Live-Off-The-Land with These 7 Summer Survival Foods

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So, summer is here again, guys and gals.  What better time to practice your survival skills?  I have mentioned in articles past that it is a good idea to put away all the high-tech gizmos and get back to the basics of doing things to give your practice realism.  We’re going to do a few articles that broach that mindset, and this one is the first: how to make dinner when the SHTF…some not-so-obvious sources.

I’m not going to cover what has already been covered, such as methods of fishing and the types of fish to catch.  We’re going to utilize a hypothetical framework.  You are “under the gun” in a SHTF/the “Road” environment.  You can’t stand idly by with a fishing pole carved from a branch, seeking dinner in a relaxed, “On Golden Pond” manner.

While many would turn their nose up to these 7 survival food sources, in a dire emergency, where there is no food, you have to take it where you can get it. 

  1. The Crayfish: Let’s do it up, down and dirty, with the “mudbug,” as they’re called in New Orleans, as our first survival food. Yes, he is known by many names, including Crawdad, Crawfish, etc.  The crayfish will provide you with ready protein, and also for bait for night fishing later (this on trot lines).  Prepare them by boiling them.  Throw in some wild garlic or wild onions for a little flavor.  You’ll get some protein in the form of meat from the tail, and a little within the front claws.  You’ll have to round up a bunch to make a good meal.  Best method: find some large rocks in a shallow stream and slowly overturn them little by little.  As the cloudy/silty water clears, he’ll usually be sitting there, waiting.  One hand place behind him, and when the other is to his front, he’ll move back.  You can also use a small dip net if you don’t prefer my method.  The big ones lurk in the deeper pools.  Eat the meat right after you cook it in a pot.  The ones for bait at night keep in a separate container with water in it.
  2. The Frog: yes, those frog legs can be eaten.  They can be boiled and peeled, or roasted over a fire.  Protein is where you find it.
  3. The Grasshopper: Grasshoppers and other edible insects are packed with protein and can be dried out in the sun, or lightly roasted over a fire.
  4. Cattail roots: This survival food can be boiled and are similar in taste to potatoes, with a more starchy taste to them.  They’ll give you some carbs and sugars, to help round out the meal.
  5. Snakes: Yes, high protein in these guys!  Gut them, peel off their skin, and put them on a spit…a coat hanger (metal) works great…and then roast them.  If not, then slice it up and cook it over a fire.  Venomous snakes can be eaten in this manner, as well, but take care when obtaining them.  Decapitate the snake by cutting off the head and about 1” behind it.  Either bury or burn the head…you wouldn’t want to either step on it or sit on it and be bitten by a dead snake’s head!  The snake meat is a little greasy, but hey, you’re eating and he’s not, right?
  6. Trot lines: Set out fishing lines at night, and set them at intervals that enable them to be checked regularly during the night.
  7. Greens: Dandelions (the whole plant), shepherd’s purse, and wild berries you can garner for starters.  Make sure you can positively ID them!  Don’t survive the SHTF initial event only to poison yourself with something you didn’t recognize!  Pine needle tea will give you a supply of Vitamin C…boil it for about 20 minutes in a pot or canteen cup.

We’re going to go more in-depth in future articles but in a SHTF situation, you want to make sure you cook in a fire pit or on a shielded fire.  Don’t allow the flames to give you away either day or night.  This situation here follows a forage-cook-feed-move/hide method.  You’ll have to also take due diligence to clean up your mess so as not to allow others to trail you.  This is another reason the fire-pit method is good.  When it’s time to put out the fire, do so and then bury it.  Practice these skills now so that they will be second nature for you when the time comes that you need them.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Survival Food – 56 Long-Term Survival Foods and Supplies at the Grocery Store

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When disaster strikes, there’s a pretty good chance your local grocery stores are going to be stripped bare in a matter of hours. From panicked people trying to stock up on last minute supplies to those who failed to prepare for even short-term disasters and now find themselves facing the prospect of starving, your local grocery store is going to look like a battleground in a post-apocalyptic movie.

Most grocery stores have a maximum 3 day supply of goods on hand before they run dry. That means even short-term disasters like hurricanes, floods and earthquakes can cause supply chain problems that will quickly wipe out their inventory. Now throw in a long-term disaster that cuts off supplies for months, and you have a real recipe for disaster.

To be prepared to face an emergency situation where food supplies are blocked, you need to invest in a long-term food supply. This supply should be made up of six months’ worth of emergency food that has a long-shelf life, and is something that you already eat.

 

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If You’re Bugging Out, Avoid Fatigue and Have These in Your Supplies

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ReadyNutrition fans, we’re going to talk about something that may seem simple, but it can make a big difference for you when the SHTF and the situation arise that you must bug out and be “on the move” without respite.  By “respite,” I don’t mean a half an hour break, or an hour to nap.  I’m speaking about when there is continuous activity for many hours (8-12) that may run up to a day or even longer.  If such a thing occurs, you’re going to need all the help that you can get.

Your Body Will Be Under a Tremendous Amount of Stress

There are several things that happen under stressful conditions from a physiological perspective.  As explained in earlier articles, your body burns off stores of glycogen (stored in the muscles) until it runs out.  Without replenishment, the body cannibalizes its muscle tissue and “manufactures” its glucose and glycogen requirements.  After “hitting the wall” (your body’s limit, usually reached within an hour or so), you burn off muscle tissue during this cannibalistic phase at a rate of 5 grams of muscle protein for every thirty minutes of prolonged effort.

With epinephrine and norepinephrine going haywire during your “fight or flight” metabolic reactions and with adrenaline pumping levels to the moon, your body will consume a tremendous amount of energy.  When there is any kind of a lag, the body kind of “sags” as it attempts to relax.  Notice how I wrote “attempts” here?  So, how do we solve this one?

Some kind of snack would be beneficial, and keeping in mind what we wrote earlier, you may not have the time for it.  Remember what I wrote for you a few articles back:

You need to ingest protein and carbohydrates within 20-30 minutes of a strenuous workout, and more if the workout is protracted.

That being mentioned, many people turn to things such as power bars to make up for the protein and carbs.  Those are OK, but make sure you have plenty of water when you eat them, or else they’ll pull water right out of your cells in order for your body to digest them…leading to dehydration.

If You’re Bugging Out, Make Sure You Have These Energy Enhancers

Even then, you may still be “lagging” for a while waiting for your body to extract what it needs.  In the meantime, try the caffeine.  Instant coffee can be consumed in an instant, just as the name implies.

While in the service, our MRE’s came with packets of coffee (Taster’s Choice, to be exact).  We “stocked” up on them and kept those packets handy for when we might need them besides just (if we could do it) the proverbial “morning cup of Joe.”  Be careful not to take in too much…but if you’re in a bind and don’t have a lot of time to restore your mental alertness, the caffeine in a helping of instant coffee (either in a happy manufactured packet or one you make up yourself) can do you some good.  I’m going to cite the PDR for Herbal Medicines, page 215, for Coffee for you:

“Quantities corresponding to as much as 500 mg of caffeine daily (5 cups of coffee) spread out over the day are toxicologically harmless for healthy adults accustomed to drinking coffee.”

The PDR goes on to state that dosages of 1,500 mg per day can lead to problems, but unless there are underlying health concerns such as arrhythmias, there is normally no real concern.  Consult with your friendly and happy family physician before using the coffee.

Many people extol the virtues of guarana, and if it works for you, that’s great.  Understand that guarana seeds (from which the energy drinks are made) main constituent to provide that energy is none other than caffeine, as well as theobromine and theophylline, two purines that are also stimulants.  Guarana is listed as a tonic for fatigue in the PDR.  Caffeine overall is also an appetite suppressant.

Keep this in mind: caffeine is also a diuretic, meaning that it works against ADH (anti-diuretic hormone) and increases the frequency of your urinations.  Care must be taken when using it so as to prevent dehydration.  Ensure you take in enough water to prevent it from occurring.

Please let me clarify one final time with all of this: I’m referring to a situation that you’re not going to get any real rest for a long period of time.  All of these items in the form of premade beverages, dried product, or tablets can be purchased in advance and stocked aside for the time you may need to rely on them.  Let’s hope that need never arises and still plan for it nonetheless.  Keep in that good fight, drink some coffee (just because it’s good!) and take care of one another!  JJ out!

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Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

25 Survival Foods You Forgot to Buy

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When it comes to survival foods, there are the staples such as rice and beans and pasta that can be found in almost every bunker. But there’s a whole host of other great survival foods that are often overlooked. If you’re a prepper, then chances are you already have most of the foods on this […]

The post 25 Survival Foods You Forgot to Buy appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

6 Wild Plants You Could Turn Into Flour

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Our ancestors used wild plant-based flours on a daily basis and it was a reliable food source back then.  They were turning wild plants into flour and use it in recipes, eaten alone or added to other grain-based meals. The following 6 wild plants are being used even today to make flour, but few people … Read more…

The post 6 Wild Plants You Could Turn Into Flour was written by Dan Mowinski and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

How to Keep Eating Healthy After The SHTF

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In a SHTF event, when food delivery systems are down and the stores quickly run out of all food supplies, how will you keep eating healthy? Does healthy eating have to include the “grocery store staples?” I think there are ways to eat healthy, or at least avoid super unhealthy food options, even when the […]

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Will You Have Enough Caffeine After SHTF?

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Several months ago, I got a terrible case of the flu. I was running to the bathroom all night, and in the morning I couldn’t even get out of bed. After a few hours, the nausea subsided, but I started to get a headache. It gradually got worse, and worse, and worse, until by lunchtime […]

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What You Need To Know About Meals Ready To Eat (MREs)

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Meals Ready to eat, or simply MREs, are very popular among preppers and survivalists. Although MREs are primary intended for use in the field by the military, they are now being stockpiled by average Americans. Before you fill your pantry with Meals ready to Eat, there are a few things you should know about these … Read more…

The post What You Need To Know About Meals Ready To Eat (MREs) was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

20 Survival Foods That Can Last At Least 20 Years

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When disaster strikes, no one ever knows when things will return to normal again. In some cases, there may be the possibility of things never truly returning to normal. With this being the case, it’s a good idea to stock up on foods that are meant for the long haul. Before we begin, it’s important […]

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Green Coffee Beans for Long Term Storage

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Green coffee beans are best for long-term storage whereas roasted coffee beans have a limited shelf-life — they comparatively won’t retain their fresh flavor for too long. The shelf life of ground coffee is even less – making both roasted coffee beans and ground coffee poor choices for long term storage. For those who are […]

How To Catch Minnows as Bait for Survival Fishing

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These are strange and dangerous times we live in for sure. If you are a survivalist you probably have your things ready to go in case a SHTF scenario occurs. In your survival pack there are some essential things that should be in there and some of them must be some fishing line, a few … Read more…

The post How To Catch Minnows as Bait for Survival Fishing was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

12 Signs Your Survival Food Has Gone Bad

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Survival food can quickly go from the thing keeping you alive to the thing that does you in. No matter how desperate your situation is, you will want to avoid eating spoiled food at all costs. While good survival food is meant to have a long shelf life, there are many things that can destroy […]

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How Pine Pollen Can Be Used as a Super Food

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ReadyNutriton Guys and Gals, this piece is designed to make you aware of the many benefits of pine pollen.  That’s right, it’s a superfood that can be put to many uses, and we’re actually coming up on the time that it can be harvested in the wild.  Raw pine pollen is good for a lot of different things, especially exercise and physical training.  Let’s outline some of the qualities of it and cite some references for your perusal.

Pine Pollen is a Powerhouse of Nutrients

Pine pollen is, technically, the male “sperm” cells of the pine tree, and is analogous to a plant-formulated testosterone.  Don’t smirk, ladies: in this form, it is very beneficial for you as well.  Studies prove that low testosterone levels in both genders (yes, women also have a minute quantity of it in their bodies) cause cholesterol levels (the “bad” form of it) to increase.  Low levels also cause losses of bone and tissue that translate into aging prematurely, and also significant weight gain (fat), sexual problems, and cardiovascular problems.

With men, in particular, low testosterone levels lead to a higher probability of cancer.  Pine pollen can fight all of these with its components of Phyto-androgens, which are the sexual hormones found in human beings but produced in plants.  This is really neat stuff because the pine pollen gives you androstenedione, testosterone, DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone), and androsterone.  Sift through the archives and you’ll find some articles I wrote on DHEA and testosterone that go into detail.

Some of the ailments that raw pine pollen can fight off are high cholesterol, chronic fatigue, and diabetes.    These conditions have been dramatically improved by the regular addition of pine pollen to the diet.  Although these Phyto-androgens are almost identical to the ones produced by the human body, there is still a slight difference, and this is beneficial: the difference enables the body to continue producing its normal levels of the androgens without being affected by the addition of the pine pollen.

It can be taken in the form of powder or tincture, and with either case mixed with a beverage.  The tincture is the more easily-consumed out of the two forms.  Here are a few websites to help you in your quest for further information:

http://www.rawforestfoods.com/questions.html
http://rawfoodhealthwatch.com/pine-pollen/
http://www.righthealth.com/topic/Pine_Pollen…

The pine pollen is also made up of about 35% protein and contains 7 essential amino acids.  To refresh your memory from the articles I have written previously, essential amino acids are those necessary to the body that are not produced within the body, i.e., we must obtain them from food.  Here they are, with the 7 essentials being underlined:

  • Alanine 17mg
  • Arginine 30mg
  • Aspartic acid 33mg
  • Cysteine 3mg
  • Glutamic acid 47mg
  • Glycine 21mg
  • Histidine 6mg
  • Isoleucine 16mg
  • Leucine 25mg
  • Lysine 24mg
  • Phenylalanine 17mg
  • Proline 26mg
  • Serine 16mg
  • Threonine 15mg
  • Tryptophan 4mg
  • Tyrosine 11mg
  • Valine 19mg

The recommended amount to consume is ½ to 1 tsp per day.  Pine pollen is also chock full of vitamins and minerals, as well as acids and a ton of substances that normally we buy in bunches, such as resveratrol and MSM.  These substances are all right there in the pine pollen.  I have seen many places to order it online, and your finer health food stores will (at the bare minimum) be able to order it for you.  As with all things, consult with your physician prior to using any of the information or materials mentioned in this article.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

An Illustrated Guide to Cooking on a Campfire

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An Illustrated Guide to Cooking on a Campfire There is nothing better than the smell of a campfire burning! There are endless uses for a campfire: a source of warmth, a way to dry clothing when camping, and one of the best uses – cooking. Food cooked over the campfire creates a unique flavour and …

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The post An Illustrated Guide to Cooking on a Campfire appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

11 Most Popular Survival Foods

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One of the cornerstones of survival, finding enough food to keep you and your loved ones alive when times get tough, is arguably the most important challenge you will face. In survival situations, though, some foods will make the cut while others are best reserved for softer times (sorry chocolate cake lovers). When it comes […]

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4 Things You Must Eat To Avoid Malnutrition

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Nutrition is a topic that doesn’t get much attention in the prepper community, but it should. Let’s say you’re living through a long-term disaster and every day you’re eating rice, gravy, pasta, sauce, and canned soup. You’ll certainly be getting enough calories, but what about vitamins and minerals? Without a well-rounded diet, you will slowly […]

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Pine Needle Tea

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com   I got the idea about pine needle tea from watching old episodes of Bear Grylls in Man vs. Wild.  He picked out some pine needles, boiled them then drank the tea.  He said pine needles are full of vitamin C.  In a survival situation, if fruits and vegetables are scarce, you’ll need a good source of vitamin C.  I also read it can be a good decongestant.  Spotting a nice looking pine […]

The post Pine Needle Tea appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

10 Requirements for Long-Term Food Storage

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We live in a world where a disaster is bound to hit us sooner or later. Food storage is one of the basics of emergency preparedness and it requires proper planning. No matter how you look at things, food will always become your number one priority during a long-term disaster. Having a well-equipped pantry doesn’t … Read more…

The post 10 Requirements for Long-Term Food Storage was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Growing vegetables in pots – Choosing plants that thrive

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Maintaining a garden can be quite a challenge for the urban prepper. The lack of gardening space and arable land is a problem for most urban dwellers. However, you shouldn’t give up on your dream of having home-grown vegetables. There are always solutions and growing vegetables in pots can be done wherever you live. Having … Read more…

The post Growing vegetables in pots – Choosing plants that thrive was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

How To Prepare an Herb Garden in Winter

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imageWho’s itching to get outside and start gardening? This article has to do with some things you can start preparing in your herbal gardens for the spring…but prepare now.  Yes, now, while the snow and ice and the Yeti are all around… well, probably not (and hopefully not) the Yeti.  But just because that snow and ice are still on the ground does not mean you cannot start taking the steps to give you an advantage and a “step ahead” of the pack come springtime.

Having a successful garden is all about timing. Make sure you prep your starter soil, pots and the area where you plan to grow. If you don’t live in an area where there is heavy snow, begin cleaning and preparing your growing area. Here are some tips to get started.

Planting Conditions

So, what kind of herbs are we talking about here?  Chives, Cilantro, and Parsley, for starters, are perfect herbs for starting in the late winter.  You’re going to start these guys indoors: seeds in general don’t germinate unless the mean temperature is at least 65 degrees Fahrenheit.  In addition, you’re going to have to utilize as much of that sunlit side of your house as possible.  When you throw these guys into pots (containers) and leave them in your windows?  Give them some “setback” from the glass, as the cool air will linger up to about 1 to 1 ½ inches away from the glass.

Sunlight

You’ll need the sunlight, but not the cold up against the glass.  You will have to be more inventive if you have closed off your windows with plastic, as this will stop some of the sunlight from reaching your sills.  Your herbs will need at least 3 to 4 hours of direct sunlight (morning is preferable), and some indirect in the afternoon if it can be provided.

Naturally, if you have your greenhouse, then much of this becomes a moot point as long as allowance for sunlight and temperature are taken into consideration.  You may need to heat the greenhouse, and this can be done in several ways: with electric heat/heat lighting, with manure/peat that generates organic heated “gassing,” or with a small wood stove.  With this last option (as I’ve mentioned in past articles), it is very important to throw a teakettle (a noiseless one!) or a pot of water on the top of the woodstove.  This will allow for some moisture and humidity, and your plants will appreciate this even more than you!


The factors to control are your water, your soil, and your drainage.  An excess or inadequacy of any of these can lead to ruined herbs, whether you’re germinating your own seeds or whether you’re using cuttings.


Potted windowsills or potted greenhouses, take your pick and stick with it.  Another thing you can do is in March, set up low-tunnels, with hoops made of plastic or aluminum and covered with plastic sheeting.  These will enable maximum amounts of sunlight, and keep your cuttings or seedlings close to the ground.

Prepare the Garden Area Before Planting

Make sure you clear out an area for them that is sufficient.  When the weather warms up so that your herbs (the hardier ones) can handle a frost, it’ll be time to transplant them into boxes.  Anything on the ground should not be touching the ground directly, to prevent frost from entering.  You mulched your perennials in the fall, and soon it will be time to start tending to them, such as garlic, for example.

All in all, potting your seedlings and/or cuttings is the way to go, either in the windows or in the greenhouses.  Best thing to do is research your herbs prior to exposing them to the cold, as some herbs like basil cannot handle cold weather and fall over when the cold hits them.  Plan according to the herb, and the zone in which you live, all of which can be determined either online or in your county extension office.  So, start your herbs and planning for the spring…a few are “early risers” (such as the ones mentioned) that you can begin in the wintertime.  Spring will be here before you know it, so get those green thumbs moving!  We’d love to hear those “green thumb” comments about what you do, as they are valued by us and all of the other readers as well.  Thumbs up, and happy winter herb gardening!

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Make Wild Game Jerky

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If you hunt to supplement your protein diet, you have a lot of options when it comes to wild game. Besides making burger and stakes, you should look into other options to diversify your diet. Making wild game jerky is an ideal option for the hunters out there. Wild game jerky is an ideal snack … Read more…

The post How To Make Wild Game Jerky was written by Dan Mowinski and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

The Benefits of Stockpiling Coffee for Long-term Survival

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If you think that coffee is just a luxury, and something that could easily be discarded in the event of a societal collapse… think again. Studies show that everyone from elite athletes, to average working people benefit greatly from drinking coffee. If you depend on a cup of Joe to function now, imagine what it … Read more…

The post The Benefits of Stockpiling Coffee for Long-term Survival was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Using Leftover Fruit Peels in the Kitchen

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The essence of emergency preparedness teaches us to get by with what we have. It doesn’t matter if you’re in the woods or in the kitchen. Being able to improvise with scarce resources is perhaps the most useful skills you could develop. Today we will discuss about the use of leftover fruit peels in the … Read more…

The post Using Leftover Fruit Peels in the Kitchen was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Preserving fish for long-term survival

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Living in a world where supermarkets are out of business is certainly no easy task. In order to survive in such world, you will be forced to hunt or fish for your food. Fishing for long-term sustenance requires for you to know various methods of preserving fish. Of all flesh foods, fish is the most … Read more…

The post Preserving fish for long-term survival was written by David Andrew Brown and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Homesteading Basics: How To Dehydrate Herbs for Long-Term Storage

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dehydrating herbs for storageHerbs are one of the first plants we put in our garden. There is nothing like fresh culinary herbs to intensify the flavors of food. As well, herbs are hardy garden plants that don’t have to be watered as much as vegetables and can serve more than one purpose by being used as natural medicine. For instance, did you know that a sage leaf can be used instead of a band-aid because it has natural healing qualities? Some of these popular culinary herbs are oregano, thymne and sage and can grow year-round in many parts of the country.

To enjoy these herbs year round, many choose to dehydrate them when they are at the peak in freshness and combine them to make their own spices and even homemade tea blends. Can you imagine how much money you could save at the grocery store by implementing this into your pantry?

How To Dehydrate Herbs for Long-Term Storage

Dehydrating herbs and other leafy greens is one of the easiest items to dry for long-term use. All you really need is a constant stream of air. You don’t necessary have to own a dehydrator because herbs can dry naturally from the air, but it does help with even drying.

Here are some steps to get started:

  1.  Prep herbs for drying. Wash and place herbs evenly on a drying rack and ensure that enough space is make for proper air flow.
  2. Set temperature and time according to the directions on your dehydrator.
  3. Ensure that herbs are 95% dehydrated for long-term storage.

Here are some great spice mixes to start adding to your pantry!

Cajun Seasoning

  • 1/3 cup salt
  • 1/4 cup paprika
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon basil
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper

Chili Powder

  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder

French Herb Mix

  • 3 tablespoons marjoram
  • 3 tablespoons dried thyme
  • 3 tablespoons savory
  • 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon sage
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground fennel seed

Chili Powder

  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder

Storing Dehydrated Herbs

Herbs can be dehydrated to store for longer periods, but storage is important for any preserved food, and dehydrated foods are no exception. Store either in heavy duty zippered bags in a metal container, or store in dry, sterile, glass jars. For long term storage, I recommend using Mylar bags.

As I stated previously, before storing, you want to ensure that your food is 95% or more dehydrated because the more moisture your food has the more likely molds and microorganisms can grow. Like all emergency food sources, ensure that you keep your dehydrated food away from natural elements.

“Best Used By” Guidelines for Dehydrated Food 

  • Spices – 1-2 years
  • Vegetables/Fruits – Up to 12 months
  • Meats – Best at 1-2 months, but can be stored for 6 months.

We are all looking for frugal ways to bulk up our preparedness pantries. Using herbs is a great way to do that. Some of our favorite herbs we love to grow in our garden can be utilized to make long-term herbal seasonings to use year round. So, what are you waiting for? It’s time to start dehydrating!

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Eight efficient food crops to grow

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Becoming self-sufficient is one of the many good reasons to want to grow your own vegetables. Nothing beats home grown food and for many people, there’s a great appeal to grow efficient food crops. The food you grow is cheaper, fresher and often better tasting than the one you get from the supermarket. Starting your … Read more…

The post Eight efficient food crops to grow was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

The Prepared Workplace: Lifesaving Supplies You Need Before the Emergency

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prepared workplace[Editor’s Note: On average, we spend over 50 hours a week away from our homes. Chances are, if a sudden disaster occurs at your workplace and you are forced to shelter in place for a given time, many coworkers (including yourself) could be unprepared. Would you have enough food and water to wait an emergency out at work? A disaster plan is only as good as your Plan A, B and C.]

So, ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, have you made a big batch of pemmican for yourselves yet?  If so, then I commend you.  If not, then get on the stick!  The beef stick, that is, because pemmican is one of the foods that is perfect to carry around.  I know, I know, between bug-out bags, micro-tools, thermoses, and the likes of which I have been writing about recently…you need to be an octopus to be able to carry all of it.  It is better to have, as you well know, than not to have something.  Let’s talk about food in this regard.

The Secret to Survival is Prior Planning

Undoubtedly you have laid up a supply for yourselves and your families in your home and have some packed in your “go” bags.  We’ll now touch on a few other areas: in your workplace and on your person. Some preparedness and emergency items for the entire office are:

Talk to your supervisor about the existing emergency plan and find ways of improving it. You could even create a preparedness month where each coworker donates money to get the office prepped!

Ultimately, It’s About You!

If your workplace shrugs off your attempts to get them prepped, that shouldn’t stop you from getting some extra food and provisions for yourself in your workplace (and also carry a little on you at all times). Keep in mind, this is about giving yourself an “edge” and perhaps buying you some time in a sticky situation.

If you have a workplace locker (the best are those that lock), a basket/cubby space, or a shelf for your things, you can stock up a few cans of food and some essentials.  Why?  Because that is what preparation is all about: the “what-if’s” that may arise.  What if you cannot go outside to your vehicle to get your “go” bag?  There could be any number of reasons: severe flooding, rioting, extreme cold weather, among others.  You may have to make do with what you have on your person or in your workplace.

As well, make sure you have some clean athletic socks and walking shoes stored on you. As well, have some extra change on hand in case you need to get items from the vending machines (items like water, nuts, crackers, etc., will run out quickly in an emergency).

Your Personal Workplace Prepper Pantry

Even if you just have a bag that you stash under a table or in a back room, you can throw extra canned goods in there.  Here’s a sample of what to place in your bag or locker (with a locker, remember, you can probably put some more food in there):

  • (4) cans of food (preferably heat-and-eat prepared dinner-ravioli, soups, etc.)
  • (2) 20-ounce or 32-ounce bottle of water
  • (1) Ziploc sandwich bag of a snack (trail mix, pretzels, dried fruit, etc.)
  • (1) Ziploc bag of hard candies
  • (1) small bag of dried meat (jerky, pemmican, beef sticks, etc.)

That will get you started, but you don’t have to stop there. There are many types of disasters that could occur while you are at work. What happens if there is a fire and you need to escape? Or, in a worst case scenario, hazardous material has leaked into the air. Why not have a gas mask on hand? There are many gas masks that are compact and can fit inside your desk.

Remember, these items are for your personal space/storage space in your workplace.  If you have an office and a desk, all the better.  If the desk has any drawers that lock, then it’s optimal.  Remember this rule:

If it’s a time of trouble or scarcity, whatever you need will also be needed by others.

Sesame Street rules aside, you do not need to advertise that you have a stash of extra food in your office drawer or wall locker.  Keep your supplies in a nondescript gym bag or other non-transparent/non-translucent carrier.

Their need is not a justification for your sharing, nor their shortsightedness for your “help” regarding preparations. 

One way to circumvent this is to get coworkers involved in getting the workplace prepared for these types of emergencies and have them create their own personal workplace pantries.

So, we’ve addressed the workplace, and now how about on your person?  Why?  Because it gives you an edge.  I have written articles in the past on the value of cargo pants with cargo pockets.  Here I am, recommending them again.  I carry a small bag of peanut butter-filled pretzels in my cargo pocket, as well as a bag of jerky, and about half a dozen hard candies (I like those Jolly Rancher ones).  There’s a good reason for it.

What if you’re trapped in an elevator?  Or (as mentioned before) something goes wrong, such as a power outage that leaves you trapped for a while.  What then?  It is a proven fact that the intake of simple sugars helps the human body during times of stress or crisis.  In addition, it is a psychological support you’ll give to yourself to help you deal with all of it.  The protein in the jerky and the peanut butter is important; the necessity to replace protein can never be understated.

The hard candies give you some simple sugar to throw into your bloodstream, and keep the mouth from drying out.  As I’ve mentioned in previous articles, if you can’t drink, then do not eat anything.  You will deplete yourself further; you must drink in order to digest your food.  The difficulty this presents is obvious, because if you don’t tote around a water bottle all the time, you’ll have trouble finding water when the need arises.  So, tote it around!  Everybody walks around all the time with coffee cups and soda bottles, so it won’t look out of place for you to tote around a 20-ounce PowerAde bottle with water in it.

These are akin to “tiers” of response levels: 1st is what you have on you, 2nd in your work area/locker, and 3rd in your vehicle.

One more key point: All the stuff not on you becomes a cache point if you can’t reach it, and you can go for the stuff later on.

You may have to forgo getting food out of your locked desk drawer because 10 other people may see it.  Who’s going to think of going into your desk drawer for food unless you make them aware it’s there.  Practice OPSEC, and re-read the article I wrote on the Nosy Neighbors…the ones who will eat your food and maybe you along with it if their needs call for it.  Keep it to yourself.  It’s better to wait until everybody is out of the area, and then obtain your supplies from your locked and unknown (to your “buddies” at work) location.  Ounce of prevention, pound of cure.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

25 Amazing Camping Recipes

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25 Amazing Camping Recipes If you find yourself off the grid, either by choice or by circumstance, you’ll need to cook meals without the usual conveniences found in the home. The easiest solution can be to open a can and heat something over a fire, but that can get old when you have a family …

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5 Recipes to make your own survival protein bars

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Survival protein bars are becoming more and more popular among preppers and survivalist, but you can also find a few of them in any type of survival kit you can think of. These small snacks are ideal for emergency kits because they help you control hunger, they provide proteins and fats, but they also keep … Read more…

The post 5 Recipes to make your own survival protein bars was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

How to Make Pemmican: A Step-By-Step Guide

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dried-beefWe’re going to do an introduction on making pemmican, a survival and backpacking food that can be used all year round as well as prepared anytime.  It is a lot simpler to make than most people realize, and does not take up a whole lot of resources or too much time.  Pemmican can be stored for long periods of time and can give you a ready source of protein when you don’t have the time to cook up a large meal.  Sure, you can buy a whole pallet of it at a time from Costco, but when your supply runs out, how do you replenish it after the SHTF?  Well, this piece gives you the basics of how to do that.

Pemmican is the Original Superfood

Pemmican is similar to jerky, but it isn’t: it’s a little different.  It is actually the original processed meat, “invented” if you will, by the Indian tribes to provide a way to preserve the meat from their wild game.  Now, as I mentioned to you in previous articles, man needs fats in his diet and vitamins as well that are not able to be furbished completely by wild game.  Here is where it becomes tricky: the Indians had to supplement their meat with fish, vegetables, herbs, and fruits both wild-crafted and raised to well-round their diets.  Pemmican well-rounded the Indians diet by adding some fats as well as some vitamins and minerals to the protein.

Pemmican is the result of drying the meat in thin strips, grinding it and pulverizing it into powder, adding liquefied fat and seasonings, and re-drying it to form the finished product.  That’s it!  The Indians had deer, elk, buffalo (bison), and antelope to use.  Most pemmican these days is made of beef and comes in a family-friendly, happy plastic bag with food grade desiccant.  This method I’m going to give to you is bare bones to make your pemmican.  Here it is:

Jeremiah’s Pemmican Recipe

What You Will Need:

  • 4 cups of extra lean meat…this is about a pound/a pound and a half…pick your meat
  • 4 cups of dried fruits, such as raspberries, blueberries, or even raisins
  • 2 cups of fat (after rendering), or about ½ pound of weight
  • Seasonings: I prefer dried onion and garlic powder, salt, pepper, etc.
  • Sweeteners: You can also use some molasses or honey if you wish

The Process:

  1. Slice up your meat in long, thin slices (as thin as possible).  One way to slice it thin is to have regular pieces of meat, and harden it in the freezer.  Don’t freeze it!  You just want the meat to be “sliceable”, but more “solid” than just barely-refrigerated meat or meat at room temperature.  Then you can add your seasonings.  Rub it in with your hands, spreading it evenly over the sliced pieces.

2. Next set that meat on the rack of your oven, and keep the temperature as low as you can go…around 135 to 150 degrees F.  Permit the oven door to be gapped/cracked during the process, as this will cut down on the humidity and water building up from the drying.  Do this for 12-16 hours, until your meat is dried out and akin to a potato chip…brittle, or crisped.

3. Pulverize this meat in any way that you wish (mortar and pestle, hammer, food processor…whatever works).  Pulverize your dried fruits (you may have to dry them even further than when you first get them).  Next comes the liquefied fat to add…first you must liquefy it.  This is called “rendering,” and you can do it in a saucepan or in a crock pot, after you cut up the fat into pieces that will easily dissolve.  Beef tallow is the best…you can pick this up from a butcher shop.  You can use pork lard; however, I don’t recommend it because it doesn’t keep as long or as well as the beef fat.

4. All of your chopped-up beef and fruit can be placed in a large pan…such as a baking or casserole pan for the addition of the fat.  Do not use the fat until it has been liquefied completely, and you’ll have to remove the solid portions of any bits floating in it…use a small sieve/strainer to scoop these pieces out by hand.  For the sweeteners (such as molasses or honey) I like to take about a quarter cup and mix it into the meat prior to the addition of the liquefied fat.

5. Then carefully pour your hot rendered fat all over the meat, allowing the fat to be absorbed by your powdered mixture.  You need to take your time with this step, and then smooth/pat the fat into place with your hands to further enable the even distribution of the fat into the meat.  A good cook uses his or her hands.  A great cook washes their hands before using them to cook!

6. When this congeals and hardens, you can cut it into strips or whatever shapes your heart desires.  I personally like to use a pair of scissors (a pair I only use for food and cooking), and cut them into elongated strips about 1” in width and 6” in length.  The reason I make them this size is that they’re easier to pull out and eat.  So many times, with store-bought pemmican you have to rip it all to pieces just to cram it into your awaiting maw.  “Not I,” said the little red hen!  I want to eat leisurely and not waste effort or energy ripping my food into bite-sized pieces. You can store this best either in plastic or in wax paper (I prefer the latter) and then flatten it out, and throw it into Ziploc bags.  Keep it in a cool place free of light and moisture, and it’ll be good for a long, long time.

So basically, that’s it!  Simple enough, right?  Now you have the information and all you need to do now is employ it!  Just think: there’s still time to make yourself a batch before New Year comes about.  Oh, what a delightful crowd-pleaser it will be to make up some and have everyone eat it all up right in front of your eyes!  Partygoers and piranhas have one difference: both eat everything until they’re filled up, but the piranhas don’t also grab some extra to take home with them!  You make up a batch of jerky and (if they haven’t eaten it all) they’ll take it!  Just make sure to keep some set aside for yourself so that you can enjoy what you made.  Happy New Year to all!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The Winchester ’94: Take Your Hunt to the Next Level

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deer-huntReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, we wrote one not long ago on basics of hunting, and now I’m going to recommend to you an excellent rifle.  The Winchester Model 1894 (called the Winnie ’94) is an outstanding lever-action rifle in 30-30 caliber.  It is compact (technically a carbine, which is a rifle with an 18 – 20-inch barrel), and is, in this author’s opinion the finest brush gun for stalking deer.  The rifle was designed by none other than John M. Browning and (as its name suggests) began to be produced in 1894.  Browning is famous for designing the .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol) model 1911.

hunting-rifleWinchester ceased production of them when the New Haven, CT plant closed down; however, they are still readily available throughout the U.S.  The Winnie ’94 is a very nice weapon, and other firms also make lever-action models in the 30-30 caliber, such as Marlin, Savage, and Sako.  I prefer the Winnie ’94 over all of the rest, and it has (in my experience) only one drawback: as it ejects spent casings from the top, a scope must be side-tapped to be mounted.  Marlins eject from the right side and can be mounted on top with a scope.

The 30-30 round is a pretty powerful round, and is more than enough muscle to put down a large deer.  The bullets come in 150 grains jacketed round-noses, as well as the larger 170 grain jacketed flat tips that have a lot of stopping power, and are sufficient for whitetail and mule deer, as well as elk and antelope.  The 150 grain bullets have a velocity on average of about 2,000 fps (feet per second), and the 170 grain bullets run about 1,875 fps on average…a tad bit slower, as it is a heavier round.

From a ballistics perspective, a high-velocity round is not the answer to all of your challenges.  Flat-tip bullets tend to spread out and increase the diameter of the round upon impact, whereas round-tips are better for deeper penetration.  The shot also has a large bearing on it, as your primary target is either the head or low and just behind the shoulder.

The rifle has a tubular magazine that holds up to eight rounds.  The finger lever (that “loop” on the lever) has a safety that must be squeezed in order to fire, and a pop-in safety is located up by the trigger mechanism that will prevent the hammer from making contact with the primer.  As I mentioned earlier, the rifle is excellent for stalking and walking through brush, as being shorter (a carbine) it is easier to manage in areas with heavy sapling and ground cover, as well as thorns and other niceties that impede travel.

I prefer iron sights, as you are usually going to have a shot within 50 feet if you’re busting brush.  This is not to say it cannot be used in a stand, but it is optimal if you’re walking game trails or negotiating terrain with any kind of underbrush.  The 30-30 cartridge is quoted by Lyman’s reloading manual in the following glowing terms:

 “Probably no other cartridge in North America has put as much venison on the table as the venerable old “thirty-thirty.”

The cartridges can be reloaded simply and at an affordable price.  The Winnie ’94 doesn’t kick excessively and is not prone to jamming or any kind of feeding problems.  Most do not come tapped for a sling, so you may have to mount your swivels or have it done.  You can also pick up a nice elastic-type of cartridge holder that will slide snugly onto the stock for extra rounds as you hunt.  It is a really nice piece and a pleasure to shoot.  Another tip: although there are lighter rounds you can target shoot with, be sure to target shoot with the actual sized rounds you plan on hunting with.  In this manner, you’ll be able to iron out any variables that may come with your switching ammo types.  So, try out that Winchester Mod. ‘94, and I believe you’ll be pleasantly surprised at just how nice it fires and how dependable it is for a hunting rifle.  Keep your powder dry and be safe at all times!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

13 Survival Foods that will outlast you

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Let’s say that disaster hits tomorrow, do you have the basics like food and water covered? Stockpiling food and water shouldn’t be a prepping trend and every sane person should do it. We live in a world where natural and man-made disasters are no longer far-fetched scenarios and people have no excuse for being unprepared. … Read more…

The post 13 Survival Foods that will outlast you was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

How To Open a Can With a Metal Spoon

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This week’s video comes from Full Spectrum Survival. A little over a year ago, I shared a video about how to open a can without a can opener. The trick is to rub the can on some concrete until the lid is loose enough to pop off. But what if you’re out in the wild […]

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How to Eat and Grow Pomegranate – an Amazing Fruit for Food and Medicine

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How to Eat and Grow Pomegranate – an Amazing Fruit for Food and Medicine When it comes to survival foods, you’ll want to grow pomegranate. If you don’t have the space to grow your own, or your not in the ideal pomegranate growing zones 7-10, then you can add this to your list of foods …

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9 Printable Food Storage Cookbooks

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The best thing about the Internet, in my opinion, is all the free information. Unless you’re looking for a particular survival course or plan, most of the info you need can be accessed with just a few clicks. One example of this is all the recipes. Back in the day you had to spend $20-$30 […]

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3 Secret Food Sources for When SHTF

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I’m looking at what’s happening in places like Syria and Venezuela these days and I am shocked at how disaster looks for these people. Buses going into Aleppo to evacuate people amid bombing? Venezuelans having Internet but no food? I don’t care what your prepping philosophy is, you have to admit that these two SHTF … Read more…

The post 3 Secret Food Sources for When SHTF was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

GORP: The Better Bug Out Bag Survival Food

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GORP: The Better Bug Out Bag Survival Food A lot of people carry emergency food in their backpack. It’s a great idea. It’s a good fail safe in case you can’t find or catch something to eat when you’re out in the wilderness. Most people carry some sort of dehydrated food. Some carry energy bars. …

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6 Pioneer Dessert Recipes you should try today

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Being able to procure your own meat, to grow your own vegetables, to organize a pantry with all the essentials and to work with your hands are all activities worth knowing and mastering. But how about your own comfort, how about satisfying your sweet tooth when times are harsh? The following pioneer dessert recipes stood … Read more…

The post 6 Pioneer Dessert Recipes you should try today was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

30 Tips and Facts About Dehydrating and Drying Food

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30 Tips and Facts About Dehydrating and Drying Food Food dehydration and drying has been around for centuries. It is one of the oldest methods of preserving food. Canning and freezing foods retain more nutrition than dehydrated foods, however dehydrated foods are space efficient, and are an excellent way to preserve foods. It is also …

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Dirt Cheap Survival Recipes

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Many preppers conclude the economy in the U.S. will collapse gradually, rather than overnight due to some cataclysmic event. Either way, your ability to find and secure meals for you and your family becomes the difference between life and death for your family. So, how do you prepare to survive in a world where food is scarce, and money is tight?

Following a SHTF event, the only certainty will be unpredictability. Depending on the event, your location, and how long it takes for the country to recover your options for cooking and food storage will change. Practice making a variety of different cheap survival recipes so that no matter what type of situation you find yourself in, you are ready to put a meal together that will satisfy your family. Below are several different ideas for your survival meal arsenal:

Lessons from the homeless:

Chicken livers come in a carton and cost around $1.00. Boil with salt and pepper in either water or chicken broth. The beneficial thing about chicken livers is just a small amount with some whole grain bread, and a cup of milk will stave off hunger for several hours.

Pouches of instant potatoes are relatively inexpensive, typically under $1.00 at the local Walmart. Ramen Noodles are another very inexpensive food; you can buy six to 12 packages for under $2.00. Both are simple to cook as they require only boiling water. For variety, mix the instant potatoes with the ramen noodles to create a high- energy food called “ramen-bombs.”

Pasta is a great food staple to have on hand, and it can be used to create a variety of meals. Cook pasta and drain. Fry several eggs over medium and sprinkle with salt and pepper if you have it. Combine the eggs with the pasta and throw in cooked veggies, cheese, or meat. You can also mix cooked pasta with any salad dressing on hand and add fresh vegetables for a great pasta salad that will fill you up.

DIY Survival Recipes

If you are lucky and are thinking ahead, you will have the time and resources to create dirt cheap survival recipes to have on hand when SHTF. Sometimes, survival is about preparing to think or in this case, cook, outside the box.

You’ve probably made toast in a toaster at some point in your lifetime, but have you ever thought to try grilled bread? Use your barbecue grill or even a campfire with a grate. Grill the bread till it’s golden brown. And if you have cheese on hand, you can melt it between two pieces of bread and make a really tasty grilled cheese sandwich.

If you correctly store cornbread mix, you can make delicious johnnycakes or cornmeal hoe cakes in a skillet of cast iron over a campfire or even on the hot rocks of a fire. Add some syrup or sprinkle with sugar for an extra treat. If you must stay on the go, put leftovers in a zip lock bag so you can carry them with you as a snack on the road.

Native Americans relocated their camp several times a year as they followed the animal herds. They carried Pimikan, typically made from dried powdered meat such as elk, bison, moose, or deer, it was a portable food adopted by fur traders in later centuries who called it. Pemmican. Practice making this cheap survival food and add it to your stockpile. It needs no refrigeration and when properly made, can last for decades.

Lessons from Redneck Campers

Include corn in your garden, or in a pinch scavenge ears of corn from a roadside field, wrap in aluminum foil with some butter and cook in the coals of a fire. If you prefer a grilled taste, soak ears of corn in water and cook on a grate over the fire to grill it. You can cook with the husks on or remove before cooking depending on your preference.

Stock up on those Pillsbury cinnamon rolls or biscuits in a can. When the power goes out, simply wrap the dough around a stick, and pinch the ends so that it won’t fall off. Hold the stick over your BBQ grill or campfire until the dough is a golden brown. Slather with butter and enjoy a tasty treat that you can carry as you eat it.

Include heavy duty aluminum foil in your stockpile of supplies. When SHTF, lay out a large section of foil and add chunks of potatoes, onions, or whatever vegetables you have on hand. Top with a chunk of butter and a little salt and pepper and then wrap it all up and cook over hot coals or the BBQ grill.

When SHTF, you may have food available that you can cook but will need to think outside the box a little when it comes to cooking without your traditional stove or oven. Planning ahead and knowing how to make some of these cheap survival recipes will help sustain you and your family whether you bug in or are forced to bug out.

Alternative Backcountry Food Options

 

The post Dirt Cheap Survival Recipes appeared first on American Preppers Network.

10 Ice Fishing Fundamentals

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As the winter season grows stronger a lot of people will try their luck with a session or two of ice fishing. Although ice fishing is quite a popular activity, it also poses some risks for the fisherman and no one should venture out onto the ice without knowing these 10 ice fishing fundamentals. If … Read more…

The post 10 Ice Fishing Fundamentals was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

How to Procure Protein Sources During Winter

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  ReadyNutrition Readers, we already kicked off the first segment of this two-part series on protein and its importance in a day-to-day, as well as a survival scenario.  Now we’re going to cover a little more on protein from a survival perspective.  This will include wild game, of which we must give you a short note to keep in mind.  A person needs fats in his diet that wild game will not provide, as the meat is very lean.  For this reason, one cannot subsist solely on wild game and must supplement that food with other foods that provide fats as well as other nutrients.

That being said, there is still an abundant amount of protein out there in the wilds you can take advantage of.  Concentrating first on the animal protein, let’s make a list of what you can obtain during the winter months.

  • Fowl:  Ducks, Geese, Turkey (No!  Not more turkey!), Grouse, Dove.
  • Fish: Trout, Bass, Bluegill/Crappie, Pike.
  • Game: Deer, Antelope (primarily the Western States), Sheep, Mountain Goat, Elk, Rabbit/Hare.
  • Other Game: Black bear, Wild Boar.

In a survival situation, beggars can’t be choosers.  It’s wintertime now, so we’re going to concentrate on what you’ll find (and face) in the wintertime.  Black Bear are semi-hibernators; that is, they slumber for extended lengths of time during the winter and emerge periodically to feed.  They do possess more than the average needed to supply humans with the essential fats.  Bear meat is very tough.  If you can, roast and/or smoke the meat, chop it up well or cube it, and then throw it in a Dutch oven.

Over the coals with a good amount of moisture and the meat will tenderize quite a bit more than just cooking it over a fire.  Supplement this protein with cattail roots.  When you dig them up (their presence is indicated by the dead reeds at the edges of frozen lakes and ponds), take the roots and boil them.  They are very similar to potatoes.  Acorns can also be gathered and pulverized into powder for a flour, but be advised: acorns are high in tannic acid. This can be leached out of the acorns by soaking them in water for a few hours, and then allowing them to dry out before making the flour.

Now be advised that many trappers (according to reports from the Hudson Bay Company in the 18th and 19th centuries) died from only eating rabbit.  As mentioned before, wild game (especially rabbit) does not contain enough fats and nutrients to keep a person alive. As the company reported, many trappers starved to death by not rounding off their diets.  The human body leaches minerals and vitamins from within itself in order to digest the rabbit, and these are passed out in the stool.  The trappers literally ate themselves to death, when if they had supplemented their game with some vegetables, their protein uptake would have been assured without depleting themselves.

Pine needle tea provides enough Vitamin C when steeped in boiling water (about 1-2 cups of needles per quart of water.  Beneath the snows can be shoots of different edible plants; use a guidebook for your geographical area to determine what you have available.  Also, your trees such as spruce and willows, as well as lichens can provide you with nutrients to balance your needs for protein with a well-rounded diet that supplies you with vitamins and minerals.  Remember, the goal is to take in more than just lean protein that will steal nutrients from your body, although protein is very, very important.

Fish and waterfowl contain more fat and while providing the protein you need are more well-rounded in terms of fats and carbohydrates.  In the wintertime, the feeding activities of fish decrease, however, you will still be able to get them if you’re diligent.  As worms and insects are mostly unavailable during the wintertime, you will need to use either artificial lures or you may use offal/meat from game that you have trapped or shot.  With ice fishing, you’ll probably need an ice augur to open a hole in a lake.  There are many rivers and streams that do not freeze totally, and it is here that you will still be able to find and catch trout.

Just 3 ounces of trout yields 21 grams of protein, along with 9 grams of fat, plus calcium, iron, potassium, and sodium.  You pull in a good-sized brookie or a rainbow trout, and you’re looking at about an 8-10 lb. fish.  Brown trout can reach about 30-40 lbs.  You can do the math: that’s a lot of protein per fish!  In addition, you can smoke and salt the daylights out of it to preserve it and carry with you.  The Northern Pike (also known as Chain Pickerel) is also a good-to-eat fish.  Be advised that from the beginning of January to about the beginning of February, they lose teeth and will not be able to strike as much.  Be careful with them when you land them, or they can bite off a finger if they’re big enough, and their teeth are very sharp.

Be advised, especially in the Western States.  Salmon are also available, but as a fisherman, you have some competition: the bears, especially Grizzly Bears.  The salmon are one of their principal food sources before they hibernate, and between September and sleepy time, they eat everything and anything they can sink their teeth into, including us.  Black bear will also fish for salmon and trout.  If it’s a survival situation, you be the judge, but for either of those two you had better be armed.  You also (regarding the Grizzly) better have the ability to prove to a court of law that it really was a survival situation, and not that your car just broke down and you would have had to walk 5 miles to get to McDonald’s.  The survival situation better be real in this case.

To back up a bit, ducks and geese have high protein, and high amounts of fat…they’re a waterfowl and need that fat to insulate them from the cold of the water and in flight.  Render the fat and save it in a jar in a survival situation; you can use it to supplement the wild game you take on land that is low in fat.  Those two also have tremendous amounts of minerals to help balance your diet.  Turkey is leaner, as it is a “ground” bird, with less fat, although it too does contain vitamins and minerals.

Also, be advised to read up on things such as Tularemia, as well as intestinal and liver flukes and parasites.  All of the mentioned types of land game can have them, the former being in rabbits and the latter found especially in deer/venison, and wild pig.  Cook all meat thoroughly, making sure to keep from contaminating the meat when you’re dressing it out and preparing it for the spit.  Better safe than sorry, so ensure that it is cooked through and through to avoid such pitfalls.

To summarize, there are many methods to prepare your protein that you garner in the outdoors.  Such is beyond the scope of this article, the point of which was to make you well aware of your options in the outdoors, especially in a survival situation.  Winter is not a “dead” time of the year; it is merely dormant, with different pitfalls and challenges to face.  Use your greatest resource – your mind – to learn about your geographical vicinity and the game and vegetation that you can subsist upon.  I also highly recommend a good book on scats and tracks to be able to identify the game that moves about in your locale.  Keep fighting that good fight, cook all your wild game until it’s well done, and be safe!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Survival Fuel: You Must Have This in Your Disaster Supplies

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hikingBeing well-nourished during a disaster can mean the difference between powering through the event with strength, stamina, and energy or plodding through the situation barely able to put one foot in front of the other.

Protein in Crucial For the Prepper’s Pantry

Protein is the basic necessary structure for the growth of organic life on a molecular level.  Protein can come from vegetable and animal sources.  Protein is further broken down into amino acids, the building blocks of protein.  There are 8 essential amino acids the body needs that it does not produce on its own and needs to obtain from food sources.  They are as follows:  isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine.

Your best sources for protein and those essential amino acids are as such: dairy products, eggs, meat, poultry, seafood, oats, nuts, seeds, and soy protein.  Here is a term you need to know concerning protein, and that is the thermic effect, which is the total calories burned in the course of a day to digest your food taken in (it usually equates to about 10% of your total caloric intake).  The reason it’s important to know is that 1 gram (g) of protein and 1 g of carbohydrates supply the same amount of energy, 4 calories.

Survival Fuel

The difference is that food is energy in the form of the various chemical bondings that must be broken down, and you need 2 1/2 times the energy to break down the protein as you do the carbohydrates.  Protein prevents you from overeating by giving you a feeling of satiety, as well as speeding up the metabolism.  That protein from meats gives you muscle.  It also aids you in tissue repair.  I also stress that while the intake is important, you can’t just be an “eating machine” and not exercise/live too sedentary a lifestyle.  Then again, you guys and gals are preppers and survivalists, well aware that your body is the most important personal tool you have.

There are a couple of works I wish to cite for your further study, as they are excellent in the manner they delve into this topic from a fitness standpoint.  They are as follows:

  1. The Testosterone Advantage Plan,” by Lou Schuler and Jeff Volek, ISBN: 1-57954-507-6.  This book is geared toward men, but has a wealth of health and dietary information that women can use, as well as information on exercise that will benefit both genders.  In-depth breakdowns of protein analysis and the glycemic index, as well as the different types of exercise and the muscle systems benefited by their application.
  2. Sports Supplement Review, 3rd Issue,” by Bill Phillips, ISBN: 096587320-X.  This is one of the greatest books you can find.  It goes into each different type of amino acid and tells you the chemistry and their effects on and requirements by the human body.  It details vitamins, minerals, supplements, and could be a “Bible” for exercise…strength, conditioning, and recovery exercises in your workouts.  This book gives you scientific procedures to obtain lean body mass and maximize your protein intake.

These works will more than get you started: they’ll help you finish.  As I have mentioned ad infinitum, you need to exercise to fully develop and take advantage of all your physical gifts.  That being said, you can supplement your diet with high-protein and high-amino-acid bearing dietary aids.  I already mentioned how I like the use of the whey protein powder; I need it with as much as I lift.  There’s one out there called Nutribiotic Organic Rice Protein Powder (Plain) in a 3-lb. container, organic with 80% vegan protein content.  One serving in scoop form gives you 36 grams of protein, plus I add 2 tbsp. peanut butter (another 8 grams) and the milk (8 grams) will give you a good “jolt” of protein.  Don’t use it as a meal replacement!  It is meant to complement, not replace.  I add the peanut butter and make a shake out of it because it really tastes bad.

Another goodie: All Natural Bragg Liquid Aminos, comes in a 32-oz bottle.  Just 1/2 tsp. will give you 290 mg of aminos.  It tastes akin to soy sauce.  You can throw this into your bowl of soup, stew, mashed potatoes, or dish such as casseroles.  It actually tastes pretty good, and you can use this to flavor your food a little better while adding amino acids.

You Need More Protein in Colder Months

During the winter months, you need more protein than usual.  The cold causes your body to need to break down more calories to provide more heat internally.  High protein diets take away some of that seasonal debilitation.  Needless to say, the high protein will also benefit you in the times of cold and flu by helping you to boost your resistance and (if you should get the sickness) hasten your recovery if necessary.  Protein is very important.  In our next segment, we’re going to cover survival sources of protein and explain why you can’t just live off of a diet of wild game and other niceties of wilderness living.  Until next time keep your powder dry, take care of one another, and turkey sandwiches…lots of turkey sandwiches!  JJ out!

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Snow Shoes: A Survival Necessity In Deep Snow

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snowshoes_truck_snow

article_snowshoes_1It’s almost time for winter here in the Northeast.  That means lots of fun outdoor activities, but one of the easiest is snow shoeing. If you ever get the opportunity, I would highly recommend that you at least try it. It’s a great way to learn how difficult snow can be to navigate. When I was in New Brunswick, Canada last season,  I had the opportunity to visit my uncle’s tipi.  It’s about a mile out in the woods and there was three feet of snow on the ground. In some higher drift areas, the height of snow exceeded this. From time to time, we will get similar amounts of snow here in Maine.

By Jarhead Survivor, a Contributing Author of SurvivalCache and SHTFBlog

I snowshoe’d out there, shoveled it out, then decided to get some wood for a fire.  I figured I’d try doing it without my snow shoes which turned into a forced march of less than a 100 yards.  It’s hard to explain, but if you’ve been in deep snow you’ll know what I’m talking about.  It’s hard to move around in deep snow.  Anyway, I went back with my armload of wood and returned wearing my snow shoes.

History and Features of Snowshoes

Snowshoes have been in use for over 4,000 years.  Ancient peoples used different kinds but our contemporary snowshoes originate from Native Americans. Older American webbed snowshoes were made from wood with gut and/or leather to form the webbing and bindings.  Modern snowshoes are made from metal and other synthetic materials.

snowshoes_traditional_survivalIn years past I’ve used beaver tail and bear paw snowshoes.  I also used a pair made by one of my uncles that were long and thin – almost like a ski, but wider, which worked awesome on open snow.  Beaver tails (my dad still uses them) are a generic snowshoe that work well in most places.  I found the bear paws, which are a little smaller and rounder, to be good in tight quarters such as bushwhacking, but not as good as the beaver tails on open trail.  With this being said, you could adequately use either type for any scenario. In fact, I preferred the bear paws my dad gave me until I bought the more modern Yukon Jack shoes.

Modern snowshoes are nice and have neat features that help in different environments.  First, modern bindings are superior to older ones.  Instead of a buckle and leather, they are made out of synthetics and easily snap into place.  I’ve froze my fingers off many times trying get old bindings tight.  Believe me, it is a relief to use more convenient, modern bindings.

Another great feature of modern snowshoes is the cleat that sits under your foot.  This is really handy if you’re climbing a hill and need traction on hard snow or ice.  I have crampons I wear for ice climbing, but snowshoes are better for overall snow travel.

There are many kinds of snowshoes on the market today. If you’re in the market for snowshoes, I’d suggest you talk to knowledgeable friends or a store expert.  Some of them are really expensive, but my Yukon snowshoes cost about $80 and have lasted me ten years with no problems.  I’ve hiked many mountains and forests with them and they are still in great shape.  Find a pair that works for you and your situation.

Snowshoe Accessories

article_snowshoes_2Most people use gaiters that keep snow out of boots as they walk through deep snow. Gaiters are pieces of fabric and velcro secured under knee to the boot. Some folks like to use ski-poles.  I now use a ski pole because there are situations where you’ll fall over without a little assistance.  I like to have at least one hand free when walking to move bushes aside, pick stuff up, or what have you, so this was a good compromise for me.  It’s like everything else, find what works for you and run with it.

Earlier this season I was walking through a frozen swamp.  If you think walking through a swamp with alders is difficult, you should try it in the winter when all the trees are bent over from the weight of the snow.  At one point I walked over a fallen tree to try and get past a particularly nasty deadfall.  When I got to the other side, I fell off the tree and landed in a five foot snow drift.  Luckily I had my ski pole with me, but I bent it all to hell using it to get out of that mess.  Without it, I’d have worked much harder to escape from the drift.

Winter boots are pretty much up to you, but I prefer to wear a technical ice climbing boot when I’m doing winter activities.  These boots are usually more expensive. While these are expensive, I get a great amount of use from them. For the record, I have an older pair of Scarpas and love them.

Snowshoeing is Tough

snowshoeing_tough_physicalIn the early part of the snowshoeing season, I get leg cramps at night. Following some of these early expeditions, I’ve jumped out of bed gritting my teeth and massaging my thigh. After a couple times out, I adjust. I suggest you start going slow and walking short distances. Be patient; you’ll get the feel for it.  Once your body adapts, you’ll be good to go.  Even though snowshoes expedite travel over snow, you’ll need be in great shape.  Snowshoeing is damned hard work.  It is especially difficult if you’re wearing a pack, pulling a sled, breaking trail, or heaven forbid, doing all three at once.

When you go out there be prepared to have fun and work hard. Anybody else out there enjoy snowshoeing? Question?  Comments?  Sound off below!

Photos Courtesy of:

JarheadSurvivor
Dave Ruben Photo 
Azmuskoka
Brigitte Malessa

Interested in writing for us? Send a sample of your work and an introductory statement to joel@survivalcache.com. If you’re a good fit, we’ll publish your work and compensate you accordingly.

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The Beginner’s Guide To Emergency Food Storage

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Having a large food stockpile is one of the main goals of every prepper. Unfortunately, many newbies think that all they have to do is run to the store and fill a cart with canned foods. This is a costly mistake. You need to take some time to figure out what foods to store and […]

The post The Beginner’s Guide To Emergency Food Storage appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

5 Exciting Ways to Use Cranberries

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cranberryCranberries are a beautiful addition to any dinner plate. Their rich color dresses everything up and adds a touch of complex sweetness. Cranberries are also extremely healthy—they are chockfull of antioxidants and proanthocyanidins (or PACs) that help to prevent the adhesion of certain of bacteria (these anti-adhesion properties inhibit the bacteria associated with E. coli, and potentially those associated with gum disease and stomach ulcers as well). Cranberries are also rich in phytonutrients, giving you an upper hand at combatting various illnesses. Women have long-been using cranberry juices and extract to treat and avoid urinary tract infections.

With Thanksgiving around the corner, you might find yourself with an abundance of cranberries on hand. Resist the urge to make typical cranberry sauce and call it a day–the following recipes show a few exciting ways to change things up. And don’t limit yourself to the holidays! These dishes taste great year round.

Cranberry Red Wine Relish

This recipe is a kind of adult version of the classic cranberry sauce. Tasty and colorful, if you make big batches you can put them in mason jars for beautiful holiday gifts for your friends and neighbors.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups white sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups dry red wine (this is a fancy one I use during the holidays)
  • 12 ounces fresh cranberries, rinsed and sorted
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 tablespoons orange zest, cut into slivers

Directions:

  1. Combine sugar and red wine in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Add the cranberries, cinnamon stick and orange peel. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring often until most of the cranberries have burst (about 15 minutes). Remove from heat and chill before serving.

Cranberry Chutney

Again, this is a bit of a more festive take on classic cranberry sauce. Perfect with turkey and other holiday dinners.

Ingredients:

  • 12 ounces (or 1 package) fresh cranberries
  • 1 orange, peeled, tough membrane removed, chopped or 1 small can pineapple tidbits, drained
  • 1/4 cup orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons agave nectar
  • 1 large apple, peeled, cored, chopped
  • 1/4 cup chopped pecans or walnuts
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon cumin

Directions:

  1. Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 8 minutes, or until cranberries are bursting.
  2. Chill until serving time; freeze surplus in small containers.

Sweet Wheat Berry Cranberry Salad

Wheat berries are a versatile whole grain. Learn more about how to use them here.

Ingredients:

Makes 8 servings

  • 2 cups wheat berries
  • 1/2 cup walnuts or pecans, chopped
  • 1/4 cup apples, diced
  • 1/2 cup carrots, shredded
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries

For Dressing:

  • 1 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon orange juice
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • salt to taste

Directions:

  1. For salad: In a large bowl, mix together all ingredients.
  2. For dressing: In a small bowl, whisk together ingredients for dressing. Pour the dressing over the salad and gently toss. Refrigerate the dressed salad to allow the flavors to meld before serving. Serve it cold or heat it up for a breakfast cereal.

Cranberry Quinoa with Cilantro

The stronger cranberry flavor plus cilantro in this dish is a real compliment to the quinoa, which can be a bit bland. Note that the cranberries used in this recipe are dried.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 cup uncooked quinoa, rinsed
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/4 cup red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1/4 cup yellow bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 small red onion, finely chopped
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 1/4 cup toasted sliced almonds
  • 1/2 cup minced carrots
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Pour the water into a saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Pour in the quinoa, cover with a lid, and continue to simmer over low heat until the water has been absorbed (about 20 minutes). Scrape into a mixing bowl and chill in the refrigerator until cold.
  2. Once cold, stir in the red bell pepper, yellow bell pepper, red onion, curry powder, cilantro, lime juice, sliced almonds, carrots, and cranberries. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Chill before serving.

Crockpot Cranberry Chicken

This is a delicious and easy way to prepare chicken breasts. The cranberries add a welcome change to our regular chicken dinner, and I love using the crockpot to prepare meals during the week.

Ingredients:

  • 4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
  • 1 (16 ounce) bottle Catalina salad dressing
  • 12 ounces fresh cranberries
  • 1 envelope onion soup mix

Directions:

  1. Place the chicken breasts in the bottom of a slow cooker. Pour the salad dressing, cranberries, and onion soup mix over the chicken. Cook on Low 4 to 6 hours.

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

The 3 WORST Animals To Eat For Survival

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The 3 WORST Animals To Depend On For Survival

Image source: Pixabay.com

Imagine this situation: You silently enter a nearby piece of woods and move stealthily along some edge cover. You take each step with care, hoping to avoid a hazardous one that would snap a twig beneath your feet and signal your presence to the entire surrounding woods. Fate has landed you in this situation, where your survival depends on your skill with a gun and your knowledge of the land.

Up ahead your prey is feeding, unaware of your presence. Ever so slowly you lift your rifle to your shoulder and take aim.

In a survival situation like this, what animal do you imagine yourself hunting? Is it a deer? Are you fortunate enough to live in an area of elk or other large animal? How about small game animals? Not only are small game animals the most abundant, but they also typically require the least amount of skill to harvest. There’s just one problem with this plan: You’ll starve to death.

The big risk people would face in this situation is a misunderstanding of how their body works and the calories their new life would require in a survival situation. If you ever find yourself in a situation where your life depends on harvesting the bounty of nature, here are three animals you shouldn’t count on:

1. Rabbits

The truth is that if you ate nothing but rabbits in a survival situation you would die from what is called rabbit starvation. This phenomenon occurs when the human body eats only lean meats for an extended period of time. To function properly, you constantly need a variety of food sources to keep you going. Native people knew all about this. Here is a diary entry from renowned explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson scribed more than 100 years ago after living with Native people:

The groups that depend on the blubber animals are the most fortunate in the hunting way of life, for they never suffer from fat-hunger. This trouble is worst, so far as North America is concerned, among those forest Indians who depend at times on rabbits, the leanest animal in the North, and who develop the extreme fat-hunger known as rabbit-starvation. Rabbit eaters, if they have no fat from another source — beaver, moose, fish — will develop diarrhea in about a week, with headache, lassitude, a vague discomfort. If there are enough rabbits, the people eat till their stomachs are distended; but no matter how much they eat they feel unsatisfied. Some think a man will die sooner if he eats continually of fat-free meat than if he eats nothing, but this is a belief on which sufficient evidence for a decision has not been gathered in the north. Deaths from rabbit-starvation, or from the eating of other skinny meat, are rare; for everyone understands the principle, and any possible preventive steps are naturally taken.

2. Squirrel

In city parks and towns around the country, you will find a population of squirrels that, at times, seems to outnumber the people. The real problem with squirrels is that their caloric return is far too low to depend on as a major food source. One squirrel is estimated to provide around 540 calories. In a world where we spend increasingly more time manipulating a screen and sitting on our keesters, we still demand around 2,000 calories a day. Even with our modern luxuries, you’d need to consume around four squirrels a day just to calorically break even. No problem, right? Well, there is one problem. In a survival situation, you could expect your caloric demands to skyrocket. Even if your daily caloric demand only doubled to 4,000 calories per day, that would put you at needing a hefty eight squirrels a day to break even. I’m sure this wouldn’t be a problem on day one in many areas, but how about with a family of four needing 32 squirrels a day? How about on day 100 when you’ve already shot 800 squirrels? As you can tell, the math doesn’t add up, and squirrel is not something you should be depending on as your staple food source.

3. Panfish

The 3 WORST Animals To Depend On For Survival

Image source: Pixabay.com

Trout and certain panfish find their way on the bottom of this list for the same reasons as squirrels. For example, a wild trout only provides 143 calories per fillet. Double that and you are at 286 calories per fish. Again, the amount of panfish or trout you’d have to catch in a day would be substantial if you were to try and live solely on their sustenance. Based on a 4,000-calorie diet, that would equate to around 14 fish per day to break even for one person. However, there would be an advantage of panfish over squirrels and rabbit. That advantage is that fishing is passive. In other words, you could cast a few lines each day and come back later to check your catch, with very little effort involved. Fishing doesn’t require nearly as many calories as hunting does; therefore, the calories of your panfish would go further and you may not burn 4,000 calories per day. If you were in a situation where you didn’t have to expend much energy, panfish could possibly be a reasonable food source for an extended period of time. However, you would still have to catch an awful lot of fish.

Final Thoughts

In reality, these animals all can play a minor role in a long-term survival diet, but they should not be viewed as long-term staple food sources. Keep in mind this analysis has considered diets solely composed of these animals. If you could find supplementary food items — from plants to other animals — you would decrease the negative effects. People who lived off the land for generations didn’t depend solely on these animals, and neither should we.

Do you agree? Disagree? What advice would you add? Share your tips in the section below:  

Prepping on a Budget: 4 Food Dehydrators under $75

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 Many believe dehydrating food is the safest, most affordable and best way to preserve flavors of foods. Having a dehydrator available allows you to make fruit leathers, dried fruits, beef jerky, nuts, seeds, and even meals. They cut down on wasted food, save money on pre-packaged snacks, and allow your family to eat healthily on the go. Dried foods are a life-saving staple and one of the most affordable ways to create an emergency food supply or preserve food that would otherwise go to waste. The Prepper’s Cookbook hails this culinary tool as a must-have for creating a stocked pantry.

If you have thought about buying a dehydrator, chances are you’ve heard of the Excalibur Food Dehydrator. It is the gold standard in food dehydration: it is reviewed highly by users, performs well and has a great guarantee package, and the customer service team has a great reputation. Many feel it is worth the upfront investment, especially if you plan on using your dehydrator often, but for some people, the $250 price tag is too much to bear.

That said, you have options! Below are some alternatives to the upper-end models and come highly recommended.

Four budget-friendly food dehydrators that get the job done!

1) Presto 06300

This no-frills dehydrator is as affordable as you can get. Selling for under $40, this four-tray system is compact and still powerful enough to dehydrate a good amount of fruits, veggies, jerky, and leathers. The clear cover allows you to keep watch over your snacks and the trays and cover are all dishwasher safe. It is quiet and lightweight, therefore easy to carry into various rooms for different purposes (such as making potpourri or drying herbs from your garden). One drawback is a lack of temperature control, but satisfied users agree that the general setting is sufficient for most tasks. This would make a great purchase or gift for someone new to food dehydration.

2) Nesco FD-75A Snackmaster Pro

At around $60, the Nesco Snackmaster Pro is one of the newest dehydrators in the Nesco product line. It has 700 watts of drying power and comes with 5 drying trays (up to 12 trays can be used in the unit but those additional trays need to be purchased separately). The adjustable thermostat ranges from 95-160 degrees. It is lightweight and compact and includes added goodies like 2 fruit roll up sheets, 3 packets of beef jerky spice, and a detailed recipe and instruction book. There isn’t a timer or an on/off switch on this unit, though users seem happy with the other features at this price point.

3) NutriChef Kitchen Electric Countertop Food Dehydrator

This dehydrator is around $50 and incredibly user-friendly. It comes with 5 trays, each of which has 6 stacking tabs that allow you to change the height between each tray so you can place thicker food on the tray and still get good results. There is space for up to 20 trays in this unit (additional trays sold separately). The trays are clear and dishwasher safe, though some users complain that the base of the unit can be difficult to clean. It is fairly quiet and has an on/off switch; it comes with a detailed user guide.

4) Cuisinart DHR-20 Food Dehydrator

The Cuisinart Food Dehydrator is the priciest in this list, though at $65 it still comes in at a much more affordable rate than the Excalibur. It has a 620-watt motorized fan with a top vent. It can hold 9 trays total and jerky lovers seem to love this dehydrator: it dehydrates up to 4 pounds of meat in 4-5 hours, depending on the cut. Replacement and additional trays are a bit pricey at around $14 a piece; otherwise, the reviews for this product are very satisfactory.

In planning for a long-term disaster, people are always trying to find foods they can look forward to that will give them optimum nutrition. These budget-friendly food dehydrators will help you do just that. Happy dehydrating!

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Prepping for a Full On Breakdown? Stockpile These Foods

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full-on-breakdownReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, as you know we’re down to the wire just before the U.S. presidential election: an election that will shape the face of the country for a long time.  But will we make it there?  And if so, will we make it through it, and the transition period?  With the contrived “Russian Cyber threat,” along with the very real threat of nuclear war, an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) attack, a true Cyberattack, an economic and societal collapse, or a grid down scenario, we have enough things to look out for.  When things of this nature make the mainstream news media, it may be time to start preparing if you have not done so.

It’s time to prepare for the worst-case scenario with this best-selling preparedness manual

People are Planning for Unrest Following the Election

Emergency food sales and preparedness related supplies have soared due to the upcoming election. Here are excerpts from this article:

“What’s feeding this new urgency?  Survivalist consumers say they’re preparing for post-election unrest that could involve everything from massive riots, to power grid outages, to the total collapse of the financial system where a can of food becomes currency.

Nor is it limited to just rural areas.  Frederick Reddie, a 41-year-old ‘urban prepper’ from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is stocking upon staples like rice and peanut butter and working on expanding his 6-month supply of emergency food to two years.  He has to use a pseudonym to protect his supply from any future hungry neighbors, he told NBC News.”

Well, it seems as if “Freddie Reddie” may have read my article about neighbors and “The Shelter” episode of the Twilight Zone.  In any event, he has the right idea.  Certainly, if you can afford it and wish to invest, then by all means (and by your choice), indulge as best fits into your budget and storage plans.  The aforementioned article reported that several companies that sell freeze-dried and dehydrated foods in Mylar that are packed in buckets are being bought akin to a wildfire.  Telephone orders are through the roof, and the companies reported they have needed extra staff to take care of the purchases.

Why Canned Goods are a Good SHTF Investment

I personally like the canned goods.  They’re within my budget (no, JJ is not a millionaire or even close), and they are the basis for my logistical needs.  I don’t normally eat a lot of canned goods, and for a survival situation, I’m not overly concerned with the food being organic, or any “leaching” that may occur out of the can liners.  My focus is on complete nutrition: protein, carbohydrates, fats, and vitamins.  Canned foods have been time-tested with me: I have had cans of vegetables and meats that I had in New Orleans during Katrina that (after ten years) were still just fine when tested.

Indeed, they found canned meat from Arctic and Antarctic missions such as Scott’s and Amundsen’s that had been almost a hundred years old with the contents still edible.  Canned goods can take tremendous changes in temperature and still be perfectly edible.  Canned goods are also pretty affordable and can even be found at dollar stores.  Everyone has undoubtedly concentrated on the basics, as follows:

Soups, prepared dinners (pasta dishes, chili), stews, canned meat (chicken and fish), canned beans and vegetables.

Be Careful of Tricky Manufacturers

You have to watch out: they’re starting to shrink not only portion size but portion content.  I just picked up the last case of ready-made mini beef ravioli with meatballs.  My sneaky grocers kept the same label on the cans but removed the “with meatballs” from the label…and (as you may have guessed) the meatballs, as well.  The can with the meatballs has a protein content of 22 grams (g), or 11 g per serving.  The one without the meatballs only has 16 g per can (8 g per serving), and they “phased” out the ones with the meatballs, but left the same price…79 cents per can.

Doesn’t sound as if it’s much, but when you buy 20 cans, that’s 120 grams of protein less in the variety sans meatballs.  Same for peanut butter, where they conveniently shrank the portion size but kept the same sized jar.  In addition to the canned goods, you can still find some case lot sales on dry goods, such as pasta, rice, peanut butter, crackers, and so forth.  With canned goods, don’t write off canned mackerel or sardines from your preps.  They’re high in protein and Omega-3 fatty acids.

We’re getting close to “crunch time” with all of these things happening.  Now is the time for you to stretch your dollars and prepare according to the many tips and articles you’ve read and researched here on ReadyNutrition.  Use those Gatorade and 2-liter soda bottles to build up as much of a bottled water supply as you can.  For your canned goods, if you can put them in bins, all the better.  If not, try out some cardboard boxes, and be sure to label them or mark them on the outside with a magic marker for what the general contents are.

Staying Organized

Inventory sheets (as I’ve mentioned in articles past) go a long way in rotating your supplies and also for keeping track of their contents.  For canned vegetables, concentrate on the ones you can get the most for your money with.  Examples would be canned, whole potatoes, spinach, kale, beans (such as baked or black…not the green beans that are almost devoid of nutrition), sauerkraut (excellent vitamin C source), canned fruit high in vitamin C (grapefruit, mandarin oranges, etc.).  Other prepared foods in cans are macaroni and cheese that you can add meat to if you wish.

They last a long time, come precooked (therefore can be eaten right out of the can), and they can take a beating.  Let’s not also forget canned juices, such as fruit juices and vegetable juices (tomato, V-8, etc.)  Stick with the non-carbonated stuff, as it’s better for you and will be less prone to burst on a fall or impact. Here is a good list to follow.

In a nutshell, these canned goods and dry goods can help you boost up your supplies, or provide you with a base if you have not been preparing.  All of the advice in the world will not help you unless you put it to use with actions.  As things occur both in the U.S. and the world, now is the time to take advantage and do all that you can, and the canned goods can be found within your budget that fulfills your basic needs.  Keep in that good fight, and fight it all the way!  JJ out!

 

 

Related Material:

11 Emergency Foods That Last Forever

The Prepper’s Cookbook

How to Stock a Prepper’s Pantry

Five Family Friendly Food Pantry Organizing Tips Anyone Can Do

Prepping With Wheat Allergies

5 Ways to Stretch Your Meals SHTF Style

Food Pantry: Take Care of Your Basic Needs

72 Hours Without This Will Kill You: Survival Water Fundamentals

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Emergency Survival Food Sales Soar as We Get Closer to Election Day

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prepper-candidateSales of emergency survival food are increasing as we approach election day, and rightfully so. With Hillary Clinton and other democrats hellbent on resuscitating a non-existent Cold War and the violent riots we’ve seen by so-called protesters at Donald trump rallies, many preppers are seeing the signs and preparing for post-election unrest by storing large amounts of non-perishable food.

Although it is quite normal to see long-term storable foods rise in sales around election time, but survival food companies are seeing a particularly large spike in business this year as we approach election day.

“This is more intense than what we saw in 2012,” Keith Bansemer, marketing VP for My Patriot Supply, a survival food company, told NBC news. He says that last election season doubled their sales, and this time around they have seen their sales triple.

“We have everyone we can on the phones. We are overwhelmed,” said Bensemer.

Those who expect Trump to win fear a revolt from violent anti-Trump protesters, such as the riot seen in San Jose, California outside of a Trump rally. Others who expect Hillary Clinton’s coronation to the presidency are preparing for a possible World War 3 scenario, which may be a very well-founded concern considering Clinton’s war-driven rhetoric about Russia’s involvement in Syria and the establishment of no-fly zones in air space around Aleppo.

However, not everyone is preparing for war with another country. Many are preparing for government-related threats to their life and liberty. One of the major threats we face is the ever-increasing desire of politicians to take away our guns and the resulting chaos that would ensue. Hillary Clinton completely disregards the second amendment, and the possibility that she would enact gun confiscation across the country should not be discounted. This would mean a declaration of war on the people, or at least those who cherish freedom.

Bansemer does not think his customer base is fearing for any specific election outcome. He thinks that many just want to be prepared for whatever may come as a result of either of these candidates’ policies.

“You hear them saying, no matter who wins, I know I could take a positive step myself and secure what’s important,” he explained. “They’re securing their food supply.”

A number of other long-term food suppliers are seeing an increase as well.

Legacy Foods is predicting that sales will jump in the weeks following the election, said owner Phil Cox. Legacy sells a $2,000 package of a year’s worth of storable food, containing nearly 1,100 meals and sealed in military-grade Mylar packs.

Retailers are noticing the increase of sales of long-term food and they are serving the market. Costco is also getting into the emergency food market with a 390-serving bucket, or one month’s supply of food, for $115. Store owner Larry Friedman is unsure what to make of the increased presence of preppers at his military surplus supply store, M&G. “Some are regulars in here,” said Friedman. “They come in, seem perfectly normal, and then suddenly, they’re talking about the apocalypse. You do a double-take.”

Friedman recalled seeing an increase of sales like this nearly two decades ago, after the original invasion of Iraq:

“It really started in ’91 with Desert Storm. People were worried about Scud missiles and chemical weapons from Iraq. We had so many people waiting we almost couldn’t close the doors. We sold every gas mask we could get our hands on. That was off the hook.”

Whatever reason one may have for preparing, there is no question that if disaster strikes and food becomes scarce, food will become a primary currency, and storable food will become highly valuable. There’s no good reason to pass up the opportunity to prepare.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Building on Basics for Survival Preparedness

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The following may be considered basic foundational categories for preparedness. The entire process of prepping and preparedness begins with basic ‘ingredients’ to survive and stay alive. Each of these are relatively inexpensive to purchase for storage, they store easily for long periods, and they provide a foundation for adequate calories and nutrition to sustain life. […]

Stockpile Supplies at Multiple BOL

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Everyone knows how important it is to stockpile supplies such as food, water and other necessities for an emergency. A small percentage of people are well prepared, many are somewhat prepared and most aren’t prepared at all. But nobody can say they weren’t warned that they could be without these crucial items should a crisis occur.

There is much less awareness of the need to have stockpiles of food, water and other items in at least two different locations, preferably three. Preppers who have gathered large amounts of bottled water, canned food, toiletries and a host of can openers, flashlights, batteries, radios, blankets, clothing, first-aid kits and weapons are putting all of their eggs in one basket if they keep everything in the same place.

A home is a great place to stockpile food, water and other essentials. That’s where I keep my largest supplies because that’s where my family and I are most likely to be when the stuff hits the fan. And even if I’m not home at that exact moment, I will probably be in a position to return there shortly.

My home is not only where I keep the majority of my emergency supplies, it’s also the place that I’ve spent time and money to secure. If a breakdown in society occurs following a disaster, I want to be as prepared as possible to protect my family and belongings.

But what if my home is destroyed or severely damaged by whatever crisis occurs? If that’s the only place where I have my emergency goods stockpiled – and either I can’t get to them or they’ve been destroyed by the disaster – I will have wasted a huge amount of time and money preparing for the exact scenario in which I find myself.

It is absolutely essential that you keep supplies in multiple locations. If you have a year’s supply of goods at home, keep six months’ worth in at least one other place. If you have six months’ worth of goods at home, store at least three months’ worth at a secondary location.

Now the question becomes, exactly where should my second and perhaps third locations be? There are several important factors to consider. For one, these other locations need to be close enough to get to, yet far enough away that they’re unlikely to be affected by the same disaster that just did a number on your home.

Just as important, these locations have to offer the same features that your home does – a cool, dry place where food and water won’t be negatively affected by sunlight, moisture and extreme temperatures.

Of course, it’s up to you to decide where those second and possibly third locations will be, but among the possibilities are a storage unit that you can rent, a root cellar or storage bunker on your property but away from your house, inside a separate building that you own in town, within a building that a trusted friend owns, or buried in a remote area where only you would think to look.

Finally, as all good preppers know, don’t advertise the fact that you have stockpiled food and water for an emergency in your home and at other locations. People will remember that, and you could have some unwelcome visitors following a disaster.

The post Stockpile Supplies at Multiple BOL appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Reasons You Should Stockpile Coffee

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by Shannon

If you’re one of those folks, living in a nine-to-five world and just trying to make it through another day without falling asleep in random places, coffee is a blessing. Some people don’t function unless they’re on the second cup of coffee.

One fun fact about coffee is that it was associated with intellectual conversation in 17th century England. With just a penny back then, a person could have a cup of coffee which allegedly helped individuals flock together and form a mentally stimulating conversation.

In a situation, wherein survival may be your priority, a proper dose of alertness is just what you need to keep yourself aware of your environment and notice any potential threats. While coffee may not be part of the priority list, there are a few reasons why it’s a good idea to stockpile it when preparing for an emergency and critical situations.

HEALTH BENEFITS

The most important reason why it’s a good idea to stockpile coffee is its health benefits. Researchers have found that coffee can protect you from a number of fatal diseases such as type 2 diabetes, Parkinson’s, liver disease, cancer, and heart failure. Significant data published by researchers have found coffee actually has an inverse relationship with the aforementioned diseases. This means that the more cups of coffee you take, the fewer chances that your health will suffer.

Aside from the fact that coffee without add-ons has a very low-calorie count (two calories), it’s also a rich source of antioxidants that can prevent oxidation or the process in which your body experiences a chemical chain reaction that can eventually lead to damaged cells.

Other health risks that coffee protects you from includes Alzheimer’s, dementia and stroke. This is the bottom line: coffee can help you live longer, at least in the health department. However, it’s also important to note here that there’s a value in keeping everything in moderation. In general, anything that is more can prove to be dangerous instead of beneficial.

FASTER, STRONGER, SMARTER

Another thing that can prove that coffee can be useful in times of dangerous and critical emergencies and situations is its ability to improve mental and physical capacities. The main reason many people drink coffee is because it gives them higher levels of awareness. It helps ease them from being asleep to being completely awake. This means that the main target of coffee is the brain which helps improve memory, energy levels, vigilance, and cognitive functioning.

Because coffee’s main target is the nervous system, it helps your brain send signals throughout your body to perform many functions such as breaking down fats and converting it to energy that you can draw from. Aside from this, it also increases the fight or flight hormone in your body which increases reaction time and general physical performance.

When you find yourself in a situation wherein you have either stay and fight or leave and flee, these effects of coffee might be something you will greatly appreciate. It helps think of a quick way out while being aware of your surroundings thus reducing the risks that can endanger your chances of survival. Another scenario where coffee can be a big help is when you’re on night watch duty. You’re no use to the people you wish to protect if you’re anything less than alert and awake.

WATER-COFFEE RELATIONSHIP

One of the basic things that should be in your stockpile is clean water, if not water filters. Because primitive water filtering system includes rocks and different kinds of soil, it can make the end product less than desirable in its taste. But because primitive water filtering systems are not much of an option for most preppers, you may want to have an actual personal water filter on hand which gives clean and tasteless drinking water. In all scenarios, coffee can play a good part.

Because of the easily palpable taste of coffee, you can drink your water without offending your taste buds. It gives you added nutrients and it gives you a good reason to drink at least one cup of water in a day which can help prevent dehydration, even if you have water filters and the taste won’t be an issue.

As we know, contaminated water is filled with bacteria and pathogens that can render you weak and in the worst case scenario, dying. If you like a hot cup of coffee, then you’re in luck.

http://cottagelife.com/environment/does-boiling-lake-water-kill-bacteria-and-viruses

If you let the water boil for at least one minute, it will kill most bacteria that could have endangered your health including Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and other viruses.

BARTER MATERIAL

If you want something but can’t afford it, you can always barter. Coffee happens to be one of the most popular barter items in the world. Even now, coffee is the second most tradeable commodity, only defeated by oil. The reason for this is simple: raw coffee can be stored for a very long time without risking the loss of flavor.

In this sense, coffee can be your currency, especially when you need items such as food or medicine but have nothing to pay for it. Though it might hurt for you to part with your much-needed coffee, it’s always good to have a backup plan that can save you and your companions in times of need. The best way to barter coffee is to make sure that it is green coffee, also known as raw coffee. This is because coffee significantly loses its value once it has been roasted. However, this does not mean that you won’t find a way to barter in your instant coffee, especially to people who may not have the time or the tools to roast and grind it.

Coffee disappears fast from grocery shelves in times of crisis. To give you a general idea of coffee’s shelf life, ground coffee lasts 3-5 months, instant coffee can last between 2 and 20 years and whole bean coffee can last between 6 and 9 months. Unopened, of course.

Remember that the best way to store coffee is to put in the freezer. Also, like most spices coffee beans will last longer than roasted or powdered coffee.

UNUSUAL USES OF COFFEE

Coffee is also great for keeping your body temperature up, especially if you find yourself stranded in cold places. Holding a hot mug and letting the liquid warm up your insides can keep you from freezing to death.

Another thing that coffee is good for is how it can change the acidity of the soil. If you plan to have a portable garden with you or if you want to grow your own potatoes, you can pour coffee on the soil in to act as composting agent. Beyond this, you can add taste to your meat by rubbing the coffee and grilling it to give you a more wholesome meal.

Hygiene is another thing that coffee can help you with. Several studies have found that if you put coffee grounds on your face and rub it, you can remove lots of dead skin which, at the very least, will help you feel fresh and clean.

FIGHT YOUR DEMONS

Aside from the physical ailments that coffee can protect you from, it can also aid in your fight against the worst enemy you can have in critical situations: yourself. In danger, alone and scared, you’re more than likely to lose hope and the will to move forward. Depression is a serious mental illness that most people fail to understand. It’s a vicious cycle that you don’t want to get caught up in. Luckily, coffee can help you.

It has been found to have the abilities to boost morale and enhancing your mood. By extension, it also reduces the risk of self-harm or suicide. This is important because if you’re alone, coffee might be the best thing that you have on hand as it can give you a few minutes to unwind and evaluate your situation while giving you the mental energy that you will need to face the day. On the other hand, if you’re trying to survive in groups, death can make or break you in a situation. In both scenarios, coffee plays an important role in giving you a sense of normalcy while at the same time giving some form of protection for your mental health.

While coffee may not be at the top of your priority list, you may still want to consider integrating it after you’ve managed to get all your basic need items together. Coffee has been proven to be beneficial in many areas such as gardening, health, hygiene, and bartering. It may not seem like much, but at the end of the day, coffee might just end up saving your life over and over again.

This is the bottom line: having a stockpile of coffee is a good idea even if you’re not an avid fan.

Best Survival Foods That Lasts Forever For SHTF | episode 122

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Best Survival Foods That Lasts Forever For SHTF

 

Today We talk about the Best Survival Foods That Lasts Forever. These foods will outlast you and deserve a spot in your preps. Many of them will already be there. Others should be added as soon as you can. I preach “Eat What You Store and Store What You Eat”. I allow for exceptions, though. Especially on the Best Survival Foods That Lasts Forever. 

You might not know what the heck Ghee is. Ghee is butter that has had the water removed. This process of removing the moisture makes it last a really long time. 

I’m a big fan of butter and anyway, I can have it for longer makes me happy. You can find it in a local international market or on Amazon. Or you can make it yourself.

I was pleasantly surprised to find that instant coffee will last the long haul. I was not looking forward to not having my cuppa joe. In fact neither are my friends and family. I am not a morning person. 

I have canned foods on the list. You may be thinking that canned food wont last forever. And They might not. But They might. The expiration date is made up. As long as the can is not compromised then you will be fine.

 

  • Honey
  • Salt
     
  • Vinegar
     
  • Sugar
     
  • Hard Liquor
     
  • White Rice
     
  • Maple Syrup
     
  • Ghee
     
  • Vanilla Extract
     
  • Lard
     
  • Hard tack
     
  • Pemmican
     
  • Dried beans
     
  • Corn starch
     
  • Powdered Milk
     
  • Soy sauce
     
  • Bouillon cubes
     
  • Instant coffee
     
  • Canned foods
     

 

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Bartering to Eat: How People on the Streets of Venezuela are Surviving

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vflagVenezuela truly has become a nightmare come to life. What has taken place over the last three years has been nothing short of a total destabilization of the entire country. The water system, the roads, the electrical grid, the hospital, and especially the food distribution system. Venezuelans became so desperate that they were forced to scrounge for food in dumpsters and hunt down cats and dogs. Crime became rampant as well, and the capital city of Caracas now has the highest murder rate in the world. Mobs of vigilantes are frequently seen picking up the slack of the corrupt police; that is, when they’re not busy looting grocery stores. Venezuela is practically a war zone now.

Here’s a breakdown of the last three years for Venezuela:

  • In 2013 a major oil crash hurt the Venezuela economy the most and prompted the butterfly effect.
  • In 2015 – The Venezuelan currency, the bolivar, was worth less than a penny, prompting a monetary breakdown of the banking industry.
  • March of 2015 – The food crisis begins. The government can’t pay to import basic food items like milk, flour and eggs, leaving many supermarkets with empty shelves. Venezuelans were doing everything they could to stockpile food in order to insulate themselves from the coming economic and monetary implosion.
  • January 2016 – New power struggles emerged as many Venezuelans had enough of Maduro. In January, the opposition party, Democratic Unity, took 109 seats in Congress, far more than the 55 seats Maduro’s socialist party won. During this time, the government declares 60-day economic emergency.
  • 2016 February – President Maduro announces measures aimed at fighting economic crisis, including currency devaluation and first petrol price rise in 20 years.
  • 2016 April – Government imposes two-day week for public sector workers in bid to overcome serious energy crisis after severe drought dramatically reduces water levels in the country’s main hydroelectric dam.
  • May 2016 – Venezuela considers defaulting on foreign debt in order to negotiate more favorable terms. 
  • 2016 September – Hundreds of thousands of people take part in a protest in Caracas calling for the removal of President Maduro, blaming him for the economic crisis and accusing the electoral commission of delaying a referendum which could shorten him term in office.

Prepare for collapse: A step-by-step guide

Surviving the Streets of Venezuela

As you can see, the country of Venezuela is experiencing a slow, agonizing death and the citizens of this once prominent country are the one’s who are suffering. The country was once considered an oil giant and jobs at the state-run oil company PDVSA were coveted for above average salaries, generous benefits and cheap credit that brought home ownership and vacationing abroad within reach for many workers. Now, the employees and citizens alike are pawning goods, maxing out credit cards, taking side jobs, and even selling PDVSA uniforms to buy food, according to Reuters’ interviews with two dozen workers, family members, and union leaders.

“Every day a PDVSA worker comes to sell his overall,” said Elmer, a hawker at the biggest market in the oil city of Maracaibo, as shoppers eyed pricey rice and flour imported from neighboring Colombia.

“They also sell boots, trousers, gloves and masks.”

“Sometimes we let the kids sleep in until noon to save on breakfast,” said a maintenance worker who works on the shores of Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela’s traditional oil-producing area near the Colombian border. He said he has lost five kilos (11 lb) this year because of scrimping on food.

Source

How to Survive an Economic Collapse

Make no mistake, to survive hyperinflation and economic collapse you need to think in terms of survival. You need to have the right skills.

You need to plan ahead. When you start seeing signs at the beginning. Many Venezuelans fled the country the moment the saw something was awry. As well, you need the kind of skills that will make you money no matter how bad things get. Jobs such as ones found in the medical field, farming, private security, mechanics, plumbers, electricians, or repairmen of any kind; as well as, teachers and tutors, especially if they can impart money-making skills.

  1. Get prepared. At the very least, buy food, products, and supplies in bulk to help you prepare for price inflation. If you have the means to do so, invest in 30-60 days worth of supplies so that you have everything you need. Having these on hand will help you if times become more difficult. You can use this free online series to begin creating a personal step-by-step preparedness plan for your family; or, buy the best-selling book, The Prepper’s Blueprint to use as a reference in your preparations. As well, if you can manage, get out of debt, organize your finances and find ways to free up some of your income for an emergency fund to help you create a personal safety net.
  2. Preserve wealth. Choose hard assets (dry goods, precious metals, land, livestock, skills, etc.) for long-term investments so they will hold their intrinsic value over time. Holding these types of investments will insulate you from inflation and other economic issues. Further, tying your money up in assets will help you avoid the inflating prices of food sources in the future, thus furthering your cause of self-reliant living.
  3. Invest in food. One thing analysts and financial pundits agree on is that, in general, commodities will continue to rise. When others are buying foods at inflated prices, you will be consuming your investment when it was purchased at a lower price. Using a combination of shelf stable foods, you can create a well-rounded food supply to depend on when an emergency arises. Further, these foods last a lifetime and would make sound investments for future planning. Ideally, you want to store shelf-stable foods that your family normally consumes, as well as find foods that are multi-dynamic and serve many purposes. Dry goods like rice, wheat, beans, salt, honey, and dry milk will provide you with an investment that will grow in value as prices rise, and also offer you peace of mind in case the economy further degrades. This  food storage calculator can show you how much food should you need to store. As well, read Emergency Items: What Will Disappear First for more ideas.
  4. Learn how to grow your own food. In a homestead environment, a person wants the land to work for them as much as possible. Invest in fruit trees, seeds, and garden supplies. If you really want these peak foods, find a way to grow them yourself. Further, if you live in a rural area, consider investing in trees and bushes that will lure wild game. The trees and bushes can provide you with added sustenance and help you stock meat in your freezer. Here is a how-to guide for creating a garden quickly.
  5. Raise your own food. Rather than paying hard-earned money at the store for eggs, poultry and dairy—raise them yourself. Chickens are very easy to care for and can provide you with meat and eggs throughout the year. Additionally, you can find substitutions for these peak foods with a little research and ingenuity. For example, rabbits would be a suitable protein replacement and can even be raised in more urban areas. Similar to chickens, they don’t require much care and with some effort can be fed from the homestead’s garden or you can grow fodder. They are also great breeders and will provide you with ample amounts of meat. These are the 10 best meat rabbit breeds. As well, for the modest price of purchasing a fishing license, you can stock your freezer with fresh-caught fish.
  6. It all adds up. Again, do what you can to pay off debts ahead of time and work to restructure your outgoing funds to lower your expenses as much as possible. Debt only enslaves you further, and finding ways to detach from the system will break those shackles. As well, look into finding additional income streams. The more income you can set aside, the better off you will be. That way, if your main income dries up, you have a fall back income and won’t have to go into default.

Be prepared to lose most of the money you’ve spent your whole life saving, because even before the collapse occurs, the government will likely have laws in place that will prevent you from taking money out of the country. However, that may be a small price to pay in exchange for not living in hell hole where you have to eat trash to survive.

The people of Venezuela are in a survival situation. The key to them surviving is dependent of them. Those who took heed and planned early will have better success at surviving. As well, being able to change to the current environments you find yourself in and being able to cut your losses in order to survive your present reality will play a role in how one survives these economic death throes. You’ll pat yourself on the back when your homeland collapses, because it is always better to be a poor man in a rich country, than a dead man in a poor country.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Select the Best Grow Light for Your Indoor Garden

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plantWith the price of food on a steady incline, more people are making an effort to grow their own food sources at home. While having a functioning garden is easy during the warm summer months, when the days get shorter in the fall, gardeners have to get creative in helping plants grow. Many turn to grow lights to provide plants additional light and time to establish themselves. This indoor gardening trick allows you to bring the benefits of sunshine indoors to make the most of your garden. Here is a list of which plants to grow during each month of the year.

There are, however, a lot of different options when it comes to these lights and it can be overwhelming to pick the right one. The following list will help you identify which grow light will work the best for your needs.

The Best Grow Lights for Your Indoor Garden

Fluorescents

Fluorescent lamps are great because they are inexpensive and readily available. Fluorescent tubes are great for installation under counters or on ledges and shelves. They provide enough light for seedlings, herbs, vegetables and some small house plants like African violets; however, they fluorescent tubes may not provide enough light for larger flowering plants or buds.

Compact Fluorescent Systems, on the other hand, are quite bright and can be used for growing most plants. Though the initial investment is a bit more up front, CFSs last up to 10 times as long as incandescent bulbs while only using a third of the electricity.

Incandescent Lamps

Incandescent lamps are affordable and can be bought at most hardware stores. They are sufficient for growing herbs or small houseplants, but they are not always a strong enough light source for growing vegetables.

High Intensity Discharge Bulbs

HID Bulbs are very bright and very efficient, but they are also quite expensive. There are a few different types of HID bulbs available, including High Pressure Sodium, Low Pressure Sodium, Metal Halide, and Mercury Vapor bulbs, though for an indoor garden, you’ll want either the High Pressure Sodium or Metal Halide bulbs (any of the other choices are overkill for what you’re trying to accomplish).

Bulbs aren’t the only things to consider when purchasing an indoor growing system. You’ll also need to acquire a ballast, cord, and reflector, though there is less variety in these components. You can buy each of these parts separately or as a complete kit. It’s best to price these systems and see what works best for your budget and your needs.

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

9 Weird Foods Our Forefathers Ate

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Over two hundred years ago when the United States was first being built, things were far different than they are today, from the clothes people wore to the technology available to the language they used in everyday conversation. But most people don’t realize that the food they ate was also very different. Granted, we continue […]

The post 9 Weird Foods Our Forefathers Ate appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Wild Persimmons – A fall delight for every forager

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It’s the time of the year when wild persimmons begin dropping in most places and it’s the perfect time to forage for these fall delicacies. If you want to enjoy wild persimmons this year, you would need to hurry as raccoons, deer, birds and pretty much every living creatures will be looking for these tasty … Read more…

The post Wild Persimmons – A fall delight for every forager was written by Dan Mowinski and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

20 Long-Lasting Foods That Will Keep You Well-Fed After SHTF

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If you haven’t already stocked up on survival food, you should get started right away. There are plenty of nutritious, long-lasting foods that you can find in any grocery store. Keep in mind that during a disaster, your body will need more calories than usual due to all the stress and work involved, so focus […]

The post 20 Long-Lasting Foods That Will Keep You Well-Fed After SHTF appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

How To Make MREs At Home

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MRE’s are very convenient. You just open it up, add water to the heater and, once it heats up, put your entree package into the hot water. Within a few minutes, you have a hot meal with enough calories to sustain you throughout the day. The problem is, most MREs aren’t very appetizing, and some […]

The post How To Make MREs At Home appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Smoking meat for long-term storage – Smoking secrets

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My family has been smoking meat ever since I can remember and their teachings have been passed on from one generation to another. If you are the type of person that hunts or have a small homestead which provides you with all the meat your family needs, smoking meat may be a useful hobby for … Read more…

The post Smoking meat for long-term storage – Smoking secrets was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Foraging for wild foods this fall, just like the pioneers did

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The first settlers that shaped and tamed this country were nothing more than modern hunter-gatherers and their foraging ways provided a good source of foods when crops were not available. Foraging for wild foods was an important skill and it was passed on to newer generations, even when trading posts were becoming more and more … Read more…

The post Foraging for wild foods this fall, just like the pioneers did was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Establishing how much food and water to store

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Storing food and water is one of the basics of emergency preparedness and you have to go through this step if you want to survive during an emergency. Deciding how much food and water to store may become a daunting task for some, but it doesn’t have to be if you follow some simple rules. … Read more…

The post Establishing how much food and water to store was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

The Incredible Edible Dandelion: Using This Weed to the Fullest

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Hey there, ReadyNutrition Readers!  We’re going to give you guys and gals a bit of information pertaining to Taraxacum officinale, also known as the Dandelion.  Last year I conducted a book review on the work “Eat the Weeds,” and out of the edible weeds, none exemplifies quality vs. misunderstanding as the common dandelion.  Most consider them a nuisance; however, they really are a treasure-trove if you know how to use them.

The dandelion is a perennial, and it contains a wealth of vitamins and nutrients, as well as naturopathic applications that are astounding.  The dandelion is edible in its entirety, which is really good to know from a survival perspective.  They also grow upon a taproot, an important consideration as they will grow back if harvested from the surface and the root is left alone.

Natural Medicine

From a naturopathic perspective, dandelion tinctures and teas can be used to help the liver and gall bladder, and the root can be tinctured and used as a diuretic, especially good for women with excessive water weight caused during the normal course of menses.

NUTRITION INFORMATION   Taken from USDA SR-21   

Source

Here are just a few segments of the breakdown (nutritionally) from dandelion.

Dandelion, 1 cup, chopped (55g)

  • Protein 1.5 g                                    
  • Vitamin A   5588 IU  (112%RDA)                           
  • Vitamin C  19.3 mg (32%RDA)
  • Vitamin E  1.9 mg (9%RDA)                      
  • Vitamin K  428 mcg  (535%RDA)

Other ingredients include Iron, Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Sodium, and Zinc.  All from the dandelion!  When you’re tincturing, you should try to harvest the roots in October/November.  This period of time is when the concentration of its natural constituents is at its height.  Dandelion is an excellent diuretic and is good to take when sweating and flushing the system are needed, such as during the time of fever or cold.  Just remember to replace the fluid taken out of your system by the dandelion.

Edibles

The herb can also be dried and preserved, reconstituted in soups, stews, or salads with minimal losses of its vitamins and nutrients.  Concentration and focus should be placed on gathering it, as it provides vitamin C and A in large quantities, and these vitamins will be scarce in times of collapse or shortage.

After rinsing the dandelion off in cold water, you can chop them up and eat them in your salads.  There is also another way that I personally prefer to eat them.  Parboil them lightly, just to take out the crisp without making them go completely limp or wilted.  Then drain them off in a colander.  Next, throw them in a frying pan with about ¼ cup of olive oil, and sauté, adding fresh chopped cloves of garlic.  It comes out with the taste and consistency of spinach.  Throw a little bit of butter and salt on it, and it is delicious.

Ben Charles Harris’ book mentioned earlier gives more weeds and “nuisance” plants for you to cook and make salads from.  Why not supplement your diet with quality food while cutting your grocery bill for fresh vegetables at the same time?  Dandelions actually help the soil by aerating it and allowing some space between for the growth of helpful microorganisms and other “helpers” such as worms and beetles that help to condition the soil.

In addition, honeybees are heavily dependent upon the pollen produced from countless fields of dandelion.  If you plan on making any honey, it would be wise to preserve the fields full of them as a food source for your bees as well as for you and your family.  So, with these words, I encourage you to go out into your backyard and reacquaint yourself with the dandelion.  With so many gifts to offer, it would be wise to take advantage of them.  Just as with anything else, sometimes a gold mine is right in front of you, and you just need to recognize it for what it is.  Dandelions are just that.  Happy salad-gathering, and let us know about your adventures and any recipes you may have for us!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Make One of the Hardiest Non-Perishable Survival Foods

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pemmicanMaintaining a supply of non-perishable food is usually of the highest priority for preppers, which explains why there is such a wide variety of books and articles catering to the prepper community, on canning, dehydrating, and storing food. But among all of the food preservation methods that are so popular with preppers, there is one little known method that stands out. It is by no means unheard of, but it isn’t nearly as popular as it used to be.

I’m referring to the process of making pemmican; a type of non-perishable food that is known for its high calorie density. Pemmican was first created by the Native Americans, and was later adopted by European settlers. It remained popular among pioneers, explorers, and military units well into the 20th century, when it likely fell out of favor with the proliferation of canned foods. Which is a shame, because pemmican is awesome. It’s loaded with all of the fat and protein you need to get through a hard day, and not to mention quite tasty as well.

Though there are multiple recipes for this survival food, pemmican always contains lean dried meat and tallow. The meat is ground up into a powder like substance before being mixed with liquid fat. Nuts and berries are often added as well. Afterward the whole mix is sealed in a container, and stored in a cool dry place. Under these conditions it can last for months, years, and sometimes decades if nothing is added to the meat and fat.

So if you’re looking for another food preservation method, watch this quick guide on how to make pemmican, and enjoy!

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Honey Mesquite: A Survival Tree for Arid Lands

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Honey mesquite also commonly called mesquite is an amazing tree native to North America that was a key resource of the native people. If you grow this tree on your property, it will provide you with food, drink, medicine and fertilizer, just as it did for the natives.   There are two known varieties of … Read more…

The post Honey Mesquite: A Survival Tree for Arid Lands was written by Dan Mowinski and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Civil War Era Foods You Can Still Make Today

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During wartime or a natural disaster, food shortages and lack of natural resources for cooking requires a great deal of improvisation and basic knowledge of cooking principles. The Civil War era foods listed in this article stood the test of time and they can still be cooked today. This is reliable information for when times … Read more…

The post Civil War Era Foods You Can Still Make Today was written by Dan Mowinski and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

How To Save Perishable Food In An Off-Grid Emergency

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canned tomatoes“That morning, when Helen apprehensively opened the freezer, she found several hundred pounds of choice and carefully wrapped meat floating in a noxious sea…As any housewife would do under the circumstances, she wept.  This disaster was perfectly predictable, Randy realized.  He had been a fool.  Instead of buying fresh meat he should have bought canned meats by the case.  If there was one thing he certainly should have foreseen, it was the loss of electricity.”   – “Alas, Babylon,” by Pat Frank, page 151

Readers, there’s your standard…what to read and what we may very well face.  The cited work, if you’re into disaster fiction/apocalyptic reading is the end-all be-all of survival stories of how a community organizes and makes it through a nuclear war.  It is not so much a how-to as a story with real-life situations that average people face.

What we are focusing upon is the initial problem: refrigerated food, and an emergency just hit and took out all of the electricity.  In this day and age, most of the family is working and out of the home.  Still, someone will return home eventually and the actions that are taken could very well save your family some of the foodstuffs they have.  If you read the articles I wrote on my personal experience during Hurricane Katrina, I detailed how I prepared all of the food that was in the refrigerator prior to the power going out.

To be sure, you’re going to lose some food.  There are generators, yes, but you’re going to have to weigh the use of it with silence around the house.  Picture the scenario of three days or so after an EMP and you are the only house on the block with a generator running.  There’s a formula for disaster via the marauders who used to be the friendly neighbors chatting about the football games.  So what can be done?

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

One thing the can be done is to start stocking a prepper’s pantry in your home. Foods that are shelf stable and nutritious are the best to stock. Here is a list of 25 must-have emergency foods and how to get them organized. Along those lines, you want to ensure you have canning supplies, Mylar storage bags and plastic bags on standby to store all the food you are about to preserve.

Another method that is done in the JJ home is when the groceries are brought home, all meats are cooked immediately, placed into Ziploc bags, and then into the freezer they go.  Remember, after a power outage your fridge will still keep things cool for about 24 hours.  The frozen meat adds about another 24 hours to its “frozenness” until it needs to be consumed.  You can do this with other portions of food as well, such as soups, pasta, vegetables, and so forth.  It’s better to have it a few days longer than to lose it in the first 24 hours.

Now what do we do?  Here’s a possible solution.  That frozen meat?  It’s cooked, so if you have the generator, why not stack up those dehydrator machines with already-cooked meat and dry it out?  It would be a one-day risk, and you could dehydrate a certain amount of it and have it last a little longer.  There’s also another method.  Break out your canning manuals, and prepare to can.  For this you’ll need something a little special.  Here’s what I have: The Coleman two-burner dual fuel stove.

Yes, that green camping stove…runs on white gas/Coleman fuel or gasoline.  The reason this is a “goodie” is that you can steadily regulate your temperature and pressure with this little gas-burner stove as you are monitoring your work.  Such regularity is important when it comes to canning.  Can away!  You’ll need to know your stuff: your elevation and the proper recipes that you have in your canning manual for your ratios of seasonings and salt.  Can the meat, can the veggies, can whatever you can!  Better to save most of your food than eat akin to the proverbial last meal and lose most of it.

Meat can also be salted; therefore, it would behoove you to pick up some 25 – 50 lb. bags of salt, and whatever can’t be canned can be preserved in this manner.  Then there’s the Brinkman, the smoker.  Yes, time to break out the charcoal and mesquite chips and smoke the daylights out of that meat.  Smoke some veggies, and dehydrate them as well.  It’ll be a race of the likes of which you’ve never run.  Have a woodstove?  Well, you can scramble all of your eggs on the top of the stove on a baking pan (hopefully yours has a lip).  Scrambled hard…and then you can dry them out after cooking them.

Seafood is tricky.  I’d throw that in the Brinkman and smoke the daylights out of it, being careful to season it, as dried fish on its own tastes pretty crappy.  Just try and avoid the use of butter or dairy sauces or any cheese.  That’ll make the meat go rancid as it goes south.

Speaking of which, if you’re going to have any kind of a “gorge” then make it a breakfast special.  Break out the pancake mix, and eat up all of the dairy products that you can for the next couple of meals, while the electricity is out and the fridge is still within that 24-hour window.  Load up on the powdered sports shakes, the grilled cheese sandwiches on the woodstove, the pancakes and cereal, because fresh milk will be a thing of the past, barring Bessie the cow being tied up outside in the backyard.

You can use the sun to dry out your fare if you have the time, and that is a big if.  You need to get everything cooked and/or canned, and get it out of sight.  The day started out as “Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm,” but after an off-grid disaster, you can bank on the day ending as “The Planet of the Apes.”  Out of sight and out of mind.  Get it cooked, dried, smoked, and canned, and get it in your vehicle if you’re getting out of Dodge, or get it out of sight.

Yes, there’s always room for improvement in this case, and any tips or suggestions you wish to add will be great to glean some of your experience that you have tested on your own.  The most important thing: go into action on this immediately.  You don’t have time to waste, and it’s best to get it all done before the “Drama in Real Life” becomes more real, and more dangerous.  Save the food, get it out of sight, and then be ready to defend it.  Hopefully it won’t come to that, but then again, it’s better safe than sorry.  Hope this piece gave you some “food for thought,” and we look forward to hearing from you.  Keep up that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Make A Swedish Torch

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swedish-torch-fire-survival

Ever wanted to know how to take one piece of firewood and turn it into a stove/torch?  Wonder no more.  This is an introduction to the Swedish torch.  As with anything there’s a dozen ways you can use this concept; from taking your chainsaw and cutting a pile of notches in a log for a long burn to doing it how I did it here, by taking a small chunk of firewood and splitting and cutting it into smaller pieces with my survival knife.

By Jarhead Survivor, a contributing author at SHTFBlog & Survival Cache

Click on image to enlarge

Click on image to enlarge

Check out the Swedish Torch video:

The Steps

First you need a chunk of wood.  In this example I used a 3 inch thick piece and about 14 inches long just to see how it would work.swedish torch  I wanted to make sure it would light easy, so I used a dry piece of fir tree that had been standing dead for a long time.  I split the wood using my TOPS Survival Knife then whittled the inside down a little to make a chimney.  Once the wood was split I whittled about an inch or so out of the four quarters before putting them back together again.  I also cut a notch into the wood that would be the place where I lit the fire about two or three inches up from the bottom.  I also had an old wire coat hanger I used to tie it together at the bottom of the log.  What I did there was wrap the wire around the bottom of the wood and then used my multi-tool to tighten it up so it wouldn’t fall apart after it started burning.

Lighting the Torch

Now I had a stick of firewood that had been split, hollowed out, had a hole carved in the side, then wired back together again.  I swedish torch front viewgathered the driest smallest sticks I could find, which typically come from the dead branches of a fir or pine tree.  I broke these little twigs into even smaller pieces and stuffed them down the “chimney” hole from the top.  Don’t stuff too much wood down or it will block the flames and you won’t get a fire.  If this happens simply pull some of the wood out and try again.  Next I lit a piece of birch bark and put it into the side hole (the fire place – if you will) then let it burn up and into the dry twigs I’d stuffed  into the top.  I wound up blowing on the fire for awhile and for awhile I didn’t think anything was going to happen.

Related: Make A Fire With A Bow Drill

It actually felt similar to blowing on a “bird nest” when you’re trying to light a fire with a coal made from a bow drill.  At first nothing happens, then bam!  There’s a beautiful flame burning.  The top of the torch lit like it was supposed to and burned reasonably even from the top down.  Nothing in nature is ever perfect, but I was really pleased with how it performed.

Duration

This particular Swedish Torch lasted maybe a half hour or so.  If I’d made the log bigger it would have lasted a lot longer, but since swedish torch top viewthis was just a test I was happy with the way that it went.  The Swedish torch isn’t really meant to be a torch.  It’s not like in the movies where the hero walks into the cave and grabs a torch covered with cobwebs that’s obviously been there for fifty years, then lights it and it burns like the sun for three hours while they explore the darkest reaches of the cave.  Could it be used as a torch if you wanted to walk through the woods?

Also Read: How To Make Your Fire Last All Night

You could probably get away with a few minutes of walking through the forest or a dark cave with it, but I wouldn’t want to depend on it for any length of time.  I’m not sure how it would perform being moved around when it’s really meant to be a stationary fire.  Would I do it if I had to?  Hell yeah!  You can always make something that is adaptable, so always try and look for more uses for something if possible.

Make It Into a Stove

I was also able to take my canteen cup and put it on top of the log in such a way that when it burned it was heating water.  It didn’t swedish torch boiling water in a pottake too long for it boil a cup of water, maybe seven or eight minutes, which is totally acceptable in the bush.The next time I make one of these torches I’m going to cut a notch in the top in such a way that it will hold the pot and still be able to burn freely at the same time.  I left it flat on top and it burned ok, but I had to offset it so that it didn’t smother the fire.

Overall Impressions

I liked the Swedish Torch for several reasons.  First, it’s economical.  It doesn’t swedish torch burning outtake a lot of wood to keep a small fire going for a reasonable amount of time.  It’s not going to throw a lot of heat, but you’ll be able to warm your hands over it with no problem.  It’s a great way to throw light if you don’t have a candle, lantern, or flashlight, or if you just want to use it for atmosphere sitting next to your fire pit.  You can heat water on it without having to make a bigger fire.  Of course the downside to it is there’s some work on the front end to fashion it and get it lit.  If I were to spend a night out without man made light, I’d probably make four or five of these and have them laying around.

Questions?  Comments
Sound off below!
Jarhead Survivor

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The 11 Best Survival Foods To Store For NUTRITION

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11 Most Nutritious Survival Foods

I was listening to a podcast the other day, the host was talking about the best survival foods you should be stocking up on. He was suggesting the typical rice and beans diet, with a few dollar store spices thrown in for flavor. I was a little taken aback when he commented, “It’s not so much about nutrition, it’s about survival!”

Huh??

I instantly felt regret for the new preppers who were likely listening to his show. It’s not so much about nutrition? Doesn’t he realize that when your body is lacking key nutrients it begins to suffer physically? Doesn’t he realize that it’s the sickly who die first?

Here at the Prepper Project, we’ve talked plenty about the importance of nutrition when the SHTF, but how exactly does that translate into storing the best survival food? What kinds of foods should we be storing in order to maximize nutrition?

As we all know, eating a balanced meal will yield the best results. There isn’t one food item alone that has all of the essential minerals, vitamins, protein, and nutrients that you’d need to survive. You must eat a variety.

Storing the proper variety of foods is key to your survival. A year’s worth of mac and cheese and beenie weenies might keep you alive, but you’ll feel like crap. Poor health is all it takes for disease to quickly set in and take over.

A good variety of vegetables, fruits, beans, meats, and grains is absolutely essential for a well stocked pantry. There’s no doubt fresh foods are far superior to cooked or dried foods. Grow as many of these survival foods as you possibly can where you are now. But beyond the garden there are a handful of nutrient dense, shelf-stable foods to focus on attaining and storing long term. These will help you get by when the garden can’t be counted on.

Here are 11 of the best, most nutritious survival foods you should be storing for emergencies:

Best Survival Food #1: stews and soups

1) Soups and Stews

Whether you opt for home-canned soups and stews or the store-bought variety, these hearty meals combining meats and vegetables (or vegetables and legumes) are a great way to pack a ton of nutrients into one jar.

My favorite home canned meals are venison or beef stew, chicken and rice soup, chili con carne, and vegetable beef soup. You can whip up a huge pot of your favorite soup and pressure can it to be used for years down the road. Pretty much any soup you buy at the grocery store, with the exception of really thick products such as the cream-of soups, can be canned at home. Venison becomes particularly tender and flavorful when canned in a soup with potatoes, carrots, and tomato juice.

Never can low acid foods, such as meats and vegetables, in anything other than a pressure canner. I’ve seen people on YouTube demonstrating “oven canning”, where you heat jars of food in an oven, and then allow them to cool until the lid seals. Folks, just because a lid seals it does not mean the food in the jar is safe to eat. It must be heated adequately in order to kill botulism spores. Please be safe and don’t cut corners. If you want to can soups, stews, meat, beans, or vegetables, you absolutely must use a pressure canner.

Please read the article 23 Things You Must Know To Can Meat Safely before you can soups and stews for the first time.

 

Best Survival Food #2: bone broth

2) Bone Broth

Homemade bone broth is an excellent source of minerals. Bones from land animals are rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus, and fish bones also contain iodine. (Source)

Bone broth is also a rich source of gelatin. “Although gelatin is by no means a complete protein… it acts as a protein sparer, allowing the body to more fully utilize the complete proteins that are taken in. Thus, gelatin-rich broths are a must for those who cannot afford large amounts of meat in their diets.” ~ Nourishing Traditions

You can start making your own rich bone broth now by using kitchen scraps you’re probably throwing away. Save the carcass of roasted chicken, carrot peels and ends, onion skins and tips, garlic scraps, and celery trimmings. Fill a freezer bag with your scraps until you have enough to make a large pot of broth to can. It can even be frozen in ziploc bags once cooled, though it won’t last nearly as long as canning it. Home canned broth will last for many years when stored in a somewhat cool place, out of direct sunlight and away from moisture. I try to use it up within 1-5 years for best nutritional value. Store bought bone broths are also available in shelf stable forms.

 

Best Survival Food #3: sweet potatoes

3) Sweet Potatoes

These tasty tubers are a great source of vitamin A and beta-carotene, vitamin C, complex carbohydrates, dietary fiber, vitamin B5, vitamin B6, manganese, and potassium. If you have to choose between white potatoes and sweet potatoes, the latter is the winner in nutritional content.

Sweet potatoes are easy to grow at home from “slips”. Potato slips are those sprouts that start to grow from the eyes of sweet potatoes when they’ve been stored for too long. When the sprouts are a couple inches long, break them off as close to the base as possible and sit them in a cup of shallow water for a week or so. Roots will begin growing from the slip. Once a good root system has been established and the sprout starts forming leaves, the slip can then be transplanted directly into the garden. Sweet potato plants grow as long vines, so be sure to either trellis them or give them lots of room to roam! They love deeply cultivated, loose, rich soil.

To store them long term you can easily can peeled sweet potatoes at home in a pressure canner. They’ll last for several years in a jar, but will need to be rotated out for best quality. If growing and canning your own isn’t an option, commercially canned sweet potatoes are available at the grocery store. You can also find them in freeze dried form with a typical shelf life of 20-30 years.

Best Survival Food #4: Kale

4)  Kale

Fresh kale is an amazing superfood. It’s full of vitamins C, A, and K, as well as other micro-nutrients and antioxidants.  If there is any way possible that you can grow it, I would highly encourage you to do so. It’s easy to cultivate, has few pests, and tolerates cold temperatures very well making it an excellent crop to try growing year round.

Although some nutrients are lost during processing, preserved kale is an excellent alternative to fresh. Kale can be canned at home in a pressure canner, or purchased as canned kale greens at the store. It can also be found in dehydrated and powdered forms, as well as freeze dried for longer storage.

Best Survival Food #5: spinach

5) Spinach

Another important dark, leafy green to have plenty of is spinach. Spinach is low in fat and and cholesterol, and high in niacin, zinc, protein, fiber, vitamins A, C, E and K, thiamin, vitamin B6, folate, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, copper, and manganese. Heck, it’s practically a multi-vitamin!

Spinach can be grown and canned at home, or purchased canned at the grocery store. Spinach will last for several years in a can or jar, but should be rotated out regularly for best nutritional value. You can also purchase it in freeze dried form for longer storage, up to 25 years.

I have a hard time stomaching canned spinach, so I’ve been stocking up on freeze dried greens. I plan on using them to make green smoothies, which combine fruits and juices in a way that masks the taste of fresh or dried spinach and kale. Green smoothies are a great way to get a lot of nutrient rich foods down at once.

Best Survival Food #6: wild caught salmon

6) Wild Caught Alaskan Salmon

You must be careful when choosing canned fish from the grocery store. Mercury and other toxins have been found in some wild caught fish, and farm-raised fish are lacking many of the nutrients that wild fish contain (not to mention have also tested positive for environmental contaminants). From what I’ve researched, the healthiest choice for canned fish is wild caught “sockeye salmon” (also referred to as red salmon) from Alaska.

Salmon is an excellent source of Omega 3 fats which are essential for proper body function and are necessary for good brain and heart health. It’s also low in sodium, and is a good source of thiamin, riboflavin, phosphorus, protein, niacin, vitamin B12 and selenium.

Want to make SURE You’re Stockpiling Enough Food?

Discover how to calculate your “Survival Calorie Number” so you know exactly how much of this food to stockpile for a years supply.

Calculating The REAL number of “Survival Calories’ Your Body Requires

 Best Survival Food #7: Quinoa

7) Quinoa

If you aren’t familiar with quinoa yet (pronounced KEEN-wah), it’s an excellent alternative to plain rice in your long term food storage. When rinsed and cooked, it has a very bland flavor that makes it blend well into a variety of dishes. Some people prefer it in savory meals in place of rice, while others like to sweeten it and enjoy it more like a hot breakfast cereal. It’s also great for thickening up soups and stews.

Quinoa is gluten-free, high in protein and one of the few plant foods that contain all nine essential amino acids. It is also high in fiber, magnesium, B-vitamins, iron, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, vitamin E and various beneficial antioxidants. (Source)

I like to purchase quinoa in 5 gallon buckets for long term storage. It’ll last indefinitely when packaged in a mylar bag with oxygen absorbers, sealed in a plastic bucket and stored somewhere out of extreme temperatures.

Best Survival Food #8: Strawberries

8) Strawberries

According to the CDC, Strawberries are the healthiest, most nutrient dense choice of berries (which surprised me, I would have guessed blueberries were number one).  They contain more vitamin C than other fruits, and are especially high in antioxidants and flavonoids.

Strawberries should be in every home garden. Mix them into a flower bed if you don’t have a dedicated garden space. Strawberries are perennials, so they’ll come back year after year. They’re easy to grow, and once established will provide you with food for many years. You’ll have to do a little research to find which varieties grow best in your region. If possible, opt for an “everbearing” variety for a longer harvesting season.

Strawberries can be canned in a water bath canner, dehydrated, or freeze dried. For longest storage, stock up on freeze dried strawberries, which can last for 25 years!

Best Survival Food #9: Garlic

9) Garlic

We wouldn’t think of garlic as a stand alone food. But when added to other dishes not only does it embolden the flavor, it also adds incredible antioxidants and disease fighting properties to what you eat. Garlic has been known for centuries to be a strong antibiotic. Including it in your daily rations will help your body rid itself of dangerous free radicals, and will fight disease causing bugs you might have been exposed to.

Garlic is easy to grow in your own backyard, especially in a raised bed. Did you know you can grow garlic from store-bought bulbs? There are plenty of varieties to choose from through seed companies as well. To plant garlic, pull a bulb apart and place each individual clove with the flat end down into loose soil, pushing it just below the surface. Plant cloves a couple inches apart for bigger bulbs. Water regularly until the cloves begin to sprout. Garlic likes cool weather best, so wait until Fall to plant.

For strongest medicinal value and best flavor, garlic should be used fresh. Once harvested from the garden, it can be stored for several months if cured and kept dry. You can also store dehydrated garlic, or jars of garlic cloves in oil, though they won’t have quite the benefits of fresh.

11 Most Nutritious Survival Foods

10) Oats

Oats are a good source of calories, protein, carbs, fat, and fiber. The great thing about stocking up on oats is that they’ll last 25+ years when stored properly. You can buy them from a food storage company in bulk, or better yet, shop at wholesale clubs such as Sams or Costco and package them in large quantities yourself. Choose from steel cut oats, rolled oats, quick oats, or old fashioned oats… they’re all nutritious and worth having in an emergency.

Fill a 5 gallon mylar bag with oats, drop in a 2000 cc oxygen absorber, seal the bag with a straight iron, and store it in a sealed 5-6 gallon food grade bucket. You can spend a few extra dollars and save yourself a lot of hassle by using gamma seal lids on your food storage buckets. Store the buckets somewhere where they won’t be exposed to extreme heat or cold. Under your bed, in a closet, or in a dry basement would be perfect.

Keep in mind that oats go rancid after a few months once they’ve been opened. If you don’t think you can go through 5 gallons of oats within a few months, you’d be better off packing them in smaller quantities or purchasing them in #10 cans.

 

Best Survival Food #11: beans

11) Beans

Dried beans are full of protein, fiber and calories, and are known among the prepper world to be an excellent (and much cheaper!) alternative to storing a ton of meat. High fiber foods help you feel fuller longer, as well as assisting the digestive tract. Beans also contain iron, phosphorous, calcium, magnesium, manganese, copper, zinc, folate, thiamin and potassium, all essential nutrients to keep your body running properly.

Store a variety of beans to keep your meals interesting. For best results, store dried beans in a mylar bag with oxygen absorbers, sealed and stored in a food grade bucket in a dry location with an average temperature no higher than 70 degrees F. Plan on rotating your beans out every 8-10 years to keep them fresh. Over time beans will begin to lose their natural oils, and will get hard and won’t cook up soft no matter how long you soak them.

Every year or so I like to go through our buckets of beans and can a bunch of them. I have found this to be a good way to rotate through our storage, as canning the beans keeps them usable and soft for a few more years. Having the beans already canned and ready to heat and eat is also very convenient for meals.

Worst case, if your beans have been stored for a really long time and become too hard to cook with, you can always grind them into bean powder and use them to thicken up soups.

Of course, these aren’t the only healthy foods you can stash in your pantry. What nutritious survival foods would you add to this list?

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6 Instant Meals: Just Add Boiling Water

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Stockpiling rice, beans, pasta, and other basic survival foods is a great idea. However, there is one major problem with storing foods like that: you have to cook your meals from scratch. This is fine if you have plenty of time, fuel, water, and cleaning supplies. But if you’re running short on any of these, […]

The post 6 Instant Meals: Just Add Boiling Water appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Pros & Cons of various Survival Foods

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Stockpiling food is one of the basics of emergency preparedness and it requires careful planning. Choosing the right survival foods for your pantry becomes an important preparedness stage as you will rely on those supplies to survive when it hits the fan. Your survival pantry should be well-equipped and diversity is the key word if … Read more…

The post Pros & Cons of various Survival Foods was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Who Else Want’s To Know Which Emergency Survival Foods Taste The Best?

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If you’d like to know what the best tasting Emergency Survival Foods are, and are worth investing in, or you’d like to know which ones taste the worst, then watch this video below, and let me know which ones you’d like me to taste test.

I’ve got a family of 6… who’d be happy to be your guinea pig and help you weed out the nasty stuff so you don’t waste you money on garbage.

To have me taste test the emergency survival food you’re most interested in purchasing, leave me a comment below and tell me what you’d like to have me taste test for you!

I’ll be taking the top picks, buying the food myself and taste testing it for you on camera.

This should be Fun!

The post Who Else Want’s To Know Which Emergency Survival Foods Taste The Best? appeared first on .

The Quick and Easy Way to Make a Fishing Spear

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fishingCivilization makes life so easy, because you only have to be specialized in a handful of skills to survive. And the money those skills bring in will pay for everything else that you need in life. If however you’re ever stuck in the wilderness, you’ll find that you have to juggle countless responsibilities to survive. You have to build your own shelter, gather your own wood, protect yourself from predators, procure and clean your own water, and you have to find your own food.

And when it comes to food, you’ll require another layer of diverse skills. You’ll need to know how to forage and how to tell which plants are edible. You’ll have learn how to set traps and how to properly clean and cook the animals that you kill. And among many other skills, it would be useful to know how to catch a fish.

Obviously, if you’re struggling to survive in the wilderness, you won’t have a fishing pole and a tackle box. All you’ll have is your own bare hands and what you can make with them. While you could make a rudimentary fishing pole, in many cases your best bet would be to simply wade into some shallow water and spear the fish yourself.

While an ordinary sharpened pole can work well for this task, you’ll be more successful with a four pronged spearfishing pole. Fortunately, they aren’t too difficult to make out of the typical vegetation you’d find in the forest. Here’s how it’s done:

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Everything You Need to Know About Planting and Harvesting Garlic

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Everything You Need to Know About Planting and Harvesting Garlic   Garlic has potent antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties in addition to being beneficial for heart health and iron assimilation. You’ll need to do a little research on how to prepare and use these. For instance, garlic is more effective chewed or chopped than …

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The post Everything You Need to Know About Planting and Harvesting Garlic appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Money Mondays: How to Get Free Containers for Emergency Storage

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com If you are trying to build up your emergency food storage, you may be concerned about the costs associated with storage containers along with the food itself.  There is some expense involved, but it does not have to break your budget.  There are free or inexpensive ways to obtain emergency storage containers. Here are a few tips: Water Containers You don’t have to spend a lot of money on water containers. 2-liter soda […]

The post Money Mondays: How to Get Free Containers for Emergency Storage appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

Bass and Bluegill : Two SHTF Protein Sources You Haven’t Considered

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fishReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, there are a few words that need to be mentioned regarding Bass and Bluegill from a survival perspective.  As preppers and adherents to the survival lifestyle, you are well aware of how important protein is for your diet.  After a SHTF scenario, we are going to be forced to return (at least partially) to a hunter-gatherer lifestyle.  Such a change can best be effected if you are cognizant of all avenues open to you.  One of those good avenues is taking advantage of pan-fish as a source for your protein.

I found the following chart you may wish to save for your records:

Bass and Bluegill Nutritional Values, Fried, 3-ounce serving

Calories 211 Sodium 484 mg
Total Fat 3 g Potassium 291 mg
Saturated 0 g Total Carbs 15 g
Polyunsaturated 0 g Dietary Fiber 1 g
Monounsaturated 0 g Sugars 0 g
Trans 0 g Protein 20 g
Cholesterol 31 mg
Vitamin A 1% Calcium 2%
Vitamin C 0% Iron 11%

As can readily be seen from this chart, bass and bluegill (in relatively small amounts, mind you) provide substantial amounts of protein, along with valuable electrolyte minerals, such as sodium and potassium.  (Source)

Now there is a lot more to it than just knowing the nutritional values for these fish.  Suffice to say that Bass and Bluegill can be found throughout the United States, and are fairly easy to catch.  You can fish for them with something as simple as some line, a hook, and a bamboo/sapling-type pole.  You can even catch fish without a hook – you just need to know how! Meat fishing is decidedly different from sport fishing.  I strongly recommend studying some books on these two species of fish.  They’re in season now.  For your home state, it is best to visit either the county extension office or the USFS (U.S. Forestry Service) for more detailed information and maps as to the prevalence of these two fish species.

The bass really go for minnows, worm, and crayfish, and the bluegill for the former two.  I have never really liked the artificial lures and spinners, even though many people have great success with them.  Crayfish can be found in the streams and lakes where the bass abound.  If you aren’t experienced in capturing these guys, be careful, as they are similar to a miniature lobster and can inflict a good pinch on you with their pincers/claws.

When you hook them to use for bait, you should try to place your hook in them between thorax and tail, from the top.  If you hook it from the bottom it will cause them to present upside-down, and the bass (who hunt from sight) will know that something’s “fishy.”  Plus, you want them to travel backwards, which is their normal manner.  Worms are not as complex; however, your object should be to not disable the animal to a degree that it doesn’t even move on the hook.  Another consideration is that you must make sure the hook will be taken by the fish.  Worms and minnow are good both for bass and for bluegill.  The crayfish is a little tough for the latter to handle, except if he’s a really big bluegill or your dealing with an exceptionally-small crayfish.

Cooking fish can be prepared in a variety of ways. There are even recipes that will use up the odds and ends that you normally don’t eat. Remember: In an emergency, you want to know how to make use of everything you have. Practice your pan-fishing, and also practice building yourself a pyramid-frame hardwood smoker.  You can smoke your fish and dry them out over wood smoke.  This will preserve them; the time will increase accordingly with the amount of moisture you remove from the fish.  Salting is another method.  Why not take the time to (along with your fishing) practice the preservation of your catch?  You should also keep a notebook with you to record the locations and conditions of your excursions.

Remember you’re practicing to be a meat-fisherman who will provide protein either for yourself alone or for others of your family who are dependent upon you.  Also good as a skill to develop it the making of line, poles, and hooks from scrap materials.  “Zebco” won’t necessarily be around after the SHTF, nor will the “Bass Pro Shop.”  Use this time to hone your skills and learn the habits of these two common pan fish.  It can benefit you in the long run and add to your survivability for when it hits the fan.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How to Choose the Best Emergency Food and Why

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How to Choose the Best Emergency Food and Why Have you ever wondered what the best emergency food is? Is it rice? Is it canned food? As a general rule of thumb, you want foods that A) Take up low volume, and B) Contain high calories. By finding foods with those two qualities, you’ll be …

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10 Best survival foods at your grocery store

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An emergency can strike without warning and unfortunately, most people find out too late that they are missing the essential supplies. Far too many times you’ve seen on the news how people line up in front of grocery stores hoping to get some last minute survival foods. If you end up doing the same, you … Read more…

The post 10 Best survival foods at your grocery store was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Expiration management – Is your food still safe to eat?

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Some things last longer than others, but eventually everything comes to an end. If you are one of the people concerned about the future, you probably have a well-equipped pantry waiting for you at home. Unfortunately, some of us take for granted our supplies and even more, there are those who have no idea how … Read more…

The post Expiration management – Is your food still safe to eat? was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

This Overlooked Protein Source Needs to be in Your Prepper Pantry

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 Hey there, ReadyNutrition Readers!  I wanted to give you some information on something I go nuts about.  Peanuts, that is!  As we speak, I have some right here, salted in the shell…cracking open in between sentences akin to a giant squirrel.  Yes, they’re really good.  I know, I know, some of you guys and girls are allergic to peanuts.  Still, there are some uses that you can still find for them.  The point I’m making is that the peanut is a winner…. now, and after the SHTF.

Did you know that peanuts are the main source of protein for the majority of the people in the world?  Technically they’re a legume, and are one of the top 25 foods to have in your prepper pantry. You can even boil and can them for later use. To grow peanuts, you’ll have to check the times of the year to germinate and plant because it varies on your geographic location.  They are a “cover” crop, simply meaning that after a harvest one year of corn, wheat, etc., you plant the next year in peanuts…it promotes the restoration of nitrogen to the soil.  That is what peanuts do.  I pick up seeds periodically as a backup, and grow some (potted) every three years…. just to seed-save and have a few.

Peanuts are a high protein source

Peanuts are very high in protein.  1-ounce of shelled peanuts has about 7 grams of protein.  They’re very high in minerals: Niacin, Magnesium, and Manganese, to name a few, and the ounce gives 20, 10, and 30% of the RDA for these respectively.  They also contain sodium and potassium (230 and 180 mg respectively), which is a good indicator of why they’re optimal for hiking and physical exertions, as they can replace some electrolytes.

Create an alternative oil source

Because peanuts have such a high oil content, you can also press them for oil.  This oil, understand, can be used for cooking (optimal), as well as lamps, emollients in homemade lotions, ointments, and creams, and in a grid-down, SHTF scenario, nothing could be so useful…for cooking meals and providing light when candles and batteries are a thing of the past.  There are hand-presses you can order that will enable you to harvest your oil.

For more information on how to press oil from seeds and nuts, click here.

Another thing of interest: the resultant mass after the oil is pressed out of the nuts can be both eaten and/or used as feed for livestock. Then there’s peanut butter, JJ’s end-all, be-all of existence in some form or fashion.  The protein shakes I take for lifting weights taste as the “S” in the SHTF; therefore, I augment it with 2 Tbsp. of peanut butter, adding an additional 8 grams of protein and making it taste really good.  Peanut butter is really great for storage and for survival food.  The type and grade is your choice.  I like to pick mine up in plastic jars, as this is Montana, and I don’t want 500 lbs. of peanut butter and 100 lbs. of cracked, broken glass jars, the former stuck and frozen to the latter.

Seriously, folks, it’s great survival food and will supplement your diet and give you the extra protein and fats your body needs in times of trouble.  The fiber (2 g per 1-ounce) will also help to prevent constipation, as peristalsis decreases in times of high stress found during a collapse scenario.  And it tastes great.  That counts for something, ladies and gentlemen.  You’re going to face enough problems when it hits.  You need something to mentally buoy you through the tough times.  Something that is good for you and fits the bill for a survival food that actually is enjoyable to eat is a definite plus that will help you mentally.

We’d love to hear about your experiences with the peanut, and how you have incorporated it into your preps.  As you probably may have guessed by my exuberance on the subject, yes, Reese’s peanut butter cups are JJ’s favorite candy, and those Nutter Butter cookies.  Either of them are akin to a can of Macadamia nuts…. you eat until everything is gone, gone, gone!  Looking forward to hearing from you.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Make The Most Delicious Beef Jerky Ever

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Jerky is one of the oldest and most popular ways to preserve meat. Traditionally dried in sun and smoke, jerky can last through the winter and often longer if you make it properly. Although veggies, fruits, grains, seeds, and nuts are easier to store, preserving your own meat is quite doable. Home-made jerky is made […]

The post How To Make The Most Delicious Beef Jerky Ever appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Sugar, foods, and health in prepping!

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Sugar, foods, and health in prepping! James Walton “I Am Liberty” I was sitting in the sauna today after a grueling workout it came to me. I was dripping sweat and staring the scorching ground of the sauna thinking about how hard it had been to avoid sugar for the 3 weeks I have been … Continue reading Sugar, foods, and health in prepping!

The post Sugar, foods, and health in prepping! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Gardening During Troubled Times: How to Start a Victory Garden

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ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, we’re going to touch on a subject that bears keeping in mind: the Victory gardens kept by citizens of the United States during World War II.  The reason this subject is good to mention is because now that spring has arrived, you should know about shortages and pitfalls people faced before.  As it is aptly written, there is nothing new under the sun; therefore, the same dilemmas faced by people before will be faced again.  A survival garden may be just the thing your family needs, as it will passively produce food for your future.

Victory-Garden-2Wartime brings real shortages in virtually every area of the economy, especially in the area of foodstuffs.  Rationing becomes the norm rather than the exception, and it is difficult for people to scrape out a bare subsistence.  During WWII, the Victory garden was recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in a pamphlet published in 1943.  The gardens were recommended to have the following vegetables planted:

Spinach, Chard or Kale for greens; Cabbage; Lettuce; Tomatoes; Soy Beans; Snap Beans; Lima Beans; Peas; Asparagus; Carrots; Beets; Turnips; Parsnips; Onions; Strawberries; Raspberries; Radishes; Peppers; Onions; Pole Beans.

That’s quite a list, but it is not comprehensive and many preppers suggest these 25 seeds to start their survival gardens for added nutrition.  The point to be made is that if you are able to grow food, then do it during the warm months.  Potatoes can be grown inside of old tires, and there are plenty of books and resources out there that will tell you how to perform micro gardening.  This is a type of gardening that allows you to maximize the minimal space and arable land that you may have.

The main thing is planning and knowing where to start.  On this site Miss Tess Pennington offers many different resources to pursue concerning gardening and cultivation.  You must find out the available square footage that is on your property and utilize it to the maximum potential to grow.  Make use of every possible growing space and do not neglect window boxes and plants that can be grown on the windowsill.  Do not neglect a deck if you live in a high-rise or an apartment building.  Be creative.  Try to plan for what you believe you will need.

Even if you do not have the acreage to be able to sustain you and your entire family, at the bare minimum you can supplement your food supply.  Let’s not forget that food in the immediacy is not the only consideration.  You want to save your seeds.  Seed-saving will be very important in the times to come, as you want to be assured of crops for future growing seasons.  The Survival Seed Vaults are good investments, especially if you have to pick up and run to another location or want to secure it in a cache.  Along those lines, consider adding the easiest seeds to grow in any of your caches, that way you can have a reliable food source when you need it the most. It’s kind of hard to take everything that is growing with you, and to have these seeds that you can take off with will help assuage the loss of your crops if you must flee.

Your survival garden should also include whatever you can pick up with wild crafting.  Remember that article I wrote last year on the book, “Eat the Weeds,” that details common wild plants and herbs that are edible?  Man forages as well as produces.  Never limit yourself to one activity.  Remember, when you find dandelions or shepherd’s purse…you can transplant them (here are some other edible weeds to consider)!  Bring them back to your survival garden and maintain them!  The only limits on your survival garden are the limits you place on it.

Other excellent resources for you are your county extension office and your local community college.  These institutions are replete with free information, tips, literature, and sometimes even free supplies for things such as gardening, horticulture, and composting.  Take advantage of these resources, as your tax dollars are paying for them.  Make inroads with the people who work there and they can point you toward a plethora of information and materials that you can use for your home.

To summarize, now is the time to get your garden in gear.  Whether you have 20 acres up in the mountains or just a small balcony in a high rise, you can make the most out of your space and resources with the proper planning and desire to grow some foods.  Plan your work and work your plan.  We look forward to hearing any ideas or suggestions you may have for your fellow readers and us.  Have a great day, and happy gardening!

 

JJ

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Make Pemmican, The Ultimate Survival Food (Video)

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pemmican

By SurvivoPedia

I’ve got a confession: I’ve wanted to make Pemmican ever since I found the recipe for it in The Lost Ways, an awesome compilation of survival information edited and published by Claude Davis.

Invented by the natives of North America, pemmican was used by Indian scouts as well as early western explorers. These people spent a great deal of time on the go and depended on having portable, high-energy, highly nutritious, and filling foods that would last for long periods of time.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: How To Make Pemmican, The Ultimate Survival Food (Video)

Filed under: Prepping, Recipes

Places to store your emergency food

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Emergency food storage is an important component of the prepping journey. Whether you buy survival food from online stores or just buy some extra food at the supermarket each week, all those supplies will overwhelm your kitchen storage. If you also store water, you will quickly run out of storage space and you will need … Read more…

The post Places to store your emergency food was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.