Fire & Security.

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This post is brought about from a link that was recommended by lonewolf. At that link & saw a popular image of an “all night burning fire”. Now on a winters night an all night fire may seem like a good idea, & there are several ways of accomplishing this, but post shtf an all night fire in my opinion is not a good idea.

Any fire small or large, day or night has the potential to attract unwanted guests, so an all night fire is going to at least double that risk. Post shtf, there will be no safe wilderness areas, people will be on the move, raiders are opportunists & a fire glowing in the night or the smell of smoke will draw them like ants to honey. Because I am a living historian, my historical treks have to be as authentic as possible. Now even today there are risks in camping out, but back in the 18th century those risks were far greater. So I set myself scenarios. Some nights I have camped with no fire, this requires knowledge of how to stay alive in winter with little bedding, because bedding is bulky & adds weight to your pack. It also requires knowledge regarding what foods to carry, because with no fire, you can not cook food, so you need to carry some food that can be eaten without having to cook it.

Other nights I do light a small fire in a fire hole. This is a scrape in the ground to contain the fire surrounded by rocks back & sides. The heat reflects off the rocks back into my shelter, & they help hide the fire from prying eyes. But a small fire does not last long once I have fallen asleep, & at some time in the night the cold will wake me & I will stoke the fire from my supplies under cover behind my bed & from a supply of wood at the end of my shelter. Despite the fact that I am always mindful & therefore alert to sounds in the forest, this waking up from the cold is for me a security measure. It is an opportunity to look & listen to the sounds around me before I make up my mind as to whether or not I should re light or stoke the fire.

If I had placed a large log on the fire to keep it going all night I would probably sleep soundly, certainly I would not be waking frequently because of the chill seeping through my bedding. This would create a security risk, one because as I have already said, the fire would be noticeably visible from a distance at night, & secondly because I would not be so alert. Just something for you to think about next time you are camping out & practicing your skills.

Keith.

Stealth camping in the city

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Most of the people I know of who live in their vans or other vehicles are travelers, they camp, they don’t tend to live in the city, not so for Jay, he lives in a retired U-Haul truck with his cat and a great dane! Yes, I said a great dane, as large as those tend to be, it’s apparently not too big for this conversion.

I like how Jay did his conversion, he kept everything very simple, which kept the weight as well as the cost at a minimum. Though the weight was much less of a factor since he used a commercial moving van as the base, it’s meant to carry a lot more weight than standard build vehicles.

I have always thought that U-Haul moving trucks would make a great camper van, they have plenty of power, they have lots of space, the kind of space you can use to create your own personalized living space. The other nice thing about the U-Haul (commercial style) trucks are they are inconspicuous, you will not draw much attention, especially if it’s painted white, it will blend in with any other commercial vehicle in the city.

Jay does in fact use his van as a delivery vehicle, so he is actually driving it around town, he left a space between the back roll up door and the inner wall/door so that he can place the items he delivers without showing that he is actually living inside his vehicle, and when he’s not using it in town, ie in a safer place, he can leave the roll up door open and use that space as a porch.

I was a bit surprised to find that Jay needs 2 air conditioners to keep the box cool, mainly for his animals, but only during the hottest part of summer, I wonder if he could add any more insulation, especially to the roof area, that might help keep the box from overheating and help keep in the cool air.

Watch and enjoy, let me know if this is something you would like to do, I’d be curious to know how you would implement this.

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Do You Know How to build a stealth shelter?

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One of the best ways to get away and be at one with nature is to build a stealth shelter in the forest. Not only are you putting yourself in the most isolated place possible, but you are also aiming to be invisible there. It’s super exciting, and pretty difficult to do this without a little bit a guidance. So here are a few simple tips to make your wilderness getaway one that only you will know about:

 

Be discreet

The first rule of successful stealth camping is to be as discreet as possible. To disappear in the forest with success, try the following:

  • Get away from the beaten track and as far out of sight from civilization as possible.
  • Keep the noise down.
  • Don’t bring loads of friends!
  • Use your flashlight as little as possible.
  • If you are having a fire, then keep it small and assess the amount of smoke and glow that it creates.
  • Don’t outstay your welcome in the same spot – move to a new spot each night.

 

Choose the right camping spot

Find a clearing in the forest where the floor is clear of vegetation and woodland debris, and if possible choose a place to sleep that is in a dip or behind some rocks. This will put you out of sight from passers-by, and it will also provide shelter if the wind picks up. With this in mind, check the stability of the trees you are sleeping under. You don’t want branches falling onto you in a gale.

Choosing a spot that is close to water is great for an easy access drinking supply, providing you use the right water purification method to make the water safe to drink. However, being too close to water can pose some problems. Bugs can be one issue, but also the potential for flash floods can be a problem too. So make sure you set camp uphill of the water and away from a gully where water levels can rise dangerously fast.

If you have been really discreet in choosing a great spot for stealth camping, then you should struggle to find it again if you walk away from it! So it’s a good idea to leave yourself some markers on the forest floor to get you back to base if necessary.

 

Bring the right gear

Most stealth campers like to keep things simple and go as light as possible with their gear. This makes it nice and easy to get moving quickly to an alternative camping spot. Bring a lightweight backpacking tent that is small and not bright red or orange. Or go without a tent altogether and put up a hammock and tarp for an even more versatile and mobile setup. This way, you won’t need a sleeping pad (if the temperature isn’t too low), just a good 3-season sleeping bag to snuggle up in.

Bringing a mosquito net will be essential in certain locations, so make sure you get some local advice on this before you go. And of course don’t forget a lightweight camping stove to cook up a feast on.

 

How to set up your stealth campsite

Once you have found the perfect spot to disappear in, your main priority is setting up your shelter. If bad weather is looming then it’s essential that you have a place to shelter yourself in and all your stuff. Take your time over staking your guy lines out properly and securely. If the ground is soft then you may need to use trees or rocks to help with this.

If you are in bear country, then ensuring you have your food stored in a bear-resistant food cache is essential. The bag should be over 100 yards from your tent, suspended 10-15 feet off the ground and at least 4 feet from each vertical support. Make sure you put all your cooking utensils and pots in this bag too. Once again, your tent is up then set up this bag as soon as possible.

If you are building a fire, then then you will want to gather some wood. Set your fire a few yards away and upwind of your tent to prevent sparks from flying or smoke polluting your sleeping space when you light it. If possible, it’s a good idea to wait until after dark to light it up so that the smoke will be less easily spotted.

Leave no trace

As with any activity in our wonderful outdoor playground, leaving no trace is an essential part of stealth camping:

  • Take a back packers shovel and make sure you dig a deep hole away from any water sources for your toilet stops.
  • If you have a fire then bury the ashes and cover over any burn marks in the soil.
  • Take all your rubbish with you.
  • Use biodegradable soap or washing up liquid.

 

With all that in mind, you should be well setup to disappear in nature. And if you do it well enough, then stealth camping in the forest will also provide some fantastic opportunities to watch the wildlife of the forest unfold around you as the sun sets and stars come out.

 

 

Joey Holmes is the editor of Cool of the Wild, an online resource for outdoor lovers. She has endless enthusiasm for any excuse to get out there and enjoy being active in the outdoor world, and loves sharing this passion to inspire others to find and follow their own dreams.

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