, and hope you will take the time to share your own experiences and adventures in these matters.  Until next time, happy “hunting,” and may each day help to hone your skills for the times to come!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Post-Collapse Bartering: This Overlooked Item Will Be a High Commodity

Click here to view the original post.

post collapse metalHey there, ReadyNutrition guys and gals!  Hope you’re all seeing a bit of thawing out now that spring is about to arrive.  This article is about some suggestions and reasons to start saving some metal for yourselves.  We welcome any comments and suggestions that you guys and gals have that entail the way you do this.  Some of you probably have your own anvils and a forge all built, ready to craft those broadswords and horseshoes.  This article is just to get those started on the idea who are at the other end of the spectrum.

With a complete societal collapse, the value of a simple thing such as a tin can will increase exponentially.  And why not?  The large steel plants of Pittsburgh and so forth may either be glowing radioactive craters or simply not functioning.  There are many things that we view as trash today and take for granted in our daily lives, but will have inestimable value when the SHTF.  We will outline some of the uses toward the end of the article for the different types of metals.

               JJ’s rule with metals: Save the metal in its original form

Steel food cans can be stripped of their labels, washed out, and allowed to air dry.  Put them in a bin.  Group your metal bins by type of metal.  You can further subdivide this category into form/function of the particular type of metal.  Aluminum beverage cans are another.  Try to get the can “whole,” that is, undented or uncrushed.  Keeping them in their original size and shape lends them more uses.  Aluminum beverage cans can be rinsed out and air dried as well.

How about silverware/flatware?  Imagine all of the good barter value that forks, spoons, and knives will have when they are not able to be obtained anymore.  Metal coat hangers are a keeper…they should have their own bin, all to themselves; and let’s not forget copper.  On this, it is good to save it in its original form.  Why?  You can always modify it later, but it is ready-made, for its original purpose!

Here is a chart you can use for the melting points of your metals:

Melting Points of Various Metals

 

  Melting Points
Metal Fahrenheit (f) Celsius (c)
Aluminum 1218 659
Brass 1700 927
Bronze 1675 913
Cast Iron 2200 1204
Copper 1981 1083
Gold 1945 1063
Lead 327 163
Magnesium 1204 651
Nickel 2646 1452
Silver 1761 951
Steel 2500 1371
Tungsten 6150 3399
Wrought Iron 2700 1482
Zinc 787 419

 

Try and concentrate on metals that are not painted or coated over with enamel or Teflon.  These are best left to some scrap metal dealer, not for you to deal with.  Iron and lead…. old cast iron pots and pans…. lead in the form of old curtain-corner weights, or lead from used batteries.  Make a bin for each metal and set it aside.

Some uses for what we have covered?  Take large, steel coffee cans or large food cans, for example.  You can make an excellent, small camp oven out of these, or fill them with cement and make a boat anchor out of them.  The aluminum beverage cans?  These are the early warning devices you can string up on your property with nylon line.  Punch holes in the bottom to allow for water drainage, and put a dozen pebbles in them.  They’re aluminum; therefore, they won’t rust.

Steel cans can be cleaned out well and be used for fish hooks, or coils of very-sharp, homemade/field-expedient “razor” wire for lining your windowsills with when the SHTF.  They can also be used (depending on the size) for small “cookers,” or even cooking “pots” if that is what remains to you.  You can make broad heads, spear points, or knives out of them.

  Remember:  All of these items can be used for barter, so use your imagination.

The most versatile are the coat hangers.  You can make almost anything out of them: handles and hooks for use on a campfire, skewers to roast fish, and a form of field-expedient wire, or fastener.  They can be unraveled to unclog drains, sinks, or toilets.  Their uses are only limited by the imagination.  They can even be used to hang clothes, hence their name “clothes hangers,” right?  Seriously, they are really great.

The bottom line is that all of these things that appear to not be worth much may appreciate in value.  If you can make a little space, allocate some bins and make a good metal collection.  Whether you’re going to make a new snare to trap game with or a new pot to melt shavings/pieces of soap with, you can find a use for these metals.  Long after the plants stop producing these metals, you may have a supply to work with for your needs for many years to come…after the SHTF.  Have a good one, and happy metal-gathering!

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Mom, Could You Please Pass the Potassium Iodide?

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition guys and gals, by now, hopefully you’re well on your way to finishing up making a batch of JJ’s Ginger Ale; and what could go better with it than a nice serving of Potassium Iodide!  Only kidding.  Potassium Iodide is what you need to stock up on to protect your thyroid from radiation.  I’m sure my Ginger Ale will help it go down a little more smoothly.  We’re going to cover Potassium Iodide in this piece…what it is, and why you should have some in your supplies to prep for when the SHTF.

Why Should Every Family Have Potassium Iodide in Their Supplies

First, let’s cover the why.  Fukushima is still glowing hot, and according to news sources, the control rods have now completely melted into a radioactive “blob” weighing many tons…and gone right through their protective casing into the earth.  The radiation levels are on the rise.  We already know (no thanks to the MSM and their obfuscations mislabeled “reporting”) that radioactive particles are reaching the West Coast and the Pacific is beginning to show signs of contamination.

In addition to the Japanese problem, there are many reactors in the U.S. that are either leaking or beginning to have structural problems.  I just recently did a piece on EMPs and that article came with a map showing the location of the nuclear power plants in the U.S.  Skipping on, we find that Kim Jong-Un of North Korea is threatening the U.S. with a nuclear strike on an almost daily basis, and he has the capability to do it.  Russia and China have not become any friendlier, and Iran is waiting in the wings to develop its own nuclear capabilities with the assistance of all three of the other nations just mentioned.

How Does Potassium Iodide Protect Me?

So, let’s talk about Potassium Iodide.  It is a compound with the chemical formula of KI.  It can be found on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, and it is commercially produced in quantity in the U.S.  It is specifically used in medicine to block excess intake of radiation by the thyroid, hence its value in a nuclear disaster/situation.  In emergency purposes, potassium iodide tablets are given out by emergency responders to prevent radioiodine uptake.  This is a deadly form of radiation poisoning caused primarily with the uptake by the human body of iodine-131, produced with a fission reaction found in a nuclear explosion or a leakage.

Symptoms of Radiation Sickness Include:

  • Bleeding from the nose, mouth, gums, and rectum
  • Bloody stool
  • Bruising
  • Confusion
  • Dehydration
  • Diarrhea
  • Fainting
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Hair loss
  • Inflammation of exposed areas (redness, tenderness, swelling, bleeding)
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Open sores on the skin
  • Skin burns (redness, blistering)
  • Sloughing of skin
  • Ulcers in the esophagus, stomach or intestines
  • Vomiting blood
  • Weakness

Read more about radiation exposure and how to circumvent it here.

You may find it interesting to know that potassium iodide is produced naturally within Kelp, and the iodide content can range from 89 µg/g to 8165 µg/g.  Potassium iodide, incidentally, is what is added to table salt to prevent iodine deficiencies.

The thyroid gland has a natural affinity for iodine.  Iodine deficiency can lead to goiters, which presents with an enlarged, thickened throat/neck area.  Potassium iodide was approved in 1982 by the FDA for use in protecting the thyroid gland from fallout or fission in a nuclear emergency/accident, or in the event of a war.  By saturating the thyroid gland with the potassium iodide, the harmful nuclear fission-produced iodide particles are unable to be absorbed/taken up by the thyroid.  This has to be taken prior to exposure.  The dosage lasts for 24 hours.  Here is the WHO recommendations for dosages of KI:

 

WHO Recommended Dosage for Radiological Emergencies involving radioactive iodine:
Age KI in mg per day
Over 12 years old 130
3 – 12 years old 65
1 – 36 months old 32
Under 1 month old 16

 The pills were given out in 1986 with Chernobyl’s nuclear reactor accident, and the U.S. Navy has been giving KI to its personnel who have operated within the area of Fukushima’s contamination.  As with all things medical, consult with your physician prior to acting upon any of this information, as there are some complications that may arise from overdosing, and also with those who have heart conditions, due to the potassium intake. In this case, there are natural foods you should have on hand that are high in iodine.

 You can obtain it (for now) in some of your health food stores, for about $10 a bottle, ranging from 50 to 100 pills.  I picked up some made by NOW foods, 30 mg per tablet, 60 per bottle…originally $9.99, for $1.00 per bottle at a yard sale.  You just have to shop around; you can find a deal on it.  Bottom line: it’s a good line of defense in your arsenal.  I’ll bet every government employee and their families have a supply for themselves, paid for by our dime, no less.  Stock up on it and set it aside, and let’s hope we’ll never have to use it.  In the meantime, drink a glass of Ginger Ale and keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Additional Information:

How to Survive When a Nuke Is Dropped

Are You Ready: Nuclear Disaster Preparedness

An Urban Guide to Surviving a Nuclear Attack

How can I avoid radiation exposure?

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Urban Survival: When the Cities Fall Apart, These Strategies Will Keep You Alive

Click here to view the original post.

 Collectively speaking, there are many of us who have been preparing for emergencies for a while and have read our fair share of prepper fiction and watched enough apocalyptic thrillers to know that the higher the population density, the more dangerous it is. As well, when resources like food and fuel have to be transported from outside the city limits, then your survivability rate lessens. So what about those who have to live in the city? Should they just stop prepping all together? Would they stand a fighting chance at surviving?

According to the last census, 80.7 percent of the U.S. population lives in urban areas. In fact, many choose to live the higher populated areas because of better paying jobs and better schools located in the city. So the probability of a shtf event happening while you are in the city is likely. As well, because many commuters spend a large majority of their time away from their homes, I recommend having these 20 items on hand to get you back home.

In an interview by Rory from The Daily Coin, he asked me in an interview if it is possible to live out a shtf scenario in an urban setting. The answer is yes, but for a majority of us, we must ask ourselves if we are up to the challenge. Because while I do believe someone could get by in an urban setting, it could prove to be more challenging for the Average Joe.

Urban Survival – Is It Even Possible?

If you are forced to stay in the city after a disaster occurs, all is not lost. I do believe urban survival is possible, but you may need to get creative. Ultimately, being able to survive in an urban setting during a major ordeal depends on multiple factors: specifically, the type of disaster, if basic infrastructure is still up, where you are located, what you have with you and your skill sets. Moreover, I believe that whether you are surviving in an urban setting or a rural one, you need the same things for survival: food, water, shelter, protection (sound familiar?). The difference is you will need to rely more on your skills and ingenuity in finding opportunities to use to your advantage in a post-disaster city. In both scenarios, rural and urban survivors will also have to find a way to carry on for long durations. That is, when your short-term reserves are tapped out, what’s your long-term plan?

Above all, the population density will be your greatest threat and your resources will quickly be depleted. If you are not familiar with Selco’s story from SHTFSchool.com, he survived in an urban setting and tells his story and shares ways that he and others survived on his website. Some of the critical needs he outlines are:

Food – No city can feed it’s people on its own and when the supply trucks stop running, supplies will quickly be depleted. It is wise to have food on hand. I outlined 25 must-have versatile foods for your pantry.

As well, I highly recommend storing a variety of heirloom seeds. These can be to grow sprouts for emergency nutrition and for gardens for long-term food sources. You could also plant edible flowers. Not only will they be lovely to look at, but they will provide sustenance when you need it the most. Alternatively, if you can locate food packing plants or warehouses in your city, that may be a good place to allocate additional food reserves if yours runs out. This article can provide information on foraging for weeds.

Water – Municipal water sources can become tainted and it will be up to you to locate water sources. Water could look crystal clear and still contain very dangerous contaminants. – so avoid this all together and make sure you have some water stored away. Your skills will come in handy here if you are actively practicing how to survive. Here are five different ways to find water when there is none to be had. As well, consider having a map on hand of water sources in close proximity to you.

Fuel – Due to so many who are getting out of dodge and leaving the city, the fuel stores will quickly be depleted. As well, this could be problematic for running your generators. Many preppers prefer to have some alternative fuel on hand, or even biomass briquettes. Make sure you follow the proper safety guidelines for storing fuel, especially those who live in apartments.

Many suggest solar panels as a good power alternative. While I like this idea, I think it can also draw unwanted attention, so further security measures should be put in place to hide the solar panels from view.

Power – The failure of the power grid will prevent things from getting back to normal. When the majority of the population realize things aren’t going to change any time soon, and the above listed items aren’t available, there will be breakdowns to the level of social collapse. Many feel this very reason is why it’s important to be ready to bug out on a moment’s notice. If you are caught in this, it could be very dangerous.

What You Will Be Up Against

While it is entirely possible to survive in the city, you need to know what you will be up against. I realize that I am painting a very bleak picture, but those who stay behind and choose not to bug out are either under prepared, trapped in the city or have enough skills and know-how to make it on very little stored resources. The latter will not be the majority. Therefore, be prepared for roaming gangs, thugs and desperate individuals who have resorted to a more primal version of themselves. They will do what they need to in order for their needs to be met. If they haven’t eaten in days, they will smell your food from miles away, so you need to know how to mask the smells of your food or you could be welcoming unwanted visitors whose primary focus is to take what you have.

Security will be crucial in surviving in an urban setting and having a group you can depend on will make it all the more secure. Many neighbors and friends living in close proximity will band together and help to fortify the homes or find a suitable location in a higher location so you can get a bird’s-eye view of the scenery.  One aspect that the city offers is a plethora of building materials to use for fortifying a home. If you start looking for fortifying plans now, you will have a better idea on what materials you will need. I also cannot stress how important it is to have a means of protecting yourself. If someone kicks in your door, they aren’t only looking for a cup of sugar. Having a firearm and knowing how to use it could make all the difference in the world.

As well, having a keen grasp on communication skills with your group to ensure your perimeter is safe and make sure you will have alerts to possible threats. Communication is key and you should have multiple forms of communication, especially if a family or group member ends up being separated. One of the greatest threats we all face in cities are terrorist attacks. They target highly populated cities with dirty bombs and chemical weapons, and what we saw in Brussels that is can happen in peaceful cities, as well. Today it was Brussels. Where will it be the next time they hit America? Protecting yourself is the only option to ensuring your family has what it needs, including gas masks to gauge against chemical and biological attacks.

Start Finding Ways to Think Outside of the Box:

As I mentioned previously, to survive in a post-disaster urban setting, you will need to get creative in the way you work problems. Nothing should be wasted and everything could be used. Trash lying around can be repurposed and fashioned into something more useful. As well, start reading resources that can help you in your future preparations. The following books have great information on this type of survival.

SAS Urban Survival Handbook

The Prepper’s Blueprint

Where There’s a Will, There’s a Way

The human species has always found way to survive and times aren’t all that different. In order to thrive in an urban environment, you need to be aware of what’s stacked against you: the lack of resources, possible threats, roaming gangs and violence. If you can change your line of thinking, utilize key skill sets and become more fluid with the problem, your odds improve.

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

What Happens to Nuclear Power Plants Following an EMP?

Click here to view the original post.

 ReadyNutrition guys and gals, we have covered some bases on the EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) and how to prepare the home and supplies against it.  One of the major problems with the EMP is not just what will not work regarding unshielded equipment, but what will happen when certain things do not run anymore.  What I’m referring to the real danger of nuclear power plants throughout the United States.  Not only will there be a shortage of power, but there will be a larger problem: radiation.

A large percentage of electricity goes into maintaining and cooling the spent fuel rods in a nuclear power plant installation.  A prime example is a Nuclear Facility that may have one working (running) reactor and two that are shut down with spent fuel rods.  This is not uncommon to find.  Now, follow the reasoning: when the primary power shuts down and the backup is rendered inoperable, how is coolant water to be pumped to cool the spent fuel rods?

We saw what happened with Fukushima, and most of us remember the horror story that almost emerged with Three Mile Island nuclear power facility in Harrisburg, PA.  The reason this is being mentioned here is that these things need to be taken into account with regard to your preparations.  What good is it to make it through the initial nuclear attack when the attack renders your nearest nuclear power facility a ticking time bomb regarding spent fuel rods?

I strongly recommend reading Cresson Kearney’s materials (downloadable for free) on Nuclear War Survival.  You will learn about doses and dosimeters, rads and fallout.  You will receive the plans on how to construct your own Kearney Fallout Meter from household materials.  The series contains a wealth of information that you can burn off…information that may save your life.

Make your own Kearny Fallout Meter

There was an interesting movie entitled Olympus Has Fallen starring Gerald Butler.  The premise revolved around terrorists wishing to turn the tables and utilize all of the US nuclear sites against itself…missiles, reactors, and what not.  This is not far-fetched.  A good thing to research would be the proximity of the nuclear sites to your home.  This photo comes from the International Nuclear Safety Center, and I think it substantiates my concerns.

mapYou can see by the photo that the largest concentration of nuclear power facilities is located in the Northeast and the Great Lakes regions of the United States.  Localize these facilities in your home state and you can then conduct the kind of research you need that will help protect you.  There are some questions you should ask.  What are the containment procedures in case of a power loss?  How much material is being stored in the facility?  What are all your distances of the facility from your home, where you and your family work and go to school, etc.  What routes would you use should the unthinkable actually occur?

You may wish to consider a good fallout meter (also known as a radiological survey meter, or Geiger counter), along with dosimeters and other cumulative radiation monitors.  The Nukalert monitor will actually let out a “chirping” noise when you come into a nuclear-irradiated area.  There are also hazmat suits/NBC suits that you may purchase.  As in all dangers and disasters, there are a certain amount of things that are out of your control; however, there are also many things you can do to prepare for them.  Research and planning is crucial in your preparations, and I highly recommend studying your area for as much information as you can find regarding this important topic.  Have a good day, and keep up the good work!

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Build Your Own Faraday Cage Out of an Ammo Can

Click here to view the original post.

ammocanSo, Readers, let’s put on our tinfoil hats and jump right into some material to cover what you can do about EMP and Solar Storm threats.  There are plenty of sites out there that detail a great deal of information regarding EMP’s and the threats they pose.  One of the major considerations for you to use this article is this will give you some pointers that may save you a few pennies.  There are ways to cut some corners that you may take and even improve.  In such light, all of your comments and tips are welcomed, as this site is a forum of discussion where we all must serve as facilitators of information.

In Part 1 we outlined the Carrington Effect, and here is where we will start.  With an EMP, there are a lot of unknown variables that can affect the scope and duration of the EMP wave.  Many scientists have found it is possible for an EMP wave to last for 15 to 20 minutes within the atmosphere (the ionosphere, to be exact).  This is a major “sticking point” that should concern you: if the wave lasts 15-20 minutes, then when you think it’s over (and it’s not), you may pull your equipment out of your shielding….and have it ruined as such.

I did an article for SHTFplan.com back in April of 2015 and I made this diagram for building your own Faraday cage.  A Faraday cage is nothing more than a closed or openwork metal shielding system that allows the Carrington effect of the EMP to pass along its surface and harmlessly into the earth while shielding electronic equipment within.

IMGAs you can readily see by the diagram, the interior walls of the ammo can are lined with a non-conductive material, such as 1/8” underlayment or cardboard.  I choose the latter in mine, simply because an ammo can is airtight and moisture will not go into it.  Cut your pieces with an Exacto knife and make sure that all the pieces butt up against one another and fit snugly.  What this does is insulate your interior from the conductive surface of the walls of the ammo can.

All of your devices need to have the batteries removed from them.  Wrap the device in newspaper, then a layer of foil, and then another layer of newspaper, and finally a Ziploc bag on the outside.  Nestle all of your equipment snugly in the cage, and when all is in place, insert an inventory sheet…. this is important!  You may (in the resultant confusion) lose the original, and this will ensure you have the contents noted.  When you’re ready to close up the cage, make sure the lid has some newspaper near the top and covers the contents, along with the cardboard.  Close the top, then seal it up with aluminum HVAC tape…run you about $15.00 per roll.  Go all around that outside edge where the lid-edge mates with the can.  Especially cover the hinge and beneath the handle.

When all is said and done, place your cage on a nonconductive surface, such as wood or brick.  Do not set it on carpeting, as the carpet can build up static electricity and hold the effect onto your cage longer than usual.  Follow JJ’s rule # 1: Always have two of everything, and one of the two in a cage at all times.  This may seem hard, as you may have night vision devices for yourself and your spouse.  Guess what?  You need four pairs, then: two for the cage and two for immediate use.  Don’t shortchange yourself!  You know, I saw a construction truck this afternoon while I was on my way back home with a very profound slogan (unattributed) for the guy’s business.  The saying went as such:

“The dissatisfaction you will experience with something of poor quality will far outlast the moment of joy you experience by finding that item at a low price.”

This does not mean that you can’t cut corners…but you have to weigh it with the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of the results you’re trying to obtain.  Other things you can do are to build an entire room with a cage system.  Your conductors for the cage are, in order of effectiveness, as follows: Copper, aluminum, steel/ferrous material.

You can make small cages out of tins for specialty equipment.  You can also use Mylar bags to help shield from the gamma rays.  I use the daylights out of empty snack bags, cut with an Exacto/utility knife and plaited together.  Test them out.  Place your remote control for your TV or your cellphone into a bag, and try them…after experimenting, you will find they are blocked from functioning.

For vehicles you can make a grounding chain in the same manner as with tractor-trailers and their use of a grounding wire to prevent static discharge and lightning strikes.  The wire maintains constant contact with the ground.  Electricity and hence an EMP will go to the frame of the vehicle and then along the wire/chain and into the ground.  Now it’s a pain in the butt to drag around a chain with 1/8” links, so obtain a braided aluminum or steel wire of the type used with a dog run tether-cord.  Ensure periodically that the worn end is reformed to have contact with the ground.

The chain can be attached to the rear axle and then coiled up and left on the ground, preferably bare ground, although concrete and asphalt are not ruled out.  Remember, the important thing is to wait a sufficient amount of time before detaching/removing any of your shielding.  Maybe even a few days, to be on the safe side.

Bottom line: you’re going to lose a certain percentage of your gear and electronic devices.  The only limitation here is the extent that you will allow yourself limited…you can put it all in cages.  Guess what?  The less you expose, the more you will have to use after the SHTF.  There’s a guy named Arthur Bradley that put out a book on defending against EMP’s and solar storms.  There are plenty of websites to place your feet upon the path, including this one and SHTFplan.com.  You can take these steps now and keep your costs low, as all of these materials are easily found and not very expensive.  I look forward to your comments and invite you to share some of your experiences and planning with all of us.  Hang in there, and stay frosty!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Survival Caches: The Ultimate Back-Up Plan

Click here to view the original post.

[Editor’s Note: When you plan on bugging out into the woods, as many preppers plan to do when Plan A and B do not go as planned, you typically walk the area in order to familiarize yourself with the surroundings. But have you planned for an emergency occurring while you are on these long hikes and walks? As Jeremiah Johnson explains, those who live close to these areas should consider adding small emergency caches along the trail in order to prevent the worst outcome possible.]

 ReadyNutrition guys and gals, we’re going to discuss more than just footgear for you for your excursions in the Winter Wonderland, as we already did that.  There are some fundamentals that we previously discussed regarding footgear recommendations.  Let’s delve into some areas that you may have not thought about pertaining to your hikes in the woods.  These areas will help you with emergency actions if and when you need to take them.

As you may have deduced, my favorite author (dealing with the outdoors) is Jack London, and in this instance, the work I wish to cite is the short story, “Love of Life.”  It’s a great read: you’ll become thoroughly frustrated with the main character if you haven’t read it already.  One of the items that the story holds that relates to you is that of the cache.  The main character lived in spite of the fact that his trail-buddy (in this case, the guy was a rat) pillaged the cache prior to his reaching it.  This is a very not-good thing; make sure your trail-buddy is truly a buddy, I highly recommend.

A Centrally Located Cache Is Your Ultimate Back-Up Plan

When you are making your way to your cache that means that your Plan A and Plan B went up in smoke. A common misconception is that a cache always has to be buried.  This holds true in military operations; however, we are focusing here on survival caches that you can fashion to help you in your outdoor adventures.  A survival cache is one that is not buried in the earth, but is protected to maintain its integrity for when you need it the most.  In this regard, your supplies need to be protected from the elements and also shielded from view.

This piece gives you some pointers on how to do this if you’re operating in fairly familiar terrain, or on ground that you periodically cover.  You can set in a few caches for yourself in an area where you “range” in your backpacking and camping excursions.  The cache is just how it sounds: backup supplies for when you need them the most.  One of the things you must take into consideration is theft or appropriation by someone other than yourself.  Do you know of a safe area in the rocks that is not frequented by many campers or hikers?  Are you familiar with safe areas that do not see much foot traffic?

Supplies Are There When You Need Them Most

You can set food and equipment as well as clothing and lifesaving supplies in these small caches that will give you an advantage should you ever become injured and where you are is untenable.  For your range from your base-camp, you will have to decide just how far you will be roaming.  Use a Triangular Model for your base-camp and the supporting caches.  Three (3) caches per base camp should suffice.  Your cache should have these at a minimum:

For other supply ideas for your prepper cache, check this list out.

The caches can be in plastic bins, and waterproofed.  When you set them in, make sure they are both concealed and camouflaged.  The triangular model will suffice. (See Fig. 1)

winter wonderland diagram_0002Your base camp should be central to all of the cache points, and you will have to emplace/set in the caches.  The size of the triangle will vary depending on your needs and capabilities.  For example, how long are you remaining in the area?  A few days?  A week?  Winter camping has its own set of problems and is not for the lighthearted by any means.

Are you just hiking or are you hunting or maybe ice-fishing?  What is your range?  These are all factors you need to figure in at first, prior to taking your trip.  When it comes to emplacing and there is two feet of snow on the ground, one effective method is to take your bins in by toboggan and snowshoe all of them to the points you will use.  I highly recommend following JJ’s rule on these temporary caches:

Rules of 3

If you’re going to be out in the brush for 1 week or more, set in the 3 caches.

Just the one time you may need it and will be worth the effort.  The reason for three: if you have a range that is, for example, five miles, you want to make sure that your cache point is closer to you than the farthest extent of your range.  This means that if your base-camp is in the center of a five-mile radius, then your points (generally speaking) will be closer than a couple of miles, depending on where you’re walking when and if an accident occurs. (Refer to the diagram: see Fig. 3)        

Should you decide to relocate your base-camp, the beauty of this is that you relocate the base in relation to the triangle.  Centrally locate the new base camp in the new triangle, and then just take the farthest cache and re-emplace it into a new position to form one of the three points of the new triangle (See Fig. 2).  Notice in the diagram how cache points # 1 and 3 stay the same?  The method works, ladies and gents, I’m here to tell you.

When you are in uncharted territory (ground you haven’t ever visited: an all-new exploration), you must emplace all three of these as you go along in a new triangle.  Remember, you want to use the triangle to limit your range.  If you venture outside of the range, you should never go more than half of the distance (from your base camp to one of the points) away from one of your cache points.  Take the time: move your base camp, and move the furthest cache point to form a new triangle.  An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.  Hope this helps you in your planning.  Always consult local laws and ordinances to find out if your cache setting is legal and doable.  Have a great day, and remember to plan your work and work your plan!

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Evac Strategy: How To Create a Coordinated Bug Out Plan

Click here to view the original post.

ReadyNutrition guys and gals, this article covers some things you can do to prepare when bugging out is the best option in a collapse/SHTF situation.  Such a concept is quite the conundrum and not what we wish to do.  Truthfully, there comes a time when you have to stand and face whatever it is that is coming against you, with no other options.  The actions you take will be dependent upon the situation you are facing, and no two families (although the threat may be the same) will face a challenge exactly identical in nature.  These are guidelines that you can use to help you organize if flight is the only option.

Establish Your Needs and Wants

Such a flight is best accomplished by a good estimate of what you are going to take with you, and what will need to be sacrificed.  Remember, a certain amount of what you may leave behind can be offset in terms of loss by what you cache or safely store before faced with the choice of rapid departure.  So how much can you transport?  What percentage of your supplies are you prepared to cede in order to escape?  Have you prioritized and organized what you are going to move out?  Have you inventoried your items and protected them? Are you aware of the dangers you may be facing when bugging out?

Repeating that concept aforementioned that your best preparation occurs before an event happens, you can cut down on the time, emotional distress, and overall misery by prepositioning a percentage of what you will take with you and storing it accordingly. Such can be referred to as a cross-loading plan, and it can make the losses you are about to sustain more easy to bear.

This free prepping resource can help you plan for short and long-term disasters and is also a best-selling prepper manual.

As it varies per family, this is the key concept here: you must determine (estimate) the percentage, broken down by specific items and their quantities of what you will take.

Efficient Bugging Out Requires Planning and Organizing 

1. Containers are a must! Durable plastic bins are the way to go, here.  Every family uses different types according to their needs.  Those gray bins with lids of varying sizes available in Wal-Mart or Target are fine, as long as you follow a few pointers:

*Most of these have predrilled “holes” in the handles that (even with the lid on) will enable water to enter if they are not blocked off if the water rises to the height of the bin.

*These bins do not come with gaskets to seal the outer edge of the lid where it meets the body of the bin

*You’re limited as to the weight you can stack (usually no more than 2-3 bins in height)

*Cold weather can crack them if they’re exposed to the temperatures and then struck or bumped with force

The higher the quality the higher the price; however, especially for your top 10-15% of your supplies, the extra price is worth it.  For the gray bins, I have found success with the holes by using JB Weld, a binary compound that forms when you mix the contents of two separate tubes of epoxy that cures into a strong “weld” of plastic.  You can find it in almost any hardware store or grocery store.  Regarding the contents, pick up some 3 mil contractor trash bags at the hardware store to pack your items within, and cinch the opening closed with the drawstring, then cover it over with duct tape.

Place an extra bag in the bin: if you should need to get into the bag quickly for whatever reason, it may be that you cannot reclose it as it was before.  The outer edges of the lid can be duct-taped and sealed to prevent water from entering.

Each bin should have a code letter or number and two corresponding inventory sheets: one inside of the bin and one on your person (a sheaf of master lists/copies).  In this manner you don’t have to scramble to obtain something if you need it.  When these bins are stored, they should be placed in an area of the house that you can back up a vehicle and load up from easily.  A garage or a secure shed are ideas. These are the items you want in the containers:

  • Water Purification Equipment (w/ extra filters)
  • Clothing for the anticipated environment
  • Shelter for the anticipated environment
  • Fire starter (reliable)
  • Food rations (freeze-dried goods, homemade MREs, etc. As well, keep these nutritional needs in mind) and game processing tools
  • Personal Medical Kits
  • Communications (HAM) and energy creation equipment (small solar charger packs, etc.)
  • Defensive equipment (lightweight and the ability to break down to hide in the pack)

2. Practice makes perfect. Equally important, you need to get the family involved and perform drills…as a family…and also as individuals, simulating if only one or two family members are at home.  Time yourselves for how long it takes to load up the vehicles, being specific for each one.  You should figure what bins are going with what vehicle.  Also, you want to further “triage” this by making sure your absolutely most critical supplies can be quickly offloaded from that vehicle in case an event renders it inoperable in the midst of your flight.

“Sensitive” items must be placed in the vehicle in a manner that they can be accessed immediately.  Weapons, ammunition, first-aid/medical kits, radiological survey meters (Geiger counters), water purification devices, “quick” meals (beef jerky, dried fruit, etc.,) and so forth are sensitive.  Other items may include (but are not limited to) radio and communications equipment, night vision devices, batteries and battery chargers, a small portable generator, etc.  The key here is to know what you have and where it is at all times in order to enable you to operate effectively without headaches.

3. Planning is key. Planning is one of the 5 P’s of Preparedness. You will also need a plan of travel and a destination.  Remember the military acronym “PACE,” standing for Primary, Alternate, Contingency, and Emergency.  This applies to plans and routes.  What if Main Street is blocked by fallen power lines?  What if Elm Avenue is sitting under three feet of water?  You need alternate routes with which to depart, and your family must know them. As well, you need a Plan B for bugging out if all highways and roads are blocked? Do you have bicycles, 4 wheelers or motorcycles or will you be leaving on foot?

4. You must know where you are going. A rallying point is a predetermined location agreed upon to meet for a group if they are separating in either an involuntary situation that arises suddenly or in an instance where the separation is preplanned.  Communications (either by shortwave/ham radio, or Motorola) can facilitate ease of transition to and from these points.  All vehicles should have maps, kept in waterproof cases and readily available to the driver and passenger riding “shotgun” during the movement.

All of these items mentioned require a lot of planning and coordination beforehand, until they’re rehearsed and remembered.  When they “feel” smooth and can be done almost nonchalantly, then you’re at peak performance.  Remember, preserve yourself and your family members first, as you are irreplaceable.  Things come and things go in life.  You can always replace them.  Hopefully this will help you to minimize your losses if you have to flee, and give you the opportunity to preserve some of it – the most essential stuff – and keep it with you when you depart.  Take care of one another, first and foremost in all things, work your plan, and trust in it…and each other.  JJ out.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Take the Frustration Out of Chopping Firewood With This Quick Tip

Click here to view the original post.

firewoodNobody ever said chopping firewood is easy. If anything, that’s what makes it so satisfying. It takes skill, precision, and endurance to build up enough firewood to last all winter, and being able to accomplish that is rewarding to say the least. Still, it’s a task that should never be more difficult than it needs to be. Any tip or trick you can find is fair game.

One of the simplest things you can do is to find a way to keep the log together as you chop it. Otherwise, every successful chop you make will mean having to bend down to pick up the pieces and adjust the log. It will also help you steady those uneven logs that simply refuse to remain standing on their own.

Probably the most popular way to do this, involves nothing more than one or two car tires.

Alternatively, a chain and a rubber bungee cord can also help you keep the log together.

In that guy’s case, it probably also helped that he had a really high quality wood splitting axe. Nonetheless, both of these methods are pretty useful for making your firewood chopping session a little shorter, and a lot less tedious.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Whole Thing is About To Come Unhinged: 6 Ways To Prepare For the Next Collapse

Click here to view the original post.

collapse1Since the last great recession of 2008, economic forecasters and preppers alike have warned of the bottom dropping out of the economy. The proverbial doom prediction of “it’s not if, but when” was used for years as a call to action to get ready for a much larger economic disaster. Well folks, it seems that history is repeating itself. This week, George Soros cautioned the public of an impending economic crisis.

Speaking at an economic forum in Sri Lanka’s capital, Colombo, he told an audience that China is struggling to find a new growth model and its currency devaluation is transferring problems to the rest of the world, according to media. He added that a return to rising interest rates was proving difficult for the developing world.

The current environment reminded him of the “crisis we had in 2008,”The Sunday Times in Sri Lanka reported on Thursday morning. “China has a major adjustment problem,” he added, according to Bloomberg. “I would say it amounts to a crisis.”

The Reality is Stark and the Consequences are Clear

For years, Mac Slavo of SHTFPlan fervently warned his readers to stock up on physical assets and to prepare. His weekly economic posts proved of economic strife, but many believed he was all hype. It seems the day is finally here and we are looking at the possibility of this crisis being more unforgiving than its predecessor.

Mac states, “All you have to do is look around. The signs are everywhere. There is an industrial recession in China, lackluster holiday sales prove there is a consumer recession in the United States, real estate is stalled and is re-collapsing and stock markets around the world are set to buckle. If you’ve yet to prepare, the time is now because the whole thing is about to come unhinged.

What is about to occur is mirroring what happened in 2008. In fact, given the many national and world events that has plagued us in the past, it seems that this looming crisis on the horizon is the perfect storm for disaster.

Mac goes on to warn us. What to expect is to expect the unexpected because uncertainty is the name of the game. We don’t know how far markets will crash, what will happen with the U.S. dollar or what will happen with geopolitical tensions; and our way of life could change literally overnight. In the last 15 years, we’ve seen what systemic breakdown does in countries like Greece, Cyprus, Venezuela and Argentina.

The lessons learned are clear – you better have supplies on hand. In Venezuela, for example, they couldn’t even get toilet paper or condoms. In Greece, people were lining up in droves to get expired food that grocery stores were throwing away, and perhaps just as significantly, access to lifesaving medicine was lost when Greek credit markets were locked up.

The reality is stark and the consequences are clear – there will be panic, confusion and violence. Are you ready for that?

If You’ve Yet to Prepare, the Time is Now

Unlike the recession of 2008, this economic beast will not be held off. There will be extensive amounts of wealth lost leading to drastic cutbacks by consumers. Moreover, you can expect massive  job loss. In 2008 and 2009, the U.S. labor market lost 8.4 million jobs, or 6.1% of all payroll employment. This was the most dramatic employment contraction (by far) of any recession since the Great Depression (Source). As well, you can anticipate food prices to increase even more than they have over the last few years. In fact, price for food has drastically risen since the last recession; and according to this chart, prices are set to steadily increase with this next crisis.

food-inflation-since-2010As Slavo points out, now is the time to invest in your future so that you can limit your exposure to this potential game changer.

  1. Get prepared. At the very least, buy food, products, and supplies in bulk to help you prepare for price inflation. If you have the means to do so, invest in 30-60 days worth of supplies so that you have everything you need. Having these on hand will help you if times become more difficult. You can use this free online series to begin creating a personal step-by-step preparedness plan for your family; or, buy the best-selling book, The Prepper’s Blueprint to use as a reference in your preparations. As well, if you can manage, get out of debt, organize your finances and find ways to free up some of your income for an emergency fund to help you create a personal safety net.
  2. Preserve wealth. Choose hard assets (dry goods, precious metals, land, livestock, skills, etc.) for long-term investments so they will hold their intrinsic value over time. Holding these types of investments will insulate you from inflation and other economic issues. Further, tying your money up in assets will help you avoid the inflating prices of food sources in the future, thus furthering your cause of self-reliant living.
  3. Invest in food. One thing analysts and financial pundits agree on is that, in general, commodities will continue to rise. When others are buying foods at inflated prices, you will be consuming your investment when it was purchased at a lower price. Using a combination of shelf stable foods, you can create a well-rounded food supply to depend on when an emergency arises. Further, these foods last a lifetime and would make sound investments for future planning. Ideally, you want to store shelf-stable foods that your family normally consumes, as well as find foods that are multi-dynamic and serve many purposes. Dry goods like rice, wheat, beans, salt, honey, and dry milk will provide you with an investment that will grow in value as prices rise, and also offer you peace of mind in case the economy further degrades. This  food storage calculator can show you how much food should you need to store. As well, read Emergency Items: What Will Disappear First for more ideas.
  4. Learn how to grow your own food. In a homestead environment, a person wants the land to work for them as much as possible. Invest in fruit trees, seeds, and garden supplies. If you really want these peak foods, find a way to grow them yourself. Further, if you live in a rural area, consider investing in trees and bushes that will lure wild game. The trees and bushes can provide you with added sustenance and help you stock meat in your freezer. Here is a how-to guide for creating a garden quickly.
  5. Raise your own food. Rather than paying hard-earned money at the store for eggs, poultry and dairy—raise them yourself. Chickens are very easy to care for and can provide you with meat and eggs throughout the year. Additionally, you can find substitutions for these peak foods with a little research and ingenuity. For example, rabbits would be a suitable protein replacement and can even be raised in more urban areas. Similar to chickens, they don’t require much care and with some effort can be fed from the homestead’s garden or you can grow fodder. They are also great breeders and will provide you with ample amounts of meat. These are the 10 best meat rabbit breeds. As well, for the modest price of purchasing a fishing license, you can stock your freezer with fresh-caught fish.
  6. It all adds up. Again, do what you can to pay off debts ahead of time and work to restructure your outgoing funds to lower your expenses as much as possible. Debt only enslaves you further, and finding ways to detach from the system will break those shackles. As well, look into finding additional income streams. The more income you can set aside, the better off you will be. That way, if your main income dries up, you have a fall back income and won’t have to go into default.

 We Have a Choice

This economic crisis is projected to hit much harder than the 2008 recession and will last longer. The truth of the matter is that we stand at the brink of a precipice and the choice is yours to make: you can ignore the tell-tale signs or get ready and brace yourselves for it. It’s time to get ready because it’s about to get real.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The New Year: Train on the Old, and in with the New

Click here to view the original post.

out with the oldReadyNutrition Readers, I wish to thank you for your comments, feedback, and insight you shared with me and the rest of us in my first year of writing with Tess Pennington and ReadyNutrition.com.  One thing you can be sure of: on behalf of Miss Tess and all of us, I reaffirm what I wrote recently, and that is you can depend on us – as a source of information exchange, new instruction, a forum for discussion, and a window into what we all need to keep preparing and stocking up.

And I am committed to you, Guys and Gals, to continue to help Miss Tess and this wonderful blog to do my part with timely information and instruction with your interests always in my mind and heart.  We all instruct one another; all learn from one another.  I have gleaned much personally from my dialogues and interactions with all of you.  I thank you for a wonderful first year of writing for you, and I am honored with the responses and contacts you have gifted me with.  You’re the heart and soul of what it means to be dedicated, self-sufficient, and resourceful with your interest and feedback.  JJ is a “very happy camper” to serve such a wonderful readership and ReadyNutrition.com.

Now that the “old” year is coming to an end, we will need to take the lessons learned from this past year and (remember: refresh on study continually!) and keep them close to mind and heart.  Such is necessary as a base and foundation for things we cover next year.  This year, in a short and summarized review, we covered such things as Bug-out/Go bags and ways to stock and employ them.  We covered a tremendous amount on Biological Warfare (a three-part series back in the late Spring/Early summer).  We went into a few pieces of equipment, reviewed some books, and gave some instruction on things such as the most likely waterborne diseasesrainwater catchment, water purification, setting up a home hospital/recovery room in event of pandemic.

We studied many different diseases and ailments and the naturopathic holistic support to aid a person in their healing, as well as covering preventative measures.  We did a series on Wilderness Survival techniques and Wilderness First-Aid.  In short, many articles covering a gamut of subjects with references and information based on training and practical experience.  I reiterate, all of the subjects I have written articles to you, I have had formal training and experience with.

I ask you to save your articles in hard-copy for your reference in the times to come: for continuous review, and also as a backup in case we ever face a long-term or indefinite power outage, stemming from man-made or natural sources. If you can’t print them off all at once, do a little at a time.  I’m certain most of you do save to hard copy, and this makes me smile: you have info that you can use, in your hands.  Read them all frequently and continually, always remembering that (as my First Sergeant used to say in the 82nd Airborne Division): “Repetition always promotes a good follow-through and success.”   He was right.

Also bring to mind what “Top” told all of us all the time (more reinforcement in itself), as I have written to you before, of which he was even more right:

            “How you train in peace is how you fight in war.”

Much of what I have tried to impart to you is that you always hold a “readiness stance,” that is, the “footing” to step off as soon as a situation throws itself into gear.  The military experience I bring to you is important, regardless of whether you have served, because we are all Americans and called upon to become citizen-soldiers when the true need arises, in whatever gifts and capacities we can serve one another.

Today’s soccer mom may be tomorrow’s key to a community’s survival: home canning and food preservation, to teach to the younger preservers, maybe serving a small, isolated town with a hundred souls.  Today’s soccer dad may be a builder by trade, but tomorrow he will be the engineer for a group laying out perimeter security projects of building and construction, building storage sheds, barns, etc., for that same community.

Today’s family member may be tomorrow’s family leader, called on to take responsibility and accountability for all of their kin, eldest to youngest.  Today you are our Readership, and (it breaks my heart to ever have to say this to you, my Countrymen), and tomorrow you may be called upon: A Citizen-Soldier, to fight a battle of survival for our country.

Review all of the techniques and articles from Miss Tess, Joshua Krause, guest-contributors such as Ruby Banks.  Review and study the things I have written to you.  It is important to reinforce the knowledge in your mind, and if you can put some of these in practicum with training?  All the better.

We’re going to go into the New Year with some goals and plans:  JJ will continue with these different subjects, and you can use many of the past year’s instruction as a basis for our ongoing studies in the coming year.  I will also interject some current events and tie them in with whatever subject I’m covering in the article.  I’m going to submit more photos and diagrams to cover many of these articles in order to help you with the instruction.  In short, the Staff and Writers of ReadyNutrition are going to be there for you in the coming year, just as in this year.

Take a few days before the New Year to reflect upon all you guys and gals have accomplished and learned.  Review these things, and go into the New Year with a fresh mind to follow after those two things you need with all of it: resolve and patience.  Outline goals you wish to accomplish.  Send in comments with requests for special subjects you wish us to cover together for you.  BTW, “Shadow,” we’ll be getting into trees and their gifts for use in survival, as you requested…haven’t forgotten you!

It has been a challenging year, but it has been great for me because of all of you.  I thank you for your support and comments and feel charged up to meet the tasks for next year with all of you.  I wish you all the blessings of the season, and a New Year with success, health, happiness, and all that your hearts wish for.  May God bless and protect you and your families, and Happy New Year.  JJ will drink a toast to all of you!  Take Care…of one another!

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

When You Lose Power this Winter, Here’s What You’ll Need

Click here to view the original post.

winterHey there, ReadyNutrition Readers!  Hope your winter season is kicking off smoothly and productively!  Here in Montana, I’ve been “battening down the hatches,” and dealing with all kinds of kooky weather and problems that are normal for this time of year, but can be very daunting, nonetheless.  I wanted to share with you how we’ve been dealing with these problems in the Johnson cabin, and some things we’ve learned may benefit you guys and gals as well.

Firstly, we’ve been having a tremendous amount of windstorms, and less than two weeks ago, a fifty-foot pine came down and missed the house, while grazing the rain gutter and taking out one of my downspouts.  Not much that can be done there.  When that tree falls, there’s nothing that’s going to stop it.  That being said, the time to remove trees is (of course) long past.  The past two weeks we have been losing power for one to two days at a time.

Heat

The wood stove (wood burner, if you prefer) is the answer to keeping the abode heated when the temperature falls.  This is crucial to keep your pipes from freezing.  The problem being when you heat the place up too much (you should see mine…it’s only about 3’x2’x2’ but can heat the place up to 80-90 degrees Fahrenheit in nothing flat).  Too much heat, and your food in your refrigerator is going to go bad faster.

I have learned in this case to just put one or two logs in to start, and then feed it with one log at a time.  This will enable you to keep the temperature about 70 degrees and not throw so much heat on the refrigerator.  For lighting, the best thing you can shake a stick at is the tea light.  You can pick up inexpensive tea-light lanterns, and position them throughout the house.  Get the ones that have a little hinged door, and a base that’s about 1” thick.  Such will keep anything it rests on from heating up.  One of these in each room, and you’ll be good to go.  The good news is the tea light candle will burn for about 3-4 hours.

You can pick up 50 of them in Wal-Mart (unscented) for about $2.75 a bag.  Put a fresh candle in each one of your lanterns, and preposition them in your rooms judiciously.  When the lights go out, it’ll make it a lot easier for you.  I also found a really nice deal on a flashlight.  It’s made by Coast, and has about 126 lumens (not a big light), but it has a nice wide beam and can be adjusted for a spotlight. This flashlight is very similar and comes with a two-way clip that works well on a baseball cap visor.  The best part is that it runs on just one (1) AA battery.  Runs you about $20 and will fit right in your pocket, as it’s about 4” in length.

Food

Now with food: after a couple of days, you’re either going to need to hook up your fridge to a generator.  The other option is to seal up your most durable food that can take a freeze in plastic bags and place them outside in plastic bins.  You’ll have to gauge according to your geographic location.  You can use your frozen foods in the freezer to help keep your unfrozen foods cold for about another additional 24 hours.  Here in Montana, it gets cold enough that everything will freeze in general.  This works well with foods that are already cooked, and leftovers. As well, have these shelf stable foods on standby to have in your survival pantry for these types of emergencies.

Remember, with a wood stove, you can heat up your stuff in foil on a baking sheet on the top of the stove.  These actions can be taken after 48 hours, if you keep the refrigerator door closed as much as possible.  Now, keep in mind: you must wrap the food in plastic and put it in bins, especially if you have either wolves or bears in your locale.  These winter scavengers (black bear…as the grizzlies are “snoozing”) are opportunistic by nature, and will come for a ready meal that is not “camouflaged” from giving off aromas.

Water

Water is an issue that needs to be dealt with before the power cuts off.  I highly recommend purchasing at least two 5-gallon water jugs for each member of the family. Yes, that’s a lot of water, but each person needs about a gallon per day.  My family uses the Water Bricks for emergencies just like these.  Stock it up before the power cuts off.  A lot of people say that you can’t use snow, but that’s malarkey: put the snow in a large pot (5 gallon) and place it on top of the wood stove.  You’ll need that anyway to keep the wood stove’s heat from drying out all of the heat in the house, as the vapors from the steam act as a humidifier.  Plus, you’ll always have hot water available, another bonus.

I also highly recommend a “porta-potty” type sitting toilet, a chair-type with a bucket.  You can line that bucket with 5-gallon plastic bags, and with the use of baking soda on each visit, you can use a bag for 5 to 7 days per person.  It’ll save you water, big time, and in a long-term outage (such as forever, with an EMP), you can burn the waste or dispose of it in a pit outside.  This of course if you don’t live in Happyville, USA with ten thousand neighbors per square mile.  If you do, and it’s grid down, then the rules “change,” so to speak.

So, stay warm, and follow some of these tips to help you with your power outages.  You can turn it into a training exercise and have a few laughs along the way as you refine your skills.  It is good training for a disaster and for the days to come in the future, should the SHTF.  Have a great day, and keep your powder dry!  JJ out.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Six Must-Have Blades for Off-Grid Living

Click here to view the original post.

multitool
When it comes to survival, there is nothing more important than a dependable knife. This tool, in my humble opinion, is indispensable. It will cut down branches for a survival shelter, used to cut down branches to make a fire, make traps or skin animals. It can also be used for cooking and defense, if need be. Because of the many uses this survival tool has, I highly recommend having a knife in your bug out bag, your vehicle and anywhere you feel you could be if the SHTF and you aren’t at home. Because so much emphasis is being placed on a knife, you want to ensure that it is of good quality. Many have learned that not all knives are the same and understanding this before investing in one will help you make the most of your investment.

I carry a knife with me everywhere I go. If I’m not carrying my multitool, I’m carrying my ESEE. That said, be careful about where you walk into with your everyday carry blade. Once, I went into a museum and had forgotten to take BOTH of these knives out of my bag and the security guards kept scanning my purse and looked suspicious at me. I grew more and more impatient and started asking them what the hold-up was. When asked if I was carrying any weapons, I emphatically denied it because I thought they were removed. Turns out, I had both of them in a secret compartment in my bag. Luckily, they allowed me to go through, but the point is, there are some knife-free zones such as airports, government buildings and some museums, etc., that do not allow knives – so make sure you don’t have them on you when you are near these locations.

Tier of Blades

If you are anything like me, knives are badass. I love them all and am an avid collector. I have bought different types of knives for family members in the hopes that they will also see how awesome knives are. There are so many to choose from and there are times I have to refrain myself from going overboard.

knivesThat said, I want to emphasize that in a survival situation, having any type of blade on you will be good and perhaps, lifesaving, but there are some that will serve you better than others. These seven tools vary in accordance to their uses and practicality, but have been found to be essentials in a grid down TEOTWAWKI environment. They are all useful in both urban and bush survival, as well as essential to carry in your bug out bags and even your vehicle. The following are blades you should consider for your preparedness endeavors. Starting with the most basic everyday carry to the tools used for daily living and moving on to tools used for outdoor or primitive survival.

  1. Multitool – This is probably the most used of my knife collection. I purchased a Leatherman Wave and use it every time I am camping outdoors, doing my outdoor chores and even to unscrew a broken windshield wiper while traveling (long story). This has many uses, and the blade itself has remained sharp for many years. It is a bit bulky, so I do not carry it in my pocket.
  2. Pocket Knife – Pocket knives also deserve high marks as an everyday carry. These handy little knives fit easily in a pocket and can be used for almost anything. I personally love having my pocket knife available to cut boxes and to use it while working outdoors. Living on a ranch, I use it almost daily!  In an outdoor situation, carrying a pocket knife, like a good old fashioned Buck knife can be used to cut small branches to make a fire, to cut away clothing in an emergency situation, used when hunting.
  3. Skinning Game Blade – If you are a hunter and want to cleanly remove the hide of a big-game animal, you need a skinning knife. This type of knife is relatively short and has a curved blade to keep the tip from puncturing the hide or spearing the meat. Also, these knives should have a sturdy handle to give you a good grip even in wet conditions. The SwingBlaze is a favorite amongst many hunters. Personally, I have a Ka-Bar Game Hook Knife that works really well too. I have used to clean out animals and because of its small size, it’s great when working inside of a cavity.
  4. Hunting Knife – If things go wrong in the outdoors, you want a high quality hunting knife with you. Their usefulness in the field is immeasurable. I hate to break it to all the Rambo die-hard fans out there, but  knives with huge blades really have no practical use for hunters. They make pretty good substitutes for hatchets or machetes but aren’t useful for skinning game or other common hunting tasks – so keep the blade between 4-8 inches. Here is a good article on the considerations of a good survival knife.
  5. Filet Knife – My grandfather was an avid outdoorsman and fisherman and always had a filet knife around. Filet knives like the Rapala Filet Knife are very useful at filleting fish or removing and trimming fat and silver skin from tenderloin.
  6. Axe – Having an axe is paramount in a survival situation and should be one of first investments you make in survival tools. While there are smaller axes that you can take with you while camping or outdoors, you will also want the full size axe at your home to chop wood for fires. Like with all of these knives, you want to ensure that these are high quality. These tools could be a lifesaver if you find yourself in an outdoor emergency situation, so make the necessary investment.

As mentioned, having any blade on you is better than none at all in a survival situation. But I also want to emphasize how important it is to know what your knife is capable of. Can it cut cordage? Could you depend on it to assist you in building a shelter? Is it sharp enough to cut branches? The point is: Know your tools and how to use them. As well, keep in mind that if you plan on using your knife or axe outdoors, you want it very, very sharp. Make sure that you have proper knife sharpening supplies on hand.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Three Preps Your SHTF Stockpile Cannot Do Without

Click here to view the original post.

 In a recent article written by Tess Pennington regarding why we should continue to prepare when nothing seems to have happened.  My philosophy and hers are almost identical.  In the vein of her sound advice, who is to know exactly when something will or will not happen?  And then, if you prepare 99 times out of a hundred, do those 99 times count for anything if you did not prepare for the 1 time that something did happen?

Statistics and probability alone bespeak of the current situation here in the U.S. and in the world.

Michael Snyder posted an excellent piece, 27 nations where the stock markets have already crashed in 2015.  Britain, China, Saudi Arabia, and Canada, surprisingly, to name a few among the group.  The Euro is in deep trouble, as is the European Union, united only in the concept of introducing their own self-destruction with inane (unless you’re a globalist-oligarch) policies of “immigration” for the “refugees” of the Middle East.

The Credit Deferred Swaps, estimated at some 80-100 trillion dollars, actually exceeds the GDP of the planet Earth.  I mentioned it that way to draw significance to it.  The entire planet Earth does not earn the amount of CDS’s that are due.  In addition to this, we know the economies of the whole world are coming apart akin to an unraveling sweater.  The numbers in the U.S. are all “faux,” with actual unemployment being somewhere around 20%.

What is on the horizon?

War is coming in the Middle East between Russia and the United States.  War is coming in Europe (the flashpoint being Ukraine) between Russia and the United States.  The world situation is rapidly deteriorating, with flashpoints in the South China Sea, with the two Koreas, and an undefined, worldwide battlefield pitting Muslim extremists against anyone not a Muslim extremist.

The Three B’s

Understanding all of this, what we need now are basics.  When all else fails, return to your basics and your base.  Regroup is the term we used in the Service.  What is your base, prepper/survivalist family?  Your base is the Three B’s:  Bullets, Beans, and Band-Aids, in that order.  Let us go into them once again.

Bullets:

The category “bullets” is all-inclusive of weaponry, meaning the firearms themselves.  It also includes reloading equipment, and anything necessary to enable you to effectively employ the weapon technically and tactically.  There is a saying by Thomas Jefferson that I will mention.  I’m sure he will not mind, as he modified the words of the prophet Isaiah.  TJ said:

               “He who beats his rifles into plowshares will plow for he who does not.”

Sage wisdom, and completely applicable.  You must defend yourself, your family, and your property, or you will lose all three.  Let me give you some rules…rules you should not bend at all…regarding such.  It may help.

  1. Firearms take precedence over food; if you have a firearm, you can hunt for food.
  2. Never barter ammunition, as it will come back at you. The sole exception is blood family members.
  3. Minimum 1,000 pieces of “Pez” per “Pez-dispenser,” if you catch my inference. Anything less (unless it is either specialty or rare), and you are shorting yourself.
  4. You must be able to reload for every “Pez-dispenser” at your disposal; never trade or relinquish reloading equipment. Here is a great ammunition loader to consider. Make sure the loader is compatible with your firearm.
  5. You need it all: muzzle-loaders, boxer, berdan…the whole kit for reloading. Berdan is tough, but it is worth it in the end.
  6. Stagger your Pez-dispensers in terms of size/caliber…you need to be able to fire whatever ammo you can find
  7. Be an expert with whatever you have. All the supplies in the world won’t do you a bit of good if you can’t employ them.
  8. Shut up around others. Keep your amounts of candy and toys to yourself.  Today’s buddy is tomorrow’s burglar.
  9. Whatever you fire, your spouse should also fire…this for handguns/pistols, and rifles. You want to be able to exchange magazines/speed loaders/ammo.
  10. The golden rule: Never give up your weapon…ever, to anyone.

[Editor’s Note: Do not be solely dependent on a firearm for protection. As much as I value my firearm, I know that it can be taken out of my hands and used against me. Learning of other forms of personal protection such as hand-to-hand combat, krav maga, martial arts and other forms to self-defense for last resort measures will only make you more capable of protecting yourself, your loved ones and your preps.]

Beans:

Important, but secondary to a weapons, always is food.  Here is the proof.  You have a rifle and I have a hamburger.  Give it time.  You’ll have a hamburger and a rifle soon.  It is neither good or bad.  It just is.  I know, it doesn’t fall in line with “The Waltons” or “Bonanza,” but it is reality.

You can be the good, giving, guy; however, you better be able to beat the bad guy.

You need to set limits and goals for yourself for food for you and your family.  Now is the time.  Knowing how to layer your food sources in order to avoid malnutrition will keep your family thriving, Canned goods, freeze dried foods, vitamins, supplements, water supplies, water purification devices.  This preparedness calculator can save valuable time in helping you plan how much food your family needs. As well, consider these 25 food items.  All of these things, it would behoove you to reevaluate now while you have some time remaining.  One year’s food supply per person should be the absolute minimum you stock up.

Make allowances for seasonal and temperature changes.  Make allowances for hunting and foraging.  He who does not hunt and forage is forced to eat from his stores. If you feel compelled to have some items to donate to the needy, make sure you do so inconspicuously.

Band-Aids:

These are your medical supplies.  First-aid kits and supplies should be comprehensive and be able to deal with a wide range of injuries.  A thermonuclear device is not just dangerous due to radiation.  There are thermal burns, and the damage caused to structures by blast overpressure.  You better have a good supply of Potassium Iodine pills.  It might also behoove you to know there are naturopathic foods such as Chlorella and Spirulina that can rid your body of radiation.  Get ahold of some silver sulfadiazine cream for burns, as well as Aloe Vera gel for the same.

You can never have enough bandages, gauze, antibiotics, suturing kits, or IV bags.  Now is the window for you to stock up on as much as you can.  As well, consider creating trauma packs to have on standby in case a dire emergency occurs. You must also have any kind of supportive or life-saving medicine or medical equipment for your family members with special needs!  When the mushroom clouds sprout, it is too late to lay in supplies for the diabetic in your family.  You need (once again) to not just gather the supplies, but know how to use them and to administer them.  You also better have some good reference materials with plenty of photos and diagrams, if you’ve never done needle pericardiocentisis or run a chest tube (tube thoracostomy) on your own.

We have covered these areas to exhort you to return to basics, and build outward.  The time is short, and Yours Truly believes that there will be a war, a World War very soon.  Prepare now while you have the time and you’re not beset by a host of problems and “behind the power curve,” so to speak.  Keep those 3-B’s in mind, and “game” the possible scenarios day by day in your mind.  Fight the good fight!  JJ out.

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

When The Meds Run Out, These are The Natural Alternatives That Could Save Your Life

Click here to view the original post.

herbsOne of the perks of Ready Nutrition is to read books on prepping and natural living and share which ones I like with all of you. Like many of you, I have a natural curiosity about natural medicine and practiced using essential oils and herbs to make my own salves and teas. I am by no means a master herbalist but love learning about the subject. I envy author Cat Ellis’s herbal background and believe it will serve her well during a time when there is no doctor. I was so excited when she decided to do a book on the subject and she was kind enough to let me interview her about her book, the Prepper’s Natural Medicine: Life-Saving Herbs, Essential Oils and Natural Remedies for When There is No Doctor.

1. Tell us a little bit about your book, Prepper’s Natural Medicine. 

51ieolyMzzLPrepper’s Natural Medicine is the book I wish I had when I first started learning about herbal medicine. It is written for the total beginner, with no assumptions of prior experience with herbs. However, I have a few tips and tricks that even experienced herbalists would find interesting.This book covers all of the basic skills necessary to make herbal medicine, the therapeutic properties of 50 herbs that will grow almost anywhere in the United States, plus provides formulas for how to create your own medicine. Instructions are provided in an easy to read, conversational style, much as I would speak if the reader were taking one of my classes in person. While this book would be of use to any budding herbalist, it specifically addresses concerns that preppers have, especially long term disasters where the option of getting professional medical care is off the table. For example, how would you treat a snake or spider bite? What about anaphylaxis? Hypothermia?There’s a trend to sanitize herbal medicine with claims that “herbs work gently”. And to a point that’s true. Chamomile is a gentle herb that helps with stress and winding down at the end of the day. On the other hand, some herbs are potent analgesics, antispasmodics, and antimicrobials. Some herbs can help stop bleeding both internally and externally. Others help with seizures.This book is primarily a medicine-making book using herbs for one’s primary source of medicine. It is not a gardening, foraging, or a plant ID book. If your survival plan is to stay mobile, this may not be for you. I do have thoughts for a future book to address those needs, though. If you are stocking up on food, water, ammo, silver, and other supplies, then this is the herbal book for you.

In your book, Prepper’s Natural Medicine, you emphasize the importance of having herbs as part of your preparedness plan. What would you recommend as a starting point for beginners?

I would start off with easy to grow herbs, such as comfrey and peppermint- just try getting either of those two not to grow, and herbs that do dual duty as culinary and medicinal herbs, such as cayenne, garlic, ginger, thyme, and sage. These are familiar to most people, which makes learning how to make herbal medicines less intimidating.

In the book, you mentioned that ingesting essential oils has its place. When is that?

Very rarely, and almost never. There are oils which have GRAS status, which means, “General Recognized As Safe” by the FDA as a food additive. The most common use of this is as a flavoring, whether that be in food or in cosmetics, such as lip balm or lip stick. What this normally means is a drop or two of, say, lemon essential oil in a batch of lemon squares. It is diluted across the entire recipe, and most people don’t sit down to eat the entire batch in one sitting.

However, from a therapeutic standpoint, essential oils are best inhaled or applied topically in some type of carrier, like a salve or lotion, as many are irritating to the skin to apply directly. Regular ingestion of essential oils over time leads to complications, like liver damage, and really misses the mark on how essential oil work best.

That being said, a drop of clove oil applied to a painful tooth, or peppermint oil in an enteric coated capsule for intestinal infections and cramping, or a drop of cinnamon oil added to herbal cough drops or an herbal sore throat spray, are good examples of when ingestion has its place. And, of course, in that batch of lemon squares.

My favorite chapter in the book is the herbal first aid kit. What herbs would you consider the most important and why?

It was tough to narrow it down to just the 50 herbs in the book! But, if I had to pick just 10, my choices would be:

  1. Peppermint: This one herb does so many things. Peppermint can settle the stomach, relieve congestion, soothe away a headache, help cool a person’s temperature, it has a pleasant taste, and kids readily take it.
  2. Comfrey: Two of this herb’s folknames are “knitbone” and “bruisewort”. Comfrey helps to knit tissues back together. This goes in my burn care salve, is excellent in a poultice for a sprained ankle, helps the skin to heal quickly and with minimal (if any) scarring. It works so well, that it should not be used on deep wounds, healing the upper tissue layers and trapping bacteria inside. Short term use only as a tea, though. But could be very useful for someone healing from a serious sprain or broken limb.
  3. Thyme: This is your respiratory system’s best friend. Use in teas, syrups, and most importantly, in herbal steams for any respiratory infection, either bacterial or viral. Add to bath water when you feel sick, to benefit from the steam and sooth the entire body, or use thyme’s antimicrobial properties in herbal cleaning products. Blends well with lavender for the same purposes. Thyme can be taken as a tea or syrup for sore throats and general respiratory relief.
  4. Yarrow: Easy to find growing wild, yarrow is known for its ability to stop bleeding. It is taken both internally and applied externally for this purpose. It can also help reduce fever through sweating, and is an anti-inflammatory, making it a wonderful flu herb, chasing away the aches and pains and fever associated with the flu.
  5. White willow: This tree’s bark contains a chemical called salicin. Salicin is metabolized into salicylic acid, which is the origin of aspirin. The active ingredient in aspirin is acetylsalicylic acid, a synthesized version of salicylic acid. White willow is much less irritating to the stomach than aspirin, and in my experience, is more effective and lasts longer. If you don’t have a white willow nearby, meadowsweet is a good alternative for your herbal garden.
  6. Cayenne: Cayenne contains capsaicin, which is well known for pain relief by blocking the signaling of pain from the source to the brain. Cayenne is a vasodilator, primarily of the small blood vessels and improves circulation. This is really important for people who are sedentary or diabetic. Cayenne is also anti-inflammatory, and analgesic. It is a primary ingredient in one of my oxymel (herbal vinegar sweetened with honey) recipes, which I use as an herbal decongestant.
  7. Berberine: This is actually a chemical found in various herbs, not an herb itself. Berberine has more uses than can be listed here. It’s top uses are as a local antibiotic, for blood glucose management, to strengthen the gut wall, lowering liver inflammation, and promoting healthy cholesterol and triglycerides levels. A berberine-containing herb can be used for wound powders. Berberine is excellent for throat infections as a spray, though it does have a very bitter taste. It must come in contact with the infected tissue to have an effect, so sweeten it up with honey or glycerin, then thin with water to work in a spray bottle. Some people taking berberine for its blood glucose and metabolic benefits prefer to take theirs encapsulated. Wherever you live in the United States, there is at least one herb that contains berberine that grows in your area naturally. These might include the Amur cork tree (an invasive on the east coast), Oregon grape root (Northwest), chaparral (Southwest), algerita (Texas and southwest), barberry (not a native plant, but can be grown almost anywhere), and goldenseal (endangered, but was native to east coast and midwest).
  8. Echinacea: This herb has been pigeonholed as a cold and flu herb, but it offers so much more. Echinacea is excellent for wound care, and makes a great addition to wound powders. The tincture is slightly warming and numbing, making it perfect in a spray for sore throat spray, or dental infection or wound. Echinacea is an immuno-stimulant, and it can act as a systemic antibiotic at the right dosage. Dosage is usually far more frequent than people expect, all the way up to once every hour. My preference is for Echincea angustafolia root.
  9. Garlic: Everyone needs lots and lots of garlic. This is the posterchild herb for food being medicine. Have your garlic raw, fermented in honey, or cooked, it’s all beneficial. Garlic supports immune function, is antibacterial, antifungal, and is well known for it’s heart health benefits.  If you want to stay healthy, eat a lot of garlic.
  10. Valerian: In about 10% of the population, it can have the opposite effect, but valerian helps almost everyone sleep. Valerian also helps with pain, spasms, coughing, and can be used topically for sore muscles.  Something to be aware of with valerian is that the dose is really dependent upon the individual. A very small dose may be fine for one person, and the next may need three times that amount.
  11. Mullein: This list needs a good expectorant to round out the list, and mullein is one of the best. The soft leaves from the first year plant are excellent for helping break up stuck phlegm. In the second year, the plant sends up a large stalk with yellow flowers. Pick the flowers and infuse them in olive oil for earaches.

What three points of the book do you want readers to walk away with? What tools would you recommend?

First, herbal medicine works, and works very well, even in serious cases. Herbs aren’t just for gently falling asleep after a stressful day. They can help . Second, while there is a lot to learn in order to use herbal medicine safely and effectively, it is fun learning. This process is enjoyable and empowering, and my book gets you started off on the right foot. And thirdly, the time to learn how to use herbal medicine is right now, while things are still relatively good.

In a long-term emergency, what natural medicines do you think will be needed most?

In a long term emergency without access to a doctor, pharmacy, or a hospital, we will still need to have the ability to treat both acute and chronic conditions. Acute injuries and infections are obvious, and require antimicrobials and analgesics. According to the CDC, however, 1 out of every 2 adults in the United States have a chronic illness, and that’s just based on people who actually go to the doctor for a proper diagnosis.While a lot of preppers are concerned with how to treat a bullet wound, and that’s a valid concern, far more people will require a sustainable source of medicine for heart conditions, diabetes, arthritis, mood disorders, and so on.

We will need:

Antimicrobial herbs: wounds, respiratory infections, and intestinal infections. Several I mentioned above, but I would add clove, black walnut hull, and artemesia for parasitical infections. I would also put special attention toward herbal antibiotics in the face of every-increasing antibiotic resistance. We would need both local and systemic herbal antibiotic alternatives to drugs. Herbs that come to mind as local antibiotics would be berberine herbs, garlic, juniper, burdock, and sage. Systemics are a little more scarce, but sida, bidens, and artemesias such as sweet Annie, cover a lot of ground.
Cardiovascular herbs: In addition to the cayenne, garlic, and berberine I mentioned above, as well as the yarrow to stop bleeding, I would also add bilberry, hawthorne, and motherwort.
Analgesics: In addition to the pain-relieving white willow bark, we will need additional pain relievers. Arnica is great for join pain, especially from arthritis, sprains, and repetitive motion injuries. Corydalis, California poppy, and Jamaican dogwood is a combination used for severe pain. Black cohosh and lobelia can be infused into an oil and a salve or lotion made from it for muscle spasms.
Anti-diabetics: Diabetes is one of our most common chronic illnesses in the United States. For type two, goat’s rue is the origin of the active ingredients for metformin. A three month study found berberine as effective as metformin.[1] There is some hope for type one diabetics with Gymnema sylvestre and fenugreek, as both help to regenerate the beta cells in the pancreas to help the body start to make its own insulin again. Gymnema is not available in plant or seed form in the United States, so one would have to stock up on the dried herb, and tincture it for both dosage and longer term storage.

You have a new book coming out. Can you tell us about it?

pandemicMy new book is called Prepping for a Pandemic: Life-Saving Supplies, Skills, and Plans for Surviving an Outbreak, and is available for preorder on Amazon. This book covers a whole range of issues related to pandemics, and is in direct response to emails I received from readers of my blog and my live internet radio show audience.We have had this unique opportunity to observe and learn from the Ebola crisis in West Africa. We have been witness to individuals attack clinics, what happens when medical facilities reach surge capacity, curfews and quarantines, martial law leaving people without food, had the specter of bio-terrorism lingering, and how our government and media control what the public know. The goals of individuals, staying healthy and not dying, are not the same as government concerns, which are maintaining order and suppressing panic. And, of course, we had the tragic case of Thomas Eric Duncan who brought Ebola to the United States by plane, and spread the disease to hospital staff. There is so much to learn from all this that helps us make better plans in case of an outbreak. If there is any positive side to the horrific loss of life in this unprecedented Ebola outbreak, it would be how to better prepare for pandemic threats.

In the book, I cover seven illnesses I believe are the most significant threats to trigger the next great pandemic. This includes drug-resistant bacteria, viruses which have a demonstrated history of causing pandemics, the human involvement of both terrorism and human error, and the conventional and herbal treatment approaches, if any, are provided. The book wraps up with a pro-active section on how to establish a Self Imposed Reverse Quarantine (SIRQ), with resources to learn more about pandemic preparedness.

My Thoughts on Prepper’s Natural Medicine: Life-Saving Herbs, Essential Oils and Natural Remedies for When There is No Doctor

Have you ever wondered what you would do if there were no pharmacy? In the early onset of my prepping endeavors this question plagued me. Dying from illness or infection is one of the most likely ways one can die in a long-term emergency and without the knowledge of medicinal herbs and natural medicine, you could be a world of trouble. This very question was the first sentence that Cat wrote in her book and what I loved so much about the book. From the very beginning, she cuts to the chase and gets to the heart of topic. Throughout the book (and something she mentioned in her interview with me) she listed fifty of the most useful herbs, medicinal uses and recipes to practice. She holds nothing back in this book and uses a layered medical approach to assembling a natural medicine kit.

This book teaches you the how’s, what’s and why’s about creating a natural medicinal pantry. Because Cat comes from a prepping background she uses a common sense approach to emphasize the vulnerabilities of solely storing western medicine supplies including how supplies will expire, run out and the ever-looming antibiotic resistance bacteria in the near future.

The book is easy to read, written in a friendly manner and is packed with information. If I could give this book 10 stars, I would. From start to finish, I absolutely loved it! Cat is a wealth of knowledge and I will recommend this book for years to come. As well, Cat has an equally informative website, Herbal Prepper that all of you should check out!

 

[1]    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2410097/

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

CA City Exposed Residents to Toxic Tap Water for Over a Year

Click here to view the original post.

 

tap waterYou probably wouldn’t be surprised to find that most preppers are deeply concerned about their water supply. After all, water is crucial to survival and there plenty of disasters that could disrupt its supply. Much like the power grid, our water delivery infrastructure is fairly fragile, and it’s a good idea to buy filters that can clean unsanitary water sources should our taps ever run dry.

However, a possible disruption of the water supply isn’t the only good reason to buy a filtration device. There’s also the risk of terrorists dumping poisons or biological weapons into the water supply, or there could be an accidental toxic spill. Sometimes pollution can unexpectedly devastate drinking water, while in other cases, the lack of oversight on the part of local governments can lead to contamination.

As you can see, there are lots of ways that your water can become unsafe, and our chaotic world never fails to produce new and unsuspected threats to our standard of living. However, I’m willing to bet that there is one threat you would have never considered. Apparently, there’s also the possibility that your local government will decide to use you as an unwitting guinea pig for an experimental water treatment option that causes cancer.

Sacramento, CA — In 2013 and 2014, the City of Sacramento performed a water treatment experiment at the expense of residents of the city “to save money,” according to a local news investigation.

Area residents were never informed about the toxic chemical contamination of their water that resulted from the experiment. “Cancer, miscarriages, and birth defects” are the consequences of consuming those chemicals, but the extent to which Sacramento residents are likely to experience these symptoms is not yet known.

City officials allowed the experiment to continue for an entire year — despite knowing early on that very process was creating carcinogens. For how long that contamination will be suspended in the water supply is up in the air.

Officials experimented on the water with a new added chemical to aid in removing sediment, silt, and other impurities in the water supply: aluminum chlorohydrate (ACH). It was due to replace the chemical known as ALUM that was regularly used to take the larger particles out of river water to treat it. Both chemicals weigh down the sediment to make it easily removable.

Unfortunately, their wacky experiment completely failed to clean the water, so more chlorine had to be added. When the excessive chlorine lingered with the organic compounds that were still floating in the water, it created a dangerous class of disinfectant byproducts known as DBPs. These substances are still lingering in Sacramento’s water supply at levels that are significantly higher than what the EPA considers to be safe.

City officials were well aware of the toxic substances they unleashed upon on the water supply, but instead of warning the public, they asked the city council for more money to buy truckloads of aluminum chlorohydrate to be delivered every week for a year. Essentially, they wanted to keep the experiment going, which they did between 2013 and 2014.

Instead of doing something sane like testing the chemical under lab conditions first, they decided to skip that step as they dragged the citizens of Sacramento into their incredibly thoughtless experiment, without their knowledge or consent. Could you imagine how this same situation would go down in other public health fields?

What if a doctor wanted to try out a new treatment, and instead of testing it in a lab with volunteer subjects, he went ahead and started injecting his unwitting patients with his treatment? What if he knew all along that it would have adverse side effects? How long do you think it would take for him to be sued into oblivion and thrown in jail?

For now there haven’t been any charges levied against the officials responsible for this harebrained experiment, but there absolutely should be. Until then, let this be lesson to anyone who thinks that America has safe drinking water. Our water supply is not only vulnerable to accidents, malicious intent, and acts of nature. It’s also vulnerable to the idiots who sometimes wind up in charge of a substance you would quickly die without. It’s just one more reason to keep a water filter handy.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

When the Lights Go Out: Tips and Tricks for Priming Off-Grid Light Sources

Click here to view the original post.


As discussed in the previous article, on primitive light sources, early humans used shells and other non-flammable objects found in nature to create the first oil lamps.  Later, hand-made oil lamps were created using clay.

As human civilization progressed, so too did the oil lamp.  The earliest records of mass produced lamps have been found in Egypt, Greece, and Rome and may have been the first mass produced objects in history.  They were easier and safer to use than the open flame of a torch, burned more efficiently, and gave off fewer residues than candles and were refillable.

Not much changed in the design until the 18th century when Aime Argand, a Swiss physicist and chemist, invented and patented the “Argand Lamp”.  Like primitive oil lamps, his lamps contained a vessel in which to hold the lamp oil, but he improved upon the design by creating a cylindrical wick to give a larger surface to the wick and a glass chimney to direct the draft and protect the flame (and the person carrying the lamp!).  During the middle of the 19th century, oil lamps gave way in popularity to kerosene lamps and design improvements continued.  Kerosene lamps stayed popular into the 20th century, especially in places that were late to acquire the new invention of the electric light bulb.

Today, oil and kerosene lamps remain popular with those that live off the grid, collectors, and those that need an emergency back-up light source for when the power goes out.

First, the Fine Print

Before beginning a discussion on oil lamps, it’s important to talk about what you should NOT do.

Do not use any of the following fuels

  • Gasoline, diesel, or aviation fuel
  • Coleman brand fuel
  • White gas
  • Paint thinner or Mineral spirits
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Naphtha
  • Turpentine
  • Benzene

These fuels are extremely dangerous and are either explosive or create deadly fumes when inhaled, or both.  There are other equally dangerous reasons not to use these fuels or any fuel with a flashpoint under 100 degrees Fahrenheit, but for the sake of brevity in this article, I’ll leave it up to you to research the reasons these fuels are no bueno.

Read more about the most popular types of fuel to store for emergencies.

Be very cautious when lowering a lighted wick on the lamp.  Lowering the lighted wick is sometimes used to control or reduce the flame and is a perfectly acceptable method; however, use caution that the wick stays within the grip of the cogs in the burner and doesn’t drop down into the tank.

Oil lamps use flammable fuel and should be handled with care.  If your pet or dog knocks over the tableside electric lamp, you’ll probably end up with a broken light bulb, at worst.  If they accidentally knock over a lighted oil lamp, the glass tank could break spilling fuel out, ignite, and cause a major fire.  Always place oil lamps out of reach of little hands, wagging tails, and either species if they’re rough-housing.

If you plan on leaving your lamp stationary on a flat surface (like a shelf), museum putty works well to hold it in place.  Museum putty can be found here.  This is also a helpful product for areas prone to earthquakes.  Modern oil lamps, when used properly, are very safe.  However, accidents do happen.  If you find yourself with a runaway flame or a fire from a spill, do not use water to extinguish it.  Oil and water don’t mix and you’ll likely spread the flaming oil out further and cause a bigger fire.  Instead, smother the flame by using a fire extinguisher specifically made for flammable liquids, smother it with dirt, or invert a metal bucket over the lamp.

How to Care for the Lamp

If you’re like me and like to pick up bargains at thrift stores and garage sales, you’ll probably need to clean your lamp before use.  A dirty lamp can take years off of its usability and won’t function at its peak performance.  There are two methods that work well with most lamps and lanterns regardless of the material used to construct them:

PH-Down (Sodium Bisulfate) Method
This method will remove rust, crud, (and eventually paint) without removing the patina.

1.  Remove the fuel cap, globe, and burner from the lantern.
2.  Mix 1 cup of PH-Down in Warm Water in a sealable 5 to 10 gallon plastic container.
3.  Submerge the lantern and burner *entirely in the Solution for **1 day.
4.  Remove the lantern, and lightly scour with a Brillo pad, (not SOS,)
5.  Repeat steps 3 and 4 until all the rust or tarnish has been removed.
6.  Once you are finished, give the lantern one final rinse in the solution, then dry with paper towels immediately.  Use a blow dryer on low to dry the inside of the tank.
7.  After the lantern has been cleaned, I recommend polishing it first with Blue Magic ™ Metal Polish to bring out the luster. You can also use #0000 steel wool to buff out the lantern.
8.  To finish the lantern ***paint or lacquer it with your choice of finish.  If using paint, taping off the center air tube on hot blast lanterns, or the chimney on cold blast lanterns, makes for a professional, like factory, looking job.  If the filler spout is brass, you might also tape it off as well.  This also goes for brass wire guides and lift brackets as well.  The burner cone and burner should be left unfinished.  An alternative to painting tin plated lanterns is to wipe them down with a small amount of boiled linseed oil mixed 50:50 with kerosene.

Molasses Method

This method will remove rust, crud, (and eventually paint) without removing the patina.
1.  Remove the fuel cap, globe, and burner from the lantern.
2.  Mix 12 oz. of Grandma’s Molasses in Warm Water in a sealable 5 to 10 gallon plastic container.
3.  Submerge the lantern and burner *entirely in the Solution for **1 day.
4.  Remove the lantern, and lightly scour with a Brillo pad, (not SOS,)
5.  Repeat steps 3 and 4 until all the rust or tarnish has been removed.
6.  Once you are finished, give the lantern one final rinse in the solution, then dry with paper towels immediately.  Use a blow dryer on low to dry the inside of the tank.
7.  After the lantern has been cleaned, I recommend polishing it first with Blue Magic ™ Metal Polish to bring out the luster. You can also use #0000 steel wool to buff out the lantern.
8.  To finish the lantern ***paint or lacquer it with your choice of finish.  If using paint, taping off the center air tube on hot blast lanterns, or the chimney on cold blast lanterns, makes for a professional, like factory, looking job.  If the filler spout is brass, you might also tape it off as well.  This also goes for brass wire guides and lift brackets as well.  The burner cone and burner should be left unfinished.  An alternative to painting tin plated lanterns is to wipe them down with a small amount of boiled linseed oil mixed 50:50 with kerosene.

Source

Always make sure everything is perfectly dry before adding the fuel to your freshly cleaned oil lamp.  Refill the tank to the recommended level for your model, replace or trim the wick as needed, trim the wick, attach the burner assembly to the base (tank), and allow the wick to become saturated with fuel for about five minutes.  If you’re using a new wick, let it become saturated for at least 30 minutes prior to lighting.  Replace the chimney and you’re done!

If you use your oil lamp regularly, you’ll also need to clean the chimney frequently to remove soot build-up.  Extinguish the flame, let the chimney and lamp cool completely, and wash the chimney in warm, sudsy water.  Take care with temperature fluctuations and thin chimney glass.  The chimney can break easily if exposed to temperature extremes.

Proper Feeding

There are several options to choose from when deciding on which fuel is best for you.  Keep in mind that some fuels should not be used indoors, so check to make sure the fuel you choose is intended for indoor use only.  They all have their pros and cons:

Kerosene

  • Before using any kerosene, verify that the flash point of the kerosene you’re using is between 124 and 150 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Dyed kerosene, or any dyed lamp oil for that matter, will eventually clog the wick and inhibit proper functioning.
  • Regular kerosene, like the kind used for heating, while typically less expensive than Ultra-pure lamp oil made specifically for oil lamps (which is also a kerosene product), will also create more soot and for some, gives off an unpleasant odor.
  • Heating kerosene also requires ventilation: a door should be left open to an adjoining area or a window should be left cracked open. Without proper ventilation, one risks carbon monoxide poisoning

Clear Lamp Oil

  • This is hands-down the best oil to use in conventional oil lamps. Conventional oil lamps were designed to burn petroleum-based products, not animal or vegetables fats.
  • Due to the ultra-filtering, this product gives off very little fumes and soot and since it contains no dyes, it is least likely to clog the wick
  • Readily available nationwide in the United States and online
  • Can be scented with essential oils

Olive Oil

  • Not recommended for conventional oil lamps
  • Has the potential to clog the wick
  • Considered more sustainable and “greener” than petroleum-based oils
  • When burned, will give off less particulate than petroleum-based lamp oils but will also produce more odors*If you would like to use plant-based oils, it’s better to use lamps designed specifically for that purpose. They have a “rope” type wick instead of the flat wick used by conventional oil lamps.  Supplies to make your own can be found here

Paraffin Oil

  • Paraffin in the UK is kerosene. Paraffin Oil in the United States is Liquid Candle Wax , and is mislabeled for use in oil lamps and lanterns, when in fact it is only suited for Candle Oil Lamps that use small diameter (under 1/4 inch) round wick. Further, it burns only 1/2 as bright of any of the approved fuels listed above. Paraffin oil has a much higher viscosity and a flash point of 200 degrees or higher, as compared to the flash point of 150 degrees for kerosene. These differences inhibit the necessary capillary action of the wick, and will cause Lamps and Lanterns with 7/8″ or larger wick to burn improperly and erratic. Once a wick is contaminated with paraffin oil, it must be replaced in order for the lantern to burner properly. If you must use paraffin oil, it may be mixed 1:10 to 2:10 (one to two parts paraffin,) to ten parts standard lamp oil or kerosene so that it will burn satisfactorily. Source

Never add fuel to a lit lamp or to one that is still hot.  Extinguish the flame and allow the lamp to cool completely before refilling.  Wipe odd any excess oil from the outside of the lamp that may have accidentally spilled.  Kerosene and lamp oil will evaporate over time, so it’s best to store it in air-tight containers.  If you’re not going to be using your oil lamps anytime soon, it’s better to empty the fuel (cooled!) back into the storage bottle and clean and dry the lamps.

If you’re not sure where to fill the tank on a thrift store find, allow at least one-inch headspace.  This allows room for the fuel and gasses to expand and the lamp warms up.  Keep your lamps at least halfway full and use indoor lamps at room temperature for the most efficient use.  Very cold temperatures (under about 20 degrees Fahrenheit) can cause kerosene and lamp oils to freeze and become dangerously unstable, even when thawed.  Normal room temperatures allow the gasses to expand and be burned along with the kerosene and oil itself, thus producing a more efficient burn.

Whether you choose conventional oil lamps or vegetable oil-burning lamps, they’re a great alternative to relying on electric lighting and can add a wonderful ambiance to your home.  They’re also one of the less conspicuous preps for your home and can be beautifully and innocuously displayed.  Stay tuned!

Ruby is a first generation Californian who grew up in the heart of the Central San Joaquin Valley farming community. She’s been involved in agriculture for 40 years and learned to preserve food, traditional home arts, to hunt and fish, raise livestock and garden from her Ozark native mother.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

This Eco-Friendly Foldable Dome Home Is The Perfect All-Season Camper

Click here to view the original post.

By Amanda Froelich

domehome1Do you value eco-friendly homes that are easy to transport, can endure types kinds of weather, and have much lower costs to maintain than traditionally constructed living spaces? If so, you’re bound to love the DOM (E) all-season home.

DOM (E), a foldable geodesic home, is truly the perfect solution for those who love to venture in life and live comfortably at the same time. The home is designed for both the sweltering desert heat and the frigid cold. Perhaps the best part? It can be transported easily.

According to its creators, the dome home is “easily foldable,” and is made from“environmentally friendly” construction materials. It also costs less to put up and tow around than other living structures.

dome7As No Rules Just Architecture (NRJA) shares, DOM (E)’s shape allows for great ventilation and conducts airflow with help from underground ducts. The top of the geodesic structure can gather rain, and it also obtains solar power from the blazing sun. In addition, the home “connects to the hot water tank, providing toilet facilities and kitchen with warm water.” 

The exterior of the home is constructed with concrete and liquid rubber. It’s well-insulated interior is made with an inviting birch plywood and allows for plenty of space to relax and enjoy life. It even has a fireplace for those who adore snuggling up with hot cocoa and watching flames in the winter.

dome5

dome2dome3 

dome4

This incredibly innovative and accommodating structure is one of the most intriguing eco-homes we’ve seen. It compares to the egg-shaped Ecocapsule Tiny Home that lets you live off-grid anywhere, and that one is on many peoples’ waiting lists.

dome7

What are your thoughts on this unique dome home? Would you consider living in a structure like this long-term? Comment below and share this article.

 

The Natural Blaze team is dedicated to the path of natural health and wellness. But we’re not just believers, we’ve experienced the healing properties of natural remedies first hand. That is why we are so deeply passionate to report natural health news, share wellness tips, and provide proven natural products to you.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition