Honey and the Healing Power!

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Honey and the Healing Power!
Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Audio player below!

Honey is truly ancient medicine. The first written reference to the medicinal use of honey is on a Sumerian tablet over 4000 years ago. Honey has been used medicinally ever since. Honey is useful for many conditions, including wounds, burns , and some of the toughest bacteria we may ever encounter. Plus, it does all of this for less than ten federal reserve notes!

Continue reading Honey and the Healing Power! at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

13 Rubbing Alcohol Survival Uses You Need To Know

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There is a little prepper in almost all things. That is a very interesting thing when you think about it. Even in todays world there are still ingredients that have tremendous potential and are old wonders from years past. It seemed like Grandmom had a few things that she used for everything. Now, our hyper …

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The post 13 Rubbing Alcohol Survival Uses You Need To Know appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Survival Medicine Hour: James Rawles, Staph, Chest Trauma, More

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Survival Medicine Hour #373

rib fracture

rib fracture

Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy discuss chest trauma, including rib fractures, ballistic and projectile trauma, and pneumothorax. Plus, an interview with Survival Blog’s James Rawles on a book he wrote about a hypothetical Christian homeland in his novel “Land of Promise”.

James Rawles' Land of Promise

James Rawles’ Land of Promise

Plus, a series of listener questions about things like Staph infections, food-grade diatomaceous earth, and much more!

To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2018/01/26/survival-medicine-hour-james-rawles-chest-trauma-staph-more

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

Joe and Amy Alton

Nurse Amy/Dr. Bones

Nurse Amy/Dr. Bones

Learn about 150 medical topics off the grid in the award-winning Third Edition of The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide For When Medical Help is Not on the Way.

How To Treat Wounds First Aid Series II | episode 163

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How To Treat Wounds First Aid Series II | episode 163
How To Treat Wounds First Aid Series II | episode 163

How To Treat Wounds First Aid Series II | episode 163

https://www.survivalpunk.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/woundmanagementepisode163.mp3

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This week I’m back with the second installment in our First aid series How to treat wounds.

This episode focuses on wounds both small and big. 

The scope covers both band-aids to sutures. 

But this show is designed to help you build a First aid kit for times with rule of law not for the SHTF. This is for everyday life and injuries. Where you can go see the doctor if need be. 

I have always said that medical training should come before buying an expensicve First aid kit. 

This show will teach you how to treat wounds for now. A kit that will be used all the time in you daily life.

Not one that sits in the closet. 

You will learn ways to close a wound and why you should consider leaving it open. 

And why peroxide is not used on wounds anymore. 

Topics

  • Cleaning Wounds
  • Water or saline
  • Mild soap Soft Soap
  • Wet wipes
  • Antiseptic
  • Topical Lidocaine
  • Blood Control
  • Pressure
  • Gauze
  • Isreali Bandages
  • Tourniquet
  • Clotting Agents
  • Wound Closure
  • Band-aids
  • Tegaderm
  • Superglue
  • Gauze pads and medical tape
  • Steri Strips
  • Skin Stapler
  • Sutures

 

 

Links

The Best First Aid Medicines You Need | episode 162

Level 1 First Aid Kit
Level II First Aid Kit

Isreli Bandage

Celox

 

 

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The post How To Treat Wounds First Aid Series II | episode 163 appeared first on Survival Punk.

7 Antiseptics For Your Medical Kit

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Betadine is a Iodophor-type antiseptic

I’ve often said that, in a major disaster, we may be thrown back to a bygone era where modern medicine is not an option. Indeed, we can expect civil war-era statistics with regards to major abdominal and chest trauma outcomes, but we will still be ahead of our ancestors even if we’re thrown off the grid. That’s because of modern knowledge of antisepsic techniques.

The word antiseptic comes from the greek words anti (against) and septikos (putrid or rotten).  Antiseptics are substances with antimicrobial properties applied to living tissue to reduce the possibility of infection. Antiseptics, it should be noted, are not antibiotics. Antibiotics are meant to destroy bacteria within the body. Antiseptics are also different from disinfectants, which destroy germs found on non-living objects. All of these are important supplies for the survival medic.

Infected wound

We have a number of videos on this website that discuss antibiotics and what your options are in a survival scenario. If you haven’t been here before, use the search engine and you’ll find there are more than you think. We haven’t, however, talked a lot about antiseptics. Let’s discuss the most popular types on the market that might be candidates for your survival medical kit.

Iodophors: Iodophors like Betadine contain iodine, a substance that can also be used to purify water, but is combined with a solubilizing agent, povidone, which makes it, unlike pure iodine, relatively nonirritating and nontoxic to living tissue. Iodophors work against a broad array of microorganisms and don’t need to be heavily diluted. I will admit that I do dilute my Betadine if I use it on open wounds for regular dressing changes.  Iodophors are effective in killing microbes within just a few minutes.

Chlorhexidine

Chlorhexidine Gluconate: This substance, perhaps better known by its brand name “Hibiclens”, is helpful  against many types of germs, although it’s not very effective against fungal infections. It’s relatively long-lasting, however, compared to some other antiseptics. For this reason, Hibiclens is popular as a way to prepare areas for surgery and for healthcare providers to scrub their hands before patient encounters.

Alcohol: Ethyl Alcohol (also called ethanol) is another tried and true antiseptic product. It, along with isopropyl alcohol, kills many different types of microbes and is fact acting and inexpensive. The problem is that alcohol has a drying effect on skin, the oral cavity, and vagina. It has a tendency to inhibit the development of new cells, so use it for an initial wound cleaning but not for regular care.

Benzalkonium Chloride: BZK is a mild antiseptic and is easily tolerated by most people. One of the most popular first aid wipes or sprays, some say that it has a special effect against the rabies virus, but there’s little hard data supporting this claim.

Hydrogen Peroxide: Hydrogen peroxide is used to clean wounds and reacts with blood to form an impressive foam. This is because blood and most cells contain an enzyme called catalase. Catalase reacts with hydrogen peroxide, converting it into oxygen and water. This effect makes it popular for household first aid in common mishaps like abrasions, but not a great candidate for regular dressing changes due to its drying effect on new cells. It can be used as a mouth rinse in the oral cavity, however, making it a candidate for a survival dental kit.

PCMX (Parachlorometaxylenol or chloro-xylenol for short): Available in more brand names than you can count, this substance is effective against most germs. It’s less potent, though, than chlorhexidine and iodophors, although the antiseptic effect lasts longer. PCMX can be irritating, so don’t use it on mucous membranes like the oral cavity and vagina.

Bleach and baking soda added to just-boiled water in the right proportions can make an effective antiseptic solution

Bleach: Bleach can be found as either a sodium hypochlorite (Clorox) solution or can be improvised with calcium hypochlorite granules, also known as “Pool Shock”. Used more as a disinfectant than an antiseptic, bleach in very dilute solutions (0.5% or less) can make Dakin’s solution, a time-honored method to clean wounds. Be sure to watch our recent two-part video on this website that shows you how to make it easily and affordably.

I’m sure you know of more products that can serve as antiseptics for your survival sick room. Armed with these items, your chances of succeeding when everything else fails, at least as a medic, go up exponentially. Be sure to get the supplies and knowledge that will save lives in times of trouble.

Joe Alton MD

Joe Alton MD

Find out more about stopping hemorrhage and 150 other medical topics in the survival mindset with the 700 page Third Edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way. And don’t forget to fill those holes in your medical supplies by checking out Nurse Amy’s entire line of kits and supplies at store.doomandbloom.net!

Survival Medicine Hour: Poison Plants, Setting a Fracture, More

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various fracture types; note open fracture 2nd from left

SURVIVAL MEDICINE HOUR #349

In the this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, our hosts discuss what you would do with a fractured bone off the grid or after a disaster where modern medicine is just not an option. Dr. Alton’s take on the subject might shock modern medical professionals, but you have to do what you can, with what you have, where you are, in tough times. Topics including placing a cast, open fractures, re-aligning bones (known as “reductions”) and more.

typical rash of poison ivy

Also, the Altons talk about what to do when you’re outdoors and surrounded by poison plants like poison ivy, oak, and sumac. How to identify plants, diagnose and treat the rash, plus natural remedies that might help.

All this and more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour with Joe and Amy Alton! To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/07/28/survival-medicine-hour-poison-plants-setting-a-fracture-more

Hey, do us a big favor and follow us on twitter @preppershow, Facebook: Doom and Bloom or join our group at Survival Medicine Dr Bones Nurse Amy, and YouTube at DrBonesNurseAmy!

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

Joe and Amy Alton

Joe and Amy Alton

 

 

Find out more about poisonous plants, fractures, and 150 other medical topics in the survival mindset with the 700 page Third Edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way. And don’t forget to fill those holes in your medical supplies by checking out Nurse Amy’s entire line of kits and supplies at store.doomandbloom.net!

Grab and Go Deluxe First Aid Trauma Kit

Grab N Go Medical Kit

Video: Making Dakin’s Solution, Part 1

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Video: Making Dakin’s Solution for Wound Care, pt. 1

open wound care

In this video, Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP take turns in front of the camera to discuss and demonstrate Dakin’s solution, a 100 year old recipe that is still used today by some practitioners as a way to treat and prevent infections in open wounds. Dakin’s solution is simple to make with affordable ingredients and is a useful tool in the medical woodshed for those that are off the grid due to a disaster or remote location. Part 1 of 2.

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

 

Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP

You can make Dakin’s solution on your own, but when you need medical kits or commercially-made individual items, check out Nurse Amy’s entire line of supplies at store.doomandbloom.net. You’ll be glad you did.

Survival Medicine Hour: Wound Debridement, Shock Treatment, More

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THE SURVIVAL MEDICINE HOUR #345

Wound Debridement

In this episode of The Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, discuss the Wilderness Medical Society’s special edition on combat casualty care guidelines applied to survival settings, where they coincide and where they diverge. Also, some basics on an important part of wound care, wound debridement, the removal of dead skin from a healing open wound. Studies show that antibiotics are important to prevent and treat wound infections, but debriding dead tissue from a wound is important to aid recovery as well.

People in shock lose heat quickly

Also, more on the different types of shock, and what to do if you have to treat someone deteriorating rapidly from some of the various types. All this and more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton MD, and Amy Alton ARNP!

To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/07/07/survival-medicine-hour-shock-wound-debridement-more

 

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

 

Joe and Amy Alton

Nurse Amy and Dr. Bones

Hey, fill those holes in your medical supplies by checking out Nurse Amy’s entire line of kits and individual items at store.doomandbloom.net. You’ll be glad you did. And don’t forget, the 700 page third edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for when Medical Help is Not on the Way is the most comprehensive book you’ll find written on medical care in times of trouble!

Wound Debridement in Survival

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Wound Debridement in Remote Settings

Maggot debridement of open wound

Injuries in remote settings like a wilderness trail or survival homestead pose challenges to the medic not experienced in long-term wound care. Ordinarily, a system exists to evacuate victims of such injuries to modern medical facilities. In situations where that option doesn’t exist for the foreseeable future, however, the average person may be medically responsible from the point of injury to full recovery.

This is a novel (and sobering) thought for most, and the tools needed to provide regular wound care and the medications to prevent and treat infection may not be at hand. For this reason, I have spent years writing articles on the importance of antibiotics as part of a prepared individual’s medical supplies.

Although I’ve written extensively on antibiotics in survival settings, I’ve written less on wound debridement. Originating from the French “desbrider (to unbridle), debridement is the act of removing dead or foreign material in and around a wound.

Debridement was likely first discovered to be a useful medical tool in wartime, where grossly contaminated wounds were common. The horrific wounds incurred in armed conflict seemed to do better if damaged and dead tissue was aggressively removed. This tissue may be on the edges or throughout the injury. It usually appears discolored, often blackish with a foul odor, although it could also appear white.

By removing dead tissue that, by definition, will not heal, you eventually reach a level where live tissue exists. After debridement, the remaining tissue can recover in a cleaner environment or might, in certain circumstances, be a candidate for wound closure.

Why Should You Debride a Wound?

Sharp debridement

Despite the benefits of debridement, some less-trained survival medics might (understandably) be reluctant to intervene. It is important for them, therefore, to understand the detrimental effects of allowing non-viable tissue to remain in an open wound.

The first is lack of exposure. An open wound is best evaluated when all the dead tissue is removed and the amount of viable material is known.

Next is the suppression of the healing process. Tissue that is no longer viable serves as a place for bacteria to grow, especially the nasty ones that cause serious issues like gangrene. These bacteria slow the healing process in open wounds by competing with growing cells for nutrients.

Necrotic (dead) tissue also causes inflammation in nearby tissues and increases the chance of sepsis (a body-wide infection).

Finally, failure to remove non-viable tissue interferes with the ability of live tissue to naturally close an open wound (a process called granulation).

Removal of non-viable tissue by debridement and treatment with antibiotics helps a wound to heal, but either treatment alone does not give you the best chance of avoiding infection, according to studies cited in a recent issue of Wilderness and Environmental Medicine (2017; Vol. 28, #2S).

The above article referenced an evaluation of open fractures, a severe injury found in both wilderness and survival settings. The results seem to show that surgical intervention and antibiotics given within 2 hours is associated with the lowest rate of infection. When antibiotics are given on time but surgery is delayed, higher rates of infection are seen. When surgical intervention occurs on time but antibiotics are delayed, even higher rates are noted, although signs of infection may not appear for three days or so.

Wound Debridement in Survival Settings

There are various ways to debride a wound, but only the following, in my opinion, would be options in a survival scenario:

Sharp Debridement: Using a scalpel and scissors, dead tissue can be quickly removed. Some surgical skill is useful for the best results.

Mechanical Debridement: Aggressive wound irrigation helps remove debris and leads to a cleaner wound, but results aren’t as complete or as rapidly seen as with sharp debridement. Less skill is required, however, to achieve the end result.

Biological Debridement: Maggot therapy. The larvae of the green bottle fly is used to digest dead tissue and bacteria. One way to collect maggots is to place, say, a dead rat or squirrel in a bag with small holes at the bottom and hang it over a plate or pan to collect the maggots that fall out after a few days. More on maggot therapy in a forthcoming article.

Here is a video from “authority guide”‘s YouTube Channel demonstrating the technique of sharp debridement:

Your goal in debriding a wound is to have clear margins of live healthy tissue on all sides. This tissue will bleed somewhat (a sign of life!), but is unlikely to hemorrhage. Moist dressings should then be used to cover the wound and changed regularly.

Debridement takes place at modern facilities in normal times. In survival scenarios, the procedure should take place where there is good lighting (and the bulk of your medical supplies). Having an assistance to help is always a good idea. In the inexperienced, the anatomy of a deeply necrotic wound may be unclear; the medic should have a good textbook on anatomy in their survival library and learn as much as possible before a long-term disaster takes place.

Bottom line: Live tissue heals, dead tissue doesn’t. Debridement allows you to remove the dead material so the live tissue can heal.

Joe Alton MD

Joe Alton, MD

Find out more about long-term wound care in austere settings by getting a copy of our 700 page Third Edition of The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way. Also, fill those holes in your medical supplies by checking out Nurse Amy’s entire line of medical kits and supplies at store.doomandbloom.net.

The Survival medicine handbook Third Edition 2016

The Survival Medicine Handbook 2017 Third Edition

 

 

 

Survival Medicine Hour: Dakin’s Sol’n, Shock, HPV, Garlic

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Survival Medicine Hour #344

Direct Pressure on Bleeding Wound

Bleeding wounds need long-term care. Are you ready?

In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, tackles a number of tough topics like, what can you put in an open wound to prevent and treat infection if a disaster happens and all you have is household items? Here’s how to use bleach and baking soda to make Dakin’s solution, used for over 100 years to prevent death from infected wounds.

Also, Nurse Amy discusses the uses of garlic, it’s not just for cooking! It’s got great antibiotic properties and more…

garlic

Plus, there are a variety of types of shock, and we’re not talking about the emotional kinds. Dr. Bones discusses hypovolemic, hemorrhagic, and cardiogenic shock in this ongoing series about dealing with a life-threatening event.

Finally, Joe Alton MD answers a question for the Survival Podcast’s expert council about whether the HPV exam is worthwhile to give to preteens. Find out more about this virus and the controversy surrounding it.

All this and more on the Survival Medicine Hour! To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/06/29/survival-medicine-hour-dakins-solution-garlic-shock-hpv-more

 

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

Joe and Amy Alton

The Altons

Hey, fill those holes in your medical storage by checking out Nurse Amy’s entire line of kits and supplies at store.doomandbloom.net. You’ll be glad you did!

Dakin’s Solution for Wound Care

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Dakin’s Solution

Dakin’s Solution by Century Pharm.

One of the challenges facing the caregiver in austere settings is how to prevent infection in open wounds. After a disaster, people may be forced to perform activities of daily survival to which they are not accustomed. Injuries may occur as a result. Infections will be more likely in areas where hygiene and sanitation are questionable; without advanced medical care, a bad outcome may be the end result.

A simple and affordable method that was used as far back as World War I may be the answer for the medic: Wound care with Dakin’s solution.

Dakin’s solution is the product of the efforts of an English chemist, Henry Drysdale Dakin, and a French surgeon named Alexis Carrel. In their search for a useful antiseptic to save the lives of wounded soldiers during WWI, they used sodium hypochlorite (household bleach) and baking soda to make a solution that had significant protective effect against infection. The chlorine in the solution had a solvent action on dead cells, which prevented the accumulation of bacteria in open wounds.

(As an aside, both sides in the war were also using chlorine in gaseous form as an anti-personnel weapon!)

Today, Dakin’s solution is still considered effective enough to be used after surgery and on chronic wounds, like bedsores, by many practitioners. It’s easily prepared and can be made stronger or milder by varying the amount of bleach used. Use it simply to clean the wound during dressing changes by pouring onto the affected area, or to moisten dressings used in an open wound.

Dakin’s Solution Recipe

pan with lid (image by pixabay)

To make Dakin’s solution, you’ll need just a few items. This recipe is from Ohio State University’s Department of Inpatient Nursing:

  • Unscented household bleach (sodium hypochlorite solution 5.25%, avoid more concentrated versions).
  • Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate)
  • A pan with a lid
  • Sterile measuring cup and spoon (sterilize by boiling)
  • Sterile canning jar and lid

Of course, wash your hands beforehand, just as you would with any medical procedure. Then:

1. Put 4 cups (32 ounces) of water into the pan and cover with the lid.

2. Boil the water for 15 minutes with the lid on.

3. Remove from the heat source.

4. Use the sterile spoon to add ½ teaspoon of baking soda to the water.

5. Add bleach (sodium hypochlorite 5.25%) in the amount needed (see below).

6. Pour into sterile canning jar and close with a sterile lid.

7.  Label and store in a dark place.

The amount of sodium hypochlorite to add:

Full Strength  (0.5%):       95 ml (about 3 oz. or 6 tablespoons)

Half Strength (0.25%):     48 ml (3 tablespoons plus ½ teaspoon)

!/4 Strength   (0.125%):    24 ml (1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons)

1/8 Strength  (0.0625%):  12 ml (2 ½ teaspoons)

Note: 3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon = 14.7 ml; 2 tablespoons = 1 US ounce = 29.5 ml

Once canned, it’s been said that Dakin’s solution will remain potent for about 30 days. For survival purposes, however, I would make it as I need it for wounds or maybe have just make just a few jars at a time. Once open, discard the remainder after a day or so. You may also consider Century Pharmaceutical’s buffered version of Dakin’s that is thought to last about a year.

Using Dakin’s Solution on Wounds

dressing an open wound

Pour into wound once daily for mildly infected wounds, twice daily for heavily infected wounds with drainage of pus. Alternatively, moisten (not soak) dressings used inside the wound (not on top of the skin) with a mild strength solution and observe progress. I would prefer using it as a cleanser as opposed to a regular component of a wet dressing. Some studies show that use in this manner may be injurious to developing cells. Having said that, if you’re dealing with a severe infection (as opposed to preventing one), it may be reasonable to incorporate Dakin’s into the dressing.

Dakin’s solution can be used as a mouthwash for infections inside the oral cavity, but must never be swallowed. Swish for about a minute before spitting it out no more than twice a week.

Full strength may irritate skin, so consider protecting skin edges with petroleum jelly or other skin protectant/moisture barrier. Look for evidence of skin rashes, burning, itching, hives, or blisters. If irritation occurs, drop down to a milder strength or discontinue. Do not use in those allergic to Chlorine.

It should be noted that not all practitioners agree about the benefits of Dakin’s solution. Certainly, there may be other options with regards to regular wound care, including sterile normal saline and sterilized tap water. Antibiotics also play an important role in treating infected wounds, and a good supply is important for any medic in a remote setting. However, Dakin’s is well tolerated by patients and is simple to make with affordable ingredients. It’s another tool in the medical woodshed for scenarios where modern medical help is not on the way.

Joe Alton MD

Joe Alton MD

Learn about wound infections and 150 more medical topic in remote or disaster settings by getting a copy of our 700 page third edition of The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way.

Herbal Wound Care Options

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Herbal wound care

Wound care should be an important part of your first aid preparedness training. After all, what may be a harmless paper cut by today’s standards could set the stage for infection in a less sanitary environment. Furthermore, if access to higher medical care were interrupted, there would be no ambulance or life flight, and maybe even no emergency room, to provide care for more serious wounds and injuries.

First aid for wounds covers many different aspects. Especially in a SHTF scenario, you would need to know how to safely control bleeding, assess the injury to gauge extent of the damage, and be able to clean the wound and prevent infection. Wilderness first aid or first responder training can be invaluable because there is so much to learn on this topic. Being able to learn from an instructor in these courses is also extremely helpful- they will correct any errors you might make and often have a great deal of  personal experience to make the material more relatable.

In long term scenarios with no higher medical care, the prevention of infection becomes a crucial step in the healing process. By using herbs to encourage healthy wound healing and support the immune system, you have a back-up plan in case medical supplies run short.

There are five basic types of herbs to keep in mind for herbal wound support: Hemostatics that curb excessive bleeding; anti-inflammatory herbs for healthy inflammation response; proliferative herbs that help with scabbing and the formation of new skin; anti-pathogenics that help minimize contamination of the wounds, and lymphatic herbs that support a healthy immune response. We will also briefly cover helpful pain relieving herbs.

Let’s take a look at the five main groups of herbs for wound care:

Herbal Hemostatics

Most herbs that have hemostatic properties are classified as astringents in traditional herbalism. These are herbs with a reputation for drawing up and tightening tissues, and drying up excessive fluids of all types. Traditional wound herbs utilized for their hemostatic properties include the leaves and flowers of shepherd’s purse, oak bark, wild geranium root, yarrow leaf and/or flower, raspberry or blackberry leaf or blackberry root, and chaparral leaf.

White oak and English oak are the two “official” oak species used in herbal medicine, but all oaks exhibit a high level of tannins and can be used interchangeable for their astringency. These herbs may be prepared as an infusion or decoction and applied as a wash, or if an extract is available it can be diluted in water and applied equally well. These herbs are also beneficial for oozing or weepy wounds or sores.

Herbal Anti-Inflammatories

These herbs may be applied topically alone or as part of a formula to encourage excessive inflammation to return to normal. Inflammation is a natural part of the healing process, but if the wound is large these herbs can help with comfort during the healing process, and help the tissue recover from pain and swelling. Several of them can also be found under the antipathogenic category, and under pain relievers. Examples of herbal anti-inflammatories include willow, meadowsweet, chaparral, lobelia, self heal, comfrey, plantain, birch, alder, aspen, poplar, and turmeric.

Proliferatives

Herbs that encourage the growth of healthy tissue during the growth process are also important. Chaparral, comfrey, horsetail, plantain, calendula, and aloe are great examples of this type of herb. It’s important to use proliferatives judiciously over deep wounds, as they can promote healing of the top layers of the epidermis before the wound has healed completely underneath. This could set the stage for infection. Be sure that the wound is clean and has started to heal well internally and that there is no chance of infection before using them.

Comfrey and calendula can promote healthy tissue growth when there is a concern that scar tissue could be damaging. These herbs have a traditional reputation for helping a wound to heal with minimal scarring. Elecampane root can be beneficial when there is “proud flesh,” meaning the wound is having difficulty forming a healthy scab (7). Stinging nettle can be taken internally as a tea, or eaten as a steamed green, during the healing process as this herb supplies micro-nutrients and protein that support the healing process (2,4).

Anti-Pathogenics

Antipathogenics are herbs that help keep the wound clean from bacterial contamination. Note that these are not going to behave in the same manner as an internal, systemic antibiotic. They need to be applied topically. Chaparral, plantain, acacia, aloe, echinacea, goldenseal, and sida are examples here. Even though goldenseal is listed, it’s important to understand that the berberine content in goldenseal does its best work topically. It’s not well absorbed into the bloodstream from the gut.

Learn More: If you would like to read more about the few herbs that do seem to have a systemic anti-pathogenic effect, you can visit my blog to read this article on Herbal Antibiotics: What You Really Need To Know. But you also need to learn about herbal lymphatics.

Herbal Lymphatics

Because there are very few herbs that have a systemic action approaching modern antibiotics, we turn to another staple in the prepared herbalist’s medicinals kit: Herbal lymphatics. These herbs work with our bodies to support the effectiveness of our immunity through our lymphatic system. If you’ve ever experienced swollen lymph glands during a fever or infection, you know first hand how hard these glands work during an immune system challenge.

Herbal lymphatics promote the movement of lymph and the ability of the body to drain off and process the byproducts of infection. Poke root, blue flag, echinacea, red root, boneset, and cleavers are herbs in this class. Alteratives, or blood purifiers, such as burdock and red clover, can support lymphatic herbs. Lymphatics can be applied as compresses over swollen lymph glands, but it is usually more practical to take them internally. Poke and blue flag are generally used in small amounts, even only a few drops at a time, due to their potency and potential toxicity. Cleavers is a very safe lymphatic that may also be eaten as a steamed green.

Herbal Support for Pain

The last topic we need to cover for herbal wound care is the problem of pain. Everyone has a different pain tolerance, but the topic of pain should be taken seriously during wound care in a SHTF scenario. Pain places more stress on an already stressed system, and can interfere with sleep and appetite. Adequate rest and nutrition are important for healing in any scenario, but especially in an emergency situation where no higher care is available. The same can be said for managing stress in what is most likely a very stressful environment to begin with. Herbs that have a tradition of use for pain include Jamaica dogwood (1), meadowsweet, willow, and black cohosh (5).

Applying Herbs in a Wound Care Scenario

In addition to knowing first aid skills and what herbs to use, you also need to know how to use the herbs. Now that you have a basic understanding of the types of herbs that could be used for wound care, you may still be curious about how the herbs would be applied.

As a general rule, the two most practical herbal preparations in any SHTF scenario are going to be extracts (sometimes called tinctures); and infusions or decoctions. Extracts are made by soaking herbal material in alcohol (if made at home, it’s common to use Everclear mixed with water or vodka), which preserves the herbs and pulls the beneficial components into the liquid. Teas made with herbs are known as infusions (for fresh or dried leaves and flowers) and decoctions (for fresh or dried roots, barks, and seeds). Both types of preparations have the flexibility of either external or internal use (depending on the herb). Extracts are most commonly used internally, but may be diluted in a small amount of water to create a wash or applied without dilution if needed.

Some of the herbs listed above, like Jamaican dogwood, poke root, and chaparral, are at one end of the herbal safety spectrum and are called for in only small amounts at a time. Herbs like burdock and cleavers fall on the opposite end of the spectrum and are safe enough to be foraged as food. Most fall somewhere in the middle, but it’s important that you become familiar with each herb you plan to use during emergency situations so that you understand the plant’s unique profile as well as how much to use.

Read More

1. 7song (2014) Jamaican Dogwood Monograph. Retrieved from: http://7song.com/blog/2014/03/jamaican-dogwood-piscidia-piscipula-2014/

2. Cleveland Clinic Foundation, The (2015) Nutrition Guidelines to Improve Wound Healing. Retrieved From:
https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/healthy_living/hic_Keeping_Your_Digestive_Tract_Healthy/hic_Nutrition_Guidelines_to_Improve_Wound_Healing

3. Coffman, Sam (2016) Zombie Apocalypse Herbal: A Basic Plant-Medicine Primer for Post Disaster or Remote Environs. The Herbaria: Plant Healer Magazine’s Free Supplement. Volume 6, Issue 3.

4. Laban K. Rutto, Yixian Xu, Elizabeth Ramirez, Michael Brandt. (2013) Mineral Properties and Dietary Value of Raw and Processed Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L.).
International Journal of Food Science, Volume 2013, Article ID 857120, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/857120

5. Noveille, Agatha (2015) Herbal Comfort for Aches and Pains. Retrieved from https://theherbalacademy.com/herbal-comfort-for-aches-and-pains/

6. Woo, Kevin. (2012) Exploring the Effects of Pain and Stress on Wound Healing. Advances in Skin and Wound Care, Volume 25 – Issue 1 – p 38–44
doi: 10.1097/01.ASW.0000410689.60105.7d

7. Wood, Matthew (2008) The Earthwise Herbal: A Complete Guide to Old World Medicinal Plants. North Atlantic Books: Berkeley

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Bleeding, Now what?

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You’re bleeding! Now what?
Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live

bleeding accident-743036_640Uh-oh, you’re bleeding! Perhaps it was a bite, a deep slice of a knife while processing a deer, a gun shot wound, road rash, or maybe an open sore. No matter what has caused the wound, it needs to be treated quickly and correctly. Otherwise, you are risking infection, bleeding out, and possibly your life.

Bleeding out from a major artery can cause death in ten to fifteen minutes. You don’t even have time for an ambulance to arrive, never mind get to the emergency room. The S has hit the F for you. The bleeding must be stopped ASAP, the wound properly cleaned, and when appropriate, stitched up.

The question is: do you know how? To take that one step further, does anyone in your group know how to serve as your back up in case you need care? If not, this is one show you’re going to want to listen to.

11-22-15 -While most wound victims are transported to the hospital for professional wound care. If time is of the essence, you may have to step in and be the “doctor” during an emergency. This may be necessary due to the severity of the wound, or because there is no trained medical personnel available. It is vital that you know what you are doing, because the last thing you want is to make a bad situation worse.

11-22-15 injury-903342_640This episode will cover several common types of wounds that bleed, how to stop bleeding, and how to clean the wound to prevent infection. Also covered is the how, when, where, and why of closing a wound, or should that specific wound be closed at all? Plus, what do you do if in spite of your best efforts, the wound becomes infected and is spreading.

This hour of wound care discussion will look at both conventional and herbal options for wound care and bringing the bleeding to a stop. There is no reason to take any tool off the table with something as serious as an open wound. Be sure to tune in to learn how to stop bleeding in an emergency.

Join us for Herbal Prepper Live “LIVE SHOW” every Sunday 7:00/Et 6:00Ct 4:00/Pt Go To Listen and Chat

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