Grandma’s Forgotten ‘Everyday Survival Skills’

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skills grandmother

Our grandparents didn’t spend their spare time watching TV or playing video games. The truth is they didn’t have spare time. Keeping the family fed, fields tended, livestock healthy and a roof over their heads kept them busy from dawn to dusk. They did whatever it took to survive and thrive.

While grandma and grandpa each had everyday skills that all homesteaders and survivalists should learn, today we’ll focus on Grandma’s day.

Grandma was a dynamo. She rose before dawn with a mile-long to-do list in her head. Feeding the family a hearty breakfast and sending them on their way was first priority. She then could get to her own busy day. Housework, fixing a fence with grandpa, helping the cow give birth, making pies to trade, fixing lunch, canning peaches and pulling weeds were checked off the list. Then it was time to make dinner and send everyone off to bed.

“The Big Book Of Off The Grid Secrets” — Every Homesteader Needs A Copy!

Parking or storage for trailers, ATVs, snowmobile

Here are some of the skills that helped her succeed at all of these tasks.

Feeding the Family

Grandma didn’t just run to a drive-thru to grab dinner after work. She planned ahead and made meals from scratch. She knew the night before what she would make for dinner. To accomplish this, she knew how to do these things:

1. Cooking from scratch – When grandma made dinner, she created masterpieces with no help from any cardboard box mix. Her meals were nutritious, tasty and far less expensive than any of the quick foods today. Love and care for her family were the special ingredients in every meal.

2. Cast iron cooking – It is amazing how many different dishes grandma made in her cast iron cookware. An entire meal, from soup to dessert, can be made with just one cast iron pot or skillet.

3. Preserving foods – Many of us remember coming home with jars of jelly, apple butter and pickles from grandma’s. Her cellar or pantry was always lined with shelves full of preserved goodness. Learning to preserve food via canning, pressure cooking or other methods is a wise investment in your own future.

Growing or Raising Food

Running to the grocery store each day was not an option to grandma. She essentially could shop every day in her own pantry or backyard.

4. The kitchen garden – No matter what grandpa grew in the fields, grandma always had a kitchen garden. She could walk out back and pick fresh dinner fixings. She often had fruit and nut trees, as well as her herbs and vegetables.

5. Animal husbandry – Grandma tended to be the one who cared for the livestock — a cow or goat for milk, a steer or pig for meat and then, the chickens. It was hard to find a homestead that didn’t have at least a few chickens – if not more. Aside from eggs, many times an old hen or rooster ended up as Sunday dinner. Which leads us to the next set of skills …

Want Out Of The Rat-Race But Need A Steady Stream Of Income?

6. Butchering livestock – Although it was more often grandpa who killed the large animals, grandma was the one who usually cut up or butchered them. Her skills with the butcher knife were admirable. She also could efficiently wring the neck of that old hen for the stew pot.

‘Jill of All Trades’

Our ancestors did as much as they could for themselves. Things were made to last, and those that didn’t were repurposed. Here are just a few more things that grandma did in caring for her family and home:

7. Crafty creations – Grandma needed basic sewing skills to keep her family clothed. She might even be talented enough to make clothing in addition to repairs. Quilting and weaving were other abilities which could provide additional income, as well as add to her family’s warmth and comfort.

8. Stretching a dollar – Being thrifty came naturally to grandma, as nothing went to waste. She reused, repurposed and recycled everything. She often was a skilled negotiator and bartered goods or her skills for things she needed or wanted.

9. Medical care – Doctors and hospitals weren’t readily available. Grandma was required to have basic medical skills and more. She even might doctor animals as well as people. Her familiarity with medicinal herbs and plants came in very handy.

So, how did your day compare to grandma’s? Did it seem a bit lacking? It’s not too late to start learning some of these skills that she used on an almost daily basis. So put down the remote and game controller and invest your time in useful endeavors. These skills could even save your life and those of your loved ones.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Julie Dees is a freelance writer from Central California who also happens to be a real, lifelong cowgirl. She enjoys writing about her animals, her interest in homesteading and anything related to the outdoor life. Visit her website, TheCowgirlWrites.com.

9 Forgotten ‘Everyday Survival Skills’ From Grandma

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Grandma's 'Everyday Survival Skills’

Our grandparents didn’t spend their spare time watching TV or playing video games. The truth is they didn’t have spare time. Keeping the family fed, fields tended, livestock healthy and a roof over their heads kept them busy from dawn to dusk. They did whatever it took to survive and thrive.

While grandma and grandpa each had everyday skills that all homesteaders and survivalists should learn, today we’ll focus on Grandma’s day.

Grandma was a dynamo. She rose before dawn with a mile-long to-do list in her head. Feeding the family a hearty breakfast and sending them on their way was first priority. She then could get to her own busy day. Housework, fixing a fence with grandpa, helping the cow give birth, making pies to trade, fixing lunch, canning peaches and pulling weeds were checked off the list. Then it was time to make dinner and send everyone off to bed.

“The Big Book Of Off The Grid Secrets” — Every Homesteader Needs A Copy!

Parking or storage for trailers, ATVs, snowmobile

Here are some of the skills that helped her succeed at all of these tasks.

Feeding the Family

Grandma didn’t just run to a drive-thru to grab dinner after work. She planned ahead and made meals from scratch. She knew the night before what she would make for dinner. To accomplish this, she knew how to do these things:

1. Cooking from scratch – When grandma made dinner, she created masterpieces with no help from any cardboard box mix. Her meals were nutritious, tasty and far less expensive than any of the quick foods today. Love and care for her family were the special ingredients in every meal.

2. Cast iron cooking – It is amazing how many different dishes grandma made in her cast iron cookware. An entire meal, from soup to dessert, can be made with just one cast iron pot or skillet.

3. Preserving foods – Many of us remember coming home with jars of jelly, apple butter and pickles from grandma’s. Her cellar or pantry was always lined with shelves full of preserved goodness. Learning to preserve food via canning, pressure cooking or other methods is a wise investment in your own future.

Growing or Raising Food

Running to the grocery store each day was not an option to grandma. She essentially could shop every day in her own pantry or backyard.

skills grandmother4. The kitchen garden – No matter what grandpa grew in the fields, grandma always had a kitchen garden. She could walk out back and pick fresh dinner fixings. She often had fruit and nut trees, as well as her herbs and vegetables.

5. Animal husbandry – Grandma tended to be the one who cared for the livestock — a cow or goat for milk, a steer or pig for meat and then, the chickens. It was hard to find a homestead that didn’t have at least a few chickens – if not more. Aside from eggs, many times an old hen or rooster ended up as Sunday dinner. Which leads us to the next set of skills …

Want Out Of The Rat-Race But Need A Steady Stream Of Income?

6. Butchering livestock – Although it was more often grandpa who killed the large animals, grandma was the one who usually cut up or butchered them. Her skills with the butcher knife were admirable. She also could efficiently wring the neck of that old hen for the stew pot.

‘Jill of All Trades’

Our ancestors did as much as they could for themselves. Things were made to last, and those that didn’t were repurposed. Here are just a few more things that grandma did in caring for her family and home:

7. Crafty creations – Grandma needed basic sewing skills to keep her family clothed. She might even be talented enough to make clothing in addition to repairs. Quilting and weaving were other abilities which could provide additional income, as well as add to her family’s warmth and comfort.

8. Stretching a dollar – Being thrifty came naturally to grandma, as nothing went to waste. She reused, repurposed and recycled everything. She often was a skilled negotiator and bartered goods or her skills for things she needed or wanted.

9. Medical care – Doctors and hospitals weren’t readily available. Grandma was required to have basic medical skills and more. She even might doctor animals as well as people. Her familiarity with medicinal herbs and plants came in very handy.

So, how did your day compare to grandma’s? Did it seem a bit lacking? It’s not too late to start learning some of these skills that she used on an almost daily basis. So put down the remote and game controller and invest your time in useful endeavors. These skills could even save your life and those of your loved ones.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Julie Dees is a freelance writer from Central California who also happens to be a real, lifelong cowgirl. She enjoys writing about her animals, her interest in homesteading and anything related to the outdoor life. Visit her website, TheCowgirlWrites.com.

News: Chaos in QLD as 80,000 without electricity & Floods in NSW.

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7 News Image.

Can we expect more of this and worse in the future? Is this a part of climate change? Trump and Turnbull are putting the world in danger!

The New Remington 1911R1 10MM Hunter

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1_1911R1_10mm_hunter_featured

2_remington_10mmThe Remington Arms Company began making firearms in 1816.  Specifically, the founder Eliphalet Remington made his first handgun in that year.  Later, in 1830, the original factory armory building was constructed in Ilion, New York.  Other buildings were added in 1854 and again in 1875. As you can well imagine with an arms company that grew to be such a comprehensive manufacturer of firearms, the total history is complex and multi-faceted.  It would take a book to outline it all, and in fact there are many books on the Remington Arms Company for those interested in such things as firearms history.  The study of Remington is a good one.  

By Dr. John J. Woods, a contributing author to SHTFBlog & Survival Cache

Remington Arms just celebrated their 200th Anniversary last year.  The company remains in a strong market position, though arms making these days is in a constant mode of flux as the markets and politics constantly changes.  And Remington has changed with the times, too.

Perhaps Remington is best known for their long guns including their benchmark bolt action rifle, the Model 700, as well as the 1100 Shotgun which became the 11-87 with enhancements, and their quintessential pump action shotgun, the 870.  But since 1816, Remington has manufactured countless models of handguns, rifles, and shotguns, not to mention ammunition, their famous Bullet knives, and other trademarked accessories.  

Remington was also a huge manufacturer of military arms from the Civil War’s 1861 revolver, various Derringers, pocket pistols, Calvary 1875 Army Revolvers, Rolling Block pistols and rifles, numerous percussion rifles, the US 1911 Remington UMC pistol, and rifles for World Wars I and II.  Their production of sporting arms is likewise legendary.  Their imagination and engineering creativity continues today.  

Recent Remington Renditions

3_remington_10mmRemington Arms Company has never been an industrial firearms manufacturing company to be satisfied with sitting on their laurels.  In just the past few years, Remington has gotten back into the pocket pistol, self-defense, personal protection and concealed handgun weapons business despite how crowded that marketplace is these days.  

First, Remington brought out their new .380 ACP semi-auto pocket pistol dubbed the RM380.  Next, they produced a pocket sized 9mm labeled the R51.  Finally, is their newest rendition, the RP9, a full sized personal protection 9mm that holds a fully stocked 18-round magazine.  

Check Out: Hiding Home Guns in Plain Sight

But along the way and besides these pistol introductions, Remington has stormed the classic 1911 pistol market with numerous variations on the 1911 frame theme including government models, commander models, enhanced versions, threaded barrel models, and more.  The 1911s come in blued steel and stainless versions in .45 ACP with limited models offered in 9mm and 40 S&W.

One of Remington’s latest 1911 renditions is the 1911R1 10mm Hunter Long Slide.  It is their first entry with a fully dedicated hunting 1911 version as well as a first semi-auto pistol chambered for the awesome 10mm round.  It’s not only handsome, it is totally purposeful for hunting, prepping, survival, and protection.

The Remington 1911R1 Long Slide

4_remington_10mmLong slide?  Yep.  Out of the box, the very first thing you notice if you are a true 1911 aficionado is that the muzzle tips over a little quicker than usual in the grip of your hand.  Why, you may ask?  Well, because this slide is six inches long, one inch more than a standard 1911 slide.  This extra inch of barrel and slide contributes to a number of enhancement performance features for the 1911R1.  Catalog specifications for this new 1911 besides the obvious six inch tube and slide includes the chambering of the 10mm Auto round.  The pistol’s magazine capacity is 8+1 rounds.  The barrel itself is stainless steel, six grooves with a 1:16 inch left hand twist.  Trigger weight pull is set at around 4.75 pounds.  Some say too heavy but it is completely manageable.

The trigger is a 3-hole design.  There is a beavertail grip and ambidextrous thumb safeties, a very nice feature.  The extractor is of the HD heavy duty type.  The pistol’s grips are the VZ Operator II type for durability, long lasting wear with aggressive checkering for firm gripping.  

The overall length of the pistol is 9.5 inches.  The gun’s carry weight is 41 ounces.  That is slightly over 2.5 pounds, so it is no lightweight.  The sights are fully adjustable, a match type with a serrated rear sight panel to reduce glare.  The front sight is a post type with an orange-red fiber optic insert.  They are highly visible and easy to line up.  The accessory rail under the frame can handle mounting a light or laser.

The gun itself is stainless steel, but it is factory finished in a black matte PVD-DLC coating.  PVD is a “physical vapor deposition” coating and the DLC is a “diamond like carbon” coating that provides a low friction factor plus a high micro-hardness feature.  So what does all that mean?  It means the metal or pistol itself is virtually impervious to moisture sink impact.  The DLC coating makes the moving parts of the pistol slick running.  

Though the factory guns are black matte as mentioned, there is a special version available now through Davidson’s Gallery of Guns.  This 1911R1 model comes with a special PVD oil rubbed bronze finish.  The VZ Operator II grips on this special pistol are a bronze reddish brown color.  It is not only unique but particularly beautiful.  These pistols should become collector’s models, but still with every bit of utility as the black versions.  Davidson’s also offers a full lifetime replacement warranty on guns bought from them.  Good deal, Lucille, as BB used to say.  

Factory delivery accessories includes a cool collectable Remington green box.  In the box is a fitted foam insert for the pistol, two silver chrome magazines, a cable gun lock with two keys, a hard plastic barrel bushing wrench, a 200th year Remington sticker, and a factory owner’s manual.  

The 10mm Auto Story

5_remington_10mmIn 1983 the earth shook.  The 10mm Auto and its first pistol, Crockett’s Miami Vice Bren Ten was introduced.  The initial load used a 200 grain fully jacketed truncated cone bullet with a muzzle velocity of 1200 fps.  The energy rating was set at 635 foot-pounds.  This meant it was more powerful than the .357 Magnum and the rather lackluster .41 Magnum police load.  

Related: How Much Ammo is Enough for SHTF? 

The Bren pistol and the 10mm came from development work by Jeff Cooper and his buddies trying to produce a new cartridge being touted as the ideal combat weapon’s load.  Some federal agencies adapted the 10mm, but in rather short order, users began to complain of recoil and training issues.  Ironically, the 10mm case was later shortened to create the .40 S&W, which is now nearly defunct in its own right.

The 10mm remains a good choice for defensive work and small game hunting up to deer sized game at reasonable ranges.  Colt, Glock, and Kimber still offer pistols chambered for the 10mm in addition to Remington’s new 1911R1 Hunter Long Slide.  

Factory ammunition is available from Hornady, Remington, Sig-Sauer, American Eagle, Armscor, Buffalo Bore, Cor-Bon, Double Tap, PMC, Prvi Partizan and Sellier & Bellot.  Bullet weights vary from 135 to 220 grains.  The standard is a 180 grain jacketed hollow point bullet.  Plenty of reloading supplies are also offered for home brewed 10mm loads.  

The Remington 1911R1 Hunter’s Purpose

6_remington_10mmSo, what is this new Remington pistol and the powerful 10mm Auto round to be used for?  There is no denying that the 10mm is a hummer, but having worked with a 10mm pistol for a couple years, I find it no more difficult to control than a full powered load in a .45 ACP.  If the .45 Auto is not for you, then the 10mm may not be either.  But try it before you dismiss it wholesale.  

In this Remington 1911R1 long slide delivery platform package, the 10mm is even more tamed with the extra inch of slide and barrel.  The increased sighting radius of this handgun also makes getting on and staying on target much easier.  The weight of this pistol dissipates both excessive recoil and muzzle blast.  

I look forward to further testing.  The bronze model came too late for my fall hunting seasons to get the new pistol into the white-tailed deer hunting stands.  Next year will not come soon enough for me.  

I have experience with the 10mm and feel confident it is suitable for hunting and gathering at stalking ranges under 100 yards.  I am not a proponent of long range shooting with a handgun or a rifle.  In a hidden ground blind, or up in a tree stand over a woods lane or food plot, I fully expect the 10mm to perform well, and the new Remington 1911R1 Long Slide even better.  

Personal defense?  Once the shooter-gun handler gets accustomed to firing the 10mm and targeting with a 10mm handgun of any brand, then for sure this combination will deter threats with authority.  So far, the edge in this regard fully goes to this new Remington.  

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The Best of Survival Fiction

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featured_castaway

Hey, even survivalists have to unwind every once in a while. Take a look at some of these fictional stories of survival, hand-picked by us for your entertainment pleasure from movies, TV and books. What’s your favourite fictional survivalist story?

By Alex Coyne, a contributing author of SurvivalCache and SHTFBlog.com

#1: The Road (2006)

1_the_roadThe Road was first published in 2006 by author Cormac McCarthy, also known for writing the books behind No Country for Old Men, Child of God and All the Pretty Horses. The Road was released to great critical acclaim, winning several book awards including the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for literature. It follows the story of a father and son making their way to safety in a post-apocalyptic nightmare world.  The story was adapted to film in 2009, starring Viggo Mortensen and Kodi Smit-McPhee, and without revealing too much we’ll say that you’ll be in for a great ride..

#2: The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1719)

1_the-life-and-adventures-of-robinson-crusoeThe original Robinson Crusoe comes from the novel “The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe” by Daniel Defoe, published way back in the 1700’s. You can find the full text of the novel (thanks to expired copyright and literary classics) available for download at Project Gutenberg by clicking here. The book tells the tale of Crusoe, a man who spends a record-breaking twenty seven years stranded on an island. Oh, and the original was published under the pseudonym of Robinson Crusoe, making people believe he was entirely real, at least for a little while.

It’s been adapted to film numerous times, including Robinson Crusoe (1997), starring Pierce Brosnan in the title role, and The Wild Life (2016), an animated spin on the tale.

#3: Survivor Type (Stephen King)

1_survivor_typeStephen King seems to love exploring survival and post-apocalyptic scenarios in his work: There’s The Stand (1978), which was turned into a pretty cool 1994 TV miniseries, The Mist (1980), which was turned into a 2007 horror flick, Cell (2006), which became a 2016 movie by the same name and Under the Dome (2009), which was also not surprisingly turned into a TV series which ran from 2013 to 2015. But a lot of people forget about a little story called Survivor Type, which was first published in a 1982 book called Terrors – though later released with Stephen King’s short story collection Skeleton Crew in 1985. The short story follows the diary of Richard Pine, a man who gets stranded on an island while trying to traffic a shipment of heroin on a cruise ship.

It’s a thrill ride like only King can write it, and the story was even adapted to short films: In 2011, 2012 and 2013.

#4: The Hunger Games (2008)

The first book in the Hunger Games series first appeared by author Suzanne Collins in 2008.  Subsequent sequels included Catching Fire in 2009 and Mockingjay in 2010. The series follows young characters Katniss Everdeen and Peeta Mellark as they make their way through a terrifying survival game-show setup straight from your worst dystopian nightmares. The trilogy also gave rise to a series of movies of the same name. It’s got all the elements of a highly successful series that makes you fall in love with the characters immediately, and if you were a fan of movies like The Running Man then you’ll surely enjoy this too.

#5: I Am Legend (1954)

I Am Legend was originally published in 1954 by Richard Matheson, and stands as one of modern fiction’s true classics: This is one of many cases on the list where you might want to read the book before you take the leap and see the movie. The story follows Dr Robert Neville and his canine companion after the breakout of a disastrous virus that “turned” most of humanity (yes, this is one of the original post-apocalyptic zombie stories).

It was adapted into a movie starring Will Smith in 2007, though some parts are radically different from the book version. For comic book nuts, there was also a graphic novel adaptation of the story.

#6: Earth’s Children (1980)

1_earth's_childrenWant to learn more about historically accurate (yet surprisingly fictionalized) survivalism? Then you should jump straight into the work of Jean M. Auel, starting with the Earth’s Children series – with six books in all. Earth’s Children is set in pre-historic times, and the finer points of Auel’s work are notorious for being exceptionally finely researched. Start off with the first book in the series, The Clan of the Cave Bear (1980) and work your way through until The Land of Painted Caves (2011). It’s worth it.

#7: The Martian (2011)

Give survivalism a completely different (and terrifying) modern spin: Put a man in space, where nobody can hear him scream. That’s the premise of the debut novel by author Andy Weir, which was first self-published in 2011 (before later being snapped up by a larger publishing house). The story follows botanist Mark Watney’s attempt to create a self-sustaining colony on Mars – something which already a possibility in reality.

It was turned into a movie starring Matt Damon in 2015.

#8: Cast Away (2000)

1_cast-awayCast Away was released in 2000 starring Tom Hanks, and is a film classic. One can almost go as far as to call it a modernized version of Robinson Crusoe. The movie follows Chuck Noland, a Fed-Ex employee, who finds himself stranded on an island after his plane takes a nosedive. Yes, this is a bit of a tear-jerker, but that also isn’t always a bad thing, is it? One of the most famous elements of Cast Away was Wilson (If you haven’t seen the movie, that’s a beach ball who, well, becomes Chuck’s eventual friend in an attempt to make island life less lonely).

Now Check Out: Your Survival Library

In 2015, Tom Hanks was reunited with the original Wilson during a NY Rangers game.

Oh, and then Family Guy – horrifyingly – did this and ruined the moment.

Watch the original trailer for Cast Away on YouTube, here.

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States agree on gun control code. AUSTRALIA.

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States agree on gun control code

Author: ANDREW DARBY, GERARD RYLE
Date: 26/05/1995
Words: 590

   


   

Publication: The Age
Page: 3

Hobart.

The states took a tentative step towards uniform gun laws yesterday when police ministers agreed to establish a national gun-control code on shooter licensing, mail-order sale, safety training and secure storage.

The Federal Government will also further restrict the importation of ammunition and machine pistols. But those attending the Australian Police Ministers Council yesterday left unresolved a national argument on the registration of all guns.

The federal Justice Minister, Mr Kerr, described yesterday’s code decision as “a step towards uniformity”.

He said quick responses to shooting tragedies in different states in recent years had led to ad hoc, potentially conflicting standards. Now ministers had set up a mechanism to take a more considered, long-term view.

Mr Kerr said the latest statistics showed that in 1993, only about 70 of Australia’s 526 firearm deaths involved violent crime.

The planned code was welcomed by Victoria’s Police Minister, Mr McNamara, as the most significant improvement in decades, and one that would remedy Victorian concerns about the effect of more relaxed laws in other states.

“It’s the hoons and lunatics that everyone wants to see firearms removed from,” he said. “We need to look at measures where we can more closely interact with mental health authorities so that we can identify persons who should be prohibited from obtaining firearms.”

The NSW Police Minister, Mr Paul Whelan, did not attend the meeting and is awaiting a briefing. Mr Kerr was confident that NSW and the other absent states, Queensland and the Northern Territory, would agree with the proposals.

While all jurisdictions now follow the principle that firearms be securely stored, the provision was variously interpreted. A Western Australian model is being proposed in which guns must be kept in steel cabinets with separate lockable ammunition storage.

The Victorian Justice Department is to coordinate the development of the code, which will be put before the next Police Ministers’ Council meeting in Tasmania in November.

The Commonwealth’s tightening of imports will outlaw a variety of ammunition, including military ammunition greater than 12.7mm, tracer bullets, armour-piercing and flechette ammunition.

Imports of standard hollow-point and soft-nosed ammunition will still be allowed, but a prohibition on military-style weapons will be extended to pistols configured as semi-automatic machineguns.

The president of the Sporting Shooters Association of Australia, Mr Ted Drane, said there were up to four million licensed shooters who ought to be consulted before changes were made to gun laws.

“We will never have national gun registration because that would mean that too many people (politicians) would lose their seats if they did in places like Queensland, New South Wales and Tasmania,” he said.

A spokesman said Victoria’s chief commissioner of police, Mr Neil Comrie, said he supported uniform gun laws.

THE PROPOSED GUN CONTROL CODE.

Recognition of licensing, perhaps with a categorisation system.

Control of mail order firearm sales.

Firearm safety training standards.

Pistol registration methods.

Secure storage standards.

Regulations governing types of ammunition are to be tightened.

Turnbull Pushes Mandatory Vaccination Rollout But Has Lucrative shares In Big Pharma

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Turnbull Pushes Mandatory Vaccination Rollout But Has Lucrative shares In Big Pharma

Turnbull protecting his investments, not doing it for the good of the people. He also has invested in tobacco! His main concern is NOT for the good of the people, just the opposite.

Islamic Threat Inside Australia.

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Right now I think our own Corporate Government is more of a threat to us than Islam, but the Islamic threat does exist. But instead of meeting this threat head on and banishing offenders back to their own country, the Australian government uses this threat to impose more restrictions on Australian citizen’s rights and freedoms!!!


Morality in a shtf event.

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Someone recently posed the question ” If you are a person with high moral values, how will these morals be effected by a major shtf event? Will you stick to your high morals, or do you think that such an event will change you and cause you to throw these morals aside?”

I think the best way in which I can answer this, at least for myself, is to show you a video. This movie is based on a true event and to my mind best shows the way that I feel I would have to respond to a clear and present danger to myself, my family and my friends regardless of the survival scenario.

Help Stop The Tax Hike On Solar Power. PLEASE SIGN THIS PETITION.

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Government ministers are about to approve a huge tax hike on solar panels that will have a devastating impact on the industry. Sign the petition to push back.

Contamination in Australian water & foods.

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(Click the web browser refresh button to see the latest reports. Date Formatting is Day/Month/Year – 11th March 2011 is 11.03.2011.) March 2015 – Tuna Contamination Report,
This incident reportedly happened six months ago, and unfortunately there was no available sample to test.
In late March I received this email from a contact who has a Geiger counter.
I have removed some information from the correspondence to protect the contacts anonymity.
“You have to watch your food like a hawk. My daughter had some tuna in oil….very small tin. I had been warning her. But dad is crazy. I found the tin going into the recycle, it still had a bit of oil in it. So, me being me, I got out my geiger counter and took a reading………it went ballistic.
It just keep climbing and climbing. I didn’t think it was going to stop……It stopped climbing when it hit 38K counts per minute….I didn’t know my bGeigie Nano meter went that high. The oil seemed OK, the tin seemed OK, but a tiny flake of leftover tuna the size of a match head was on the lip of the tin, that is what set it off. Don’t eat ANYTHING from the sea….anymore. That tuna was toxic radioactive nuclear waste, and not food.”
38K counts per minute would be around 1000 times background, using this model Geiger counter!
I sent this email to get more information on this very high detection.
Do you still have the sample?
If you are located in Australia, and still have the sample, I could test it, if you posted to me.
If you don’t have it, if you provide the information below, I may be able to source some here, and test it.
In what country was the tuna tinned?
In what country was it purchased?
Here is the reply to my email query.
This happened over 6 months ago.
I can only assume it was canned in the USA. tuna in oil. At that time I thought the reading was coming from the oil in the tin….I didn’t notice the flake that was on the outside top edge of the can. I got it stuck on my finger and washed it off. After this, is when I couldn’t get a reading from the tin or the oil again. I realized that the flake which was gone down the drain by then was the cause.
I thought my Geiger counter was malfunctioning at the time, which it never has before or since. The count was going up and it freaked out my son as we watched it climb. The highest reading I have ever gotten until then was 164 CPM off of a milled piece of pine, but at that time I was (and still am) learning how to use the geiger counter.
Comment:
A small number of tests on different brands of tinned tuna have been conducted here recently, and over the last couple years. There was nothing to report from these tests. This is only one community testing lab, and each test takes 24 hours, or more. A large variety of mainly Australian food products have been tested, so statistically the number of tinned tuna tests conducted here at this stage is very small.
It obvious more widespread community and government food testing needs to be conducted.
08.03.2014 – Proven: Pilliga groundwater contaminated by Santos CSG
Extracts:
Documents obtained by The Wilderness Society show that groundwater in the Pilliga has been contaminated by Santos CSG operations.
Uranium levels recorded in the groundwater as a result of CSG activities are at 20 times the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines.
The NSW EPA have confirmed the contamination event, but failed to act with any proper legal force, choosing to fine Santos only $1,500 dollars.
On Friday, EPA chief environmental regulator Mark Gifford confirmed the contamination was caused by water leaking from the pond and that lead, aluminium, arsenic, barium, boron, nickel and uranium had been detected in an aquifer at levels ”elevated when compared to livestock, irrigation and health guidelines’
Comment By Lock the Gate:
Uranium levels recorded in the groundwater as a result of CSG activities are at 20 times the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. It is the nightmare that the communities of the north west dreaded, and we hope that the contamination is contained and does no harm. Groundwater is the lifeblood of towns and rural businesses and the worst fears of local farmers are being realised.
http://www.lockthegate.org.au/proven_groundwater_contaminatedhttp://www.smh.com.au/environment/santos-coal-seam-gas-project-contaminates-aquifer-20140307-34csb.html
26.09.2013 – Detection of Radon-220 in the rain
http://sccc.org.au/detection-of-radon-220-in-the-rain-september-2013
20.09.2013 – “Contaminated seawater reaches the east coast of Australia and Indonesia,” Japan Meteorological Research Institute.
Comment:
It is important to read the PDF presentation to fully understand the dynamics of this. (Link provided below)
http://fukushima-diary.com/2013/09/japan-meteorological-research-institute-contaminated-seawater-reaches-the-east-coast-of-australia-and-indonesia/http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Meetings/PDFplus/2013/cn207/Presentations/1028-Aoyama.pdf
09.09.2013 – Detection of radioactive Iodine I-129 in roof gutter moss Australia.
http://sccc.org.au/detection-of-radioactive-iodine-i-129-in-roof-gutter-moss-australia
October 2012, Impact on Australia from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident
1. Food imported from Japan, page 22.
2. Family living in Fukushima for 150 days, page 32.
3. Vehicles and Military aircraft, including American helicopters, page 28.  (They appear to be using measurements of square centimeters cm2 instead of per square meter m2, so multiply by 10,000 to get the Bequerel per square meter amount.)
4. Mutton Birds Tasmania, page 36.
http://www.arpansa.gov.au/pubs/technicalreports/tr162.pdf
11.09.2011 – Silent Storm atomic testing in Australia
Extracts:
Australia’s milk supply? From 1957 to 1978, scientists secretly removed bone samples from over 21,000 dead Australians as they searched for evidence of the deadly poison, Strontium 90 – a by-product of nuclear testing.
Official claims that British atomic tests posed no threat to the Australian people.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDOUeniCNKM


Time for global action on Earth’s great threat – Fukushima’s spreading ionising radiation

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Federal Government says that the radioactive levels within it are “within safe limits”? Are we going to continue to label people like myself (of which there are many) as “conspiracy theorists” and uneducated alarmists who have been expressing concern over the Fukushima catastrophe since it occurred — people like me who know from objective observed and scientific fact that all is not well with what is going on (or not going on) at Fukushima?

Thoughts For The Week By Ron Owen.

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Thoughts For The Week.
2017. An election in Queensland which offers to change our nation and will vibrate and inspire the world. That is of course, “IF” the apathetic Firearm Owners of Queensland turn the telly off and aid the people who support them, to replace those corrupt puppets of the internationalist. A very big “IF” of course, but the key has turned.  The 2016 Federal election where 22 % of the voters excluded the major parties, Brexit, Trump, Le Pen, Geert Wilders are showing that the mainstream media is losing its grip on the minds of the people. They call it populist, but it’s the internet that exposes the fake news that has been rammed down our throats on the 6 o’clock news.

Do YOU Want A Free Country Again.
The 2 million licensed shooters in Australia can make this happen. At the last federal election there were 13 million voters and our shooting companions are nearly 18 % of them, that is enough for us to chose which government rules this country.
We are now the largest single interest group on the Australian political landscape, we just have to be the best organised lobby group.
Of course the main party hacks will bring out that old furphy, ‘if the aircraft is having a few problems would you ask farmer plod sitting in the back economy seats to come and fly the plane.’  Besides, it’s not being relative and just an rhetorical trick, if we made a simile between the plane and our country, our pilots – sold out to another country, baled out and left us in a screaming power dive towards the rocks, anyone who pulled up the joy stick and levelled up the plane would be appreciated and loved by all the passengers.

FIRE WEATHER to TORCH Europe and US world becomes giant tinderbox ready to IGNITE

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The world is set for blazing fires of epic proportion which are anticipated to strike Portugal, Spain, France, Greece, Turkey and other tourist hotspots around the world, a new study has revealed.

Cities in southern Australia and western North America are also in the firing line. 

Researchers from the University of Idaho, South Dakota State University and the University of Tasmania forecast increasingly dangerous fire weather, as the globe witnesses and alarming increase of devastating fires. 

Scientists have just detected a major change to the Earth’s oceans linked to a warming climate

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The One Most Important Question Survivalists Can Ask Themselves: Why Are You Trying To Survive?

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The One Most Important Question Survivalists Can Ask Themselves: Why Are You Trying To Survive?

With the news being what it is, the world has now come to the point at which a huge shake-up is undeniable – to anyone who has 2 cents worth of brain matter between their ears. So hordes are joining the stampede to become “survivalists”. The movement has even spurred the development of the “survival industry”, with commercials now being played on mainstream media stations for freeze-dried storage foods and solar generators.

There is an old saying, “If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will do.” So if you are going to go the path of being a “survivalist”, first you’ll want to know where you are going – and why.

Plenty of alternative news outlets are trumpeting that “martial law” is soon to be implemented – and the facts they present in support can only lead to that conclusion. So everyone wants to survive martial law. But what is on the other side of the marital law? The reality is that martial law can’t go on forever, but what will society/government look like after it has been dismantled?

If 9/11 caused so much restriction – by law or by fiat – of travel, of personal dignity rights, of speech, of redress of grievances, what will the next event (planned by man or by the hand of The Almighty) bring? Will you take the chip to be given your ration of food? If you allow your children to stand naked to be viewed by pedophiles in order to shop in a mall or fly on a plane, will you say no to anything else demanded of you?

Another major story all over the Internet – alternative and mainstream outlets – is that virtually the entire world’s economy is about to collapse – again, a foregone conclusion. Not a matter of if, but when. Eventually, the creditors demand their due. So everyone wants to survive an economic collapse and the chaos that will bring. But what is on the other side of the collapse?

Putting aside all the sensationalism, putting aside all the hype and all the wishes, the most likely scenario is that a new monetary system, digital in format, no cash, will be instituted and run by the same bankers who run the dollar systems now – if not the same people, people with the same heart. They will tout the new system as being just like before (hush . . . except that everyone’s every financial move will be tracked, incoming and outgoing).

It will usher in the removal of personal privacy and the instilling of fear. Fear that stops you from doing something, not because it’s not right, but because someone says you shouldn’t do it – usually because it does not benefit them. Is that alright with you? Will you join that society? Is that why you want to survive – to end up just as entrapped, even more so, than you are now?

Far too many people die soon after reaching retirement. The reason for this is that they have spent their entire careers with the only goal being that retirement. They did not have a vision of life after retirement, and so they had none. An unfortunate fact.

We have met many people who believe that they truly want to be survivalists. They have many reasons for wanting to survive, based on what they understand of the news. But over time they show that they still want to have one foot on third base, and so will never make it to home plate. They really don’t want their comfy lives upset, they don’t really want to have to give up their 62” plasma screen TV, they don’t really want to eat foods they actually have to cook, they want to be able to whip out their credit card at Trader Joe’s forever . . . but they want to be out of the way when TSHTF, too. Their vision is to “hole-up” in a sanctuary until the noise stops, and then go back to the same rat race they were in before – the same rat race that got us all in the predicament in which we now find ourselves as a society.

So why bother? If your ultimate goal is to save your neck so that you can go back to the same old same old, why would you put yourself through this? It’s like quitting smoking and starting again, knowing that you’ll just have to go through the withdrawal all over again. To be more exact, an ancient book of wisdom talked of “a dog returning to its own vomit.” Why put yourself through that? Why dislocate yourself and your family, mentally as well as physically, if you are ultimately happy right where you are?

If you are contented to fight your way through the morning commute so that you can be given a paycheck for performing a job you hate just so you can still afford your $8 Latte Enema at the local coffee chain and you can use that money to buy your kids every throw-away toy the commercials tell them they want, STAY THERE! You won’t be comfortable outside of those bonds.

The right answer to the question proposed in the title is: I want to survive because there is a better way to live, regardless of what the world “out there” does or does not do.

I want to be paid by nature for my own labor and that of my family (by blood or otherwise) in being good stewards of the Earth.

I want to help others who are also willing to work toward a common goal, each lightening the load of the other.

I want to look out my window and be invigorated by the Earth’s natural beauty before my eyes, by the stars in the sky.

I want to be judged by my acts of kindness, not by how much money I can obtain.

I want to give something of real value to my children and to theirs.

It’s not impossible. It’s not a foolish wish. It is being lived now by those who have stopped complying with that which is wrong. It is being lived now by those who know the depth of their own power and use it – not to impose evil acts upon another, but to lead a good and natural life for themselves. It is being lived now by those who choose to survive – not to survive the chaos, but to survive the beating down of the human spirit so that they may be a beacon to renew that spirit in light.

It ain’t easy – but it sure is worth it.

History has shown us many times that it can all fly away in a split of a second. The biggest misstep that you can take now is to think that this can never happen in America or to you! Call me old fashioned; I don’t care…but I completely believe in America and what our ancestors stood for. They all had a part in turning this land into one of the most powerful countries in the world. Many died and suffered before a creative mind found an ingenious solution to maybe a century old problem. Believe it or not, our ancestors skills are all covered in American blood. This is why these must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same for our children and our children’s children. Our ancestors laid the bricks and built the world’s strongest foundation…that we are about to -irreversibly forget! I don’t want to see our forefathers’ knowledge disappear into the darkness of time…and if you care for your family…and what America stands for…then neither should you! Watch the video HERE and learn more

 

Source : www.activistpost.com

About the author : Dan & Sheila are the authors of Surviving Survivalism – How to Avoid Survivalism Culture Shock, and hosts of the podcast, Still Surviving with Dan & Sheila. For questions about space in their Intentional Survivalist Community or other survivalist issues, they can be reached at surviving@lavabit.com.

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Off Grid and Preppers Beware. It is coming here!

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The government is set on making Australian citizens totally dependent on their services. In some places they are trying to charge land owners for the use of their own dam water, in some towns rainwater collection is banned. This in a country as dry as ours! We live off grid, & yet we have to pay rates/taxes for services that they do not supply, nor do we want or need their services. We are even charged a fee for our use of our own compost toilets!!! Meanwhile the government still has disarmament of all civilians high on its list of restrictions. We have already lost so many of our rights & freedoms in the name of safety from terrorism!!! 
There may come a time when we will have to go silent on the net. The local councils are corrupt & already know of people like us who are off grid, but we can at least do our best to lower our profile.

Keith.

My thanks to Stephen M.C. for bringing this news video to my attention.

Bugging Out. Carrying all that weight.

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You can travel light and carry all you need for long term wilderness living/survival, all that is accept perhaps enough water and food! If there are water holes on your route then there is no problem. If you are able to hunt & forage on the way then there is no problem. But what if you get diverted have to by-pass those water holes? What if you are trekking in winter and there are few edible plants to find and the game is scarce? Then you have a problem. You can survive for three days without water, but this also depends on how hard you are working. You can survive three weeks without food, but again, this is dependent on your exertion level. You probably know as well as I that when you are working hard your need for water and food increases. You are drinking all the time to stay hydrated and come lunch time you are very hungry. To go without water and food is dangerous, because the lack of water and food effects how you perform, mentally and physically. One minute you think you are doing fine, the next minute you are feeling sick. Keep going and you will collapse.
Sharing the load with a partner is fine, you can carry the shelter, kettle, arms and ammunition, your partner can carry the water. But water is heavy, and to be safe and practicle your partner also needs to carry at least some of her/his own equipment. Simply put, you can never really carry enough water for a long trek unless you can find a water source along the way to refill your water bottles. Even then to be safe you will need to stop and boil that water before you can drink it.
So what is a simple and practicle alternative? Using a trekking trolley. A trekking trolley can carry a lot of weight, and there is a wide variety of different trolleys to suit your needs. On a level surface pulling a trolley is easier that carrying a heavy load, but going uphill you will need to pace yourself. Even so, when you stop for a rest on the trail and take a drink of water, you are not still bearing that load. If you are travelling with a partner or a group, you can use a rope to link you to another trekker who can help pull the load up steep inclines. If you can afford it, you can purchase a trekking trolley, if you don’t have the funds, then you can make your own without too much trouble.
An Australian made trekking trolley.
A trekking trolley that the author made from old wheelbarrow parts and bush timber. This one only has one wheel, but the author plans to make another one from an old golf trolley.

When you reach your destination this trolley will still be of use, and can be used for: transporting game, transporting water from a water source, carrying firewood, transporting rocks for a fireplace, moving camp if needs be. Perhaps you can think of further uses?
Keith.

NASA scientist: Earth is overdue a dinosaur-killing asteroid strike, and we’re woefully unprepared.

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NASA scientist: Earth is overdue a dinosaur-killing asteroid strike, and we’re woefully unprepared.



Survival, Then and Now.

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Survival, Then and Now.

What do you think has changed  in the last 300 years regarding our survival needs? Anything? Whether it be long term wilderness living as it was for the New World settlers in the 17th and 18th centuries or whether it be a lost in the bush survival situation, I don’t see as though anything has changed. Our requirements are still the same, sensible tools, good survival provisions and primitive survival skills. Yet here we are in 2016, and people are obsessed with using dryer lint. stubby so called “bushcraft knives”, camo clothing, ferrocerium rods, pop-up nylon tents, RAT packs and freeze dried foods, special hiking boots, fuel stoves, battery operated equipment and no skills to speak of except invented ones like “battening”, making Vaseline cotton balls and other “homemade” fire starters and inventing new ways to lay a fire so they can take photos of it for their favourite forum!

300 years ago the main tools you needed to survive were the gun, the axe, the knife and flint and steel for making fire. You could even survive without the flint and steel if you had to because you could use the lock on your flintlock gun to make fire. You needed skills such as trap making and the knowledge of trapping. You packed only the essential equipment and provisions, and if you made mistakes in packing too much useless gear, then you ditched it along the track and learnt a hard lesson. Generally you asked experienced people for their advice, some ignored that advice to their own peril, and others profited by it. Today many so called survivalists and preppers also seek advice on internet forums, or at least they appear to. Most though have already made up their minds, and really all they want to do is share on the forum what they have chosen and carry. Giving correctional advice to these people is usually a waste of time, and in some cases you will be answered with rudeness and ridicule. Most of us, who have been there and done that, had a lot of experience in long term wilderness living simply ignore this and perhaps go to the persons profile and click the “Ignore” button. After all, we don’t have to put up with abuse, and the less people that survive after tshtf the better for us, less hunting and foraging competition.

For those of you that are serious about survival, and genuinely think that a shtf situation could arise in the future, here is my advice, take it or leave it: Think about your needs, think about the tasks you will be faced with if you have to survive in a wilderness situation. Choose you tools carefully. You will need a tool or tools for hunting, you will need an axe for cutting wood for shelter construction and trap making, you will need blades for skinning and butchering, camp chores and trap making, and perhaps a spare just in case. You need a hunting knife with a blade long enough to be used in self defence. You do NOT need a tool for skinning and butchering that was designed to cut wood, and you don’t want to have to cut saplings down with a knife! Each tool should have a specific purpose, don’t skimp on tools to save weight, you need the right tool for the specific job in hand.

Think sustainable, if you purchase something that is going to break, wear out or run out and you are unable to repair it, then it is just extra weight in your pack you don’t need, and it is going to compromise your safety. Carrying good sustainable gear may mean that you are carrying extra weight, and may mean that you will have to travel slower and take more breaks, but long term it will pay off.

Learn the skills you will need now. Having a good pair of hiking boots may help you initially, but what happens if they break or wear out? Do you know how to make a moccasin pattern? Do you know how to make moccasins? Do you know how to tan an animal skin to make leather? If you make a pair of moccasins now, then you will not only have learnt the skill, but you will have the moccasins and the pattern for another pair. This is the way you need to think. A modern firearm is great providing it remains functional, but what if it ceases to work? Can you fix it? How much weight in ammunition can you afford to carry? How much ammo do you use on an average hunting trip? You may shun primitive hunting tools such as the traditional bow, the crossbow and the muzzle-loading gun or rifle, but these tools have certain advantages over the modern firearm for long term wilderness living. By all means if you are travelling in company have someone carry a modern firearm, but make sure it is not the only hunting tool you are taking with you.

Keith.



Herbalist Katja Swift Interview!

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Herbalist Katja Swift Interview Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Listen in player below! This week on Herbal Prepper Live, I will be chatting with Boston-based herbalist Katja Swift. Katja, along with Ryn Midura, founded the CommonWealth Center for Herbal Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts. Katja is the center’s Director of Education.  From Katja’s bio on the … Continue reading Herbalist Katja Swift Interview!

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The cost & importance of learning. Clubs, Groups & Schools. Plus the advantages & disadvantages.

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The cost & importance of learning, clubs, groups & schools. Plus the advantages & disadvantages.

When it comes to long term survival, the skills start with choosing the right clothing & equipment. After that you have to learn how to use that equipment & you need to learn how to manage if you should lose that equipment. Survival schools are generally expensive, this is because they have to put in a lot of time teaching people the skills, & time cost money if you are running a business. Some schools will teach you primitive skills, others will not. Some schools will teach you how to survive if you get lost in the bush, others may teach you how to survive long term. But it will all cost you money.

Bushcraft groups are good & they will teach you some survival skills. Again, some may promote the use of modern tools & equipment, where as others may teach you more primitive skills. In general, you will pay a yearly fee which is used to pay for your insurance cover. Survival groups fall roughly into the same category as the bushcraft groups, a mixed lot which may or may not teach you what you need to know. Basically it depends on the individual members, some will be more knowledgeable than others, but in the long run they can’t teach you what they don’t know themselves.

It is well known that in order to survive long term in a wilderness situation, you will need to learn primitive skills, & your equipment & tools will need to be low tech. Modern equipment is not made to last, batteries will go flat, items will break & wear out. You need sustainable methods & primitive gear. If you start off with pre 19th century equipment you will never drop below that level of comfort. But if you start off with all modern gear, then sooner or later you will be thrown back into the stone age.

Now let’s look at another kind of club or group, an 18thcentury living history group. Most again will charge a yearly membership fee, & it must be said that not all living history groups are equal in the benefits that they offer the survivalist. But, the potential for learning is still there, you simply may have to put in more effort to gather some members together who have the skills that you need to learn.

Our group, the New England Colonial Living History Group does not charge any membership fees or training fees, it is all free. However, we do not carry any insurance either, our members are covered by the Civil Liability Amendment (Personal Responsibility) Bill 2002. For many years I payed for our group insurance out of my own pocket so that lower income families could afford to join our group. Eventually, I had to stop paying out of my own pocket (there never were any accidents or insurance claims). When you think about it we go with groups of friends out bush for various recreational activities, & no one ever questions if there is insurance cover. We all take personal responsibility for ourselves, & we watch out for the safety of others.

The advantages of joining a group like ours is that our activities cover a wide range of interests. We can advise on equipment & clothing, & we teach people all the skills they may need for free. Individuals do not have to participate in any activity if they do not wish to, but remember, in a shtf situation, there will be NO insurance, NO doctors & NO hospitals. If you want to cover yourself, use your money to purchase a good modern medical kit & take it to group meetings. Also carry a personal first aid kit in your pack. That way if you cut yourself or smack yourself in the head whilst learning archery, you can patch yourself up & keep going.

Kids in general love participating in living history. It is an opportunity to do something which is fun & educational & they get to share this experience with there parents or carers. In shooting clubs, archery clubs & fishing clubs you will learn only so much, very little of what you do learn will prepare you for survival. In a group like ours though you get to learn everything; you learn what is the best equipment & how to use it. You learn how to repair your equipment & in the case of archery & fishing, you learn how to make your own from scratch with no modern tools.

Some living history groups have splinter groups such as a militia group where you can learn battle tactics. Some groups are purely Ranger groups & again, battle training is a normal part of their activities on top of all the other skills you can learn. All Living History groups are family oriented, so all the family gets to join in one way or another. On top of all this learning & training, living history groups are a lot of fun. If you are serious about long term wilderness survival, I recommend you inquire in your area for a living history group, be it medieval period or 18thcentury or somewhere in between.
Keith.


Our Group’s Official Forum: http://eighteenthcenturylivinghistory.freeforums.org/  

You will also find links to other groups in other areas & countries on our forum.

Failed New Australian Survival Forum. But Old One Still Exists.

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Because I was not satisfied with present survival forums I attempted to start one myself. This failed miserably. Simply put not enough people were really interested in the forum, even though I bent over backwards to make it interesting & supplied plenty of choices on subjects. It was primarily a Primitive Survival forum, although modern equipment was not left out. Even so I think that most survival preppers & survivalists are not really serious about survival, they like the idea, but are not prepared to go the extra distance. Camping & playing at survival is fun, but this will not get you through a serious shtf situation.

If you can’t think of anything more important to carry than modern battery operated equipment & multi-tools along with a ferocerium rod for fire lighting, then in a long term wilderness survival/living situation you are going to be in a lot of trouble. How long do you think this modern equipment will last? What will you do when your hiking boots come apart at the seems? What you need is equipment & methods that are sustainable & to a point renewable, & you need to have skills.

Modern medical supplies & equipment are a priority, no argument there. Modern firearms if they are only used for defence & you can afford to carry them without compromising your ability to hunt are also fine. But if you are only going to carry a modern firearm for hunting & defence, then you will not only need to carry a lot of ammunition, but you will also be putting all your eggs in one basket!!!

If you are serious about survival, if you think there is a possibility that a TEOTWAWKI situation may arise in Australia, then I suggest you check out our forum “The Survival Connection” on our group’s 18th century Living History forum at: http://eighteenthcenturylivinghistory.freeforums.org/  We have some good people on this forum, knowledgeable people from all over with whom you can share your knowledge & learn from. 
Regards, Keith.

Law Enforcement & Preparedness!

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Law Enforcement & Preparedness! Josh “The 7P’s of Survival” On this episode of the 7 P’s Of Survival Show we will be going a little different direction than normal. We are out of the wilderness and into the mind of James Leery a law enforcement veteran and the proprietor of planandprepared. James is also a member … Continue reading Law Enforcement & Preparedness!

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Why The World Needs Survivalists

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Although survivalists are usually portrayed as paranoid conspiracy theorists by the main stream media, during a major disaster they are heroes. Take a look at this poster. The U.S. Department of Agriculture printed and distributed it during the Great Depression. At that time, the country was suffering terribly and soup kitchens were stretched to the […]

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TEOTWAWKI. Survival. How Prepared Are You?

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TEOTWAWKI. Survival. How Prepared Are You?

How prepared are you? Have you gone to any expense or put much time into your survival plans? Or don’t you really think anything is going to happen anyway, so what is the point in going the whole hog?

The problem is of course, IF there is a survival event, it will be too late to prepare after it has happened. I find myself at that point where I think I have done all I can do without “going the whole hog”. We are off grid & off all services, we are equipped with 18thcentury technology & some modern technology. We are producing our own food. BUT, if a survival situation arrives that is a direct threat to my family & my home, then we will need to construct a high palisade right round both houses & the garden areas.

To do this now would be inconvenient, because (A) we don’t have the man power that we would have in a survival situation, & (B) the palisade would block our view from the house. It would also use up a lot of our time & resources for something that we may never need.

Going off grid was not difficult, & we have been off grid for many years. It has cost us less to live off grid than it would have done to live in the city. Getting all the necessary tools & equipment together was not a problem, nor did it involve any extra expense.  Living off grid is a lifestyle choice, & the items you need to purchase are a part of that lifestyle. The 18thcentury equipment was purchased to satisfy my interest in Living History, Historical Trekking & experimental archaeology. The fact that we now have all this equipment, supplies, knowledge & skills is a plus in our survival preparations. Indeed, if I had not become interested in 18th century Living History, it would have taken me a lot longer to realise the potential & advantages of this technology over modern technology.

So having told my story, what is yours? Are you really serious about being prepared, or is it just a game? If you are serious, just how far have you got so far, & how far are you prepared to go pre shtf ?
Keith.

After the Pacific Ocean swallows villages and five Solomon Islands, a study blames climate change

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After the Pacific Ocean swallows villages and five Solomon Islands, a study blames climate change.


Mike Lowe From History’s ALONE

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Mike Lowe From History’s ALONE Josh “The 7P’s of Survival” On this program we have Mike Lowe from History Channels Alone on the show and we talk about his life’s journey leading up to his choice to take part in ALONE. Once we learn a little about his background we dig into what he decided to … Continue reading Mike Lowe From History’s ALONE

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Overlooked Survival Skills That Even The Experts Haven’t Mastered

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Overlooked Survival Skills That Even The Experts Haven’t Mastered

The list of skills that would be useful in a survival situation is a very long one, and it’s nearly impossible for a single human being to be adept at all of them.

But are there really skills that even the most hardcore survivalist hasn’t mastered? Yes.

And to prove it to you, I made a list of some of the hardest skills to master. Are you ready to tackle at least one of them?

1. Crossing a river

I’m starting with this because it’s the “easiest hardest skill” I could find. The last time I crossed a creek was a few days ago, and it was a piece of cake. All I had to do was take off my shoes, my socks, and slowly move through the cold water. But what if you’re in a survival situation and you need to cross a fast, deep river AND take all your gear to the other side? What if you have a spouse or a kid with you who can’t swim?

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Crossing a river is NOT easy. You need to think about the depth, you need to find the right place to do it, you need to worry about the speed of the current, the river bed and so on. It’ll also be useful if you had at least one flotation device on you. Something to consider beforehand when you assemble your survival kit or bug-out bag.

2. Preparing mentally

Even the toughest Navy Seals have trouble keeping it straight when faced with utter chaos. But how can we prepare for something that we’ve never experienced – that even trained military personnel, who train for years, aren’t ready for?

There’s a few things you can do to toughen yourself up and make sure you change the way you react to disastrous events:

  • Take self-defense classes (your life won’t be in danger, but at least you’ll experience falling and physical pain).
  • Imagine yourself surviving.
  • Start going to the gym and set ambitious goals (check with your doctor first, to make sure you can do this, but try to push yourself to the limit. You can even keep a diary if you want, like I used to do so back in college).
  • Watch YouTube videos of people caught in flash floods, earthquakes, house fires, etc., and try to put yourself in their shoes. Also, watch survival movies.

3. Making primitive tools

Why would anyone want to make primitive tools and weapons in the first place? Because in a survival situation, they may be the only tools available.

Overlooked Survival Skills That Even The Experts Haven’t Mastered

Stone tomahawk

Anyone can make a spear or a primitive hammer with their survival knife, but what about more complex items such as stone tomahawks, grain grinders, spear throwers, or returning boomerangs? These all require practice, and rest assured you won’t be able to do them without someone guiding you. You can find people online teaching such classes, and hopefully there’s someone near you who can help.

4. Medical survival

Most survivalists aren’t doctors, because becoming one involves dedicating your entire life to it. Taking a first-aide course is a good start, but delving even more into it requires not just patience but someone to point you in the right direction. If you have a spouse or a relative who’s a doctor, they might be able to help.

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To get your feet wet, one of the things you can do is to learn about herbal medicine and home remedies. Replacing pills with nature’s medicine is a great way to boost your immunity as well as to learn about making these potions, plant extracts and poultices. It will also teach you to eat healthier and to take care of your body more, thus reducing the odds of coming down with something awful as you age.

5. Working with clay

A major disaster could mean you won’t be able to buy things. This includes pots and pans. The trouble is, making pottery isn’t something you learn in an afternoon. You also need quite a few pottery tools. Still, this can be an enjoyable hobby that will provide real value in day-to-day life.

Related:

10 Survival Skills Your Great-Grandparents Knew (That Most Of Us Have Forgotten)

What skills would you add to this list? Share your ideas in the section below:  

Learn How To ‘Live Off The Land’ With Just Your Gun. Read More Here.

Is Prepping Really Dead?

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Is Prepping Really Dead? Highlander “survival & Tech Preps” In these days of doubt can we really say Prepping is dead? Or are we now labeled as paranoid wackos with guns in the woods? After the flop of certain tv shows that depicted preppers in a very bad light, what are we thought of now? … Continue reading Is Prepping Really Dead?

The post Is Prepping Really Dead? appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

How Low-Cost-Drones Can Be Used For Off-Grid Survival

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Image source: DJI.com

Image source: DJI.com

 

The reliance of our US government on drone programs overseas has brought the reality of unmanned warfare to battlefields across the world. If these drones had stayed on battlefields, than most people wouldn’t have an issue with them.

But now, the government has found a way to use drones in day-to-day life here in America, and many constitutionally minded people are rightly fearful.

Even with the fear and suspicion of the government’s use of drones, one of last year’s hottest-selling Christmas presents was drones. More appropriately known as quadcopters, these drones range from toy-grade quadcopters to racing drones and photography-grade drones. The price: anywhere from $15 to several thousand dollars. None of these drones are close to what the military and the government has, and, of course, none of them are armed.

After seeing a drone that was purchased for a coworker for Christmas, I was instantly hooked on the idea of having one myself. I never had a previous interest in anything remote-controlled, but something about the quadcopter drew me to the hobby. Upon purchasing my own drone, and learning to fly the device, I began to see the potential of the little guy for survivalists.

I purchased the Dromida Ominus FPV, which retails for around $150. FPV stands for “first-person view,” as it includes a camera which is capable of relaying information back to the user as the drone flies.

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This allows a real-time feed from the drone’s camera, which gives users the ability to fly the drone through the use of this camera. It was in this camera’s ability to relay real-time information that I could see the tactical advantage of an FPV-equipped quadcopter for survivalists.

Drone Survival Advantages

How Low-Cost, Camera-Equipped Drones Can Be Used For Survival

Dromida Ominus FPV

First off, the ability to have an eagle-eyed view of your surroundings is an incredible advantage. You can send the basic drone up to around 50 feet with ease and gather information. Stronger and larger drones can fly higher. The feed can be recorded and saved onto a memory card. Most of these drones broadcast their footage to a smartphone for FPV flying.

Some drones have cameras that do not have FPV functions. These cheaper drones allow users to take photographs and video, and the photos and videos have to be removed and placed on a computer.

The tactical advantage of having an eye in the sky would allow users to spot trouble long before it gets to you. You also can conduct recon in certain environments, mainly urban, without having to expose yourself to potential threats. The recon and scouting ability of an FPV drone is quite incredible, even if it was just used as an eye in the sky.

The camera system on my $150 drone allows me to see an impressive distance. The cameras on more advanced models, like the DJI Phantom, are even more capable and can fly further and in more adverse conditions.

The DJI models range from $500 to $1,200 and are the superior model. The DJI standard, which is the $500 model, is completely sufficient for reconnaissance and scouting operations. The DJI is probably the best choice, and will be the next model I buy. With a half-mile range and the ability to fly in excess of 400 feet high, and its crystal-clear camera quality, the DJI is one of the best models available.

Drone Survival Disadvantages

First off, drones have pretty lousy battery life. My drone has a battery life of about 12 minutes while filming. The battery takes roughly an hour to charge, so multiple batteries are a must. Other larger drones, like the DJI model, can fly for around 25 minutes, but take around 90 minutes for a complete charge.

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This also means that in a grid-down scenario you’ll need some form of power to continue charging them — be it a generator, solar panels or other tertiary sources. This is an immediate disadvantage and can ultimately make a drone a deadweight.

Things to Know About Drones

DJI Phantom

DJI Phantom

Anyone looking to fly a drone over a half a pound will have to register with the FAA. Brushed motors will require replacements over a few hours of flight. These are the type found on cheaper quadcopters.

Lighter, smaller drones can be heavily affected by the wind, and you cannot fly a drone legally within five miles of an airport. Obviously, you should always respect property and privacy when flying drones during non-emergency situations.

Drone Scenarios

Imagine you own several acres of rural land – miles from the city and police — and begin hearing vehicles approaching. Or imagine hearing sounds in the woods, such as talking or even shooting. Instead of having to check out the situation by yourself, you can simply throw a drone in the air for a bird’s eye view. You can observe the party and decide if they are a danger.

In situations where a natural disaster has occurred, a drone can be used to scout for escape routes, look at washed-out roads, and avoid the massive amount of potential obstacles that could halt or delay an evacuation. You could use the footage recorded by the drone to brief your family, team and others on the plan, the route and other information.

A drone requires some time to learn to pilot, but it is fun. You’ll need to take the time to learn the skills to pilot the drone to be effective, and you’ll need to decide the level of investment you are willing to make. For the cost of a Glock, you can have a powerful, capable and ready-to-recon drone. You’ll have to make the decision if this system can work for you, but it can be a valuable tool to have in the survival box.

What advice would you add on using drones for survival? What other situations do you think they could be used? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Learn How To ‘Live Off The Land’ With Just Your Gun. Read More Here.

Long Term Wilderness Living/Survival.

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Long Term Wilderness Living/Survival.

After the dust has settled & the survivors have left the cities to live in the bush, they will have to get down to some serious work in order to continue to survive. This also applies to those of us who already live in the bush, because our ties to the city will also be severed. Then, the equipment we have is all we have. There will be no new supplies of anything available to us. If the equipment we have chosen is not sustainable, then we will be in trouble in a very short period of time.

The same can be said of the skills we have at that time. Sure we can learn new skills, but just how much discomfort do you think you will suffer whilst you try to learn these skills? Whether it be making fire or making your own footwear, these skills are not learnt & certainly not mastered overnight, & one of the problems with using modern gear is that it does not teach you anything worthwhile.

My wife & I lived for over 20 years in the bush without electricity or any modern gadgets. We washed our clothes by boiling them in a copper. For light we made tallow candles & grease lamps. We grew our own food & I hunted meat for the table with a flintlock muzzle-loading gun. We started off this way living an 18th century lifestyle & our level of comfort never dropped. IF we had started off using modern equipment, we would have finished up living a Stone Age lifestyle! Yes I have the ability to live a Stone Age lifestyle, I have the primitive skills & it is a very secure feeling knowing this, but I do not want to have to live that way, I like a certain level of comfort.

So my advice is, if you are really serious about being able to survive in the future should it all go pear shaped, take a good long hard look at the gear you have, & ask yourself “is it sustainable”? DO NOT defend your choices of equipment to save face, DO NOT defend your choices because of its monetary cost. We are talking about survival here, our ability to keep living, & our quality of life. Going camping for a weekend or a month is not a good way of reviewing your gear. It is fun, but it is nothing but just that. Fuel stoves, matches, ferocerium rods, canned foods, torches, radios, Bowie type survival knives, etc will not last or will not do a satisfactory job in keeping you alive & within your comfort zone. So start learning the skills that will keep you alive & enable you to live with a certain amount of comfort. Acquire the tools & equipment that will support you through long term wilderness living.

Now having said that, I would like to make it quite clear that I have nothing against modern firearms or modern medical supplies, & I think those life straws for purifying water sound great. BUT, if you are going to carry a modern firearm, keep it for defence only or your limited supply of ammunition is not going to last long if you use it for hunting as well. If you are travelling alone I suggest you carry a bow as well, & not a compound bow. Or if you are only going to carry one gun & no bow, get yourself a flintlock muzzle-loading gun.

If it all hits the fan before my next post (can’t see that happening), best of luck.
Keith.

4 Foods Every Survivalist Should Know How To Find In The Woods

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4 Foods Every Survivalist Should Know How To Find In The Woods

Jerusalem Artichoke

If you ever find yourself in a wilderness survival situation, then you’ll have two initial goals. One, you’ll need to find or build a suitable shelter. And two, you’ll need food.

Most experienced wilderness survivalists carry simple fishing gear (some line and hooks) as well as the materials to build snares, deadfalls and traps to capture birds and fish. However, the truth is that hunting and fishing with primitive methods requires considerable skill.

Fortunately, nature often provides the observant individual with another bountiful source of calories in the form of wild fruits, nuts, tubers and greens. Although they are seasonal, they are both surprisingly tasty and highly nutritious. Here’s four of the best foods to forage:

1. Wild lettuce

4 Foods Every Survivalist Should Know How To Find In The Woods

Wild lettuce

The human body requires certain vitamins and minerals which are most easily obtained from eating green, leafy vegetables such as wild lettuce. This plant contains the vitamins A, E, C, K, and the minerals iron, magnesium, manganese, calcium, folic acid, carotenoids and Omega 3 fatty acids. It is high in fiber, which helps to keep your digestive system working properly, and it contains antioxidants to help prevent cell damage and cell mutations. Located throughout North America in wooded regions where the soil has been disturbed, wild lettuce is commonly found in forested river bottoms, adjacent to roads and trails, along the edges of woods, and in shaded, fallow, fields. Appearing as a biennial plant that grows to a height of approximately three feet, it produces a rosette of large, long, slim, lance-shaped, green leaves up to 10 inches in length.

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The leaves have distinctly lobed edges and the plant produces a dandelion-like head from which the flowers bloom. In addition, all parts of the plant turn light orange-brown upon exposure to the air. It should be noted that there are several different species of wild lettuce throughout North America and that the leaves of this plant appear very similar to the dandelion plant (which is edible as well).

2. Jerusalem artichoke

The Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) is one of the best known wild tubers in North America and it appears as a green, leafy, flowering weed. Its tubers are high in starch and sugars, which the human body converts to carbohydrates. It also contains thiamin, iron, phosphorus and potassium. Widespread in North America east of the Mississippi River, the Jerusalem artichoke can be found from southern Canada to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Great Plains to the East Coast. It prefers to grow in sandy river bottoms, floodplains, lake edges, creek sides and wet areas where there is plenty of sunlight and where the soil is sand, loamy sand or sandy loam. A member of the sunflower family, this plant is tall, green and leafy with a single, straight, round, unbranched (except occasionally near the top) stalk, usually measuring 1/2 inches to 3/4 inches in diameter. The stalk is covered with short, stiff, raspy hairs which remain after the plant dies in the fall. Jerusalem artichokes produce large flower heads that usually measure two to three inches in diameter and look like miniature sunflowers, except that the discs in the center are yellow instead of black and much smaller. The edible part of this plant is the tubers it produces below ground, which can be dug at any time of the year but are not fully ripe until late fall, winter or early spring. Also, because of their flatulent properties, they should be cooked by either steaming, boiling or baking for one to six hours (depending on the time of year they are harvested) to convert any inulin they contain to simple sugars and reduce the chance of stomach upset. If cooked properly, they have a highly palatable, almost buttery flavor.

3. Morels

4 Foods Every Survivalist Should Know How To Find In The Woods

Morels

Thousands of foragers each year hunt for morel mushrooms simply for their superior taste. This distinctive fungi has a honeycomb-like appearance and the ascocarps are highly prized by gourmet cooks (especially for French cuisine). Morel mushrooms can be found throughout most of the lower 48 states and require moist soil, deep shade, and warm weather to propagate. As a result, they are most often available in the spring. Yellow morels (Morchella esulenta) and black morels (Morchella elata) are commonly found beneath deciduous trees such as oak, ash, elm, sycamore and tulip poplars, as well as fruit-bearing trees such as apple. In addition, morels are seldom found in close proximity to most of the common poisonous mushrooms but they do grow adjacent to false morels (Gryomitra sp.) and elfin saddles (Verpa sp.).

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False morels (which are poisonous) can be differentiated from true morels by careful study of the cap, which is often wrinkled rather than honeycomb or net-like. The easiest way to tell a false morel from a true morel is that false morels contain a cotton ball-like substance inside their stem while true morels have a hollow stem. Also, the caps of the false morel can be easily twisted in comparison to that of the true morel. Lastly, false morels often display a reddish-brown color. Morel mushrooms should be cooked prior to consumption because they occasionally contain insect larvae.

4. Acorns

While neither as palatable nor as glamorous as the other foods mentioned here, the fact is that acorns are one of the most widespread, readily available forage foods in the U.S. In fact, oak trees are so common in the eastern U.S. that most people consider their acorns to be a nuisance. Various species of oak trees exist all across the U.S. except in desert regions, and they all produce acorns. Once you have gathered a store of these nuts, you will need to examine each one carefully and discard any with worm holes or deformed and soft hulls. To crack the shell, you will need to use a baton or a hammer stone, combined with an anvil. Once you remove the nut portion, you must soak it to remove the tannic acid, which has a bitter taste. You will need to repeatedly soak the pieces for a couple of hours (changing the water after each soaking) in order to leech the tannic acid from the nuts. Once they are fully leeched, you can either boil them or crush the pieces and mix them with water to form a paste, which can then be baked like bread.

Although there is actually a very wide variety of edible plants available to a forager in a wilderness survival situation, the five plants listed above are all widespread, commonly available foods that will provide your body with the necessary vitamins, minerals and carbohydrates it needs. They also provide nutrients that you simply cannot obtain from consuming protein alone. If you know where to look and what to look for, there is a veritable banquet of foods to forage throughout the year that can easily keep you alive in a crisis situation.

What wilderness foods would you add to the list? Share your tips in the section below:

Learn How To ‘Live Off The Land’ With Just Your Gun. Read More Here.

Survival & Long Term Wilderness Living Chores. What will you be doing?

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My wife says that if there are any modern gadgets that will make wilderness living more comfortable or survival more likely, then she would like to have them. My problem with most modern gadgets is that they don’t in my opinion add to ones comfort, & they are not sustainable for the most part. Two types of people disagree with my way of thinking; those that have already invested in a multitude of modern gadgets & are not about to do it any other way, & those that are really not interested in long term wilderness survival, they are more into camping & pretending they are surviving.
I will agree that some modern gadgets could be useful in a “lost” situation, but long term, no, I don’t think so. Fuel stoves for instance, even home made so called “hobo stoves” that burn wood. How much do these weigh? How much room to they take up in your pack? Do you seriously think that these are a priority? Is there nothing else that you would rather be carrying in there place?
If they are only carrying modern firearms, how long do you think the ammunition will last if it is used for defence & hunting? How much ammo can they carry to make it worthwhile? What if the firearm malfunctions? How many spare parts are they going to carry for their compound bows? What if they drop & break their ferocerium rods? By using & carrying all these gadgets, what primitive skills have they learnt ready for the time when this modern gear starts to break down?

Battery powered torches for letting raiders know where you are! Solar panels for recharging heavy batteries, radios, hiking boots, compound bows. I wish I could remember now all the gadgets that have been recommended on various forums, but I dare say you can think of more yourself.

So when they get to where you are going in the wilderness with these various gadgets, what do you think they will be doing? What daily chores will they have? Water collection, collecting firewood, checking the trap line, hunting, ranging for security, on watch duty for security, cooking meals, boiling water for purification, dehairing animal hides, brain tanning animal skins, making clothing, making moccasins, fishing, foraging for food & tinder plants, smoking animal skins, digging toilet holes, preparing & tending gardens, perhaps constructing shelters or defenses, collecting Goonagurra for making matting & arrow shafts, making reed mats, bow making, arrow making, attending militia drill, can you think of more?
So tell me, where do these gadgets come into helping with these chores? How do they make life more comfortable? How do they help you survive? And whilst we are at it, are they sustainable? How long will they last?

Anyway, just something for people to think about.

Advantages of A Flintlock Muzzle-loader.

Never take for granted the freedoms we enjoy today!

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Rather a strange title for us in Australia, as we have already lost so many of our freedoms. Let’s make sure we do not lose any more human rights! 

Never take for granted the freedoms we enjoy today! https://ww…
Posted by Gabby Franco on Wednesday, 2 March 2016

Detective Southall said Mr Valenti had a right to defend himself.

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Detective Southall said Mr Valenti had a right to defend himself.
“Yes, everyone’s got a right to defend themselves and their property from a home invader… as long as the force used is reasonable in the circumstances,” hesaid.

If or When TSHTF Part Five. My choice of the best gun for long term wilderness living. The Muzzle-Loader.

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Any muzzle-loader will give you an edge in long term wilderness living except the percussion lock. The percussion lock, also known as a caplock, requires fulminate of mercury caps for its ignition. This method is NOT sustainable. Tinderlocks & Matchlocks are good but they require a burning fuse at all times making you visible in the dark & the gun not so pleasurable to use as other later locks. The wheellock is good but does require Pyrite for its ignition & this is not always easy to find.

The flintlock requires a siliceous or igneous rock for ignition & this type of rock can be found in the bush if you know what you are looking for. I find the easiest way is to carry a fire steel with you & simply test the rocks you come across to see if they are hard enough to create sparks by striking the steel.

Above: This is English flint, a siliceous rock which can occasionally be found in coastal areas of Australia where English ships dumped their flint rock ballast before taking on a new cargo.

Above: This is agate which can be very common in places in Australia. Agate was used a lot in place of flint for flint & steel fire lighting. Agate is also a siliceous rock.

Above: This is quartz, very common in places & although it tends to fracture easily it is still a good rock to use for gun or fire lighting.

Above: Green chert.

http://www.aradon.com.au/green_chert.html;

Jasper.

This is obsidian, an igneous rock or volcanic rock.

Advantages of A Flintlock Muzzle-loader.

If or When TSHTF Part Four. Primitive living/survival skills.

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This is a basic list of skills for woodsrunners in our group. These are long term wilderness living/survival skills.

Woodsrunner’s Skills.

This is a list of basic skills in which I personally would expect an 18th century woodsman or woods-woman to have some experience with in our group.

Corrupt Government Bullshit BUSTED!!! Adler versus Coach Gun.

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Adler A110 vs Coach Gun

With all the controversy surrounding the new “Rapid Fire” Adler A110, we decided to test out just how fast it really is by racing it against a double barrel coach gun.The results will surprise you…

Posted by Shooting Stuff Australia on Friday, 12 February 2016

If or When TSHTF Part Two.

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Long Term Wilderness Living/Survival.

In a TEOTWAWKI situation, in my opinion, the towns & especially the cities are not going to be a good place to survive for decent people, especially those with families. My reasoning is. 1) How are you going to be able to defend yourself against gangs which are prepared to burn you out if they can’t get you any other way? 2) Food is only going to last a short time. The gangs will get the majority of the equipment and food, and it will be very dangerous for anyone else out in the open on the streets or in the stores. 3) Your ammunition for your modern firearms will not last long if you are continually have to fight off raiders. You can of course for a while reload your own ammo if you have the gear and have managed to secure a store of powder, primers and lead. 4) There will be no clean water, no electricity unless you have a generator indoors and plenty of fuel. There will be no toilet facilities and you can not risk going outside. Yes there are toilet systems available that do not require water, but these are not designed to be used only in house.

So, the wise survivalist or prepper will leave the city and move to a place in the bush, be it your own property, or just a suitable place with running water, shelter and a food source. If you travel early, you will be able to use some form of transport, but if you leave it too late, the roads out may be blocked. Few people will already be living in the bush. If you are one of the lucky ones, and you have the money, then you will be able to set yourself up for a long term stay. But if you have to move to your retreat when TSHTF, then again your supplies will be limited to what you can transport.

If a survival situation big enough to warrant leaving the city arises, many people will not know until it is too late. Ask yourself now, what will be the signs? How will I know when to leave? If this is the situation you find yourself in, you will have to be prepared to ditch your vehicle if A) it breaks down, or B) the roads are blocked and you can’t get around it. This will mean having to travel on foot. How much of your gear and supplies can you carry on foot? What will you take with you? What are you prepared to leave behind?

A sensible person will have thought of this already, and what they will be packing in the vehicle will be back-packs, and only the stuff they can carry on their backs. There may be other separate supplies, just in case they can get through, but if they have to walk, these separate supplies will be left behind. This preparation will take a lot of serious thought. Remember, you are not military; there will be no back-up supplies when you run out. You are on your own, group or individual so choose your equipment and supplies wisely.

Something else to think about.

It is my belief that if you start off with all modern equipment and tools, sooner or later these items are going to start to wear out or break, and when they do, you are going to have to resort to a very primitive lifestyle. Most of the equipment we carry is solely for comfort and ease of living. When these items are no more, then our lifestyle will be radically changed. If however you choose a period lifestyle pre 19th century, then it is highly unlikely that you will ever have to drop below this level of comfort. I chose the mid 18th century, mainly because I am a living historian and this is my chosen period of interest, but also because I soon came to realise that this period’s technology is not too modern, and not too primitive. For survival purposes it gives me a level of ease and comfort I am happy living with.

Equipment and Tools.

For every piece of equipment you intend to take with you, ask yourself these questions: Will this add significantly to my comfort? Do I really need it? How long will it last? How versatile is it? Is there some better alternative? If it malfunctions or breaks, can I fix it?

Let’s look at some typical examples of good and poor choices. One of the most important tools you will need is something for cutting wood. Even if you do not have to construct a shelter, you will need to construct animal traps, some form of fencing for gardens, possibly splints and crutches if someone is injured, maybe fishing poles, spears, pikes, defenses, drying racks for food preservation, frames for scraping animal skins, and possibly more besides. Saws are good but limited in their use. A good strong pruning saw could be useful and it is not heavy, but you will need more than this. Many people choose the machete or a similar tool. This may be okay in a jungle, but it is still limited in its use. Only a fool would use a good knife for cutting wood, especially if it was the only tool you had. A knife is a very useful tool to carry but it has specific uses, and they do not include cutting large pieces of wood.

A tomahawk on the other hand is light, versatile and very efficient for all the tasks mentioned earlier. It can also be thrown for recreation and hunting if needs be. The head can easily be removed if it has a tapered eye and be used for fleshing skins. A new helve is easier to make and fit for a tomahawk than for a modern belt axe. The poll can be used as a hammer for driving in pegs and stakes, and it is a good fighting tool.

Now how about your firearms? If you only have modern firearms and no bows, then your ammunition will not last long if you have to use them for hunting and defence. Brass shells are heavy and you will need to carry a lot of weight in ammunition and possibly a reloader. A modern firearm is a good idea for use in defence if you have people to carry them, but the weight of the ammunition can make it unpractical to carry too much ammo. There are many other important supplies to be carried by someone. If your modern firearm malfunctions, can you repair it?

A flintlock muzzle-loading gun or rifle on the other hand is far more versatile than a modern gun. It can be used to create fire without using precious gunpowder; on the other hand the gunpowder can itself be used to make fire in certain circumstances. The flintlock is easy to repair with just a few simple tools & spare parts, and even if you do not have any spare parts, the lock can easily be converted to a matchlock or tinderlock for continued use. Lead is retrieved from shot game & remoulded, so there is no need to carry a lot of lead. Also there is the option of using other projectiles besides lead. Extra gunpowder can be carried in place of the extra lead, which means that your supplies will last longer.

Before you go spending your hard earned dollars on a custom knife or some Bowie look-alike, think about the use to which your blade will be put. Your knife or knives need to be able to field dress, skin and butcher game. They may also be needed for defence. A good butcher knife will serve you well in this regard, which is why the butcher knife was the most commonly carried knife by woodsmen and Indians alike back in the 18th century. A legging knife can be carried as a back-up to your hunting knife, and a good clasp knife will serve well for camp chores and making pot hooks and trap triggers. All three of these knives can be purchased for the cost of a modern camp or hunting knife.

If or When TSHTF. Part One.

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If or When the SHTF.

Personally I think it has already started hitting the fan, and as the world can see, Australians have failed to act. This is what Australia & Australians have come to, gutless in the majority and apathetic. Our government is totally corrupt and prioritises mining over farming, power and profit over the security and well being of Australian citizens. The majority only have themselves to blame, but they are also to blame for dropping the rest of Australians right in it!  Yes there are plenty of petitions, and even some rallies and protests, but none of these battle the real problem. We can beg and plea and it may even seem at times that we have won a particular fight, but unless we get rid of the present government and the present system, then we will constantly be loosing in the long run. 

Will anything big happen to signal a SHTF situation? Or will the government continue to erode our rights and freedoms until it is totally too late? Either way the majority of Australians would sooner see citizens marched into gas chambers than rally against injustice.  The mass shooting in Tasmania was the catalyst for banning certain firearms here in Australia, and the truth about who organised that mass murder was never revealed.

So how can we determine what sort of survival situation we are preparing for? We can’t. We are already in a survival situation with our human rights being taken away from us. Local councils acting as government despite a referendum that clearly said NO. Higher rates/taxes are being charged to land holders and those that can’t pay are evicted from their OWN property and that property sold. How can we become self-reliant and self-sufficient when the local councils do all they can to make sure this does not happen?

Still we do what we can, we prepare just in case there should be TEOTWAWKI. Something big enough to sweep aside the corrupt so called law and order, sweep aside the local councils so they no longer matter.  We put in solar power and get off the grid. We put in our own grey water systems and compost toilets. We use rain water tanks so we don’t have to rely on town water. We grow our own food to improve our health and become as self-reliant as we possibly can.

But sooner or later, for us as a minority or the majority of Australian citizens, push will come to shove. If we can’t fight, then we may have to leave our homes. In a real bad situation families will NOT be able to safely live in the cities, and even the smaller towns may be under threat. So we prepare, we choose our gear, clothing & tools carefully because if we have to leave home to survive in the wilderness it may be for a very long time. So I want you to think about that. We live in a throw away society, things are not made to last, but we NEED things to last! Ordinary camping equipment will not cut it; neither will military equipment because neither was meant to last long. Forget about battery operated equipment. Think about your real needs. Modern ammo won’t last long if you are going to use it for hunting and self-defence. Compound bows are not long term reliable in a wilderness situation. Whatever you choose must be sustainable. Don’t let romantic visions of yourself surviving like Rambo rule your head, it will only get you and yours killed.

I have lived for over 20 years without electricity and water on tap. We grew our own food (and still do) and I hunted for meat using a trap line and a flintlock muzzle-loader. Now we have a solar powered home, water on tap from large rainwater tanks. Grey water system & compost toilets. So in this series of articles I will give you some ideas for you to think about. You may improve on my methods, but do please give it some serious thought before dismissing  anything.
Keith.

The Survival Connection By Keith H. Burgess.

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The Survival Connection By Keith H. Burgess.

I will tell you a little about our group, who we are and what we do. Firstly we are an 18th century living history group, called the New England Colonial Living History Group 1680-1760. I started this group some 30 odd years ago, and we have an online presence in our official forum. Living History is about interpreting and recreating  past lifestyles, a little like Historical Re-enactment, except that we do not generally put on displays for the public and we go into the skills & equipment far deeper than the re-enactors do, and we emulate common personas in everyday situations rather than just military as re-enactors tend to do.

Part of our activities is Experimental Archaeology. That is the using of equipment, clothing & foods to establish exactly how an item was used. Sometimes this involves actually making that item. This can be anything from making fire in a primitive or period manner, to building a ship & sailing it on a trade route. Now there is another side that has been added known as Experiential Archaeology, which is the continuing use of the skills that we learn in experiments. We only wear period correct clothing, and we only use period correct equipment.

Not so much in Australia’s colonial past, but more in the New World colonial past, life was all about survival for those colonists who chose to live in the wilderness. They had to find or make some of their own tools, they had to often travel on foot to their destination carrying these tools and other supplies. On the way and once there they had to deal with the threat posed by natives and criminals. Everyone who was strong enough to hold and aim a gun was expected to know how to shoot. Plus there were a host of other skills needed to construct a dwelling, grow and hunt for food and to complete certain chores.

Now it does not take a total genius to realise that the above situation is very much in line with our needs as modern survivalists. All the more so because modern equipment rarely teaches us anything other than this is a throw-away society that we live in. Where as primitive equipment teaches us much about flora, fauna and our environment. A typical example would be the difference between using the “real” flint and steel method of fire lighting that has been in use for hundreds of years, and using a ferocerium rod. Many people do not learn about plant tinders when using the ferocerium rod, or the difference between plant tinders and kindling. Making fire in the rain can be difficult with a ferocerium rod, but not with a flint and steel. The skills learnt by using the flint and steel extend to the making and use of the fire-bow, flintlock fire lighting and reading glass fire lighting.

With the 18th century knapsack and contents I carry, along with other simple tools, I can survive a lifetime in the wilderness. Can a modern survivalist with what is considered mostly camping equipment claim the same? I very much doubt it. So what we have in 18thcentury living history is tried equipment and primitive skills. But it gives us something else that is of the utmost importance in survival, and that is a reasonable level of comfort. I will gladly admit that most of what I carry on my person is for comfort and not necessarily required for my survival. I can survive without carrying any equipment with me into a wilderness, but it is a very hard life until one manages to make a collection of primitive tools to make life easier, and even then we are talking about a Palaeolithic lifestyle.

By carrying 18th century equipment combined with the period and primitive skills, I can at least guarantee that my level of comfort will never drop below that level. Where as if I were to carry only modern clothing and equipment, slowly over time as items failed to work or broke and clothing wore out, I would be cast into a very primitive lifestyle regardless of the skills I may have learnt over time. If I were using a modern firearm it too may have ceased to function, or I may have simply run out of ammunition. Those using modern compound bows would be no better off, as these tools require special arrows, bow strings and parts.

However, do not think that I am totally against the use of modern technology; I believe that if we are able to carry some modern items as well as our period gear, then that would be an added advantage. The more people you have, the more you can take with you, but if I have to leave something behind, it will be the modern firearms etc that will in time break down and constitute a lot of weight for little gain. Modern medicine is an absolute must carry, despite what you may know about primitive methods and herbal use. Regardless of what you carry, you must keep one thing in mind. There must be a compromise between maximum self-reliance, and minimum weight.

If you have to leave the city or if you are forced from your bush retreat, you will need to make the right choice of equipment the first time. You may never get a chance to correct any mistakes, so choose wisely. IF you are serious about preparing for survival, and for you this is not just a game or a pastime, then you need to forget about looking like someone in the military. The military always has relied on back-up supplies and equipment. You, we, will NOT have that option. Whatever we take with us must be practicle, hard wearing and last us the rest of our lives.

15 Security tips for off-grid homes

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Ways to keep your off grid home secure

How do you secure this?

As the financial crunch continues, property crime is on the rise.  Living off-grid you are more vulnerable to opportunist thieves – people who happen to be passing.

Here are some time-tested crime prevention secrets – countermeasures to secure your home, whether you are off-gridders, RVers, preppers, hermits, survivalists, or simply spending a few days off the beaten track wild camping .

There are lots of things we can do that are both inexpensive and do not require utility power.  Many are just commonsense. The more difficult your property looks to breach the less likely that would-be thieves will select you as their target.

1. Know your neighbors

In remote areas this is the No 1 safety tip: neighbors and community members who know you by name and by face will be the ones that will watch your back in a crisis.

You do not have to become best friends with these people – but you do need to say hi once in awhile and perhaps get involved in some community activities so that they can get to know you and you them.

2. Get a dog

A dog is a great really great early warning system.  Heck my little 7 kilo Terrier makes a  racket if a stranger is walking around outside at night.

He might not scare an intruder once he is in the house but he certainly would give the would-be burglar reason to look elsewhere. Plus we would know that someone who should not be here is close by if not inside our home.

3. Landscape with inhospitable plants

Inhospitable doesn’t mean the plants aren’t beautiful.  Thorny plants like rugosa rosebushes bougainvillea or blackberry vines make it far more difficult to sneak around outside of windows or to climb fences.

4. Consider an alarm system

We are not talking about an expensive monitored alarm system and as a matter of fact I think advertising that you have a monitored system whether it is true or not simply tells the world that you have lots of goodies that need protection.

When I say alarm system I am referring to a loud horn or blast that goes off when someone invades your territory.

This is especially effective if you have neighbors who will also hear the alarm but even in a more remote area the alarm will annoy and dissuade the burglars from sticking around.

Wireless motion sensors can be installed on doors to scare away a person trying to break in. Best of all they’re battery operated and will suprise the bejassus out of anyone who thought they were on an easy picking spree.

5. Keep your outdoor areas well lit

This does not have to be costly. Even shaded areas will benefit from inexpensive solar lighting.

Motion lights around doorways can be startling since they come on when a person walks up to the door.

6.  Do not leave keys out

Even if you think you’re being clever don’t leave keys under mats, under flower pots, on top of door frames or in one of those $3 magnetic key carriers that fit under the frame of your car.

Thieves know about these places and are more creative than you might think when it comes to locating a spare.

Don’t leave a spare key in a coded key vault similar to the type real estate agents use. They are easy to smash into.

 7. Add internal locks to critical storage areas

This includes your emergency food storage area, crawl spaces and your larder.

Many people keep their Root cellar away from the house – which can be one of the most targeted areas in times when food is scarce

8. Secure your mail

In addition to minimizing identity theft an overflowing mail box is an open invitation to thieves who will assume you are not at home or traveling. Invest in a PO box – they are cheap.

9. Secure your doors with multiple locking mechanisms

Yes it is an annoyance to carry multiple keys but why make it easy for the bad guys? A deadbolt is essential and even two would not be excessive. Make sure the locks are difficult to pick.

10. Reinforce your door frame

Remember that a lock is only as good as the strength of the door frame.  Suppose you were home, up a long remote track, when thre bad guys come calling.

It doesn’t matter how many locks you have if they are only supported by a flimsy interior frame.

A strong person can generally break those down with a well-placed hit from a shoulder.

Invest in a high-quality metal frame. These are very difficult to breach.

11. Be wary of people who come to the door

Whether they are strangers delivery people or even officers of the law if they are unexpected you need to be alert.

These are all common ruses that precede home invasions.

Have your pepper spray handy and ask for ID.

If in doubt do not open the door. Ask for a badge or ID number and call it in.

Remember uniforms can be readily purchased online and in these days of Photoshop fake IDs can be easily created on a home computer.

12. Add locks to your gates

tIf you lock your gate then you don’t have to worry about people showing up right at your door.

Plus you’ll be sure to be on high alert if there’s a knock at the door.

13. Secure sliding glass doors

Before bed each night block the track of sliding doors with a metal bar or a piece of wood.

Those locks are very easy to force.

14. Secure sidelights or doors with large windows

It’s a simple thing for a thief to break out a small window then reach in and unlock your door from the inside.

Invest in some decorative metal grid work to make this more difficult.

15. Create a safe area to which you can retreat

In a worst case scenario if someone breaks into your home while you are there it’s important to have an area that you can run to until help arrives.

A back door leading to a bumpy uneven track that you know well is one good idea.  IT all depends ont he terrain.  Internally, reinforce a bedroom door with a good quality frame and replace the flimsy interior door with an exterior one.

Have a way to call for assistance inside the room and a method of self-defense.

Think Like a Burglar

Not so much a tip – more a way of life – Walk around your place and pretending you are a bad guy think about points of entry.

Take a look at your home from the street. Are you advertising all of the goodies inside? Or does your home look like a modest well-kept abode with good lighting and well trimmed landscaping? If you were a burglar which home on your street would you hit?

Finally: here is a good youtube video on the subject – there are many more like it:  https://www.youtube.com/embed/1NQf8zSOlVY

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Fukushima Radiation Protection A Basic Primer

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Living with Fukushima’s Legacy
By By GunsmithG
Greetings, fellow Preppers and Survivalists. With the damage done to Japan’s
Fukushima Nuclear power plants from the tsunami, there has been much speculation
about how much damage and what the released radiation is going to do, not only in Japan, but also on the west coast of Canada and the United States. There has been a lot of panicked responses

Preppers are going to die

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Preppers are going to die…

Preppers are going to die…
In this video, I pull no punches because I care enough about you to tell you just how it is. I realize I may lose some subscribers but that’s not what it’s about to me, it’s about doing the right thing, about living my values and about trying to help. I can’t help unless I speak up about something that is really out of line here in the