More on Gun Control & the Recent Firearms Amnesty.

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We are seeing the use of terms such as “Illegal”, “Arsenals” “guns off the streets” & other sensationalising terms. So who made these guns illegal in the first place? Our government. Some guns being handed in now date back to WW2. All these thousands of “Illegal Guns” have supposedly been “on our streets” since WW2 & we only had one mass shooting which was in Tasmania!!! Don’t you think this sounds a little odd?

Now we are hearing about private “arsenals”, not collections or ownership but arsenals. Well if these private “arsenals” are such a risk, considered so dangerous, how come we have not had mass shootings like they have had in America? The confiscation of law abiding gun owner’s guns after the Port Arthur shooting did nothing to stop crime, because these guns BELONGED to law abiding gun owners. But now you might as well put a poster out front of every Australian home declaring “This House Not Protected With Firearms”!!! Now we are seeing regular home invasions, AND you can face charges if you try to defend yourself or your family. Australian women are attacked & assaulted every 2 minutes in Australia & all the government did was to cut funding to women’s help centers!!!

Surely we should have the right to defend ourselves & our families from harm? Yet in Australia it is illegal to purchase or carry ANYTHING for use in self defence, no guns, no pepper sprays, no tasers, not even marking paint!

Farmers used to be able to carry hand guns whilst they went about their daily work. Some carried snake guns which were cut down .410 shotguns for protection against snakes. Not any more. These were law abiding people who were suddenly classed as criminals because the government deemed it so! Shotguns, the farmer’s stock in trade along with the little .22 rimfire rifle is now under attack by the Greens & the anti-gun lobby. Semi-auto .22s have already been banned, & now they want our shotguns as well!!!

As I see it it is no good us complaining & protesting against more gun control & the loss of our human rights. We need to put an end to this. Our government is supposed to be looking after our well being, that means ALL OF US. Not just big companies, not just the wealthy, but ALL OF US. This is no longer happening. Whether it be the environment, our safety, our freedoms, our human rights, our well being, or the right to choose our own lifestyle, the right to defend ourselves, our families & our homes. All that is gone now.

I think Australians need to ask themselves where this is all going, is there no end to the government seemingly uncaring attitude. If we have lost the right to defend ourselves & our families without risk of prosecution, then what rights do we have left that matters? People are dieing out there! Do you think that this can’t happen to you? If the preservation of our freedom & the right to defend ourselves is NOT the most important thing in our lives, what is?

https://www.centraltelegraph.com.au/news/almost-3000-queensland-guns-be-destroyed/3236243/

Here’s What Burglars Will Tell You About Protecting Your Home From Thieves

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I’d wager that no one leaves their home without being at least somewhat concerned about the belongings that they leave behind. Contained within most homes, is the sum total of the owner’s life, and not just in a material sense. There are plenty of items with sentimental value as well. And all of it is typically protected by little more than a few locks on the doors and windows. If someone really wants to break into your home and steal what you own when you’re not around, chances are that there isn’t much standing in their way.

But if you want to make it harder for any would-be burglar to enter your home, or at least make your home a less desirable target, don’t just buy an alarm system and call it day. You should really listen to people who are burglars and take their advice. An MSNBC affiliate out of Atlanta recently did just that. They sent letters to 86 people who had gone to prison for burglary and asked them a variety questions about their crimes. Their answers could tell you a lot about how to protect your home from this crime. What they told reporters included the following:

  • Don’t advertise what you own. One burglar admitted to looking for homes that had cars with NRA bumper stickers, which would indicate that there are plenty of guns to steal there.
  • Burglars don’t just look in obvious places. If they feel safe, they’ll tear everything up looking for hidden valuables.
  • The best time to break into a house was between 12:30 and 2:30, because it’s rare for both kids or adults to be home at that time period.
  • Not all burglars are intimidated by security alarm signs and cameras, and many admitted to knowing how to disable alarms. Some suggested that cameras would indicate that there are valuables in the home.
  • As you might expect, burglars are terrified of large dog breeds.
  • Burglars aren’t typically killers. They don’t want to a serious confrontation with a homeowner, so any sign that someone is home is a deterrent.

When asked what precautions homeowners should take to keep their homes from being burglarized, most of the inmates gave similar answers. For instance, many of them suggested that homeowners leave some sign that someone is home, such as parking a car in the driveway or leaving a TV or radio on.

But the biggest deterrent is visibility, and that applies in more than one sense. They suggested that you keep your bushes and trees trimmed so that your home is easy to see. Homes that were isolated, either by the distance from other houses or by being obscured by big fences and vegetation were definitely easier to rob. It seems that the things people build around their homes to make them feel safer have the opposite effect.

And of course, visibility means nothing if no one is actually watching your home. One inmate admitted to preferring homes in communities where the neighbors were very reserved and conservative, and others recommended that you get to know your neighbors. The implication is obvious. In neighborhoods where people don’t really know each other or care about each other, it’s quite easy to break into a home.

That’s because nobody wants to get involved when they see someone hopping your fence, nobody can tell if anything out of the ordinary is going on in your home if they don’t know you, and nobody is really paying attention. As a result, nobody calls the cops.

The bottom line is that neighborhoods, where people talk to each other and don’t feel the need to build barriers between each other, are safer. And that’s probably something that we’ve known intuitively all along.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

When Do Burglaries Occur?

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Our apartment complex has been experiencing an increase in burglaries.  One resident even reported getting home and finding the intruder, who then escaped out of the second floor balcony.   Because it is happening right where I live, I thought it might be a good time to take a look at when most burglaries occur. When Do Burglaries Occur? Written by Matthew Wilson According to the FBI, a burglary occurs every 18 seconds in the U.S., adding up to nearly […]

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South Africa Power Crisis

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South Africa goes off grid

How South Africans prefer their electricity.

The local authorities in Cape Town, South Africa face a power crisis as electricity theft, unpaid bills and switching to renewable energy puts pressure on the electricity companies. Even though the economy and population has grown, the city expects to sell far less electricity than it has since 2006.

Solar electricity panels are appearing on rooftops all over the cities of South Africa, leaving municipalities from Thembelihle in the Northern Cape to Mantsopa in the Eastern Free State in trouble – and it is getting worse.

Leslie Rencontre, Director of Electricity in Cape Town explained the increase in prices to the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) last week: “Where you see a decrease in electricity sales, which we are seeing because of high prices and the introduction of renewable energy, the increase in the electricity tariff has to take that into account.”

As new data confirmed last week, municipalities around the country rely heavily on the profit they get from reselling mostly Eskom power to their towns and cities. In Johannesburg about half of the city´s prepaid electricity boxes claim that the households have used no electricity. It is thought that people have stopped paying for electricity due to the higher prices.

– We are facing massive bypassing of meters and sabotaging of meters, Quentin Green, acting Chief Executive of the Johannesburg agency, City Power, told NERSA.

He explains that between the revenue loss of such illegal connections and the need for maintenance, some of it caused by the load from those illegal connections, they cannot sustain the business.

For most local governments, about a third of their revenues come from electricity sales, where the money is put into other vital services such as roads.

As the price of electricity increases, so does the number of people who choose to live off the grid and use solar power to get electricity instead. These small electricity storage solutions are becoming more and more attractive, but this can eat to absurdities.

– One of the key threats we discussed with NERSA  previously is that we were finding higher-end households were able to reduce their electricity consumption and were then accessing subsidies aimed at the indigent, Rencontre said, referring to packages intended to make more electricity accessible for the poorest of the poor.

Cape Town, Johannesburg and a dozen other municipal areas have appeared before NERSA to demand and beg to be allowed to increase the amount they charge residents for electricity. In terms of NERSAs guideline local authorities can increase their prices by about 2 per cent, but must get permission for anything above that. Last week municipalities askes for a hike of more than 20 per cent for business customers.

– We really hope and believe that NERSA will look favourably on this application,” David McThomas, a manager for the Breede Valley district in the Western Cape said.

In desperation different municipalities are trying to find a solution to the problem. In Renosterberg it proposed a 12 per cent increase in electricity prices, but the citizens, 60 per cent of whom are formally in the indigent bracket said they were not going to be able to afford that. The municipality decided to apply for a 6.4 percent increase instead. Johannesburg hopes to thwart electricity theft with a new generation of smart prepaid meters, and in Msukaligwa the council hopes to uncover fraud on prepaid electricity by auditing meters with strange buying patterns.

As the municipalities hope to lessen the power crisis they aim to achieve zero theft to fix the economic problems they are facing, but there is no reason to expect anything other than an accelerating move away from the grid as prices for solar panels keep dropping. Various municipalities have proposed fees that can be levied in return for the rich maintaining but not using their connections to the grid for when their private batteries run low. Yet such charges, they admit, only create an incentive to aim for an entirely off-the-grid home or business.

In the meantime, NERSA is due to announce its decision on the individual municipalitiy’s applications for increases in the coming weeks.

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