Sustainable Prepping: 5 Alternative Energy Types for When the SHTF

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There are actually a lot of different types of energy sources to tap into after a disaster strikes. One of the major differences is that unless you have formed some kind of intentional community or have a group of like-minded individuals in your area, you will be the engineer, the mechanic, and the maintenance man all rolled into one. To digress just a bit, this is why shows such as “The Colony” (the reality show, not the aliens), and “Doomsday Preppers” are productive for the introduction of ideas. Those ideas need to be researched and employed, in that order.

Let’s cover some methods to generate energy and provide power, and discuss the positive and negative aspects of each one.

  1. Wood:  absolutely a mainstay after disaster strikes. I’ve written several pieces on the benefits of wood stoves: for cooking, boiling water for washing, laundry, and drinking, and of course, for heat. For those with a fireplace and no woodstove, a set of Dutch ovens (cast-iron cookware) and a kettle that can be hung within it are good for starters. There are also racks out there for hanging laundry and taking advantage of the heat from the fireplace or the woodstove. The main problems with the woodstove are fuel and security. First, you need to lay in a good supply of wood long before either the winter and/or the disaster strikes. Secondly, the wood fire produces smoke, something that cannot be concealed, and this will alert others to your location.
  2. Solar:  It’s always worthwhile to throw some panels up on the roof, as these can give at least a trickle charge, if not power everything you have. Undertaking this is fairly uncomplicated. During your spring, summer, and fall months, you’ll get a lot out of it. Winter is a different matter: not just for the snow, but also for the gray days where you won’t receive that much light. There are even solar generators with high-capacity lithium power packs or portable solar panels you can take with you in your bug-out bag.
  3. Wind: There are plenty of kits out there that will enable you to throw up one or more windmills, and these can take up the slack for the solar panels on days that there is not much in the way of the sun. Windmills also need to be maintained a little more, as they can be damaged or have a breakdown from the moving parts.
  4. Bicycle Generator: Please take note: this is a generator that runs from pedal power, as in a stationary exercise bicycle that doesn’t move…just turns that front wheel. The wheel provides the power to turn a generator flywheel. There are many different plans and kits available here, as well. Basically, all you need is a generator of some type, a belt to rig up on the front wheel of the bicycle, a voltage regulator (so you don’t overload/blow out your battery), and the battery itself.
  5. Wood Gassifier: this contraption is made from a container holding a heat source (fire) that in turn heats another container filled with wood pieces. The resulting wood gas is then channeled to the carburetor of an engine and directly used by that engine for fuel to run on. The fuel tank is bypassed, as the wood produces a gas. The engine then turns a flywheel that is hooked up to an alternator, and your power is then produced…that can charge a battery array. There are plans all over the Internet for these gassifiers.

The time to begin undertaking these projects is now, prior to needing them. One other problem has to do with the human element, an element more inhumane than anything else. Local building codes, community and residential codes, inspectors, permits, and the usual “conga line” of loser-bureaucrats coming out to steal your money and prevent you from doing anything…these are sure to materialize. You may have to build everything and not employ it until after a disaster hits. Not to mention “friendly,” nosy, intrusive, vicious, snooping neighbors will swoop in to denounce you or cause you other forms of trouble. I’ve written about these “gems” before in the past: more deadly to deal with after the S hits the fan than the disaster itself.

Those are some basics, and you need to do some research and figure out which one (or ones) can be viable for you. There are plenty of resources out there all over the Internet, as well as in your local library or county extension office. Take some time working with each to come up with the best possible courses of action. Then when the time comes, if you’ve prepared, you’ll be able to sing the song, “I’ve got the power,” although it will be getting kind of hectic. You’ll be able to handle it.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

9 Ways our Homestead Cooks Off Grid

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9 Ways our Homestead Cooks Off Grid I learned early in my prepping career that stoves can die on you! Particularly electric stoves. They are just not the best single option for the average home. The power goes out and now you are stuck with eating out or eating cold. When you talk about a …

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8 Weird Ways Your Ancestors Kept The Bed Warm During Winter

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8 Weird Ways Your Ancestors Kept The Bed Warm During Winter

Image source: Wikigallery

Our ancestors’ homes usually were heated by wood-burning stoves. While any wood stove will keep a certain space warm, the ability to heat a whole house – particularly one that is two stories — diminished with distance and range.

Sitting next to a fire is nice when the weather outside is -30 degrees Fahrenheit, but if you’re sleeping upstairs you’re going to feel far less heat and far more cold.

While some homes had the luxury of a second story fireplaces, most did not. As a result, our ancestors had to improvise numerous solutions to stay warm at night.

Some of these solutions were simple and some more complex. Some were temporary, while others were more permanent. Many of these solutions were used in combination on particularly cold nights. Still, our ancestors found some unique and even weird ways to stay warm at night when sleeping.

1. The “grate.” Homeowners would cut a hole between the first and second floor and insert a grate that would allow the hot air from below to rise into the second floor. It was far from forced-air heating, but it did offer some relief.

2. The hot-bed pan. Another solution was to take hot coals from the fire and insert them into a covered pan on the end of a long wooden handle and rub it over a mattress before sleeping.

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It brought some wood smoke into the bedroom briefly, but that was and still is common in any home heated by wood. The heat was temporary, yet it took the edge off a cold bed when first turning in.

8 Weird Ways Your Ancestors Kept The Bed Warm During Winter3. The “nightcap.” If you’ve ever slept in a cold tent during winter, then you know the need for a “nightcap.” This was a head covering that could be a knitted cap or, in Artic climates, a fur cap. When the weather outside is frightful, keeping your body warm is only half the battle. A stocking cap or “nightcap” made a big difference.

4. Layers on layers of insulation. Layering is a common concept for anyone in winter, and layers of sheets, blankets and quilts made a sleeping arrangement warm and warmer. Goose down quilts were a luxury and often a necessity on bitterly cold nights.

5. Sleep with the dog. The shared body heat from a pet can help keep a bed warm at night — and the dog appreciates it, too.

6. Night clothes beyond pajamas. Most pajamas are made from a thin, lightweight material that serve more as a modest way to sleep.

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Our ancestors didn’t mess around. Their night clothes were often heavyweight combinations of wool and thick, cotton flannel.

7. Snuggling. Families often slept together in the same bed, especially on cold, winter nights. The human body radiates heat at an average of 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit, and a combination of people in the same bed allowed the body heat to be shared.

8. Hot iron. This is potentially dangerous, but hot pieces of iron were sometimes heated on the top of a wood-burning stove or in a fireplace and then placed into a metal bucket. The bucket was then brought to the bedroom and placed on the floor or even under the bed. The radiant heat from the hot iron lasted for hours and helped to bring some added heat to a cold bedroom.

Of course, when all else failed, it was likely that a family would sleep downstairs in closer proximity to a stove or fireplace. This was a somewhat radical move, but when temperatures plunged far below zero, it was sometimes the only alternative.

Do you know of other ways our ancestors kept their house warm at night during frigid temps? Let us know in the section below:

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Keeping Warm with Winter Preps!

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Keeping Warm with Winter Preps! Highlander “Survival & Tech Preps” Audio in player below! BRRRRR! Getting cold out there! What are you doing to keep warm in the beginning months of winter? Well fall is almost over and winter is right upon us. In this episode I will be talking all about how to keep warm. … Continue reading Keeping Warm with Winter Preps!

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